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APWH_syllabus_2012

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					                                          Advanced Placement World History
     Course Description and Purpose
     The Advanced Placement World History course is designed for highly motivated college-bound students
     who wish to earn college credit in high school through a rigorous academic program. The course fosters an
     understanding that civilizations develop around specific social, political, and economic factors which are
     often impacted through trade, religion, technology and war. Over time, societies change in reaction to
     environmental, social, and/or political events while still maintaining aspects of the original civilization.
     The course relies heavily on college-level texts, primary and secondary sources, and outside readings. As a
     student, you will be expected to investigate how societies around the world developed, how they adapted
     and changed due to environmental constraints, and to explain why they chose to maintain certain aspects of
     their society as time progressed. A special emphasis will be given to historical writing through essay and
     document-based questions (DBQ). Students will write numerous essays using released topics from the
     College Board and topics relating to the period currently under study. The essays will include Change and
     Continuity Over Time (CCOT), Cultural Comparison (CC), and Document-Based Questions (DBQ). In
     addition, objective exams, simulations, and integrated computer technology assignments will be
     incorporated into the curriculum, which consists of five overarching themes. The class will continually go
     back to these during the year, for they are of the upmost importance in understanding World History at this
     level. The themes are posted in greater detail in the class and a brief list is provided below.

     Themes
1.    Interaction between humans and the environment
                   ·     Demography and disease
                   ·     Migration
                   ·     Patterns of settlement
                   ·     technology
2.    Development and interaction of cultures
                   ·     Religions
                   ·     Belief systems, philosophies and ideologies
                   ·     Science and technology
                   ·     The arts and architecture
3.    State-building, expansion, and conflict
                   ·     Political structures and forms of governance
                   ·     Empires
                   ·     Nations and nationalism
                   ·     Revolts and revolutions
                   ·     Regional, transregional and global structures and organizations
4.    Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
                   ·     Agricultural and pastoral production
                   ·     Trade and commerce
                   ·     Labor systems
                   ·     Industrialization
                   ·     Capitalism and socialism
5.    Development and transformation of social structures
                   ·     Gender roles and relations
                   ·     Family and kinship
                   ·     Racial and ethnic constructions
                   ·     Social and economic classes


     Historical Thinking Skills
     In addition, the course will address historical skills or habits of mind. Using reliable and detailed information,
     we will analyze events of world history using the following historical thinking skills:
     1) Crafting historical arguments from historical evidence
                         This will include constructing meaningful interpretations of information through the
                         analysis of relevant historical evidence. Crafting your argument is crucial to writing a
                         historical essay. This requires the ability to identify, describe and evaluate evidence with
                         respect to content, authorship, purpose, format, and audience.
     2) Chronological reasoning
                         Students must be able to identify, analyze, and evaluate relationships between multiple
                         historical causes and effects, whether short or long term. This will include the ability to
                         look at how things change or continue over time, making connections to course themes
                  and global processes. This skill also includes "periodization," or the ability to categorize
                  events into discrete blocks and identify turning points between those blocks.

3) Comparison and contextualization
                    Students will be able to compare related historical developments and processes across
                    time, place, and or different societies. This includes evaluating historical phenomenon for
                    multiple and differing perspectives. As world history doesn't concentrate on any one
                    region or era of the past, comparison is particularly important. It is also important to
                    connect historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place as well as to
                    broader regional, national or global processes--contextualization. This is really just
                    looking at how something happening in a region of the world is impacted by OR impacts
                    what is happening elsewhere in the world--the big picture.
4) Historical interpretation and synthesis
                    We will spend a good deal of time looking at primary and secondary historical
                    sources. Students will be required to evaluate sources for the writer's point of view. With
                    secondary sources, this will involve determining how the writer's point of view influences
                    their historical interpretation as well as how historical interpretations change over
                    time. Students will also be required to analyze evidence in the form of maps, charts,
                    graphs, and images in addition to textual information/evidence. Finally, synthesis requires
                    that students pull together all the other historical thinking skills so as to arrive at
                    meaningful and persuasive understandings of the past by drawing on evidence from
                    different fields of inquiry or disciplines. They must then creatively fuse relevant
                    information/evidence from both primary and secondary sources into a solid historical
                    argument.

Textbook
                                                                                                  th
Stearns, Peter, et al., World Civilizations: The Global Experience (NY: Pearson Education, Inc., 6 Edition,
2010). . [cr1a]
Student resources for the textbook are available on-line at: www.ablongman.com/stearns4eAP
And at www.myhistorylab.com

Student Evaluation

Throughout the year students must demonstrate thorough reading of all materials, the development of world
history “habits of mind,” strong thematic understanding of course content, and the ability to write clearly and
analytically – evidenced by the student’s ability to write three different types of essays: the Compare and
Contrast essay, the Change over Time essay, and the Document-Based Question essay. [cr10]

Students will be assessed in the following ways:

        Quizzes: Aimed primarily at testing factual knowledge (i.e. People, place, term identification)
         weekly and over the assigned reading.
        Homework: An integral part of the learning process, students will complete reading and take notes,
         answer questions from primary sources, employ graphic organizers, construct time lines, complete
         map assignments, complete leader analysis sheets, create positions papers, and utilize a variety of
         techniques to acquire historical analysis skills. [cr7] [cr8]
        Projects: Concepts learned in class will be reinforced through four, quarter long, projects,
         emphasizing APWH themes. [cr4] [cr14]
        Tests: One per unit. Tests are designed to test both factual and conceptual information. They will
         follow the format of the AP exam.
        Essays: The AP exam contains three timed essays. Over the course we will learn how to write
         these essays. [cr6]
        Exams:. Students will take a mid-term exam and a final exam as prescribed by the Social Studies
         curriculum.

Students’ grades will be determined using a points system (a division of total points earned by total possible
points).
Grading
100-90 = A, 89-80 = B, 79-70 = C, 69-60 = D, 59 and below = F
Please Note:

    
                                                           th
         The AP Exam will take place on Thursday, May 17 , 2012 at 8am.


Supporting Materials
Books:

Uppity Women of Medieval Times, by Vicki Leon, Conari Press, 1997.

Genes, Peoples, and Languages, by Luigi Cavalli-Sforza, University of California Press, 2000.

The Great Human Diasporas: The History of Diversity and Evolution, by Luigi Cavalli-Sforza, Perseus
Books, 1995.

Seed to Civilization, by Charles Heiser, W.H. Freeman and Company, 1973.

King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, Heroism in Colonial Africa, by Adam Hochschild, Mariner,
1999.

The Crusades through Arab Eyes by Amin Maalouf, Schocken Books, 1984.

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, by Jared Diamond, W.W. Norton and Company,
1997. [cr15]

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, by Jared Diamond, Penguin Books, 2005.

A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World, by Gregory Clark, Princeton University Press,
2007.

The Ten Thousand Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution, by Gregory Cochran
and Henry Harpending, Basic Books, 2009.

The Long Summer: How Climate Changed Civilization, by Brian Fagan, Basic Books, 2004.

A History of the World in 6 Glasses, by Tom Standage, Walker Publishing Company, 2006.

An Edible History of Humanity, by Tom Standage, Walker and Company, 2009.

Aspects of Western Civilization: Problems and Sources in History, Volumes I and II, Perry Rogers, ed.,
Prentice-Hall, 1992.

The Mammoth Book of How it Happened: Eyewitness Accounts of History in the Making from 2000 B.C. to
the Present, Jon Lewis, ed., Carroll & Graf, 2006.

China’s Examination Hell: The Civil Service Examinations of Imperial China, by Ichisada Miyazaki, Yale
University Press, 1983.

A Brain for All Seasons: Human Evolution and Abrupt Climate Change, by William Calvin, University of
Chicago Press, 2002.

Smithsonian Intimate Guide to Human Origins, by Carl Zimmer, Smithsonian Books, 2005.

The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s Eye View of the World, by Michael Pollan, Random House, 2002.

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, by Richard Wrangham, Basic Books, 2009.

From Reliable Sources: An Introduction To Historical Methods, by Martha Howell & Walter Prevenier, Yale
University Press, 2001. [cr1c]
A History of Histories: Epics, Chronicles, and Inquiries from Herodotus and Thucydides to the Twentieth
Century, by J.W. Burrow, Vintage Books, 2009.

Online (we are a One to One school):

http://www.activehistory.co.uk/historiography/historiography_2/a_starter_activity.htm
A great starter resource for introducing historical interpretation.

http://www.sasked.gov.sk.ca/docs/acthis20/info1-2.html#18
This site contains a decision-making graphic that walks students through a reasoned approach to arriving at
a decision.

http://www.cusd.chico.k12.ca.us/~bsilva/ib/histo.html
This site contains a brief summary of major schools of thought of historical interpretations. While rather
simplistic, it allows students to recognize patterns of approaches to historical interpretation of causation.

http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/
This site contains source material from Nazi Germany. It provides a visual record of Social Darwinism, as
well as speeches that outlined the racial basis of the need for lebensraum. It provides a powerful prompt for
a guided discussion of Historical Interpretation.

http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/whc/6.2/strickland.html
Maybe the best site for starting APWH. I have used his annotated rubrics, the charts, and the How to Teach
the DBQ. I have yet to try something from this site that did not increase student understanding. There are
30 appendices at this site and I have used 15 of them in class. The discussions in the annotated rubrics are
excellent starting points for historical interpretation, especially for the speaker point-of-view and the Change-
Over-Time analysis of historical causes.

http://www.chinaknowledge.de/index.html
I use this site every time we have China in a unit. The maps and the information are important supplements
to understanding China. The organization lends itself to APWH thematic content.

http://www.east-asian-history.net/textbooks/index.htm
This is another excellent site for supplementing the text on China. The layout is easy to navigate and the
links to greater detail and images are extremely useful, and the site allows free use for educational
purposes.

http://www.silk-road.com/artl/srtravelmain.shtml
While this site is difficult to navigate from the home page, there are rich resources on the Silk Road from
east to west across multiple eras.

http://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/texts/changchun.html
A sample of one of the translated texts.

http://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/texts/weilue/weilue.html#section12
Another sample, this gives an exchange rate and what products the Romans produced as described by a
Chinese official. The translator’s notes and background information provide important historical context.

http://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/
This is an excellent site for primary sources on the Silk Road, which allows the students to build their own
DBQ project. The amount of materials is extensive, and the annotations provide enough context to allow
critical analysis.

http://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/texts/texts.html

http://guides.main.library.emory.edu/content.php?pid=23698&sid=170478
This site has a introduction to understanding the difference between primary and secondary sources.

http://docsouth.unc.edu/
This is an excellent site for primary resources regarding African-American studies.

http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/ssrg/africa/history/hisprimary.html
A site rich in links to African primary resources, the descriptions are detailed enough to eliminate fruitless
searches. While many of the sources deal with slavery, there are African responses to imperialism as well
as records of African culture that are instructive.

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/eguides/afam/primary.html
This was another excellent site to introduce analyzing historical documents.

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/africa/africasbook.html
The History Sourcebook is an invaluable site for primary sources. This African Sourcebook was a welcome
source for documents.

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html
Another History Sourcebook site, the ease of finding documents by era or geography makes this easy to
navigate.

http://www.lib.washington.edu/subject/history/tm/africa.html
This site is rich in resources on African studies. The content it easy to find and arranged by region and type
of record, and link to the document’s location, for example the Library of Congress.

http://guides.library.fullerton.edu/historians_toolbox/index.html
This contains a Historian’s Toolbox. It offers a step-by-step guide to identifying, analyzing, and using
historical materials. This site has an excellent introduction to analyzing historical documents, including an
interactive intro, with a quiz. The students grasped a fundamental understanding of the importance of the
intent of the creation of the document.


http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0029/twps0029.html          [cr1b]
This shows a quantitative approach to history from data from the U.S. census. The tables are useful guides
for comparison of demographic data. Because some released DBQs relied heavily on data tables, the
students struggled with analyzing point-of-view of tables. Reminding them to infer the intended audience of
the table helped with this type of document analysis.

http://www.bowdoin.edu/writing-guides/
This site contained a reading, writing, and research guide for history students. The information is in both
web pages and pdfs, which make it useful for handouts.



http://puritanism.online.fr/
This site is rich in full-text primary sources regarding Puritanism and colonial government.

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/collection/index.html
This collection is primarily American and some European history documents and is useful for primary
sources.

http://anpa.ualr.edu/digital_library/digital_library.htm
This is a digital library of Native American resources. It also includes poetry of contemporary Native
American writers.

http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/subjects/
This site has an enormous amount of digitized documents from American and European history.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moagrp/
                                                        th
The Making of America digital library, free access to 19 century periodicals, we are just now reaching this
era, so we have not made use of this yet.

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/
One of the better-known digital libraries, Perseus specializes in the Classical world era of the Greeks and
Romans.
http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/japanese/texts/index.html
Part of the University of Virginia’s etext library, it contains poems and fiction from both pre-modern and
modern Japanese literature.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/books/etext.html
An extremely useful clearinghouse of digital collections, the links are current and the content arranged in a
useful fashion.

http://www.etana.org/abzu/
An archive of texts from the Near East. It contains scholarly articles and while most are for specialists, the
search engine accepts simple subject queries, and the results are available in pdfs.

http://www.uga.edu/islam/
While this site has much to offer, I use it primarily to suggest to students a resource for contemporary
Muslim perspectives. It does include much history.

http://www.san.beck.org/index.html
This author has a wealth of materials on world spirituality. Students that are seeking a more in-depth
discussion of religion find this beneficial.


http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/
While primarily weighted with American and European primary sources, there are some Asian and African
                 th
sources in the 20 century era.

http://geacron.com/home-en/ [cr11]
An interactive atlas of world history that visually conveys the changes over time of civilizations.

http://www.uncp.edu/home/rwb/World_History_Documents.pdf
A document set of readings from world history from the beginning of civilization to the present.

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/WorldHistoryHistoricalThinkingSkills.pdf
An article giving examples of how to provide instruction in historical thinking.

http://cm.dce.harvard.edu/1999/01/83101/L16/seg1/index_FlashSingleHighBandwidth.html
                                China: Traditions and Transformations

                              The Civil Service Examination System and Society
                                  Presented on 10/24/2008 in HIST E-1825


Peter K. Bol, PhD, Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard
University


William C. Kirby, PhD, T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences,
Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School, and Harvard University
Distinguished Service Professor


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2wyclHrvzo&list=PL0F20231852519BBC&feature=plcp&context=C473bd
c0FDvjVQa1PpcFMSCP8XenVX8aVfdAfcsaFQE1aTep6XNs4=

http://www.iceman.it/en/milestones

http://chem11.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=UFO&action=print&thread=2284


http://www.at1ce.org/themenreihe.p?c=Evolutionary%20biology
http://www.millstone.k12.nj.us/teachers/golizij/iceman/webquest.html
http://iceman.eurac.edu/

http://anthro.palomar.edu/synthetic/synth_2.htm

http://www.homepages.ucl.ac.uk/~ucbpyit/Yuval%20Summer%20Project.pdf

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2010/10/volkerwanderung-back-with-a-vengeance/

http://www.olek.waw.pl/inne/1357/Eisenstadt3.pdf

http://www.pnas.org/content/98/4/1335.full

http://www.archaeology.org/0705/abstracts/isotopes.html

http://wps.ablongman.com/wps/media/objects/7082/7252683/LAWL_V1_IM.pdf

http://www.uni-
mainz.de/FB/Biologie/Anthropologie/MolA/Download/Haak%20et%20al.%202005%20Science.pdf

http://volgagermanbrit.us/documents/Archaeogenetics_Europe__Pedro_Soares_et_al.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC49772/pdf/pnas01090-0391.pdf

http://umanitoba.ca/publications/openjournal/index.php/mb-anthro/article/viewFile/25/5

http://dnghu.org/indoeuropean/Proto-Indo-Europeans.pdf

http://www.continuitas.org/texts/alinei_interdisciplinary.pdf

http://www.ditext.com/diamond/mistake.html

http://anthropology.lbcc.edu/handoutsdocs/mistake.pdf

http://www.mesacc.edu/dept/d10/asb/lifeways/hg_ag/agric_bones.html

http://leilan.yale.edu/works/city_gate/intro.html

http://www.worldagesarchive.com/Reference_Links/Empires_in_the_Dust.htm

http://sayer.lab.nig.ac.jp/~saitou/paper-pdf/Omoto_AJPA97.pdf

http://www2.gol.com/users/hsmr/Content/East%20Asia/Japan/History/roots.html

http://www.esd.ornl.gov/projects/qen/Indo2.html

http://www.usu.edu/markdamen/1320Hist&Civ/chapters/07IE.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC49772/pdf/pnas01090-0391.pdf

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0021592

Addendum for resubmission:
Component 7: The course provides opportunities for students to identify and evaluate diverse historical
interpretations – Interpretation

The Neolithic Revolution: Diffusion or Displacement

Read two of the following and identify the theories and evaluate the evidence. Write a position paper that
identifies the theories that explain the spread of agriculture in Neolithic Europe, and evaluate the evidence that
supports the theories, and defend your evaluation. Identify the conflict between archaeologists and geneticists in
the reconstruction of the past.

Milk Drinking and European Ancestry- a Computational Model Following a

Single Gene With a Strong Positive Selection

Yuval Itan

Supervisors: Dr. Mark Thomas, Dr. Karen Page

CoMPLEX, University College Londo

Found at: http://www.homepages.ucl.ac.uk/~ucbpyit/Yuval%20Summer%20Project.pdf

Genomics at the Origins of Agriculture, Part Two

GEORGE J. ARMELAGOS AND KRISTIN N. HARPER

Found at: http://www.biomed.emory.edu/PROGRAM_SITES/PBEE/pdf/armelagos2.pdf

http://www.belili.org/marija/marler_article_02.pdf

http://volgagermanbrit.us/documents/Archaeogenetics_Europe__Pedro_Soares_et_al.pdf

http://umanitoba.ca/publications/openjournal/index.php/mb-anthro/article/viewFile/25/5

http://www.continuitas.org/texts/alinei_interdisciplinary.pdf


Evaluation Guideline: The syllabus must describe at least one assignment or activity, in which students evaluate
a minimum of two written interpretations by scholars beyond the textbook. Reading a source alone is not
sufficient.


Component 9: The course provides opportunities for students to examine relationships between causes and
consequences of events or processes - Historical causation

What was the source of Hitler’s anti-Semitism? Write a position paper evaluating the evidence for Hitler’s anti-
Semitism and defend the strongest case for the cause, and quantify the human consequence.
http://www.vision.org/visionmedia/article.aspx?id=261
http://www.ihr.org/jhr/mypatienthitler.html
http://www.randomhouse.com/boldtype/1299/rosenbaum/excerpt.html
http://www.h-net.org/~german/gtext/kaiserreich/hitler1.html
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005143


Evaluation Guideline: The syllabus must describe at least one activity or assignment that explicitly addresses
both causes and effects. The activity or assignment must allow students to evaluate the interaction of multiple
causes and effects of a historical event.


Component 11: The course provides opportunities for students to examine diverse models of periodization
constructed by historians. – Periodization
Compare/contrast the bases of historical division from scientists and historians. Write a position paper on
periodization in history, and select a system for categorizing the past.

http://usm.maine.edu/sites/default/files/The%20Collaborative%20of%20Global%20and%20Big%20History/
Aunger%20Periodization%20big%20history.pdf
http://usm.maine.edu/sites/default/files/The%20Collaborative%20of%20Global%20and%20Big%20History/
146timescales.pdf

http://www.culturahistorica.es/bentley/periodization.pdf

http://www.stonegateinstitute.org/323/the-periodization-of-history---excerpts

Evaluation Guideline: The syllabus must describe at least one activity or assignment that asks students to
critically evaluate periodizations constructed by historians.


Component 15: The course provides opportunities for students to recognize how the study of history has been
shaped by the findings and methods of other disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, visual arts,
literature, economics, geography and political science. – Synthesis

Who was Otzi? Read two of the following and write a position paper identifying Otzi, weigh the evidence from
multiple disciplines to support that Otzi was a herder, shaman, victim of violence, or sacrificial victim.


http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/iceman-last-meal.html

http://www.zeiss.com/C125716F004E0776/0/89B5E684C76DE80CC125716F005491F5/$File/innovation_11.
pdf

http://www.iceman.it/en/milestones

http://iceman.eurac.edu/



Evaluation Guideline: The syllabus must describe at least one activity or assignment where students recognize
findings or methods from another discipline to examine or solve a historical question or problem. Simply
examining primary sources (e.g., art or literature) as historical evidence is not sufficient.




Course Planner:

Period 1: Technological and Environmental Transformations, to c. 600 B.C.E. (5%)
         PART I FROM HUNTING AND GATHERING TO CIVILIZATIONS,
2.5 MILLION–1000 B.C.E.: ORIGINS
         Key Concept 1.1. Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth
         Key Concept 1.2. The Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies
             Technological innovations led to improvements in agricultural
             production, trade, and transportation.
                    Required examples of improvements in agricultural production, trade,
                    and transportation:
                            • Pottery
                            • Plows
                            • Woven textiles
                            • Metallurgy
                            • Wheels and wheeled vehicles

              Key Concept 1.3. The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral, and Urban
       Societies [cr3]
              Core and foundational civilizations developed in a variety of
              geographical and environmental settings where agriculture flourished.
              Students should be able to identify the location of all of the following
              required examples of core and foundational civilizations:
                     • Mesopotamia in the Tigris and Euphrates River Valleys
                     • Egypt in the Nile River Valley
                     • Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa in the Indus River Valley
                     • Shang in the Yellow River or Huang He Valley
                     • Olmecs in Mesoamerica
                     • Chavín in Andean South America
      Teach one illustrative example of new weapons, either from the list below or
      an example of your choice:
                                    • Compound bows
                                    • Iron weapons (Hittites)
      Teach one illustrative example of new modes of transportation, either from
      the list below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Chariots (Habiru)
                                    • Horseback riding
      Teach one illustrative example of monumental architecture and urban
      planning, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Ziggurats (Sumer)
                                    • Pyramids (Egypt)
                                    • Temples (Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro)
                                    • Defensive walls (Babylon)
                                    • Streets and roads (Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro)
                                    • Sewage and water (Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro)
      Teach one illustrative example of arts and artisanship, either from the
      list below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Sculpture
                                    • Painting
                                    • Wall decorations (Babylon, Assur)
                                    • Elaborate weaving (Chavin)
      Teach one illustrative example of systems of record keeping, either from
      the list below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Cuneiform (Sumer)
                                    • Hieroglyphs (Egypt)
                                    • Pictographs (Indus River Valley script)
                                    • Alphabets (Phoenician)
                                    • Quipu (Inca, later)
      Required examples of trade expansion from local to regional and
      transregional:
                                    • Between Egypt and Nubia (gold, ivory)
                                    • Between Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley (copper)
      Teach one illustrative example of literature, either from the list below or an
      example of your choice:
                                    • The “Epic of Gilgamesh”
                                    • Rig Veda
                                    • Book of the Dead
      Read excerpts from: World History Documents, 1.4 The Epic of Gilgamesh
      1.5 The Code of Hammurabi, 3.1 The Rig Veda
      Students will analyze and evaluate various visual records both from the Stearns text, and from online
sources.

           Students will compare development of political, social, economic, and belief systems in early
civilizations
Mesopotamia: Tigris and Euphrates, Egypt: Nile, East Asia: Shang, South Asia: Harappa and Mohenjo-
Daro, Meso-America: Olmecs, Andes; Chavin


         Stearns, CHAPTER 1 From Human Prehistory to the Early Civilizations


Period 2 Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies, c. 600 B.C.E. to c. 600 C.E. (15%)
Key Concept 2.1. The Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions
       Teach one illustrative example of the influence of Daoism on the development
       of Chinese culture, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                                   • Medical theories and practices (The Three Treasures)
                                    • Poetry
                                    • Metallurgy
                                    • Architecture
      Teach one illustrative example of regions where ancestor veneration persisted, either from the list
      below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Africa
                                    • The Mediterranean region
                                    • East Asia (Confucianism)
                                    • The Andean areas (Inca imperial mummy cult)
Read excerpts of Filial Piety, and The Three Treasures (Daoism)
      Teach one illustrative example of literature and drama, either from the list
      below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Greek plays (The Iliad, Antigone)
                                    • Indian epics (The Mahabharata, Ramayana)
Read excerpts of The Iliad, Mahabharata, and Ramayana
       Key Concept 2.2. The Development of States and Empires
             Required examples of key states and empires (Student should know the
                     location and names):
                             • Southwest Asia: Persian Empires
                             • East Asia: Qin and Han Empire
                             • South Asia: Maurya and Gupta Empires
                             • Mediterranean region: Phoenicia, Greek city-states
                             and colonies, and Hellenistic and Roman Empires
                             • Mesoamerica: Teotihuacan, Maya city-states [cr5b]
                             • Andean South America: Moche
             Teach one illustrative example of Persian Empires, either from the list below or
             an example of your choice:
                             • Achaemenid (Darius, Xerxes)
                             • Parthian
                             • Sassanid
             Required examples of administrative institutions:
                                    • Centralized governments
                                    • Elaborate legal systems and bureaucracies (Qin dynasty)
                             Teach one illustrative example of regions where rulers created
                             administrative institutions, either from the list below or
                             an example of your choice:
                                    • China (Han dynasty, scholar-gentry)
                                    • Persia
                                    • Rome
                                    • South Asia
                             Required examples of such techniques:
                                    • Diplomacy
                                    • Developing supply lines
                                    • Building fortifications, defensive walls, and roads (Great Wall, Roman
                                    Roads, Royal Road)
                                    • Drawing new groups of military officers and soldiers from the local
                                    populations or conquered peoples
                             Teach one illustrative example of cities, either from the list below or an
                             example of your choice:
                                    • Persepolis
                                    • Chang’an
                                    • Pataliputra
                                    • Athens (Acropolis, Agora)
                                    • Carthage (Harbor, walls)
                                    • Rome
                                    • Alexandria
                                    • Constantinople
                                    • Teotihuacan (Temples, canals, chiampas)
                             Teach one illustrative example of such methods, either from the list below or
                             an example of your choice:
                                    • Corvée
                                    • Slavery (Rome)
                                  • Rents and tributes (Han dynasty)
                                  • Peasant communities
                                  • Family and household production
                            Teach one illustrative example of environmental damage, either from the list
                           below or an example of your choice:
                                  • Deforestation
                                  • Desertification
                                  • Soil erosion
                                  • Silted rivers



         Key Concept 2.3. Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and Exchange
             Required examples of trade routes:
                                    • Eurasian Silk Roads (Silk Road)
                                    • Trans-Saharan caravan routes
                                    • Indian Ocean sea lanes (Indian Ocean trade)
                                    • Mediterranean sea lanes
             Teach one illustrative example of new technologies, either from
             the list below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Yokes
                                    • Saddles
                                    • Stirrups (Asiatic nomads)
             Teach one illustrative example of domesticated pack animals, either from
             the list below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Horses (use in warfare)
                                    • Oxen (wheeled transport)
                                    • Llamas
                                    • Camels (Silk Road)
             Teach one illustrative example of innovations in maritime technologies,
             either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                                    • Lateen sail (did not rely on prevailing wind)
                                    • Dhow ships
             Required examples of transformed religious and cultural traditions:
                                    • Christianity (appeal to slaves and women)
                                    • Hinduism (caste system)
                                    • Buddhism (competed with Confucianism and Taoism and
             complemented Shintoism)

        PART II THE CLASSICAL PERIOD,
1000 B.C.E.–500 C.E.: Uniting Large Regions
        CHAPTER 2 Classical Civilization: China
        CHAPTER 3 Classical Civilization: India
        CHAPTER 4 Classical Civilization in the Mediterranean: Greece and Rome
        CHAPTER 5 The Classical Period: Directions, Diversities, and Declines by 500 C.E.


Period 3: Regional and Transregional Interactions, c. 600 C.E. to c. 1450 (20%)
             Key Concept 3.1. Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks
                    Required examples of existing trade routes:
                           • The Silk Roads (revival under Mongols)
                           • The Mediterranean Sea
                           • The Trans-Saharan (Bedouins to Mali)
                           • The Indian Ocean basins
                    Teach one illustrative example of new trading cities, either from the list below or an
                    example of your choice:
                           • Novgorod
                           • Timbuktu (gold for salt)
                           • The Swahili city-states
                           • Hangzhou
                           • Calicut
                           • Baghdad
        • Melaka
        • Venice (salt, spices)
        • Tenochtitlan (tribute)
        • Cahokia (regional North American trade center)
Teach one illustrative example of luxury goods, either from the list below or an
example of your choice:
        • Silk and cotton textiles (East Asia and South Asia to Middle East)
        • Porcelain
        • Spices (South and Southeast Asia to Middle East)
        • Precious metals and gems
        • Slaves (Slavs to Vikings, East Africans to Middle East)
        • Exotic animals
Teach one illustrative example of caravan organization, either from the list below or an
example of your choice:
        • Caravanserai (Safavid Royal Road)
        • Camel saddles
Teach one illustrative example of new forms of credit and monetization, either from the
list below or an example of your choice:
        • Bills of exchange
        • Credit (Flying money)
        • Checks
        • Banking houses (Knights Templar)
Teach one illustrative example of state practices, either from the list below or
an example of your choice:
        • Minting of coins
        • Use of paper money (Yuan dynasty to Mongols and to west)
Teach one illustrative example of trading organizations, either the
one below or an example of your choice:
        • Hanseatic League (East India Company)
Required examples of empires:
        • China (Yuan Dynasty through Ming)
        • The Byzantine Empire (Diocletian to 1453 fall)
        • The Caliphates (Abbasids)
        • The Mongols



Teach one illustrative example of environmental knowledge and technological
adaptations, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
         • The way Scandinavian Vikings used their longships to travel in coastal and
         open waters as well as in rivers and estuaries (Kievan Rus)
         • The way the Arabs and Berbers adapted camels to travel across and around
       the Sahara
         • The way Central Asian pastoral groups used horses to travel in the steppes
       (Mongols and yurts)
Teach one illustrative example of diasporic communities, either from
the list below or an example of your choice:
         • Muslim merchant communities in the Indian Ocean region
         • Chinese merchant communities in Southeast Asia
         • Sogdian merchant communities throughout Central Asia
         • Jewish communities in the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean basin, or
         along the Silk Roads (Radhanites)
Teach one illustrative example of interregional travelers, either from the list
below or an example of your choice:
         • Ibn Battuta (Voyages of Ibn Battuta)
         • Marco Polo (Travels of Marco Polo)
         • Xuanzang
Teach one illustrative example of the diffusion of literary, artistic and
cultural traditions, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
         • The influence of Neoconfucianism and Buddhism in East Asia (footbinding
         and monasteries)
         • Hinduism and Buddhism in Southeast Asia
                      • Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia
                      • Toltec/Mexica and Inca traditions in Mesoamerica and Andean America
              Teach one illustrative example of the diffusion of scientific and technological
              traditions, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                      • The influence of Greek and Indian mathematics on Muslim scholars
                      • The return of Greek science and philosophy to Western Europe via
                      Muslim al-Andalus in Iberia (The library of Toledo and Michael Scot)
                      • The spread of printing and gunpowder technologies from East
                      Asia into the Islamic empires and Western Europe
              Teach one illustrative example of new foods and agricultural techniques,
              either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                      • Bananas in Africa (East Africa via South Asia)
                      • New rice varieties in East Asia
                      • The spread of cotton, sugar, and citrus throughout Dar al-Islam and the
                      Mediterranean basin

Key Concept 3.2. Continuity and Innovation of State Forms and Their Interactions

              Teach one illustrative example of traditional sources of power and legitimacy, either
              from the list below or an example of your choice:
                      • Patriarchy
                      • Religion
                      • Land-owning elites (Ayan)
              Teach one illustrative example of innovations, either from the list below or
              an example of your choice:
                      • New methods of taxation (labor, grain, and cash in Byzantine Empire)
                      • Tributary systems
                      • Adaptation of religious institutions.
                                    Teach one illustrative example of Islamic states, either from the
              list below or an example of your choice:
                      • Abbasids
                      • Muslim Iberia (el-Andalus)
                      • Delhi Sultanates

            Teach one illustrative example of city-states, either from the list below or an
            example of your choice:
                    • In the Italian peninsula (Venice and Florence)
                    • In East Africa
                    • In Southeast Asia
                    • In the Americas
            Teach one illustrative example of such synthesis by states, either from the list
            below or an example of your choice:
                    • Persian traditions that influenced Islamic states (literature and gardens)
                    • Chinese traditions that influenced states in Japan (bureaucracy)
            Required examples of technological and cultural transfers:
                    • Between Tang China and the Abbasids (paper making)
                    • Across the Mongol empires (stirrup and siege craft)
                    • During the Crusades (siege craft and medicine)
Key Concept 3.3. Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its Consequences
            Teach one illustrative example of technological innovations, either from the
            list below or an example of your choice:
                    • Champa rice varieties
                    • The chinampa field systems (up to six crops per year)
                    • Waru waru agricultural techniques in the Andean areas (raised beds and
                    resistant to frost damage)
                    • Improved terracing techniques
                    • The horse collar
            Required examples of these factors:
                    • Invasions (Mongol invasion of Middle East)
                    • Disease (Black Death)
                    • The decline of agricultural productivity
                    • The Little Ice Age (effects on Western Europe)
                     Required examples of these factors:
                           • The end of invasions (end of nomadic challenges)
                           • The availability of safe and reliable transport
                           • The rise of commerce and the warmer temperatures between 800 and 1300
                           (Medieval Warming and cathedral building)
                           • Increased agricultural productivity and subsequent rising population (maize
                           and potato)
                           • Greater availability of labor also contributed to urban growth (improved
                           agricultural productivity and technological displacement led to urban growth)
                     Required examples of forms of labor organization:
                           • Free peasant agriculture (East Asia and Western Europe)
                           • Nomadic pastoralism (Asian steppes and African Bantu migrations)
                           • Craft production and guild organization (by castes in South Asia, guilds in
                           Western Europe)
                           • Various forms of coerced and unfree labor (corvee)
                           • Government-imposed labor taxes (Byzantine)
                           • Military obligations (Feudalism, European and Japanese)

      PART III THE POSTCLASSICAL ERA, 500–1450:
NEW FAITH AND NEW COMMERCE
      CHAPTER 6 The First Global Civilization: The Rise and Spread of Islam
      CHAPTER 7 Abbasid Decline and the Spread of
      Islamic Civilization to South and Southeast Asia
      CHAPTER 8 African Civilizations and the Spread of Islam [cr5a]
      CHAPTER 9 Civilization in Eastern Europe: Byzantium and Orthodox Europe
      CHAPTER 10 A New Civilization Emerges in Western Europe
      CHAPTER 11 The Americas on the Eve of Invasion
      CHAPTER 12 Reunification and Renaissance in Chinese Civilization: The Era of the Tang and
      Song Dynasties
      CHAPTER 13 The Spread of Chinese Civilization: Japan, Korea, and Vietnam
      CHAPTER 14 The Last Great Nomadic Changes: From Chinggis Khan to Timur
      CHAPTER 15 The West and the Changing World Balance

Semester Exam (Units I, II, and III) Semester research project due. 18 weeks total

Period 4: Global Interactions, c. 1450 to c. 1750 (20%)
       Key Concept 4.1. Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange
                      Teach one illustrative example of new tools, either from the list below or an
                      example of your choice:
                               • Astrolabe (Muslim mariners)
                               • Revised maps (Prince Henry the Navigator)
                      Teach one illustrative example of innovations in ship designs, either the one
                      below or an example of your choice:
                               • Caravels (Portugal and Spain)
                                             Teach one illustrative example of American foods, either from
                      the list below or an example of your choice:
                               • Potatoes (more calories per acre than grain, and in colder climates)
                               • Maize
                               • Manioc
                      Teach one illustrative example of cash crops, either from the list below or
                      an example of your choice:
                               • Sugar (slave-based plantation agriculture)
                               • Tobacco
                                             Teach one illustrative example of foods brought by African
                      slaves, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                               • Okra (Gumbo)
                               • Rice

                     Teach one illustrative example of syncretic and new forms of religion, either from
                     the list below or an example of your choice:
                              • Vodun in the Caribbean (sympathetic magic)
                              • The cults of saints in Latin America
                           • Sikhism in South Asia
                   Teach one illustrative example of innovations in visual and performing arts,
                   either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                           • Renaissance art in Europe (Perspective and humanism)
                           • Miniature paintings in the Middle East and South Asia
                           • Wood-block prints in Japan
                           • Post-conquest codices in Mesoamerica
                   Teach one illustrative example of popular authors, literary forms and works of
                   literature, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                           • Shakespeare (Humanism and comedy and tragedy)
                           • Cervantes
                           • Sundiata
                           • Journey to the West
                           • Kabuki
Key Concept 4.2. New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production
                   Teach one illustrative example of the intensification of peasant labor, either from the
                   list below or an example of your choice:
                           • The development of frontier settlements in Russian Siberia
                           • Cotton textile production in India
                           • Silk textile production in China
                   Teach one illustrative example of coerced labor, either from the list below or
                   an example of your choice:
                           • Chattel slavery
                           • Indentured servitude (North America)
                           • Encomienda and hacienda systems (Spanish colonies)
                           • The Spanish adaptation of the Inca mit’a (using prior noble class)
                   Teach one illustrative example of new elites, either from the list below or an
                   example of your choice:
                           • The Manchus in China
                           • Creole elites in Spanish America (Simon Bolivar and Latin American
                           republics)
                           • European gentry
                           • Urban commercial entrepreneurs in all major port cities in the world
                   Teach one illustrative example of existing elites, either from the list below or
                   an example of your choice:
                           • The zamindars in the Mughal Empire
                           • The nobility in Europe (Feudalism)
                           • The daimyo in Japan (Shogunate)
                   Teach one illustrative example of gender and family restructuring, either
                   from the list below or an example of your choice:
                           • The dependence of European men on Southeast Asian women for conducting
                           trade in that region
                           • The smaller size of European families (the rise of the nuclear family)
                   Teach one illustrative example of new ethnic and racial classifications, either
                   from the list below or an example of your choice:
                           • Mestizo (Spanish colonies)
                           • Mulatto
                           • Creole
      Key Concept 4.3. State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion
                   Teach one illustrative example of the arts as displays of political power,
                   either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                           • Monumental architecture (Taj Mahal, Angor Wat)
                           • Urban design
                           • Courtly literature (Tale of Genji)
                           • The visual arts
                   Teach one illustrative example of these religious ideas, either from the list
                   below or an example of your choice:
                           • European notions of divine right (Louis XIV)
                           • Safavid use of Shiism
                           • Mexica or Aztec practice of human sacrifice (Huitzilopochtli)
                           • Songhay promotion of Islam
                           • Chinese emperors’ public performance of Confucian rituals
                    Teach one illustrative example of the differential treatment of ethnic and
                    religious groups, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                           • Ottoman treatment of non-Muslim subjects (Dhimmi, Mamelukes)
                           • Manchu policies toward Chinese (division into good and mean people,)
                           • Spanish creation of a separate “República de Indios”
                    Teach one illustrative example of bureaucratic elites or military professionals, either
                    from the list below or an example of your choice:
                           • Ottoman devshirme
                           • Chinese examination system (proficiency in the Six Arts)
                           • Salaried samurai
                    Required examples of land empires:
                           • Manchus
                           • Mughals
                           • Ottomans
                           • Russians
                    Required examples of maritime empires:
                           • Portuguese
                           • Spanish
                           • Dutch
                           • French
                           • British
                    Teach one illustrative example of competition over trade routes, either from the list
                    below or an example of your choice:
                           • Omani-European rivalry in the Indian Ocean
                           • Piracy in the Caribbean (Privateers)
                    Teach one illustrative example of state rivalries, either from the list below or
                    an example of your choice:
                           • Thirty Years War (Bourbon-Habsburg rivalry)
                           • Ottoman-Safavid conflict
                    Teach one illustrative example of local resistance, either from the list below or
                    an example of your choice:
                           • Food riots
                           • Samurai revolts
                           • Peasant uprisings (German Peasant’s War

        PART IV THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD, 1450–1750: THE WORLD SHRINKS
        CHAPTER 16 The World Economy
        CHAPTER 17 The Transformation of the West 1450–1750
        CHAPTER 18 The Rise of Russia
        CHAPTER 19 Early Latin America
        CHAPTER 20 Africa and the Africans in the Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade
        CHAPTER 21 The Muslim Empires
        CHAPTER 22 Asian Transitions in an Age of Global Change

Period 5: Industrialization and Global Integration, c. 1750 to c. 1900 (20%)
       Key Concept 5.1. Industrialization and Global Capitalism
              Required examples of factors leading to the rise of industrial production:
                              • Europe’s location on the Atlantic Ocean
                              • The geographical distribution of coal, iron and timber
                              • European demographic changes
                              • Urbanization
                              • Improved agricultural productivity
                              • Legal protection of private property
                              • An abundance of rivers and canals
                              • Access to foreign resources
                              • The accumulation of capital
                      Teach one illustrative example of the production and export of single natural
                      resources, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                              • Cotton
                              • Rubber (Belgian Congo)
                              • Palm oil
                              • Sugar
                    • Wheat
                    • Meat
                    • Guano (Chile)
                    • Metals and minerals
             Teach one illustrative example of a declining agriculturally based economy, either
             the one below or an example of your choice:
                    • Textile production in India (British trade policy)
             Teach one illustrative example of new consumer market, either the one below or an
             example of your choice:
                    • British and French attempts to “open up” the Chinese market during the
                   nineteenth century (Opium Wars)
             Teach one illustrative example of mining centers, either from the list below or an
             example of your choice:
                    • Copper mines in Mexico
                    • Gold and diamond mines in South Africa (Cecil Rhodes and DeBeers)
             Teach one illustrative example of financial instruments, either from the list below or
             an example of your choice:
                    • Stock markets
                    • Insurance (Lloyd’s of London)
                    • Gold standard
                    • Limited liability corporations

             Teach one illustrative example of transnational businesses, either from the
             list below or an example of your choice:
                     • The United Fruit Company (Guatemala)
                     • The HSBC — Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation
             Required examples of developments in transportation and communication:
                     • Railroads (Great Britain, North America)
                     • Steamships
                     • Telegraphs
                     • Canals (Suez)

             Teach one illustrative example of alternative visions, either from the list
             below or an example of your choice:
                     • Utopian socialism (Robert Owen)
                     • Marxism
                     • Anarchism
             Teach one illustrative example of state-sponsored visions of industrialization,
             either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                     • The economic reforms of Meiji Japan (Meiji Restoration)
                     • The development of factories and railroads in Tsarist Russia
                     • China’s Self- Strengthening Movement
                     • Muhammad Ali’s development of a cotton textile industry in Egypt

            Teach one illustrative example of reforms, either from the list below or an
            example of your choice:
                    • State pensions and public health in Germany (Bismarck’s reforms)
                    • Expansion of suffrage in Britain
                    • Public education in many states
Key Concept 5.2. Imperialism and Nation-State Formation
            Teach one illustrative example of states with existing colonies, either from the list
            below or an example of your choice:
                    • British in India (The British Raj)
                    • Dutch in Indonesia
            Teach one illustrative example of European States that established empires in
            Africa, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                    • Britain in West Africa
                    • Belgium in the Congo (King Leopold and the Belgian Congo)
            Teach one illustrative example of Europeans who established settler colonies,
            either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                    • The British in southern Africa, Australia, and New Zealand (Penal colony in
                    Australia)
                      • The French in Algeria
             Teach one illustrative example of industrialized states practicing economic
             imperialism, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
             • The British and French expanding their influence in China through the Opium Wars
             • The British and the United States investing heavily in Latin America (Dollar
             Diplomacy)
          Teach one illustrative example of the contraction of the Ottoman Empire, either from
          the list below or an example of your choice:
                      • The establishment of independent states in the Balkans (Serbian
                      Independence from the Ottomans)
                      • Semi-independence in Egypt, French and Italian colonies in North Africa
                      • Later British influence in Egypt
             Teach one illustrative example of such new states, either from the list below or
             an example of your choice:
                      • The Cherokee Nation
                      • Siam
                      • Hawai’i
                      • The Zulu Kingdom (Anglo-Zulu War)
             Teach one illustrative example of nationalism, either from the list below or an example
             of your choice:
                      • The German nation (Kultur and German Unification)
                      • Filipino nationalism
                      • Liberian nationalism

Key Concept 5.3. Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform
            Teach one illustrative example of such thinkers, either from the list below or
            an example of your choice:
                    • Voltaire
                    • Rousseau (The Social Contract)
            Teach one illustrative example of Enlightenment thinkers, either from the list
            below or an example of your choice:
                    • Locke (Tabula Rasa and the Lockean Social Contract)
                    • Montesquieu
            Required examples of revolutionary documents:
                    • The American Declaration of Independence (Natural Rights)
                    • The French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen
                    • Bolivar’s Jamaica Letter
            Teach one illustrative example of subjects challenging imperial government, either
            the one below or an example of your choice:
            • The challenge of the Marathas to the Mughal Sultans (Military prowess and
            administrative incompetence)
            Teach one illustrative example of anticolonial movements, either from the
            list below or an example of your choice:
                    • The Indian Revolt of 1857 (Sepoy Rebellion)
                    • The Boxer Rebellion
            Teach one illustrative example of such rebellions, either from the list below or
            an example of your choice:
                    • The Taiping Rebellion
                    • The Ghost Dance (Wounded Knee)
                    • The Xhosa Cattle- Killing Movement
            Teach one illustrative example of reforms, either from the list below or an example of
            your choice:
                    • The Tanzimat movement (Ottomanism)
                    • The Self-Strengthening Movement
            Teach one illustrative example of such demands, either from the list below or an
            example of your choice:
                    • Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
                    • Olympe de Gouges’s “Declaration of the Rights of Women and the Female
                    Citizen”
                    • The resolutions passed at the Seneca Falls Conference in 1848 (Declaration
                    of Sentiments)
Key Concept 5.4. Global Migration
                    Teach one illustrative example of such migrants, either from the list below or
                    an example of your choice:
                            • Manual laborers (East Asia to North America)
                            • Specialized professionals
                    Required examples of coerced and semicoerced labor migration:
                            • Slavery (Belgian Congo)
                            • Chinese and Indian indentured servitude
                            • Convict labor
                    Teach one illustrative example of such temporary and seasonal migrants,
                    either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                            • Japanese agricultural workers in the Pacific (Hawai’i)
                            • Lebanese merchants in the Americas
                            • Italians in Argentina
                    Teach one illustrative example of migrant ethnic enclaves in different parts
                            of the world, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                            • Chinese in Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, South America, and North America
                            (Railroads in North America)
                            • Indians in East and southern Africa, the Caribbean, and Southeast Asia
                    Teach one illustrative example of the regulation of immigrants, either from the list
                    below or an example of your choice:
                            • The Chinese Exclusion Acts (The Yellow Peril)
                            • The White Australia Policy
        PART V THE DAWN OF THE INDUSTRIAL AGE, 1750–1914
        CHAPTER 23 The Emergence of Industrial Society in the West, 1750–1914
        CHAPTER 24 Industrialization and Imperialism:
        The Making of the European Global Order
        CHAPTER 25 The Consolidation of Latin America, 1830–1920
        CHAPTER 26 Civilizations in Crisis: The Ottoman Empire,
        the Islamic Heartland, and Qing China
        CHAPTER 27 Russia and Japan: Industrialization Outside the West

Period 6: Accelerating Global Change and Realignments, c. 1900 to the Present (20%)
       Key Concept 6.1 Science and the Environment
                     Teach one illustrative example of new scientific paradigms, either from the
                     list below or an example of your choice:
                             • The theory of relativity (Time is not a universal constant)
                             • Quantum mechanics
                             • The Big Bang theory
                             • Psychology
                     Teach one illustrative example of medical innovations, either from the
                     list below or an example of your choice:
                             • The polio vaccine
                             • Antibiotics (“Miracle” drug)
                             • The artificial heart
                     Teach one illustrative example of diseases associated with poverty,
                     either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                             • Malaria (A third world problem)
                             • Tuberculosis
                             • Cholera
                     Teach one illustrative example of emergent epidemic diseases, either
                     from the list below or an example of your choice:
                             • The 1918 influenza pandemic (Global transportation)
                             • Ebola
                             • HIV/AIDS
                     Teach one illustrative example of diseases associated with changing
                     lifestyles, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                             • Diabetes (Obesity and sedentism)
                             • Heart disease
                             • Alzheimer’s disease
                     Teach one illustrative example of improved military technology, either
                     from the list below or an example of your choice:
                             • Tanks
                     • Airplanes
                     • The atomic bomb (Hiroshima and Nagasaki)
             Teach one illustrative example of new tactics, either from the list below or an example
             of your choice:
                     • Trench warfare (Western Front, WWI)
                     • Firebombing
             Teach one illustrative example of wartime casualties, either from the
             list below or an example of your choice:
                     • Nanjing (Rape of Nanking)
                     • Dresden (firebombing)
                     • Hiroshima

Key Concept 6.2 Global Conflicts and Their Consequences
            Teach one illustrative example of internal and external factors, either from
            the list below or an example of your choice:
                     • Economic hardship
                     • Political and social discontent (Russian Revolution, 1917)
                     • Technological stagnation
                     • Military defeat
            Teach one illustrative example of negotiated independence, either from
            the list below or an example of your choice:
                     • India from the British Empire (Gandhi)
                     • The Gold Coast from the British Empire
            Teach one illustrative example of independence through armed struggle,
            either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                     • Algeria and Vietnam from the French empire (FLN)
                     • Angola from the Portuguese empire
            Teach one illustrative example of nationalist leaders, either from the list
            below or an example of your choice:
                     • Mohandas Gandhi (India)
                     • Ho Chi Minh
                     • Kwame Nkrumah (Ghana)
            Teach one illustrative example of regional, religious, and ethnic movements, either
            from the list below or an example of your choice:
                     • Muhammad Ali Jinnah (Pakistani independence)
                     • The Québécois separatist movement
                     • The Biafra secessionist movement
            Teach one illustrative example of transnational movements, either from the
            list below or an example of your choice:
                     • Communism (Marxism)
                     • Pan-Arabism (Arab-nationalism of Nasser)
                     • Pan-Africanism
            Teach one illustrative example of population resettlements, either from
            the list below or an example of your choice:
                     • The India/Pakistan partition (Punjab and Bengal, and 1947 Indo-Pakistani
                     War)
                     • The Zionist Jewish settlement of Palestine
                     • The division of the Middle East into mandatory states
            Teach one illustrative example of such migrations, either from the list below or
            an example of your choice:
                     • South Asians to Britain
                     • Algerians to France
                     • Filipinos to the United States
            Teach one illustrative example of such ethnic violence, either from the list
            below or an example of your choice:
                     • Armenia
                     • The Holocaust (Final Solution)
                     • Cambodia
                     • Rwanda
            Teach one illustrative example of displacement of peoples, either from the list
            below or an example of your choice:
                     • Palestinians (Intifada)
         • Darfurians
Teach one illustrative example of mobilization of a state’s resources, either from the
list below or an example of your choice:
         • The Gurkha soldiers in India
         • The ANZAC troops in Australia (Gallipoli)
         • Military conscription
Required examples of the sources of global conflict:
         • Imperialist expansion by European powers and Japan (Manchuria)
         • Competition for resources
         • Ethnic conflict
         • Great power rivalries between Great Britain and Germany
         • Nationalist ideologies (Nazism)
         • The economic crisis engendered by the Great Depression.
Teach one illustrative example of groups and individuals who challenged war,
either from the list below or an example of your choice:
         • Picasso in his Guernica
         • The antinuclear movement during the Cold War
         • Thich Quang Duc by self-immolation (Vietnam)
Teach one illustrative example of nonviolence, either from the list below or
an example of your choice:
         • Gandhi
         • Martin Luther King (Letter from a Birmingham Jail)
Teach one illustrative example of such groups and individuals, either from the
list below or an example of your choice:
         • Communist leaders such as Vladimir Lenin and Mao Zedong
         • The Non-Aligned Movement, which presented an alternative political bloc to
         the Cold War (Third World)
         • The Anti-Apartheid Movement in South Africa
         • Participants in the global uprisings of 1968
         • The Tiananmen Square protesters that promoted democracy in China
Teach one illustrative example of responses that intensified conflict, either
from the list below or an example of your choice:
         • The promotion of military dictatorship in Chile, Spain, and Uganda
         • The United States’ promotion of a New World Order after the Cold War
         • The buildup of the “military-industrial complex” and arms trading (Eisenhower’
         s Farewell Address)
Teach one illustrative example of movements who used violence, either from
the list below or an example of your choice:
         • IRA
         • ETA (Basque Separatist)
         • Al-Qaeda
Teach one illustrative example of popular culture influenced by global conflicts,
either from the list below or an example of your choice:
         • Dada
         • James Bond (Cold War)
         • Socialist Realism
         • Video games

Teach one illustrative example of Communist governments controlling their national
economies, either from the list below or an example of your choice:
        • The Five-Year Plans (USSR)
        • The Great Leap Forward (China)
Teach one illustrative example of governments guiding economic life, either
from the list below or an example of your choice:
        • Nasser’s promotion of economic development in Egypt
        • The encouragement of export-oriented economies in East Asia
Teach one illustrative example of governments encouraging free market policies,
either from the list below or an example of your choice:
        • The United States beginning with Ronald Reagan (Supply-side economics)
        • Britain under Margaret Thatcher
        • China under Deng Xiaoping
        • Chile under Pinochet
          Teach one illustrative example of new international organizations, either from the list
          below or an example of your choice:
                   • The League of Nations
                   • The United Nations (UN Security Council)
                   • The International Criminal Court
          Teach one illustrative example of new economic institutions, either from
          the list below or an example of your choice:
                   • The International Monetary Fund (IMF)
                   • World Bank
                   • World Trade Organization (WTO)
          Teach one illustrative example of humanitarian organizations, either from
          the list below or an example of your choice:
                   • UNICEF
                   • The Red Cross
                   • Amnesty International
                   • Doctors Without Borders
                   • World Health Organization (WHO)
          Teach one illustrative example of multinational corporations, either from
          the list below or an example of your choice:
                   • Royal Dutch Shell
                   • Coca-Cola
                   • Sony
          Teach one illustrative example of protest movements, either from the
          list below or an example of your choice:
                   • Greenpeace (Rainbow Warrior)
                   • Green Belt in Kenya
                   • Earth Day
          Teach one illustrative example of human rights, either from the list below or
          an example of your choice:
                   • The U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights
                   • Women’s rights
                   • The end of the White Australia Policy
          Teach one illustrative example of new cultural identities, either the one
          below or an example of your choice:
                   • Negritude
          Teach one illustrative example of exclusionary reactions, either from the
          list below or an example of your choice:
                   • Xenophobia
                   • Race riots (Rwanda)
                   • Citizenship restrictions
          Teach one illustrative example of new forms of spirituality, either from the
          list below or an example of your choice:
                   • New Age Religions
                   • Hare Krishna
                   • Falun Gong
          Teach one illustrative example of application of religion to political issues,
          either from the list below or an example of your choice:
                   • Fundamentalist movements (Iranian Revolution)
                   • Liberation Theology
          Teach one illustrative example of such sports, either from the list below or
          an example of your choice:
                   • World Cup Soccer
                   • The Olympics (US-USSR rivalry)
                   • Cricket
          Teach one illustrative example of the diffusion of music and film, either from
          the list below or an example of your choice:
                   • Reggae (Bob Marley)
                   • Bollywood

PART VI THE TWENTIETH CENTURY IN WORLD HISTORY
CHAPTER 28 Descent into the Abyss: World War I and the
Crisis of the European Global Order
        CHAPTER 29 The World Between the Wars:
        Revolution, Depression, and Authoritarian Response
        CHAPTER 30 A Second Global Conflict and the End of European World Order
        CHAPTER 31 Western Society and Eastern Europe in the Decades of the Cold War
        CHAPTER 32 Latin America: Revolution and Reaction into the 21st Century
        CHAPTER 33 Africa, the Middle East, and Asia in the Era of Independence
        CHAPTER 34 Rebirth and Revolution: Nation-Building in East Asia and the Pacific Rim
        CHAPTER 35 The End of the Cold War and the Shape of a New Era:
        World History 1990–2006
        CHAPTER 36 Globalization and Resistance

16 weeks total
Review for AP Exam (2 weeks)

				
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