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					              Colorado State Library
    Colorado Department of Education




              LSTA Five-Year Plan
                          2008-2012
 (Revised submission September 2007)



                               For the
Institute of Museum & Library Services




                     Eugene Hainer, Director
                      Colorado State Library
                     201 East Colfax Avenue
                                  Room 309
                         Denver, CO 80203
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012              2


                                     Table of Contents

Introduction                                             3

Plan Overview                                            4

Colorado State Library Mission Statement                 6

Needs Assessment                                         6
     Need #1                                             6
     Need #2                                             8
     Need #3                                             10
     Need #4                                             12

Evaluation Plan                                          14

Stakeholder Involvement                                  15

Communication and Public Availability                    16

Monitoring                                               16

References                                               17

Attachments: Assurances
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                                3



                                         Introduction
Projecting a five-year horizon can be challenging, for any planning process. A state’s
economy can ebb and flow; technologies advance at a quick pace; political agendas are
refined or broadened; and an entire host of external factors push and pull at the priorities
established within our civic communities, our school districts, our academic institutions
and our cultural institutions.

In the midst of these environmental changes, one of the signposts for Colorado’s libraries
is the Colorado State Library’s (CSL) Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) five-
year plan. It is intended to serve as a guide, pointing the way for library resource
development, expansion of information services, and allocation of funding. Such funding
is crucial to the sustenance of libraries throughout Colorado.

While social networks, library 2.0 and the “long tail” may be influencing library staff and
library users today, there is no way of accurately predicting what the trends of tomorrow
might bring.

Libraries continue to fulfill a crucial role within their communities as the key provider of
information in all formats for all needs. They are constantly adjusting to external
demands and internal pressures for services; in spite of all uncertainties, libraries remain
a primary community anchor for all who use them.

The five-year plan outlined here addresses the ongoing challenges associated with
growing a “State of Learners.” Enhancing and investing in individual literacy, learning in
families, and preservation of cultural heritage are at the core of this broad mission.

Diverse programs, activities, resources and technologies for building 21st-century skills
are among the many strategic tools Colorado libraries will use to accomplish the mission.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                              4



                                        Plan Overview
This plan identifies four needs and associated goals: access; services for educational
advancement; services to underserved populations; and shared resources.

The goals established in this plan are consistent with the purposes and directions outlined
in the Library Services and Technology Act, a federal program administered by the
Institute of Museum and Library Services.

As a foundation for guiding Colorado’s five-year LSTA plan, these four needs are
defined as:

    1. Access. A need for Colorado residents to be able to access information resources
       and services electronically through all types of libraries.

    2. Services for educational advancement. A need for Colorado libraries and
       librarians to provide services in support of education and lifelong learning for
       students as well as adult learners.

    3. Services to underserved populations. A need for designing and establishing
       specialized, targeted library services to reach underserved Colorado residents with
       disabilities, residents from various ethnic groups and other unique populations.

    4. Shared resources. A need for Colorado libraries to cooperatively develop
       strategies for resource sharing to serve the interests of Colorado residents while
       reducing duplication of services.

Each of the needs identified above, along with the associated goals, expected benefits,
and potential projects, are further refined in the remainder of this five-year plan. The CSL
allocates LSTA funding to libraries across the state in three ways: 1) for selected, locally-
initiated projects; 2) for statewide initiatives that address identified needs coinciding with
the broad needs stated in this long-range planning document; and 3) for internal
administrative purposes related to oversight of numerous programs and projects
consistent with the LSTA purpose.

The programs implemented with LSTA funding in the State Library include summer
reading initiatives for underserved populations in rural, urban and resort areas;
networking and resource sharing; promoting access to learning and information resources
in all types of libraries for all ages; enhancing electronic linkages among or between
libraries; and targeting library and information services to persons having difficulty using
a library.

The many programs that are supported in whole or in part through LSTA funds have
been, and will continue to be, developed to meet the tenets of this plan. Included herein is
a wide array of potential project ideas to offer guidance to grant applicants interested in
developing projects tailored to these stated goals.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                           5


Due to Colorado’s inherent population differences, geographic constraints, and travel
distances, the Colorado State Library offers an assortment of support mechanisms for
library service in multi-type libraries, along with technical assistance and logistical
guidance to project directors when necessary. This approach allows local control of
projects that are selected for funding. This process, with oversight and evaluation
managed closely by the CSL, will continue under the 2008-2012 Plan.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                            6



                    Colorado State Library Mission Statement
The mission of the Colorado State Library is to provide leadership and expertise to help
develop libraries and deliver information services throughout Colorado.

                                     Needs Assessment


Need #1: Colorado residents need to be able to access information resources and
         services electronically through all types of libraries.

Needs Assessment Summary:

        Nearly 300,000 Coloradans do not have remote access to databases through a
        local public library. Of the 115 public libraries, 47 do not provide remote access
        to online databases.1
        Over 200,000 Coloradans do not have remote access to an OPAC through a local
        public library. Twenty-nine public libraries do not provide remote access to their
        OPAC.2
        Forty-four public libraries (38.3%) provide less than one public access computer
        for each 1,000 people served.3
        Twenty-four public libraries (20.9%) report not having a web site, and seven do
        not have an automated library catalog (6.1%).4
        Of the respondents to the 2006-07 Annual School Library Survey, 48.9 percent do
        not have streaming A/V available at their schools, 29.3 percent do not have
        remote access to databases, and 34.2 percent have fewer than two computers for
        every 100 students.5
        Demand for electronic information access continues to increase as evidenced by
        the ongoing growth of AskColorado, a statewide 24/7 online reference service.
        Between 2004 and 2006, AskColorado has almost doubled its annual traffic, and
        in 2006 the service responded to more than 52,000 sessions (with one or more
        questions in each session).6
        According to the report Public Libraries and the Internet, 2006 Colorado was one
        of four Western states that “frequently had the highest percentages of libraries not
        applying for E-rate funding for a number of different reasons.”7

Goal #1: Colorado residents will be able to access resources and services
         electronically through libraries to meet their information and learning
         needs.

LSTA Purpose: LSTA funding will be used for expanding services for learning and
              access to information and educational resources in a variety of
              formats, in all types of libraries, for individuals of all ages.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                               7


Expected Benefits:

    1. A cooperatively planned and cost-effective virtual reference service is available
       to, and supported by, all libraries.
    2. A collection of electronic content for all residents including databases, electronic
       books, electronic journals, and audiovisual materials will be available to all
       libraries at an affordable price.
    3. Cooperatively planned and cost-effective digitization of intellectual holdings is
       available to, and supported by, all libraries.
    4. Affordable web hosting is available to small or medium libraries lacking the
       resources to create or manage their own sites.
    5. Colorado libraries are able to respond flexibly to changing needs of citizens by
       collaboratively developing new means of accessing resources and services.
    6. Residents in state institutions will have access to automated library catalogs.

Potential Projects:

        Enhance and expand AskColorado virtual reference service initiatives.
        Increase number and quality of Colorado-focused digitization projects.
        Develop and offer instructional technology and information literacy training for
        local or statewide audiences.
        Create or enhance bibliographic end user instruction through non-traditional
        delivery methods.
        Establish a centrally-supported web hosting service targeted to libraries lacking a
        web site or libraries without adequate access (or resources) to manage an existing
        web site.
        Automated library catalog access for institutional residents in state facilities.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                          8


Need #2: Colorado libraries and librarians need to provide services that support
         educational achievement and lifelong learning for students as well as
         adult learners.

Needs Assessment Summary:

        In 2006 there were over 1.27 million children aged 18 and under in Colorado. By
        2012 that number is expected to increase by 10.7 percent to over 1.41 million.8
        From 2005 to 2006, Colorado public school student membership increased by
        13,318 to a total of 794,026 students.9
        According to the 2007 KidsCount Colorado report, nearly one in three students
        did not graduate from high school in Colorado in 2005. The graduation rate for
        public school students who were expected to graduate was 69.8 percent.10
        According to the most recent report from NCES, nearly half of America’s
        children and teens (46%) rely on the Internet to complete school assignments.
        One out of 10 students reported using the Internet at the public library (10%) and
        more than two out of five students access the Internet from school (43%).11
        At least 7,000 home schooled children in Colorado need curriculum-based books
        and materials. Nationally, three out of four parents who are home schooling their
        children rely on their public library for curriculum materials.12
        Of the 115 public libraries, 42 (36.5%) reported providing 10 or fewer adult
        programs in 2006. Seventy-one libraries reported 10 or fewer young adult
        programs (61.7%), compared to only 11 reporting 10 or fewer children’s
        programs (9.6%).13
        According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL), between 1992
        and 2003 “prose literacy declined for adults with a high school diploma.” In
        addition, “prose and document literacy declined for adults with some college or
        with higher levels of education.”14
        Almost one in ten Coloradans is 65 or older—that is, there were an estimated
        469,331 seniors in Colorado in 2006. This number is expected to grow to 592,573
        in 2012.15
        In 2006 study, the Library Research Service found that Colorado inmates enrolled
        in college courses were twice as likely as other college students to report that
        librarians taught them how to cite sources appropriately, explore subjects of
        interest outside their classes, and critically evaluate information.16

Goal #2: Colorado students and adult learners receive services from libraries and
         librarians that support educational achievement and lifelong learning.

LSTA Purpose: LSTA funding will be used for expanding services for learning and
              access to information and educational resources in a variety of
              formats, in all types of libraries, for individuals of all ages; developing
              private and public partnerships with other agencies and other
              community organizations.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                             9


Expected Benefits:

    1. Libraries become empowered to provide outstanding services to all citizens
       through improved communication, collaboration, and partnership efforts within
       and beyond the library community.
    2. Colorado schools credit improvement in school library services, collections, and
       staffing to the distribution of quantitative and qualitative standards for school
       libraries.
    3. A number of libraries support and implement online learning and course access
       for residents.
    4. School library programs are aligned with educational curricula, teaching
       practices, and assessment strategies employed in schools.
    5. Information literacy is integrated with educational technology plans in all school
       districts.
    6. Information literacy is a component of educational programs provided in all
       public libraries.

Potential Projects:

        Develop or enhance after school literacy programs in public and school libraries.
        Improve collection development for libraries.
        Develop workshops on implementing or improving collaboration with teachers
        and library staff in both schools and state institutions.
        Augment access to library education programs and resources.
        Provide matching funds for libraries to support educational needs for staff in the
        areas of adult learning and online course development.
        Supplement summer reading programs and services.
        Refine and improve services to day care centers for summer reading programs and
        staff development in literacy-related activity.
        Support existing family and adult literacy programs in libraries.
        Develop or improve cooperative projects between and among libraries that meet
        or exceed established services standards.
        Develop partnerships with other libraries, agencies, or businesses to further
        promote and expand library services in the community.
        Design innovative educational programs for emerging on-line communities of
        learners.
        Work with the educational and business communities statewide to improve
        understanding about the role and importance of school library programs,
        specifically the relationship between school library media programs and student
        achievement.
        Develop best practices for technology training platforms to deliver continuing
        education.
        Develop standards for Division of Youth Corrections libraries.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                        10




Need #3: Underserved Colorado residents, such as those with disabilities, ethnic
         groups, institutional residents in isolated areas, and other unique
         populations need specialized, targeted library services that are freely
         available statewide.

Needs Assessment Summary:

        In July 2006, the U.S. Census estimated that approximately one in five of the 4.7
        million Coloradans were of Hispanic or Latino origin (19.7%). In addition, nine
        out of 10 Colorado residents were identified as White with the highest percentage
        of ethnic minorities being Black or African Americans (4.1%) and Asian
        (2.6%).17
        According to the 2007 KidsCount Colorado report:18
            - Both the number and rate of English language learners enrolled in
                Colorado public schools have increased over the past five years.
            - The percentage of public school students characterized as English
                language learners was 12.8 percent in 2005, an increase from 8.4 percent
                in 2000, with the number of students nearly doubling from 60,852 in 2000
                to 114,857 in 2005.
        According to a September 2006 report from NCES, the “digital divide” persists
        and is drawn along demographic and socioeconomic lines. For example, use of
        both computers and the Internet is higher among Whites than among Blacks and
        Hispanics. In addition, students coming from better educated and wealthier
        families are more likely to use these technologies. However, schools help bridge
        the digital divide and “many disadvantaged students use the Internet only at
        school.”19
        In 2000, 11.8 percent of Coloradans over the age of five reported having at least
        one disability. That’s over one in 10 reporting one or more sensory, physical,
        mental, self-care, or go-outside-home disability.20
        In 2006, the Division of Youth Corrections (DYC) served 7,215 detained youth
        and 2,404 committed youth.21
        In fiscal year 2006, there were 21,651 offenders under the jurisdiction of the
        Colorado Department of Corrections (DOC); 363 of these were youth under the
        age of 20.22 By June 2011, this is number is expected to increase at least 20% to
        between 27,000 and 29,500.23
        A nationwide literacy study found that prison inmates had lower average prose,
        document, and quantitative literacy than adults living in households.24
        According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Education, over 15
        percent of Coloradans’ primary language is one other than English.25
        In a recent study of workers in Colorado libraries, 89.8 percent of respondents
        were white and 90.3 percent were women. In the same study, 15.9 percent of
        Hispanic respondents cited lack of racial/ethnic diversity in the profession as a
        factor that discouraged pursuing librarianship as a profession.26
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                         11


Goal #3: Colorado residents, people with disabilities, ethnic populations,
         institutional residents and those underserved by libraries receive services
         from Colorado libraries that meet their targeted needs.

LSTA Purpose: LSTA funding will be used for projects targeting library services to
              individuals of diverse geographic, cultural, and socioeconomic
              backgrounds, to individuals with disabilities, and to individuals with
              limited functional literacy or information skills.

Expected Benefits:

    1. Library technology, materials, and services are accessible in a manner appropriate
       to each diverse population’s needs.
    2. Libraries identify diverse and /or underserved populations for service
       improvement and initiate activities to address the improvements needed.
    3. Libraries develop best and promising practices that lead to more effective service
       to individuals of diverse populations.
    4. The number of minority and persons with disabilities on library staff and boards
       of trustees is proportional to their presence in the community.
    5. Library staff will be better trained to meet the needs of diverse and underserved
       populations.

Potential Projects:

        Offer scholarships for librarians interested in learning a second language or
        working with culturally diverse populations.
        Support additional special language collections to meet specific population needs.
        Determine the necessary services required by diverse populations through a needs
        assessments and data analysis.
        Create programs to better serve diverse populations in correctional and other
        institutional facilities.
        Improve access to ideas for serving special populations by offering greater
        numbers of resources, tutorials, programming and online resources that promote
        best-practice concepts.
        Provide services to home-bound patrons.
        Targeted literacy collections and programs to meet specific population needs.
        Professional development opportunities for library staff who work with
        underserved populations.
        Assessment of the impact of library services offered to underserved populations.
        Improvement of public library services for formally-incarcerated individuals.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                          12


Need #4: A need for Colorado libraries to cooperatively develop strategies for
         resource sharing to serve the interests of Colorado residents while
         reducing duplication of services.

Needs Assessment Summary:

        Of the 115 Colorado public libraries, 30 do not have their collection included in
        the Colorado Virtual Library catalog.27 Eighty percent of these libraries serve
        small communities (legal service area populations under 5,000).28
        In 2006, twenty-four Colorado public libraries reported having no non-resident
        borrowers.29
        All of the public libraries that are members of Prospector, which includes a
        patron-initiated ILL system, are located in metropolitan counties.30
        198,098 Coloradans31 are not served by a local public library participating in a
        Colorado-based interlibrary loan service, such as the services provided by
        SWIFT32 or Prospector.33
        13,128 students at Colorado colleges and universities34 are not served by a library
        participating in a Colorado-based interlibrary loan service, such as the services
        provided by SWIFT35 or Prospector.36

Goal #4: Colorado libraries cooperate to develop strategies and techniques that
         assure the sharing of resources to best meet the needs of Colorado
         residents.

LSTA Purpose: LSTA funding will be used for providing electronic and other linkages
              among and between all types of libraries and/or other agencies.

Expected Benefits:

    1. Colorado residents will experience improved accessibility to a variety of library
       services and resources.
    2. Use of library resources is increased as a result of placement within
       complimentary on-line environments and meets information users where they are.
    3. Shared investment in online resources will result in cost savings for individual
       libraries.
    4. Linkages with civic and economic groups will result in greater community
       support and valuable public-private partnerships.

Potential Projects:

        Provide training in improving services or establishing best practices for resource
        sharing statewide.
        Improving or creating automation projects in individual libraries and collaborative
        library consortia to provide holdings statewide.
        Creating flexible and interactive on-line environments for delivering new and
        evolving library and educational services.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                                13


        Developing strategies for integrating library resources and services naturally
        within on-line communities.
        Planning and delivery of collaborative environments for libraries to share
        resources and to create Colorado content tailored to libraries and their users.
        Investigating opportunities to include institutional libraries in interactive online
        environments.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                         14



                                       Evaluation Plan
The Colorado State Library will continue to utilize Outcome-Based Evaluations, with the
Library Research Service (LRS) taking the lead to ensure that these evaluations are
conducted for one or more statewide projects representing every unit of the agency.

Having the LRS coordinate this effort will achieve several desirable ends, such as:

        Guaranteeing that libraries and other clients served by multiple CSL units receive
        only one OBE survey;
        Standardizing some survey questions to permit aggregation of data across units;
        Streamlining the OBE survey development and report writing processes by
        creating economies-of-scale;
        Extending the benefits of LRS expertise in survey design and data analysis to all
        units; and
        Assuring that evaluations are conducted objectively and equitably while
        protecting the anonymity of respondents.

LRS staff will consult with unit managers and staff on the following issues:

        Selecting appropriate project(s);
        Identifying likely outcomes (i.e., what the data would be about);
        Specifying appropriate types of outcome data (i.e., customer satisfaction,
        anticipated outcomes, actual outcomes);
        Locating available data, if any; and
        Designing questions and questionnaires.

Remaining OBE activities to be pursued by the LRS staff independently of the unit staff:

        Administering questionnaires;
        Processing and analyzing data; and
        Drafting, reviewing, and presenting reports.


For all other projects, an important component will be a tracking process that monitors
sub-grantee projects funded under the LSTA program. Status reports will be required as
well as a final report on the outcomes of each project. Sub-grantees will be encouraged to
use the OBE methodology. State Library staff will provide training and support to those
that request assistance.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                             15



                                Stakeholder Involvement
The Colorado State Library, in collaboration with the Colorado library community,
previously developed a new strategic plan to cover the years 2006–2010 called Moving
Libraries Forward: A Roadmap for Colorado Library Cooperation. This document was
introduced in 2006 to serve as a guide for how libraries, working together, can improve
services to the residents of Colorado, while acknowledging the ongoing, difficult task of
doing more with less.

The intent of the state’s Moving Libraries Forward plan is to help libraries of all types
strengthen relationships with their communities and with each other. It was developed
within the values and ethical structure embraced by the entire library community.

A Strategic Planning Task Force was used to plan, develop, and coordinate research
activities during the Moving Libraries Forward project. The Task Force consisted of one
representative from each library type, one citizen, and three representatives from the State
Library.

Due to the extent and currency of the stakeholder involvement in the Moving Libraries
Forward document, the LSTA Five-year Planning Committee agreed that replicating
efforts employed to create that document would be a poor use of LSTA funding, when
the end result would be nearly identical to what was produced just over 12 months ago.
For these reasons, this LSTA five-year plan has been created through careful selection of
key areas identified during the process of creating the state’s earlier 2006 plan. In both
instances the stakeholders are the same and the original involvement to create Moving
Libraries Forward was thorough and well developed.

Methodology included a web-based survey administered to library leaders, public library
trustees, school library district administrators, and academic officers. Through the survey,
more than 200 leaders helped identify the key issues and concerns that needed to be
addressed in the plan.

A values workshop was convened by the Colorado Library Advisory Board (CoLAB) and
the Strategic Planning Task Force. A summit of more than 30 representative leaders from
multiple library organizations gathered to refine the language of six goals developed by
the Task Force along with the information gathered from the survey and workshop. The
participants at the summit further developed 17 objectives based on these goals for
consideration by the wider library community.

The Task Force then presented these goals and objectives to 12 different library groups
for comments and changes. These groups included school librarians, regional multi-type
library meetings and conferences, a paraprofessional group, public library directors and
trustees. From this input, both the goals and objectives were rewritten. The plan was
presented to the Colorado Library Advisory Board and to the State Board of Education.
Four of the original six goals carried forward from the current state strategic plan for
libraries from the “Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012.” The remaining
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                             16


two goals reflected needs for services that are not considered allowable costs under OMB
Circular A-87 and are not included in this LSTA plan.

                      Communication and Public Availability
Once the five-year plan has been approved by IMLS, it will be published and posted on
the Colorado State Library’s Web site for access by all librarians, staff, and the general
population. The document’s availability will be announced on key library electronic
discussion lists to reach our key stakeholders. Relevant portions (goals, strategic
directions, potential projects) will accompany annual “Request for Grant Proposals.” The
complete document will be incorporated into sub-grantee fiscal training as well as LSTA
grant training.

Any substantive revisions to the plan that are necessary due to changing economic
conditions in the state or a refocusing of efforts in areas not currently addressed in the
needs and goals of this plan will be submitted to IMLS according to the provisions of the
LSTA, and to appropriate stakeholders. If changes are made, they will be publicized
through the CSL Web site, through email lists, or via the state’s monthly mailing.
Combined, these communication tools can reach all librarians and stakeholders in the
state.

The CSL will report achievements that result from addressing the needs, goals, and
expected outcomes of the Five-Year Plan as required for reporting purposes in the
Annual IMLS State Program Report. The CSL also will continue to post LSTA Success
Stories on the ASCLA & ALA Web site for other libraries to review and learn from. The
CSL will utilize the necessary communication channels listed above, as well as the state
library’s annual report, to make these results known to all stakeholders in the state.



                                          Monitoring
The CSL will utilize appropriate staff from the Library Development Services, Library
Research Service, Networking and Resource Sharing unit, and others across the state, as
needed to continuously track both the implementation of the five-year plan, and the
projects that are awarded through the grant application procedures associated with LSTA
funding.

Appropriate reports and progress will be prepared and provided to IMLS as required.
An important component of this tracking process will be monitoring of sub-grantee
projects that are funded under the LSTA Program. In addition to providing requisite
status reports and final reports on the progress of each project in relation to the Plan, the
CSL staff will conduct an annual on-site visit for each project selected for monitoring.
Any necessary corrective action or program changes will be decided on in collaboration
with the sub-grantees in compliance with existing regulations.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                                17




                                          References
1
  Library Research Service. 2006 Public Library Annual Report (Preliminary). Colorado State
Library. http://www.lrs.org/pub_stats.php.
2
  Library Research Service. 2006 Public Library Annual Report (Preliminary). Colorado State
Library. http://www.lrs.org/pub_stats.php.
3
  Library Research Service. 2006 Public Library Annual Report (Preliminary). Colorado State
Library. http://www.lrs.org/pub_stats.php.
4
  Library Research Service. 2006 Public Library Annual Report (Preliminary). Colorado State
Library. http://www.lrs.org/pub_stats.php.
5
  Library Research Service. Colorado School Library Survey Statistics, 2006-07. Colorado State
Library. http://www.lrs.org/school/stats_2006.php.
6
  AskColorado Collaborative Virtual Reference. AskColorado Usage Statistics. Colorado State
Library. http://www.aclin.org/reference/stats.html.
7
  Bertot, John Carlo, Charles R. McClure, Paul T. Jaeger, and Joe Ryan. “Public Libraries and the
Internet 2006: Study Results and Findings.” Florida State University.
http://www.ii.fsu.edu/projectFiles/plinternet/2006/2006_plinternet.pdf.
8
  Colorado State Demography Office. Population Estimates and Forecasts by Age and Gender.
Department of Local Affairs. http://dola.colorado.gov/dlg/demog/age_colo.html.
9
  Data and Research Unit. October 2006 Public School Membership. Colorado Department of
Education.
http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdereval/download/PDF/2006PM/Pupilmembership2006letter.pdf.
10
   KidsCount in Colorado. “2007 KidsCount Colorado.” Colorado Children’s Campaign.
http://www.coloradokids.org/includes/downloads/kidscount2007.pdf.
11
   DeBell, Matthew and Chris Chapman. “Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003:
Statistical Analysis Report.” National Center for Education Statistics.
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2006/2006065.pdf.
12
   Cole, Holly. “Home-Based Education and Colorado Public Libraries.” Fast Facts. Library
Research Service. http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/234_Homeschool.pdf.
13
   Library Research Service. 2006 Public Library Annual Report (Preliminary). Colorado State
Library. http://www.lrs.org/pub_stats.php.
14
   Kutner, Mark, Elizabeth Greenberg, Ying Jin, Bridget Boyle, Yung-chen Hsu, Eric Dunleavy,
and Sheida White. “Literacy in Everyday Life: Results from the 2003 National Assessment of
Adult Literacy.” National Center for Education Statistics.
http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2007480.
15
   Colorado State Demography Office. Population Estimates and Forecasts by Age and Gender.
Department of Local Affairs. http://dola.colorado.gov/dlg/demog/age_colo.html.
16
   Cairns, Schanie. “How Librarians Help College Students at Colorado Correctional Facilities.”
Fast Facts. Library Research Service, Colorado State Library.
http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/233_DOC.pdf.
17
   “Table 4: Estimates of the Population by Race and Hispanic or Latino Origin for the United
States and States: July 1, 2006 (SC-EST2006-04).” Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau.
http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.php.
18
   KidsCount in Colorado. “2007 KidsCount Colorado.” Colorado Children’s Campaign.
http://www.coloradokids.org/includes/downloads/kidscount2007.pdf.
19
   DeBell, Matthew and Chris Chapman. “Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003:
Statistical Analysis Report.” National Center for Education Statistics.
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2006/2006065.pdf.
20
   American Fact Finder. “S1801 Disability Characteristics: Colorado.” 2005 American Community
Survey. US Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/home/saff/main.html?_lang=en.
Colorado State Library Five-Year Plan 2008-2012                                                  18



21
   Division of Youth Corrections. Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Management Reference Manual, January
2007. Colorado Department of Human Services.
http://www.cdhs.state.co.us/dyc/PDFs/MRM0506_FINAL.pdf
22
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