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Selected Portions of the Criminal Code of Canada

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					EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                      -1-

                           Selected Portions of the Criminal Code of Canada
                                               J. Barnett

                                               PART I
                                               GENERAL
Presumption of innocence
    6. (1) Where an enactment creates an offence and authorizes a punishment to be imposed in
respect of that offence,
    (a) a person shall be deemed not to be guilty of the offence until he is convicted or discharged
    under section 730 of the offence; and
    (b) a person who is convicted or discharged under section 730 of the offence is not liable to
    any punishment in respect thereof other than the punishment prescribed by this Act or by the
    enactment that creates the offence.

Offences outside Canada
(2) Subject to this Act or any other Act of Parliament, no person shall be convicted or discharged
under section 730 of an offence committed outside Canada.

                                       PARTIES TO OFFENCES
Parties to offence
   21. (1) Every one is a party to an offence who
   (a) actually commits it;
   (b) does or omits to do anything for the purpose of aiding any person to commit it; or
   (c) abets any person in committing it.

Common intention
(2) Where two or more persons form an intention in common to carry out an unlawful purpose and
to assist each other therein and any one of them, in carrying out the common purpose, commits
an offence, each of them who knew or ought to have known that the commission of the offence
would be a probable consequence of carrying out the common purpose is a party to that offence.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 21.

Person counselling offence
   22. (1) Where a person counsels another person to be a party to an offence and that other
person is afterwards a party to that offence, the person who counselled is a party to that offence,
notwithstanding that the offence was committed in a way different from that which was
counselled.

Idem
(2) Every one who counsels another person to be a party to an offence is a party to every offence
that the other commits in consequence of the counselling that the person who counselled knew or
ought to have known was likely to be committed in consequence of the counselling.

Definition of “counsel”
(3) For the purposes of this Act, "counsel" includes procure, solicit or incite.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 22; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 7.

Offences of negligence — organizations
    22.1 In respect of an offence that requires the prosecution to prove negligence, an
organization is a party to the offence if
    (a) acting within the scope of their authority
        (i) one of its representatives is a party to the offence, or
        (ii) two or more of its representatives engage in conduct, whether by act or omission, such
        that, if it had been the conduct of only one representative, that representative would have
        been a party to the offence; and
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   (b) the senior officer who is responsible for the aspect of the organization’s activities that is
   relevant to the offence departs — or the senior officers, collectively, depart — markedly from
   the standard of care that, in the circumstances, could reasonably be expected to prevent a
   representative of the organization from being a party to the offence.
2003, c. 21, s. 2.

                 PROTECTION OF PERSONS ADMINISTERING AND ENFORCING THE LAW

Protection of persons acting under authority
      25. (1) Every one who is required or authorized by law to do anything in the administration or
enforcement of the law
      (a) as a private person,
      (b) as a peace officer or public officer,
      (c) in aid of a peace officer or public officer, or
      (d) by virtue of his office,
is, if he acts on reasonable grounds, justified in doing what he is required or authorized to do and
in using as much force as is necessary for that purpose.

Idem
(2) Where a person is required or authorized by law to execute a process or to carry out a
sentence, that person or any person who assists him is, if that person acts in good faith, justified
in executing the process or in carrying out the sentence notwithstanding that the process or
sentence is defective or that it was issued or imposed without jurisdiction or in excess of
jurisdiction.

When not protected
(3) Subject to subsections (4) and (5), a person is not justified for the purposes of subsection (1)
in using force that is intended or is likely to cause death or grievous bodily harm unless the
person believes on reasonable grounds that it is necessary for the self-preservation of the person
or the preservation of any one under that person’s protection from death or grievous bodily harm.

When protected
(4) A peace officer, and every person lawfully assisting the peace officer, is justified in using force
that is intended or is likely to cause death or grievous bodily harm to a person to be arrested, if
    (a) the peace officer is proceeding lawfully to arrest, with or without warrant, the person to be
    arrested;
    (b) the offence for which the person is to be arrested is one for which that person may be
    arrested without warrant;
    (c) the person to be arrested takes flight to avoid arrest;
    (d) the peace officer or other person using the force believes on reasonable grounds that the
    force is necessary for the purpose of protecting the peace officer, the person lawfully
    assisting the peace officer or any other person from imminent or future death or grievous
    bodily harm; and
    (e) the flight cannot be prevented by reasonable means in a less violent manner.

                                     SELF-INDUCED INTOXICATION
When defence not available
   33.1 (1) It is not a defence to an offence referred to in subsection (3) that the accused, by
reason of self-induced intoxication, lacked the general intent or the voluntariness required to
commit the offence, where the accused departed markedly from the standard of care as
described in subsection (2).

Criminal fault by reason of intoxication
(2) For the purposes of this section, a person departs markedly from the standard of reasonable
care generally recognized in Canadian society and is thereby criminally at fault where the person,
while in a state of self-induced intoxication that renders the person unaware of, or incapable of
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consciously controlling, their behaviour, voluntarily or involuntarily interferes or threatens to
interfere with the bodily integrity of another person.

Application
(3) This section applies in respect of an offence under this Act or any other Act of Parliament that
includes as an element an assault or any other interference or threat of interference by a person
with the bodily integrity of another person.
1995, c. 32, s. 1.

                                         DEFENCE OF PERSON

Self-defence against unprovoked assault
     34. (1) Every one who is unlawfully assaulted without having provoked the assault is justified
in repelling force by force if the force he uses is not intended to cause death or grievous bodily
harm and is no more than is necessary to enable him to defend himself.

Extent of justification
(2) Every one who is unlawfully assaulted and who causes death or grievous bodily harm in
repelling the assault is justified if
    (a) he causes it under reasonable apprehension of death or grievous bodily harm from the
    violence with which the assault was originally made or with which the assailant pursues his
    purposes; and
    (b) he believes, on reasonable grounds, that he cannot otherwise preserve himself from death
    or grievous bodily harm.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 34; 1992, c. 1, s. 60(F).

Self-defence in case of aggression
    35. Every one who has without justification assaulted another but did not commence the
assault with intent to cause death or grievous bodily harm, or has without justification provoked
an assault on himself by another, may justify the use of force subsequent to the assault if
    (a) he uses the force
        (i) under reasonable apprehension of death or grievous bodily harm from the violence of
        the person whom he has assaulted or provoked, and
        (ii) in the belief, on reasonable grounds, that it is necessary in order to preserve himself
        from death or grievous bodily harm;
    (b) he did not, at any time before the necessity of preserving himself from death or grievous
    bodily harm arose, endeavour to cause death or grievous bodily harm; and
    (c) he declined further conflict and quitted or retreated from it as far as it was feasible to do so
    before the necessity of preserving himself from death or grievous bodily harm arose.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 35.

Provocation
   36. Provocation includes, for the purposes of sections 34 and 35, provocation by blows,
words or gestures.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 36.

Preventing assault
    37. (1) Every one is justified in using force to defend himself or any one under his protection
from assault, if he uses no more force than is necessary to prevent the assault or the repetition of
it.

Extent of justification
(2) Nothing in this section shall be deemed to justify the wilful infliction of any hurt or mischief that
is excessive, having regard to the nature of the assault that the force used was intended to
prevent.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 37.
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                               PROTECTION OF PERSONS IN AUTHORITY
Correction of child by force
    43. Every schoolteacher, parent or person standing in the place of a parent is justified in
using force by way of correction toward a pupil or child, as the case may be, who is under his
care, if the force does not exceed what is reasonable under the circumstances.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 43.
    44. [Repealed, 2001, c. 26, s. 294]


                                        PART II
                          OFFENCES AGAINST PUBLIC ORDER
           TREASON AND OTHER OFFENCES AGAINST THE QUEEN’S AUTHORITY AND PERSON


                                  UNLAWFUL ASSEMBLIES AND RIOTS
Unlawful assembly
    63. (1) An unlawful assembly is an assembly of three or more persons who, with intent to
carry out any common purpose, assemble in such a manner or so conduct themselves when they
are assembled as to cause persons in the neighbourhood of the assembly to fear, on reasonable
grounds, that they
    (a) will disturb the peace tumultuously; or
    (b) will by that assembly needlessly and without reasonable cause provoke other persons to
    disturb the peace tumultuously.

Lawful assembly becoming unlawful
(2) Persons who are lawfully assembled may become an unlawful assembly if they conduct
themselves with a common purpose in a manner that would have made the assembly unlawful if
they had assembled in that manner for that purpose.

Exception
(3) Persons are not unlawfully assembled by reason only that they are assembled to protect the
dwelling-house of any one of them against persons who are threatening to break and enter it for
the purpose of committing an indictable offence therein.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 64.

Punishment for unlawful assembly
   66. Every one who is a member of an unlawful assembly is guilty of an offence punishable on
summary conviction.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 67.

                                          PART III
                                FIREARMS AND OTHER WEAPONS

Certain weapons deemed not to be firearms
(3) For the purposes of sections 91 to 95, 99 to 101, 103 to 107 and 117.03 of this Act and the
provisions of the Firearms Act, the following weapons are deemed not to be firearms:
    (a) any antique firearm;
    (b) any device that is
        (i) designed exclusively for signalling, for notifying of distress, for firing blank cartridges or
        for firing stud cartridges, explosive-driven rivets or other industrial projectiles, and
        (ii) intended by the person in possession of it to be used exclusively for the purpose for
        which it is designed;
    (c) any shooting device that is
        (i) designed exclusively for the slaughtering of domestic animals, the tranquillizing of
        animals or the discharging of projectiles with lines attached to them, and
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       (ii) intended by the person in possession of it to be used exclusively for the purpose for
       which it is designed; and
   (d) any other barrelled weapon, where it is proved that the weapon is not designed or adapted
   to discharge
       (i) a shot, bullet or other projectile at a muzzle velocity exceeding 152.4 m per second or
       at a muzzle energy exceeding 5.7 Joules, or
       (ii) a shot, bullet or other projectile that is designed or adapted to attain a velocity
       exceeding 152.4 m per second or an energy exceeding 5.7 Joules.

Exception — antique firearms
(3.1) Notwithstanding subsection (3), an antique firearm is a firearm for the purposes of
regulations made under paragraph 117(h) of the Firearms Act and subsection 86(2) of this Act.

                                             USE OFFENCES
Using firearm in commission of offence
    85. (1) Every person commits an offence who uses a firearm
    (a) while committing an indictable offence, other than an offence under section 220 (criminal
    negligence causing death), 236 (manslaughter), 239 (attempted murder), 244 (discharging
    firearm with intent), 272 (sexual assault with a weapon) or 273 (aggravated sexual assault),
    subsection 279(1) (kidnapping) or section 279.1 (hostage-taking), 344 (robbery) or 346
    (extortion),
    (b) while attempting to commit an indictable offence, or
    (c) during flight after committing or attempting to commit an indictable offence,
whether or not the person causes or means to cause bodily harm to any person as a result of
using the firearm.

Using imitation firearm in commission of offence
(2) Every person commits an offence who uses an imitation firearm
    (a) while committing an indictable offence,
    (b) while attempting to commit an indictable offence, or
    (c) during flight after committing or attempting to commit an indictable offence,
whether or not the person causes or means to cause bodily harm to any person as a result of
using the imitation firearm.

Punishment
(3) Every person who commits an offence under subsection (1) or (2) is guilty of an indictable
offence and liable
    (a) in the case of a first offence, except as provided in paragraph (b), to imprisonment for a
    term not exceeding fourteen years and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term
    of one year; and
    (b) in the case of a second or subsequent offence, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding
    14 years and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of three years.
    (c) [Repealed, 2008, c. 6, s. 3]

Sentences to be served consecutively
(4) A sentence imposed on a person for an offence under subsection (1) or (2) shall be served
consecutively to any other punishment imposed on the person for an offence arising out of the
same event or series of events and to any other sentence to which the person is subject at the
time the sentence is imposed on the person for an offence under subsection (1) or (2).
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 85; 1995, c. 39, s. 139; 2003, c. 8, s. 3; 2008, c. 6, s. 3.

Pointing a firearm
   87. (1) Every person commits an offence who, without lawful excuse, points a firearm at
another person, whether the firearm is loaded or unloaded.

Punishment
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(2) Every person who commits an offence under subsection (1)
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five
    years; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 87; 1995, c. 39, s. 139.

Carrying concealed weapon
     90. (1) Every person commits an offence who carries a weapon, a prohibited device or any
prohibited ammunition concealed, unless the person is authorized under the Firearms Act to carry
it concealed.

Punishment
(2) Every person who commits an offence under subsection (1)
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five
    years; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 90; 1991, c. 28, s. 6, c. 40, ss. 4, 35; 1994, c. 44, s. 6; 1995, c. 39, s. 139.

               OFFENCES RELATING TO LOST, DESTROYED OR DEFACED W EAPONS, ETC.
Losing or finding
   105. (1) Every person commits an offence who
   (a) having lost a firearm, a prohibited weapon, a restricted weapon, a prohibited device, any
   prohibited ammunition, an authorization, a licence or a registration certificate, or having had it
   stolen from the person’s possession, does not with reasonable despatch report the loss to a
   peace officer, to a firearms officer or a chief firearms officer; or
   (b) on finding a firearm, a prohibited weapon, a restricted weapon, a prohibited device or any
   prohibited ammunition that the person has reasonable grounds to believe has been lost or
   abandoned, does not with reasonable despatch deliver it to a peace officer, a firearms officer
   or a chief firearms officer or report the finding to a peace officer, a firearms officer or a chief
   firearms officer.

Punishment
(2) Every person who commits an offence under subsection (1)
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five
    years; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 105; 1991, c. 28, s. 10, c. 40, ss. 18, 39; 1994, c. 44, s. 7; 1995, c. 39, s.
139.
                                                GENERAL
Onus on the accused
    117.11 Where, in any proceedings for an offence under any of sections 89, 90, 91, 93, 97,
101, 104 and 105, any question arises as to whether a person is the holder of an authorization, a
licence or a registration certificate, the onus is on the accused to prove that the person is the
holder of the authorization, licence or registration certificate.
1995, c. 39, s. 139.


                                   PART IV
            OFFENCES AGAINST THE ADMINISTRATION OF LAW AND JUSTICE

Disobeying a statute
    126. (1) Every one who, without lawful excuse, contravenes an Act of Parliament by wilfully
doing anything that it forbids or by wilfully omitting to do anything that it requires to be done is,
unless a punishment is expressly provided by law, guilty of an indictable offence and liable to
imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.
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Disobeying order of court
     127. (1) Every one who, without lawful excuse, disobeys a lawful order made by a court of
justice or by a person or body of persons authorized by any Act to make or give the order, other
than an order for the payment of money, is, unless a punishment or other mode of proceeding is
expressly provided by law, guilty of
     (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or
     (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

                                         MISLEADING JUSTICE
Perjury
    131. (1) Subject to subsection (3), every one commits perjury who, with intent to mislead,
makes before a person who is authorized by law to permit it to be made before him a false
statement under oath or solemn affirmation, by affidavit, solemn declaration or deposition or
orally, knowing that the statement is false.

Video links, etc.
(1.1) Subject to subsection (3), every person who gives evidence under subsection 46(2) of the
Canada Evidence Act, or gives evidence or a statement pursuant to an order made under section
22.2 of the Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Act, commits perjury who, with intent to
mislead, makes a false statement knowing that it is false, whether or not the false statement was
made under oath or solemn affirmation in accordance with subsection (1), so long as the false
statement was made in accordance with any formalities required by the law of the place outside
Canada in which the person is virtually present or heard.

Idem
(2) Subsection (1) applies, whether or not a statement referred to in that subsection is made in a
judicial proceeding.

Application
(3) Subsections (1) and (1.1) do not apply to a statement referred to in either of those subsections
that is made by a person who is not specially permitted, authorized or required by law to make
that statement.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 131; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 17; 1999, c. 18, s. 92.

Witness giving contradictory evidence
    136. (1) Every one who, being a witness in a judicial proceeding, gives evidence with respect
to any matter of fact or knowledge and who subsequently, in a judicial proceeding, gives evidence
that is contrary to his previous evidence is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to
imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years, whether or not the prior or later evidence
or either is true, but no person shall be convicted under this section unless the court, judge or
provincial court judge, as the case may be, is satisfied beyond a reasonable doubt that the
accused, in giving evidence in either of the judicial proceedings, intended to mislead.

Fabricating evidence
     137. Every one who, with intent to mislead, fabricates anything with intent that it shall be used
as evidence in a judicial proceeding, existing or proposed, by any means other than perjury or
incitement to perjury is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not
exceeding fourteen years.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 125.

Obstructing justice
   139. (1) Every one who wilfully attempts in any manner to obstruct, pervert or defeat the
course of justice in a judicial proceeding,
   (a) by indemnifying or agreeing to indemnify a surety, in any way and either in whole or in
   part, or
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    (b) where he is a surety, by accepting or agreeing to accept a fee or any form of indemnity
    whether in whole or in part from or in respect of a person who is released or is to be released
    from custody,
is guilty of
    (c) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or
    (d) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Idem
(2) Every one who wilfully attempts in any manner other than a manner described in subsection
(1) to obstruct, pervert or defeat the course of justice is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to
imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years.

Idem
(3) Without restricting the generality of subsection (2), every one shall be deemed wilfully to
attempt to obstruct, pervert or defeat the course of justice who in a judicial proceeding, existing or
proposed,
    (a) dissuades or attempts to dissuade a person by threats, bribes or other corrupt means from
    giving evidence;
    (b) influences or attempts to influence by threats, bribes or other corrupt means a person in
    his conduct as a juror; or
    (c) accepts or obtains, agrees to accept or attempts to obtain a bribe or other corrupt
    consideration to abstain from giving evidence, or to do or to refrain from doing anything as a
    juror.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 127; R.S., c. 2(2nd Supp.), s. 3; 1972, c. 13, s. 8.

Public mischief
     140. (1) Every one commits public mischief who, with intent to mislead, causes a peace
officer to enter on or continue an investigation by
     (a) making a false statement that accuses some other person of having committed an
     offence;
     (b) doing anything intended to cause some other person to be suspected of having committed
     an offence that the other person has not committed, or to divert suspicion from himself;
     (c) reporting that an offence has been committed when it has not been committed; or
     (d) reporting or in any other way making it known or causing it to be made known that he or
     some other person has died when he or that other person has not died.

Punishment
(2) Every one who commits public mischief
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five
    years; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 140; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 19.

                                              PART V
           SEXUAL OFFENCES, PUBLIC MORALS AND DISORDERLY CONDUCT
                                        SEXUAL OFFENCES
Consent no defence
    150.1 (1) Subject to subsections (2) to (2.2), when an accused is charged with an offence
under section 151 or 152 or subsection 153(1), 160(3) or 173(2) or is charged with an offence
under section 271, 272 or 273 in respect of a complainant under the age of 16 years, it is not a
defence that the complainant consented to the activity that forms the subject-matter of the
charge.

Exception — complainant aged 12 or 13
(2) When an accused is charged with an offence under section 151 or 152, subsection 173(2) or
section 271 in respect of a complainant who is 12 years of age or more but under the age of 14
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years, it is a defence that the complainant consented to the activity that forms the subject-matter
of the charge if the accused
     (a) is less than two years older than the complainant; and
     (b) is not in a position of trust or authority towards the complainant, is not a person with whom
     the complainant is in a relationship of dependency and is not in a relationship with the
     complainant that is exploitative of the complainant.

Exception — complainant aged 14 or 15
(2.1) When an accused is charged with an offence under section 151 or 152, subsection 173(2)
or section 271 in respect of a complainant who is 14 years of age or more but under the age of 16
years, it is a defence that the complainant consented to the activity that forms the subject-matter
of the charge if
     (a) the accused
          (i) is less than five years older than the complainant; and
          (ii) is not in a position of trust or authority towards the complainant, is not a person with
          whom the complainant is in a relationship of dependency and is not in a relationship with
          the complainant that is exploitative of the complainant; or
     (b) the accused is married to the complainant.

Exception for transitional purposes
(2.2) When the accused referred to in subsection (2.1) is five or more years older than the
complainant, it is a defence that the complainant consented to the activity that forms the subject-
matter of the charge if, on the day on which this subsection comes into force,
    (a) the accused is the common-law partner of the complainant, or has been cohabiting with
    the complainant in a conjugal relationship for a period of less than one year and they have
    had or are expecting to have a child as a result of the relationship; and
    (b) the accused is not in a position of trust or authority towards the complainant, is not a
    person with whom the complainant is in a relationship of dependency and is not in a
    relationship with the complainant that is exploitative of the complainant.

Exemption for accused aged twelve or thirteen
(3) No person aged twelve or thirteen years shall be tried for an offence under section 151 or 152
or subsection 173(2) unless the person is in a position of trust or authority towards the
complainant, is a person with whom the complainant is in a relationship of dependency or is in a
relationship with the complainant that is exploitative of the complainant.

Mistake of age
(4) It is not a defence to a charge under section 151 or 152, subsection 160(3) or 173(2), or
section 271, 272 or 273 that the accused believed that the complainant was 16 years of age or
more at the time the offence is alleged to have been committed unless the accused took all
reasonable steps to ascertain the age of the complainant.

Idem
(5) It is not a defence to a charge under section 153, 159, 170, 171 or 172 or subsection 212(2)
or (4) that the accused believed that the complainant was eighteen years of age or more at the
time the offence is alleged to have been committed unless the accused took all reasonable steps
to ascertain the age of the complainant.

Mistake of age
(6) An accused cannot raise a mistaken belief in the age of the complainant in order to invoke a
defence under subsection (2) or (2.1) unless the accused took all reasonable steps to ascertain
the age of the complainant.
R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 1; 2005, c. 32, s. 2; 2008, c. 6, ss. 13, 54.

Sexual interference
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   151. Every person who, for a sexual purpose, touches, directly or indirectly, with a part of the
body or with an object, any part of the body of a person under the age of 16 years
   (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten
   years and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of forty-five days; or
   (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a
   term not exceeding eighteen months and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a
   term of fourteen days.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 151; R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 1; 2005, c. 32, s. 3; 2008, c. 6, s. 54.

Invitation to sexual touching
     152. Every person who, for a sexual purpose, invites, counsels or incites a person under the
age of 16 years to touch, directly or indirectly, with a part of the body or with an object, the body
of any person, including the body of the person who so invites, counsels or incites and the body
of the person under the age of 16 years,
     (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten
     years and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of forty-five days; or
     (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a
     term not exceeding eighteen months and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a
     term of fourteen days.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 152; R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 1; 2005, c. 32, s. 3; 2008, c. 6, s. 54.

Sexual exploitation
   153. (1) Every person commits an offence who is in a position of trust or authority towards a
young person, who is a person with whom the young person is in a relationship of dependency or
who is in a relationship with a young person that is exploitative of the young person, and who
   (a) for a sexual purpose, touches, directly or indirectly, with a part of the body or with an
   object, any part of the body of the young person; or
   (b) for a sexual purpose, invites, counsels or incites a young person to touch, directly or
   indirectly, with a part of the body or with an object, the body of any person, including the body
   of the person who so invites, counsels or incites and the body of the young person.

Punishment
(1.1) Every person who commits an offence under subsection (1)
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten
    years and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of forty-five days; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a
    term not exceeding eighteen months and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a
    term of fourteen days.

Inference of sexual exploitation
(1.2) A judge may infer that a person is in a relationship with a young person that is exploitative of
the young person from the nature and circumstances of the relationship, including
    (a) the age of the young person;
    (b) the age difference between the person and the young person;
    (c) the evolution of the relationship; and
    (d) the degree of control or influence by the person over the young person.

Definition of “young person”
(2) In this section, "young person" means a person 16 years of age or more but under the age of
eighteen years.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 153; R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 1; 2005, c. 32, s. 4; 2008, c. 6, s. 54.

Sexual exploitation of person with disability
    153.1 (1) Every person who is in a position of trust or authority towards a person with a
mental or physical disability or who is a person with whom a person with a mental or physical
disability is in a relationship of dependency and who, for a sexual purpose, counsels or incites
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                       -11-

that person to touch, without that person’s consent, his or her own body, the body of the person
who so counsels or incites, or the body of any other person, directly or indirectly, with a part of the
body or with an object, is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months.

Definition of “consent”
(2) Subject to subsection (3), "consent" means, for the purposes of this section, the voluntary
agreement of the complainant to engage in the sexual activity in question.

When no consent obtained
(3) No consent is obtained, for the purposes of this section, if
    (a) the agreement is expressed by the words or conduct of a person other than the
    complainant;
    (b) the complainant is incapable of consenting to the activity;
    (c) the accused counsels or incites the complainant to engage in the activity by abusing a
    position of trust, power or authority;
    (d) the complainant expresses, by words or conduct, a lack of agreement to engage in the
    activity; or
    (e) the complainant, having consented to engage in sexual activity, expresses, by words or
    conduct, a lack of agreement to continue to engage in the activity.

Subsection (3) not limiting
(4) Nothing in subsection (3) shall be construed as limiting the circumstances in which no consent
is obtained.

When belief in consent not a defence
(5) It is not a defence to a charge under this section that the accused believed that the
complainant consented to the activity that forms the subject-matter of the charge if
     (a) the accused’s belief arose from the accused’s
          (i) self-induced intoxication, or
          (ii) recklessness or wilful blindness; or
     (b) the accused did not take reasonable steps, in the circumstances known to the accused at
     the time, to ascertain that the complainant was consenting.

Accused’s belief as to consent
(6) If an accused alleges that he or she believed that the complainant consented to the conduct
that is the subject-matter of the charge, a judge, if satisfied that there is sufficient evidence and
that, if believed by the jury, the evidence would constitute a defence, shall instruct the jury, when
reviewing all the evidence relating to the determination of the honesty of the accused’s belief, to
consider the presence or absence of reasonable grounds for that belief.
1998, c. 9, s. 2.
     154. [Repealed, R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 1]

Voyeurism
    162. (1) Every one commits an offence who, surreptitiously, observes — including by
mechanical or electronic means — or makes a visual recording of a person who is in
circumstances that give rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy, if
    (a) the person is in a place in which a person can reasonably be expected to be nude, to
    expose his or her genital organs or anal region or her breasts, or to be engaged in explicit
    sexual activity;
    (b) the person is nude, is exposing his or her genital organs or anal region or her breasts, or
    is engaged in explicit sexual activity, and the observation or recording is done for the purpose
    of observing or recording a person in such a state or engaged in such an activity; or
    (c) the observation or recording is done for a sexual purpose.
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Definition of "visual recording"
(2) In this section, “visual recording” includes a photographic, film or video recording made by any
means.

Exemption
(3) Paragraphs (1)(a) and (b) do not apply to a peace officer who, under the authority of a warrant
issued under section 487.01, is carrying out any activity referred to in those paragraphs.

Printing, publication, etc., of voyeuristic recordings
(4) Every one commits an offence who, knowing that a recording was obtained by the
commission of an offence under subsection (1), prints, copies, publishes, distributes, circulates,
sells, advertises or makes available the recording, or has the recording in his or her possession
for the purpose of printing, copying, publishing, distributing, circulating, selling or advertising it or
making it available.

Punishment
(5) Every one who commits an offence under subsection (1) or (4)
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five
    years; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Defence
(6) No person shall be convicted of an offence under this section if the acts that are alleged to
constitute the offence serve the public good and do not extend beyond what serves the public
good.

                              OFFENCES TENDING TO CORRUPT MORALS
Corrupting morals
   163. (1) Every one commits an offence who
   (a) makes, prints, publishes, distributes, circulates, or has in his possession for the purpose of
   publication, distribution or circulation any obscene written matter, picture, model, phonograph
   record or other thing whatever; or
   (b) makes, prints, publishes, distributes, sells or has in his possession for the purpose of
   publication, distribution or circulation a crime comic.

Idem
(2) Every one commits an offence who knowingly, without lawful justification or excuse,
    (a) sells, exposes to public view or has in his possession for such a purpose any obscene
    written matter, picture, model, phonograph record or other thing whatever;
    (b) publicly exhibits a disgusting object or an indecent show;
    (c) offers to sell, advertises or publishes an advertisement of, or has for sale or disposal, any
    means, instructions, medicine, drug or article intended or represented as a method of causing
    abortion or miscarriage; or
    (d) advertises or publishes an advertisement of any means, instructions, medicine, drug or
    article intended or represented as a method for restoring sexual virility or curing venereal
    diseases or diseases of the generative organs.

Defence of public good
(3) No person shall be convicted of an offence under this section if the public good was served by
the acts that are alleged to constitute the offence and if the acts alleged did not extend beyond
what served the public good.

Definition of “child pornography”
    163.1 (1) In this section, "child pornography" means
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                    -13-

   (a) a photographic, film, video or other visual representation, whether or not it was made by
   electronic or mechanical means,
       (i) that shows a person who is or is depicted as being under the age of eighteen years
       and is engaged in or is depicted as engaged in explicit sexual activity, or
       (ii) the dominant characteristic of which is the depiction, for a sexual purpose, of a sexual
       organ or the anal region of a person under the age of eighteen years;
   (b) any written material, visual representation or audio recording that advocates or counsels
   sexual activity with a person under the age of eighteen years that would be an offence under
   this Act;
   (c) any written material whose dominant characteristic is the description, for a sexual purpose,
   of sexual activity with a person under the age of eighteen years that would be an offence
   under this Act; or
   (d) any audio recording that has as its dominant characteristic the description, presentation or
   representation, for a sexual purpose, of sexual activity with a person under the age of
   eighteen years that would be an offence under this Act.

Making child pornography
(2) Every person who makes, prints, publishes or possesses for the purpose of publication any
child pornography is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years and to
    a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of one year; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of
    ninety days.

Distribution, etc. of child pornography
(3) Every person who transmits, makes available, distributes, sells, advertises, imports, exports or
possesses for the purpose of transmission, making available, distribution, sale, advertising or
exportation any child pornography is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years and to
    a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of one year; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of
    ninety days.

Possession of child pornography
(4) Every person who possesses any child pornography is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years and to
    a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of forty-five days; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of
    fourteen days.

Accessing child pornography
(4.1) Every person who accesses any child pornography is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years and to
    a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of forty-five days; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of
    fourteen days.

Interpretation
(4.2) For the purposes of subsection (4.1), a person accesses child pornography who knowingly
causes child pornography to be viewed by, or transmitted to, himself or herself.
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Aggravating factor
(4.3) If a person is convicted of an offence under this section, the court that imposes the sentence
shall consider as an aggravating factor the fact that the person committed the offence with intent
to make a profit.

Defence
(5) It is not a defence to a charge under subsection (2) in respect of a visual representation that
the accused believed that a person shown in the representation that is alleged to constitute child
pornography was or was depicted as being eighteen years of age or more unless the accused
took all reasonable steps to ascertain the age of that person and took all reasonable steps to
ensure that, where the person was eighteen years of age or more, the representation did not
depict that person as being under the age of eighteen years.

Defence
(6) No person shall be convicted of an offence under this section if the act that is alleged to
constitute the offence
    (a) has a legitimate purpose related to the administration of justice or to science, medicine,
    education or art; and
    (b) does not pose an undue risk of harm to persons under the age of eighteen years.

Question of law
(7) For greater certainty, for the purposes of this section, it is a question of law whether any
written material, visual representation or audio recording advocates or counsels sexual activity
with a person under the age of eighteen years that would be an offence under this Act.
1993, c. 46, s. 2; 2002, c. 13, s. 5; 2005, c. 32, s. 7.

Corrupting children
    172. (1) Every one who, in the home of a child, participates in adultery or sexual immorality or
indulges in habitual drunkenness or any other form of vice, and thereby endangers the morals of
the child or renders the home an unfit place for the child to be in, is guilty of an indictable offence
and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.
    (2) [Repealed, R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 6]

Definition of “child”
(3) For the purposes of this section, "child" means a person who is or appears to be under the
age of eighteen years.

Who may institute prosecutions
(4) No proceedings shall be commenced under subsection (1) without the consent of the Attorney
General, unless they are instituted by or at the instance of a recognized society for the protection
of children or by an officer of a juvenile court.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 172; R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 6.

Luring a child
    172.1 (1) Every person commits an offence who, by means of a computer system within the
meaning of subsection 342.1(2), communicates with
    (a) a person who is, or who the accused believes is, under the age of eighteen years, for the
    purpose of facilitating the commission of an offence under subsection 153(1), section 155 or
    163.1, subsection 212(1) or (4) or section 271, 272 or 273 with respect to that person;
    (b) a person who is, or who the accused believes is, under the age of 16 years, for the
    purpose of facilitating the commission of an offence under section 151 or 152, subsection
    160(3) or 173(2) or section 280 with respect to that person; or
    (c) a person who is, or who the accused believes is, under the age of 14 years, for the
    purpose of facilitating the commission of an offence under section 281 with respect to that
    person.
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Punishment
(2) Every person who commits an offence under subsection (1) is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than ten years; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months.

Presumption re age
(3) Evidence that the person referred to in paragraph (1)(a), (b) or (c) was represented to the
accused as being under the age of eighteen years, sixteen years or fourteen years, as the case
may be, is, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, proof that the accused believed that the
person was under that age.

No defence
(4) It is not a defence to a charge under paragraph (1)(a), (b) or (c) that the accused believed that
the person referred to in that paragraph was at least eighteen years of age, sixteen years or
fourteen years of age, as the case may be, unless the accused took reasonable steps to
ascertain the age of the person.
2002, c. 13, s. 8; 2007, c. 20, s. 1; 2008, c. 6, s. 14.

                                        DISORDERLY CONDUCT
Indecent acts
    173. (1) Every one who wilfully does an indecent act
    (a) in a public place in the presence of one or more persons, or
    (b) in any place, with intent thereby to insult or offend any person,
is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Exposure
(2) Every person who, in any place, for a sexual purpose, exposes his or her genital organs to a
person who is under the age of 16 years is guilty of an offence punishable on summary
conviction.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 173; R.S., 1985, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 7; 2008, c. 6, s. 54.

Causing disturbance, indecent exhibition, loitering, etc.
    175. (1) Every one who
    (a) not being in a dwelling-house, causes a disturbance in or near a public place,
         (i) by fighting, screaming, shouting, swearing, singing or using insulting or obscene
         language,
         (ii) by being drunk, or
         (iii) by impeding or molesting other persons,
    (b) openly exposes or exhibits an indecent exhibition in a public place,
    (c) loiters in a public place and in any way obstructs persons who are in that place, or
    (d) disturbs the peace and quiet of the occupants of a dwelling-house by discharging firearms
    or by other disorderly conduct in a public place or who, not being an occupant of a dwelling-
    house comprised in a particular building or structure, disturbs the peace and quiet of the
    occupants of a dwelling-house comprised in the building or structure by discharging firearms
    or by other disorderly conduct in any part of a building or structure to which, at the time of
    such conduct, the occupants of two or more dwelling-houses comprised in the building or
    structure have access as of right or by invitation, express or implied,
is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

                                            PART VI
                                     INVASION OF PRIVACY
                                 INTERCEPTION OF COMMUNICATIONS
Interception
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   184. (1) Every one who, by means of any electro-magnetic, acoustic, mechanical or other
device, wilfully intercepts a private communication is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to
imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.

Saving provision
(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to
    (a) a person who has the consent to intercept, express or implied, of the originator of the
    private communication or of the person intended by the originator thereof to receive it;
    (b) a person who intercepts a private communication in accordance with an authorization or
    pursuant to section 184.4 or any person who in good faith aids in any way another person
    who the aiding person believes on reasonable grounds is acting with an authorization or
    pursuant to section 184.4;
    (c) a person engaged in providing a telephone, telegraph or other communication service to
    the public who intercepts a private communication,
        (i) if the interception is necessary for the purpose of providing the service,
        (ii) in the course of service observing or random monitoring necessary for the purpose of
        mechanical or service quality control checks, or
        (iii) if the interception is necessary to protect the person’s rights or property directly
        related to providing the service;
    (d) an officer or servant of Her Majesty in right of Canada who engages in radio frequency
    spectrum management, in respect of a private communication intercepted by that officer or
    servant for the purpose of identifying, isolating or preventing an unauthorized or interfering
    use of a frequency or of a transmission; or
    (e) a person, or any person acting on their behalf, in possession or control of a computer
    system, as defined in subsection 342.1(2), who intercepts a private communication originating
    from, directed to or transmitting through that computer system, if the interception is
    reasonably necessary for
        (i) managing the quality of service of the computer system as it relates to performance
        factors such as the responsiveness and capacity of the system as well as the integrity and
        availability of the system and data, or
        (ii) protecting the computer system against any act that would be an offence under
        subsection 342.1(1) or 430(1.1).

                                        PART VIII
                    OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON AND REPUTATION
                          DUTIES TENDING TO PRESERVATION OF LIFE

Duty of persons to provide necessaries
   215. (1) Every one is under a legal duty
   (a) as a parent, foster parent, guardian or head of a family, to provide necessaries of life for a
   child under the age of sixteen years;
   (b) to provide necessaries of life to their spouse or common-law partner; and
   (c) to provide necessaries of life to a person under his charge if that person
        (i) is unable, by reason of detention, age, illness, mental disorder or other cause, to
        withdraw himself from that charge, and
        (ii) is unable to provide himself with necessaries of life.

Offence
(2) Every one commits an offence who, being under a legal duty within the meaning of subsection
(1), fails without lawful excuse, the proof of which lies on him, to perform that duty, if
     (a) with respect to a duty imposed by paragraph (1)(a) or (b),
          (i) the person to whom the duty is owed is in destitute or necessitous circumstances, or
          (ii) the failure to perform the duty endangers the life of the person to whom the duty is
          owed, or causes or is likely to cause the health of that person to be endangered
          permanently; or
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   (b) with respect to a duty imposed by paragraph (1)(c), the failure to perform the duty
   endangers the life of the person to whom the duty is owed or causes or is likely to cause the
   health of that person to be injured permanently.

Punishment
(3) Every one who commits an offence under subsection (2)
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five
    years; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a
    term not exceeding eighteen months.

Presumptions
(4) For the purpose of proceedings under this section,
    (a) [Repealed, 2000, c. 12, s. 93]
    (b) evidence that a person has in any way recognized a child as being his child is, in the
    absence of any evidence to the contrary, proof that the child is his child;
    (c) evidence that a person has failed for a period of one month to make provision for the
    maintenance of any child of theirs under the age of sixteen years is, in the absence of any
    evidence to the contrary, proof that the person has failed without lawful excuse to provide
    necessaries of life for the child; and
    (d) the fact that a spouse or common-law partner or child is receiving or has received
    necessaries of life from another person who is not under a legal duty to provide them is not a
    defence.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 215; 1991, c. 43, s. 9; 2000, c. 12, ss. 93, 95; 2005, c. 32, s. 11.

                                        CRIMINAL NEGLIGENCE
Criminal negligence
   219. (1) Every one is criminally negligent who
   (a) in doing anything, or
   (b) in omitting to do anything that it is his duty to do,
shows wanton or reckless disregard for the lives or safety of other persons.

Definition of “duty”
(2) For the purposes of this section, "duty" means a duty imposed by law.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 202.

Causing death by criminal negligence
    220. Every person who by criminal negligence causes death to another person is guilty of an
indictable offence and liable
    (a) where a firearm is used in the commission of the offence, to imprisonment for life and to a
    minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of four years; and
    (b) in any other case, to imprisonment for life.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 220; 1995, c. 39, s. 141.

Causing bodily harm by criminal negligence
    221. Every one who by criminal negligence causes bodily harm to another person is guilty of
an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 204.


                                             ASSAULTS
Uttering threats
    264.1 (1) Every one commits an offence who, in any manner, knowingly utters, conveys or
causes any person to receive a threat
    (a) to cause death or bodily harm to any person;
    (b) to burn, destroy or damage real or personal property; or
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   (c) to kill, poison or injure an animal or bird that is the property of any person.

Punishment
(2) Every one who commits an offence under paragraph (1)(a) is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months.

Idem
(3) Every one who commits an offence under paragraph (1)(b) or (c)
    (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two
    years; or
    (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.
R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 38; 1994, c. 44, s. 16.

Assault
   265. (1) A person commits an assault when
   (a) without the consent of another person, he applies force intentionally to that other person,
   directly or indirectly;
   (b) he attempts or threatens, by an act or a gesture, to apply force to another person, if he
   has, or causes that other person to believe on reasonable grounds that he has, present ability
   to effect his purpose; or
   (c) while openly wearing or carrying a weapon or an imitation thereof, he accosts or impedes
   another person or begs.

Application
(2) This section applies to all forms of assault, including sexual assault, sexual assault with a
weapon, threats to a third party or causing bodily harm and aggravated sexual assault.

Consent
(3) For the purposes of this section, no consent is obtained where the complainant submits or
does not resist by reason of
    (a) the application of force to the complainant or to a person other than the complainant;
    (b) threats or fear of the application of force to the complainant or to a person other than the
    complainant;
    (c) fraud; or
    (d) the exercise of authority.

Accused’s belief as to consent
(4) Where an accused alleges that he believed that the complainant consented to the conduct
that is the subject-matter of the charge, a judge, if satisfied that there is sufficient evidence and
that, if believed by the jury, the evidence would constitute a defence, shall instruct the jury, when
reviewing all the evidence relating to the determination of the honesty of the accused’s belief, to
consider the presence or absence of reasonable grounds for that belief.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 244; 1974-75-76, c. 93, s. 21; 1980-81-82-83, c. 125, s. 19.

Assault
   266. Every one who commits an assault is guilty of
   (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years; or
   (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 245; 1972, c. 13, s. 21; 1974-75-76, c. 93, s. 22; 1980-81-82-83, c. 125, s. 19.

Assault with a weapon or causing bodily harm
   267. Every one who, in committing an assault,
   (a) carries, uses or threatens to use a weapon or an imitation thereof, or
   (b) causes bodily harm to the complainant,
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is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years or
an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
exceeding eighteen months.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 267; 1994, c. 44, s. 17.

Aggravated assault
   268. (1) Every one commits an aggravated assault who wounds, maims, disfigures or
endangers the life of the complainant.

Punishment
(2) Every one who commits an aggravated assault is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to
imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

Excision
(3) For greater certainty, in this section, “wounds” or “maims” includes to excise, infibulate or
mutilate, in whole or in part, the labia majora, labia minora or clitoris of a person, except where

    (a) a surgical procedure is performed, by a person duly qualified by provincial law to practise
    medicine, for the benefit of the physical health of the person or for the purpose of that person
    having normal reproductive functions or normal sexual appearance or function; or

    (b) the person is at least eighteen years of age and there is no resulting bodily harm.

Consent
(4) For the purposes of this section and section 265, no consent to the excision, infibulation or
mutilation, in whole or in part, of the labia majora, labia minora or clitoris of a person is valid,
except in the cases described in paragraphs (3)(a) and (b).
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 268; 1997, c. 16, s. 5.

Unlawfully causing bodily harm
   269. Every one who unlawfully causes bodily harm to any person is guilty of

    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years; or

    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not
    exceeding eighteen months.

R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 269; 1994, c. 44, s. 18.

Removal of child from Canada
   273.3 (1) No person shall do anything for the purpose of removing from Canada a person
who is ordinarily resident in Canada and who is
   (a) under the age of 16 years, with the intention that an act be committed outside Canada that
   if it were committed in Canada would be an offence against section 151 or 152 or subsection
   160(3) or 173(2) in respect of that person;
   (b) 16 years of age or more but under the age of eighteen years, with the intention that an act
   be committed outside Canada that if it were committed in Canada would be an offence
   against section 153 in respect of that person; or
   (c) under the age of eighteen years, with the intention that an act be committed outside
   Canada that if it were committed in Canada would be an offence against section 155 or 159,
   subsection 160(2) or section 170, 171, 267, 268, 269, 271, 272 or 273 in respect of that
   person.

Punishment
(2) Every person who contravenes this section is guilty of
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   (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years; or
   (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.
1993, c. 45, s. 3; 1997, c. 18, s. 13; 2008, c. 6, s. 54.


                                        BLASPHEMOUS LIBEL
Offence
     296. (1) Every one who publishes a blasphemous libel is guilty of an indictable offence and
liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.

Question of fact
(2) It is a question of fact whether or not any matter that is published is a blasphemous libel.

Saving
(3) No person shall be convicted of an offence under this section for expressing in good faith and
in decent language, or attempting to establish by argument used in good faith and conveyed in
decent language, an opinion on a religious subject.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 260.
                                         DEFAMATORY LIBEL
Definition of “newspaper”
     297. In sections 303, 304 and 308, "newspaper" means any paper, magazine or periodical
containing public news, intelligence or reports of events, or any remarks or observations thereon,
printed for sale and published periodically or in parts or numbers, at intervals not exceeding thirty-
one days between the publication of any two such papers, parts or numbers, and any paper,
magazine or periodical printed in order to be dispersed and made public, weekly or more often, or
at intervals not exceeding thirty-one days, that contains advertisements, exclusively or principally.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 261.

Definition
     298. (1) A defamatory libel is matter published, without lawful justification or excuse, that is
likely to injure the reputation of any person by exposing him to hatred, contempt or ridicule, or that
is designed to insult the person of or concerning whom it is published.

Mode of expression
(2) A defamatory libel may be expressed directly or by insinuation or irony
    (a) in words legibly marked on any substance; or
    (b) by any object signifying a defamatory libel otherwise than by words.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 262.

Publishing
   299. A person publishes a libel when he
   (a) exhibits it in public;
   (b) causes it to be read or seen; or
   (c) shows or delivers it, or causes it to be shown or delivered, with intent that it should be read
   or seen by the person whom it defames or by any other person.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 263.

Punishment of libel known to be false
    300. Every one who publishes a defamatory libel that he knows is false is guilty of an
indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 264.

Punishment for defamatory libel
   301. Every one who publishes a defamatory libel is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to
imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 265.
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Extortion by libel
    302. (1) Every one commits an offence who, with intent
    (a) to extort money from any person, or
    (b) to induce a person to confer on or procure for another person an appointment or office of
    profit or trust,
publishes or threatens to publish or offers to abstain from publishing or to prevent the publication
of a defamatory libel.

Idem
(2) Every one commits an offence who, as the result of the refusal of any person to permit money
to be extorted or to confer or procure an appointment or office of profit or trust, publishes or
threatens to publish a defamatory libel.

Punishment
(3) Every one who commits an offence under this section is guilty of an indictable offence and
liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 266.

Proprietor of newspaper presumed responsible
    303. (1) The proprietor of a newspaper shall be deemed to publish defamatory matter that is
inserted and published therein, unless he proves that the defamatory matter was inserted in the
newspaper without his knowledge and without negligence on his part.

General authority to manager when negligence
(2) Where the proprietor of a newspaper gives to a person general authority to manage or
conduct the newspaper as editor or otherwise, the insertion by that person of defamatory matter
in the newspaper shall, for the purposes of subsection (1), be deemed not to be negligence on
the part of the proprietor unless it is proved that
     (a) he intended the general authority to include authority to insert defamatory matter in the
     newspaper; or
     (b) he continued to confer general authority after he knew that it had been exercised by the
     insertion of defamatory matter in the newspaper.

Selling newspapers
(3) No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he sells a
number or part of a newspaper that contains a defamatory libel, unless he knows that the number
or part contains defamatory matter or that defamatory matter is habitually contained in the
newspaper.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 267.

Selling book containing defamatory libel
    304. (1) No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he sells
a book, magazine, pamphlet or other thing, other than a newspaper that contains defamatory
matter, if, at the time of the sale, he does not know that it contains the defamatory matter.

Sale by servant
(2) Where a servant, in the course of his employment, sells a book, magazine, pamphlet or other
thing, other than a newspaper, the employer shall be deemed not to publish any defamatory
matter contained therein unless it is proved that the employer authorized the sale knowing that
    (a) defamatory matter was contained therein; or
    (b) defamatory matter was habitually contained therein, in the case of a periodical.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 268.

Publishing proceedings of courts of justice
   305. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes defamatory matter
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                        -22-

   (a) in a proceeding held before or under the authority of a court exercising judicial authority;
   or
   (b) in an inquiry made under the authority of an Act or by order of Her Majesty, or under the
   authority of a public department or a department of the government of a province.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 269.

Parliamentary papers
    306. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
    (a) publishes to the Senate or House of Commons or to the legislature of a province
    defamatory matter contained in a petition to the Senate or House of Commons or to the
    legislature of a province, as the case may be;
    (b) publishes by order or under the authority of the Senate or House of Commons or of the
    legislature of a province a paper containing defamatory matter; or
    (c) publishes, in good faith and without ill-will to the person defamed, an extract from or
    abstract of a petition or paper mentioned in paragraph (a) or (b).
R.S., c. C-34, s. 270.

Fair reports of parliamentary or judicial proceedings
    307. (1) No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes in good faith, for the information of the public, a fair report of the proceedings of the
Senate or House of Commons or the legislature of a province, or a committee thereof, or of the
public proceedings before a court exercising judicial authority, or publishes, in good faith, any fair
comment on any such proceedings.

Divorce proceedings an exception
(2) This section does not apply to a person who publishes a report of evidence taken or offered in
any proceeding before the Senate or House of Commons or any committee thereof, on a petition
or bill relating to any matter of marriage or divorce, if the report is published without authority from
or leave of the House in which the proceeding is held or is contrary to any rule, order or practice
of that House.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 271.

Fair report of public meeting
    308. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes in good faith, in a newspaper, a fair report of the proceedings of any public meeting if
    (a) the meeting is lawfully convened for a lawful purpose and is open to the public;
    (b) the report is fair and accurate;
    (c) the publication of the matter complained of is for the public benefit; and
    (d) he does not refuse to publish in a conspicuous place in the newspaper a reasonable
    explanation or contradiction by the person defamed in respect of the defamatory matter.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 272.

Public benefit
    309. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes defamatory matter that, on reasonable grounds, he believes is true, and that is relevant
to any subject of public interest, the public discussion of which is for the public benefit.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 273.

Fair comment on public person or work of art
    310. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes fair comments
    (a) on the public conduct of a person who takes part in public affairs; or
    (b) on a published book or other literary production, or on any composition or work of art or
    performance publicly exhibited, or on any other communication made to the public on any
    subject, if the comments are confined to criticism thereof.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 274.
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When truth a defence
   311. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel where he proves that the
publication of the defamatory matter in the manner in which it was published was for the public
benefit at the time when it was published and that the matter itself was true.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 275.

Publication invited or necessary
     312. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes defamatory matter
     (a) on the invitation or challenge of the person in respect of whom it is published, or
     (b) that it is necessary to publish in order to refute defamatory matter published in respect of
     him by another person,
if he believes that the defamatory matter is true and it is relevant to the invitation, challenge or
necessary refutation, as the case may be, and does not in any respect exceed what is reasonably
sufficient in the circumstances.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 276.

Answer to inquiries
    313. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes, in answer to inquiries made to him, defamatory matter relating to a subject-matter in
respect of which the person by whom or on whose behalf the inquiries are made has an interest
in knowing the truth or who, on reasonable grounds, the person who publishes the defamatory
matter believes has such an interest, if
    (a) the matter is published, in good faith, for the purpose of giving information in answer to the
    inquiries;
    (b) the person who publishes the defamatory matter believes that it is true;
    (c) the defamatory matter is relevant to the inquiries; and
    (d) the defamatory matter does not in any respect exceed what is reasonably sufficient in the
    circumstances.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 277.

Giving information to person interested
     314. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes to another person defamatory matter for the purpose of giving information to that
person with respect to a subject-matter in which the person to whom the information is given has,
or is believed on reasonable grounds by the person who gives it to have, an interest in knowing
the truth with respect to that subject-matter if
     (a) the conduct of the person who gives the information is reasonable in the circumstances;
     (b) the defamatory matter is relevant to the subject-matter; and
     (c) the defamatory matter is true, or if it is not true, is made without ill-will toward the person
     who is defamed and is made in the belief, on reasonable grounds, that it is true.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 278.

Publication in good faith for redress of wrong
    315. No person shall be deemed to publish a defamatory libel by reason only that he
publishes defamatory matter in good faith for the purpose of seeking remedy or redress for a
private or public wrong or grievance from a person who has, or who on reasonable grounds he
believes has, the right or is under an obligation to remedy or redress the wrong or grievance, if
    (a) he believes that the defamatory matter is true;
    (b) the defamatory matter is relevant to the remedy or redress that is sought; and
    (c) the defamatory matter does not in any respect exceed what is reasonably sufficient in the
    circumstances.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 279.
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                        -24-

Proving publication by order of legislature
    316. (1) An accused who is alleged to have published a defamatory libel may, at any stage of
the proceedings, adduce evidence to prove that the matter that is alleged to be defamatory was
contained in a paper published by order or under the authority of the Senate or House of
Commons or the legislature of a province.

Directing verdict
(2) Where at any stage in proceedings referred to in subsection (1) the court, judge, justice or
provincial court judge is satisfied that the matter alleged to be defamatory was contained in a
paper published by order or under the authority of the Senate or House of Commons or the
legislature of a province, he shall direct a verdict of not guilty to be entered and shall discharge
the accused.

Certificate of order
(3) For the purposes of this section, a certificate under the hand of the Speaker or clerk of the
Senate or House of Commons or the legislature of a province to the effect that the matter that is
alleged to be defamatory was contained in a paper published by order or under the authority of
the Senate, House of Commons or the legislature of a province, as the case may be, is
conclusive evidence thereof.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 316; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 203.

                                        HATE PROPAGANDA
Advocating genocide
     318. (1) Every one who advocates or promotes genocide is guilty of an indictable offence and
liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.

Definition of “genocide”
(2) In this section, "genocide" means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy in
whole or in part any identifiable group, namely,
     (a) killing members of the group; or
     (b) deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical
     destruction.

Consent
(3) No proceeding for an offence under this section shall be instituted without the consent of the
Attorney General.

Definition of "identifiable group"
(4) In this section, "identifiable group" means any section of the public distinguished by colour,
race, religion, ethnic origin or sexual orientation.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 318; 2004, c. 14, s. 1.

Public incitement of hatred
    319. (1) Every one who, by communicating statements in any public place, incites hatred
against any identifiable group where such incitement is likely to lead to a breach of the peace is
guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Wilful promotion of hatred
(2) Every one who, by communicating statements, other than in private conversation, wilfully
promotes hatred against any identifiable group is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.
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Defences
(3) No person shall be convicted of an offence under subsection (2)
    (a) if he establishes that the statements communicated were true;
    (b) if, in good faith, the person expressed or attempted to establish by an argument an
    opinion on a religious subject or an opinion based on a belief in a religious text;
    (c) if the statements were relevant to any subject of public interest, the discussion of which
    was for the public benefit, and if on reasonable grounds he believed them to be true; or
    (d) if, in good faith, he intended to point out, for the purpose of removal, matters producing or
    tending to produce feelings of hatred toward an identifiable group in Canada.

Forfeiture
(4) Where a person is convicted of an offence under section 318 or subsection (1) or (2) of this
section, anything by means of or in relation to which the offence was committed, on such
conviction, may, in addition to any other punishment imposed, be ordered by the presiding
provincial court judge or judge to be forfeited to Her Majesty in right of the province in which that
person is convicted, for disposal as the Attorney General may direct.

Exemption from seizure of communication facilities
(5) Subsections 199(6) and (7) apply with such modifications as the circumstances require to
section 318 or subsection (1) or (2) of this section.

Consent
(6) No proceeding for an offence under subsection (2) shall be instituted without the consent of
the Attorney General.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 319; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 203; 2004, c. 14, s. 2.

                                               PART XI
           WILFUL AND FORBIDDEN ACTS IN RESPECT OF CERTAIN PROPERTY
                                        CRUELTY TO ANIMALS
Causing unnecessary suffering
   445.1 (1) Every one commits an offence who
   (a) wilfully causes or, being the owner, wilfully permits to be caused unnecessary pain,
   suffering or injury to an animal or a bird;
   (b) in any manner encourages, aids or assists at the fighting or baiting of animals or birds;
   (c) wilfully, without reasonable excuse, administers a poisonous or an injurious drug or
   substance to a domestic animal or bird or an animal or a bird wild by nature that is kept in
   captivity or, being the owner of such an animal or a bird, wilfully permits a poisonous or an
   injurious drug or substance to be administered to it;
   (d) promotes, arranges, conducts, assists in, receives money for or takes part in any meeting,
   competition, exhibition, pastime, practice, display or event at or in the course of which captive
   birds are liberated by hand, trap, contrivance or any other means for the purpose of being
   shot when they are liberated; or
   (e) being the owner, occupier or person in charge of any premises, permits the premises or
   any part thereof to be used for a purpose mentioned in paragraph (d).

Punishment
(2) Every one who commits an offence under subsection (1) is guilty of
    (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than five years; or
    (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to a fine not exceeding ten
    thousand dollars or to imprisonment for a term of not more than eighteen months or to both.

Failure to exercise reasonable care as evidence
(3) For the purposes of proceedings under paragraph (1)(a), evidence that a person failed to
exercise reasonable care or supervision of an animal or a bird thereby causing it pain, suffering or
injury is, in the absence of any evidence to the contrary, proof that the pain, suffering or injury
was caused or was permitted to be caused wilfully, as the case may be.
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                                                PART XII
                               OFFENCES RELATING TO CURRENCY
                                         DEFACING OR IMPAIRING
Clipping and uttering clipped coin
    455. Every one who
    (a) impairs, diminishes or lightens a current gold or silver coin with intent that it should pass
    for a current gold or silver coin, or
    (b) utters a coin knowing that it has been impaired, diminished or lightened contrary to
    paragraph (a),
is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen
years.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 413.

Defacing current coins
   456. Every one who

    (a) defaces a current coin, or
    (b) utters a current coin that has been defaced,
is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 414.

                                     PART XII.1
                  INSTRUMENTS AND LITERATURE FOR ILLICIT DRUG USE
                               OFFENCE AND PUNISHMENT
Offence
    462.2 Every one who knowingly imports into Canada, exports from Canada, manufactures,
promotes or sells instruments or literature for illicit drug use is guilty of an offence and liable on
summary conviction
    (a) for a first offence, to a fine not exceeding one hundred thousand dollars or to
    imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to both; or
    (b) for a second or subsequent offence, to a fine not exceeding three hundred thousand
    dollars or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.
R.S., 1985, c. 50 (4th Supp.), s. 1.

                                              PART XIV
                                            JURISDICTION
                                              GENERAL
Superior court of criminal jurisdiction
   468. Every superior court of criminal jurisdiction has jurisdiction to try any indictable offence.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 426.

Court of criminal jurisdiction
   469. Every court of criminal jurisdiction has jurisdiction to try an indictable offence other than
   (a) an offence under any of the following sections:
        (i) section 47 (treason),
        (ii) section 49 (alarming Her Majesty),
        (iii) section 51 (intimidating Parliament or a legislature),
        (iv) section 53 (inciting to mutiny),
        (v) section 61 (seditious offences),
        (vi) section 74 (piracy),
        (vii) section 75 (piratical acts), or
        (viii) section 235 (murder);
Accessories
   (b) the offence of being an accessory after the fact to high treason or treason or murder;
   (c) an offence under section 119 (bribery) by the holder of a judicial office;
Crimes against humanity
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    (c.1) an offence under any of sections 4 to 7 of the Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes
    Act;
Attempts
    (d) the offence of attempting to commit any offence mentioned in subparagraphs (a)(i) to (vii);
    or
Conspiracy
    (e) the offence of conspiring to commit any offence mentioned in paragraph (a).
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 469; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 62; 2000, c. 24, s. 44.

                                            RULES OF COURT
Power to make rules
    482. (1) Every superior court of criminal jurisdiction and every court of appeal may make rules
of court not inconsistent with this or any other Act of Parliament, and any rules so made apply to
any prosecution, proceeding, action or appeal, as the case may be, within the jurisdiction of that
court, instituted in relation to any matter of a criminal nature or arising from or incidental to any
such prosecution, proceeding, action or appeal.

Power to make rules
(2) The following courts may, subject to the approval of the lieutenant governor in council of the
relevant province, make rules of court not inconsistent with this Act or any other Act of Parliament
that are applicable to any prosecution, proceeding, including a preliminary inquiry or proceedings
within the meaning of Part XXVII, action or appeal, as the case may be, within the jurisdiction of
that court, instituted in relation to any matter of a criminal nature or arising from or incidental to
the prosecution, proceeding, action or appeal:
    (a) every court of criminal jurisdiction for a province;
    (b) every appeal court within the meaning of section 812 that is not a court referred to in
    subsection (1);
    (c) the Ontario Court of Justice;
    (d) the Court of Quebec and every municipal court in the Province of Quebec;
    (e) the Provincial Court of Nova Scotia;
    (f) the Provincial Court of New Brunswick;
    (g) the Provincial Court of Manitoba;
    (h) the Provincial Court of British Columbia;
    (i) the Provincial Court of Prince Edward Island;
    (j) the Provincial Court of Saskatchewan;
    (k) the Provincial Court of Alberta;
    (l) the Provincial Court of Newfoundland;
    (m) the Territorial Court of Yukon;
    (n) the Territorial Court of the Northwest Territories; and
    (o) the Nunavut Court of Justice.

Purpose of rules
(3) Rules under subsection (1) or (2) may be made
    (a) generally to regulate the duties of the officers of the court and any other matter considered
    expedient to attain the ends of justice and carry into effect the provisions of the law;
    (b) to regulate the sittings of the court or any division thereof, or of any judge of the court
    sitting in chambers, except in so far as they are regulated by law;
    (c) to regulate the pleading, practice and procedure in criminal matters, including pre-hearing
    conferences held under section 625.1, proceedings with respect to judicial interim release
    and preliminary inquiries and, in the case of rules under subsection (1), proceedings with
    respect to mandamus, certiorari, habeas corpus, prohibition and procedendo and
    proceedings on an appeal under section 830; and
    (d) to carry out the provisions of this Act relating to appeals from conviction, acquittal or
    sentence and, without restricting the generality of this paragraph,
         (i) for furnishing necessary forms and instructions in relation to notices of appeal or
         applications for leave to appeal to officials or other persons requiring or demanding them,
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        (ii) for ensuring the accuracy of notes taken at a trial and the verification of any copy or
        transcript,
        (iii) for keeping writings, exhibits or other things connected with the proceedings on the
        trial,
        (iv) for securing the safe custody of property during the period in which the operation of an
        order with respect to that property is suspended under subsection 689(1), and
        (v) for providing that the Attorney General and counsel who acted for the Attorney
        General at the trial be supplied with certified copies of writings, exhibits and things
        connected with the proceedings that are required for the purposes of their duties.

Publication
(4) Rules of court that are made under the authority of this section shall be published in the
Canada Gazette.

Regulations to secure uniformity
(5) Notwithstanding anything in this section, the Governor in Council may make such provision as
he considers proper to secure uniformity in the rules of court in criminal matters, and all uniform
rules made under the authority of this subsection prevail and have effect as if enacted by this Act.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 482; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 66; 1994, c. 44, s. 35; 2002, c. 13, s.
17.
                                              PART XV
                             SPECIAL PROCEDURE AND POWERS
                              GENERAL POWERS OF CERTAIN OFFICIALS
When accused not present
(1.1) Jurisdiction over an accused is not lost by reason of the failure of the accused to appear
personally, so long as subsection 515(2.2), paragraph 537(1)(j), (j.1) or (k), subsection 650(1.1)
or (1.2), paragraph 650(2)(b) or 650.01(3)(a), subsection 683(2.1) or 688(2.1) or a rule of court
made under section 482 or 482.1 applies.

Exclusion of public in certain cases
    486. (1) Any proceedings against an accused shall be held in open court, but the presiding
judge or justice may order the exclusion of all or any members of the public from the court room
for all or part of the proceedings if the judge or justice is of the opinion that such an order is in the
interest of public morals, the maintenance of order or the proper administration of justice or is
necessary to prevent injury to international relations or national defence or national security.

Protection of witnesses under 18 and justice system participants
(2) For the purposes of subsection (1), the “proper administration of justice” includes ensuring
that
     (a) the interests of witnesses under the age of eighteen years are safeguarded in all
     proceedings; and
     (b) justice system participants who are involved in the proceedings are protected.

Reasons to be stated
(3) If an accused is charged with an offence under section 151, 152, 153, 153.1, 155 or 159,
subsection 160(2) or (3) or section 163.1, 171, 172, 172.1, 173, 212, 271, 272, 273, 279.01,
279.02 or 279.03 and the prosecutor or the accused applies for an order under subsection (1),
the judge or justice shall, if no such order is made, state, by reference to the circumstances of the
case, the reason for not making an order.
R.S., 1985, c. C-46, s. 486; R.S., 1985, c. 27 (1st Supp.), s. 203, c. 19 (3rd Supp.), s. 14, c. 23
(4th Supp.), s. 1; 1992, c. 1, s. 60(F), c. 21, s. 9; 1993, c. 45, s. 7; 1997, c. 16, s. 6; 1999, c. 25, s.
2(Preamble); 2001, c. 32, s. 29, c. 41, ss. 16, 34, 133; 2002, c. 13, s. 20; 2005, c. 32, s. 15, c. 43,
ss. 4, 8.

Support person — witnesses under 18 or who have a disability
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    486.1 (1) In any proceedings against an accused, the judge or justice shall, on application of
the prosecutor, of a witness who is under the age of eighteen years or of a witness who has a
mental or physical disability, order that a support person of the witness’ choice be permitted to be
present and to be close to the witness while the witness testifies, unless the judge or justice is of
the opinion that the order would interfere with the proper administration of justice.

Other witnesses
(2) In any proceedings against an accused, the judge or justice may, on application of the
prosecutor or a witness, order that a support person of the witness’ choice be permitted to be
present and to be close to the witness while the witness testifies if the judge or justice is of the
opinion that the order is necessary to obtain a full and candid account from the witness of the acts
complained of.

Application
(2.1) An application referred to in subsection (1) or (2) may be made, during the proceedings, to
the presiding judge or justice or, before the proceedings begin, to the judge or justice who will
preside at the proceedings.

Factors to be considered
(3) In making a determination under subsection (2), the judge or justice shall take into account the
age of the witness, whether the witness has a mental or physical disability, the nature of the
offence, the nature of any relationship between the witness and the accused, and any other
circumstance that the judge or justice considers relevant.

Witness not to be a support person
(4) The judge or justice shall not permit a witness to be a support person unless the judge or
justice is of the opinion that doing so is necessary for the proper administration of justice.

No communication while testifying
(5) The judge or justice may order that the support person and the witness not communicate with
each other while the witness testifies.

No adverse inference
(6) No adverse inference may be drawn from the fact that an order is, or is not, made under this
section.
2005, c. 32, s. 15.

Testimony outside court room — witnesses under 18 or who have a disability
     486.2 (1) Despite section 650, in any proceedings against an accused, the judge or justice
shall, on application of the prosecutor, of a witness who is under the age of eighteen years or of a
witness who is able to communicate evidence but may have difficulty doing so by reason of a
mental or physical disability, order that the witness testify outside the court room or behind a
screen or other device that would allow the witness not to see the accused, unless the judge or
justice is of the opinion that the order would interfere with the proper administration of justice.

Other witnesses
(2) Despite section 650, in any proceedings against an accused, the judge or justice may, on
application of the prosecutor or a witness, order that the witness testify outside the court room or
behind a screen or other device that would allow the witness not to see the accused if the judge
or justice is of the opinion that the order is necessary to obtain a full and candid account from the
witness of the acts complained of.

Application
(2.1) An application referred to in subsection (1) or (2) may be made, during the proceedings, to
the presiding judge or justice or, before the proceedings begin, to the judge or justice who will
preside at the proceedings.
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                       -30-

Factors to be considered
(3) In making a determination under subsection (2), the judge or justice shall take into account the
factors referred to in subsection 486.1(3).

Specific offences
(4) Despite section 650, if an accused is charged with an offence referred to in subsection (5), the
presiding judge or justice may order that any witness testify
    (a) outside the court room if the judge or justice is of the opinion that the order is necessary to
    protect the safety of the witness; and
    (b) outside the court room or behind a screen or other device that would allow the witness not
    to see the accused if the judge or justice is of the opinion that the order is necessary to obtain
    a full and candid account from the witness of the acts complained of.

Offences
(5) The offences for the purposes of subsection (4) are
    (a) an offence under section 423.1, 467.11, 467.12 or 467.13, or a serious offence committed
    for the benefit of, at the direction of, or in association with, a criminal organization;
    (b) a terrorism offence;
    (c) an offence under subsection 16(1) or (2), 17(1), 19(1), 20(1) or 22(1) of the Security of
    Information Act; or
    (d) an offence under subsection 21(1) or section 23 of the Security of Information Act that is
    committed in relation to an offence referred to in paragraph (c).

Same procedure for determination
(6) If the judge or justice is of the opinion that it is necessary for a witness to testify in order to
determine whether an order under subsection (2) or (4) should be made in respect of that
witness, the judge or justice shall order that the witness testify in accordance with that subsection.

Conditions of exclusion
(7) A witness shall not testify outside the court room under subsection (1), (2), (4) or (6) unless
arrangements are made for the accused, the judge or justice and the jury to watch the testimony
of the witness by means of closed-circuit television or otherwise and the accused is permitted to
communicate with counsel while watching the testimony.

No adverse inference
(8) No adverse inference may be drawn from the fact that an order is, or is not, made under this
section.
2005, c. 32, s. 15.

Accused not to cross-examine witness under 18
    486.3 (1) In any proceedings against an accused, on application of the prosecutor or a
witness who is under the age of eighteen years, the accused shall not personally cross-examine
the witness, unless the judge or justice is of the opinion that the proper administration of justice
requires the accused to personally conduct the cross-examination. The judge or justice shall
appoint counsel to conduct the cross-examination if the accused does not personally conduct the
cross-examination.

Other witnesses
(2) In any proceedings against an accused, on application of the prosecutor or a witness, the
accused shall not personally cross-examine the witness if the judge or justice is of the opinion
that, in order to obtain a full and candid account from the witness of the acts complained of, the
accused should not personally cross-examine the witness. The judge or justice shall appoint
counsel to conduct the cross-examination if the accused does not personally conduct the cross-
examination.
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                      -31-

Factors to be considered
(3) In making a determination under subsection (2), the judge or justice shall take into account the
factors referred to in subsection 486.1(3).

Victim of criminal harassment
(4) In any proceedings in respect of an offence under section 264, on application of the
prosecutor or the victim of the offence, the accused shall not personally cross-examine the victim
unless the judge or justice is of the opinion that the proper administration of justice requires the
accused to personally conduct the cross-examination. The judge or justice shall appoint counsel
to conduct the cross-examination if the accused does not personally conduct the cross-
examination.

Application
(4.1) An application referred to in subsection (1), (2) or (4) may be made, during the proceedings,
to the presiding judge or justice or, before the proceedings begin, to the judge or justice who will
preside at the proceedings.

No adverse inference
(5) No adverse inference may be drawn from the fact that counsel is, or is not, appointed under
this section.
2005, c. 32, s. 15.

Order restricting publication — sexual offences
    486.4 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the presiding judge or justice may make an order
directing that any information that could identify the complainant or a witness shall not be
published in any document or broadcast or transmitted in any way, in proceedings in respect of
    (a) any of the following offences:
         (i) an offence under section 151, 152, 153, 153.1, 155, 159, 160, 162, 163.1, 170, 171,
         172, 172.1, 173, 210, 211, 212, 213, 271, 272, 273, 279.01, 279.02, 279.03, 346 or 347,
         (ii) an offence under section 144 (rape), 145 (attempt to commit rape), 149 (indecent
         assault on female), 156 (indecent assault on male) or 245 (common assault) or
         subsection 246(1) (assault with intent) of the Criminal Code, chapter C-34 of the Revised
         Statutes of Canada, 1970, as it read immediately before January 4, 1983, or
         (iii) an offence under subsection 146(1) (sexual intercourse with a female under 14) or (2)
         (sexual intercourse with a female between 14 and 16) or section 151 (seduction of a
         female between 16 and 18), 153 (sexual intercourse with step-daughter), 155 (buggery or
         bestiality), 157 (gross indecency), 166 (parent or guardian procuring defilement) or 167
         (householder permitting defilement) of the Criminal Code, chapter C-34 of the Revised
         Statutes of Canada, 1970, as it read immediately before January 1, 1988; or
    (b) two or more offences being dealt with in the same proceeding, at least one of which is an
    offence referred to in any of subparagraphs (a)(i) to (iii).

Mandatory order on application
(2) In proceedings in respect of the offences referred to in paragraph (1)(a) or (b), the presiding
judge or justice shall
     (a) at the first reasonable opportunity, inform any witness under the age of eighteen years
     and the complainant of the right to make an application for the order; and
     (b) on application made by the complainant, the prosecutor or any such witness, make the
     order.

Child pornography
(3) In proceedings in respect of an offence under section 163.1, a judge or justice shall make an
order directing that any information that could identify a witness who is under the age of eighteen
years, or any person who is the subject of a representation, written material or a recording that
constitutes child pornography within the meaning of that section, shall not be published in any
document or broadcast or transmitted in any way.
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                         -32-

Limitation
(4) An order made under this section does not apply in respect of the disclosure of information in
the course of the administration of justice when it is not the purpose of the disclosure to make the
information known in the community.
2005, c. 32, s. 15, c. 43, s. 8.

Order restricting publication — victims and witnesses
     486.5 (1) Unless an order is made under section 486.4, on application of the prosecutor, a
victim or a witness, a judge or justice may make an order directing that any information that could
identify the victim or witness shall not be published in any document or broadcast or transmitted
in any way if the judge or justice is satisfied that the order is necessary for the proper
administration of justice.

Justice system participants
(2) On application of a justice system participant who is involved in proceedings in respect of an
offence referred to in subsection 486.2(5) or of the prosecutor in those proceedings, a judge or
justice may make an order directing that any information that could identify the justice system
participant shall not be published in any document or broadcast or transmitted in any way if the
judge or justice is satisfied that the order is necessary for the proper administration of justice.

Limitation
(3) An order made under this section does not apply in respect of the disclosure of information in
the course of the administration of justice if it is not the purpose of the disclosure to make the
information known in the community.

Application and notice
(4) An applicant for an order shall
    (a) apply in writing to the presiding judge or justice or, if the judge or justice has not been
    determined, to a judge of a superior court of criminal jurisdiction in the judicial district where
    the proceedings will take place; and
    (b) provide notice of the application to the prosecutor, the accused and any other person
    affected by the order that the judge or justice specifies.

Grounds
(5) An applicant for an order shall set out the grounds on which the applicant relies to establish
that the order is necessary for the proper administration of justice.

Hearing may be held
(6) The judge or justice may hold a hearing to determine whether an order should be made, and
the hearing may be in private.

Factors to be considered
(7) In determining whether to make an order, the judge or justice shall consider
     (a) the right to a fair and public hearing;
     (b) whether there is a real and substantial risk that the victim, witness or justice system
     participant would suffer significant harm if their identity were disclosed;
     (c) whether the victim, witness or justice system participant needs the order for their security
     or to protect them from intimidation or retaliation;
     (d) society’s interest in encouraging the reporting of offences and the participation of victims,
     witnesses and justice system participants in the criminal justice process;
     (e) whether effective alternatives are available to protect the identity of the victim, witness or
     justice system participant;
     (f) the salutary and deleterious effects of the proposed order;
     (g) the impact of the proposed order on the freedom of expression of those affected by it; and
     (h) any other factor that the judge or justice considers relevant.
Conditions
EDUC 5176 – Educational Law                                                                        -33-

(8) An order may be subject to any conditions that the judge or justice thinks fit.

Publication prohibited
(9) Unless the judge or justice refuses to make an order, no person shall publish in any document
or broadcast or transmit in any way
    (a) the contents of an application;
    (b) any evidence taken, information given or submissions made at a hearing under subsection
    (6); or
    (c) any other information that could identify the person to whom the application relates as a
    victim, witness or justice system participant in the proceedings.
2005, c. 32, s. 15.

Offence
    486.6 (1) Every person who fails to comply with an order made under subsection 486.4(1), (2)
or (3) or 486.5(1) or (2) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Application of order
(2) For greater certainty, an order referred to in subsection (1) applies to prohibit, in relation to
proceedings taken against any person who fails to comply with the order, the publication in any
document or the broadcasting or transmission in any way of information that could identify a
victim, witness or justice system participant whose identity is protected by the order.
2005, c. 32, s. 15.

				
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