Planet Rock Profiles Interview with Moby 26800 _ Slane Castle.doc

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					MOBY SCRIPT



MOBY’S ‘PLAY’ ALBUM HAS TO DATE SOLD ALMOST FIVE MILLION
COPIES WORLD-WIDE.

ITS SUCCESS HAS PUT MOBY, PREVIOUSLY SEEN AS A MUSIC
INDUSTRY OUTSIDER, COMPLETELY AT THE HEART OF THE
MAINSTREAM.

HIS EARLIER ALBUMS HAD ESTABLISHED HIM AS A LEADING LIGHT
IN THE WORLD OF TECHNO MUSIC, BUT SOME HAD ACCUSED HIM OF
TRIVIALISING THE FORM UNTIL ‘PLAYS’ COMBINATION OF EARLY 20TH
CENTURY BLACK VOCALS AND LATE 20TH CENTURY DANCE BEATS
CREATED SOMETHING THAT ALMOST ANYONE COULD LIKE.

HIS MUSIC IS NOW IMPOSSIBLE TO AVOID. SONGS LIKE HONEY,
RUN ON AND NATURAL BLUES ARE MAINSTAYS ON YOUR RADIO, TV,
MOVIE SOUND TRACKS AND THE LORD KNOWS ADVERTISING.

EVERY SINGLE TRACK ON PLAY HAS BEEN USED TO SELL SOMETHING,
YET WHAT IT SELLS IS RARELY WHAT IT’S SLEEVE NOTES WOULD
INDICATE ARE IMPORTANT TO MOBY; VEGANISM, CHRISTIANITY,
HUMAN AND ANIMAL RIGHTS.

IT’S JUST ONE OF MANY CONTRADICTIONS SURROUNDING RICHARD
MELVILLE HALL, BORN TO A WEALTHY WHITE PROFESSOR TEACHING
IN IMPOVERISHED HARLEM, WHO’S EARLY DEATH MEANT THAT MOBY
WAS RAISED BY THE IMPOVERISHED WIDOW IN DARIEN,
CONNECTICUT.

Moby
I think growing up as the only child of single parent and in a town where there
were lots of really stable big families and growing up as one the only poor
families in a very wealthy town and growing up with a mother who was sort of a
bohemian hippy in a town that was very conservative I think that’s has instilled
in me a sort of life long sense of being an outsider. than at some point, it
happens to you after adolescence. I realised that most of the interesting
cultural figures of the twentieth century were also insecure outsiders and then
a lot of my heroes became people who sort of made disentrancement and
outsider status seem very romantic and suddenly the people who represented
the status quo the people who represented the main stream seemed like anti
heroes you know and they were the people to be fought against you know the
captain of the football team and the people who were popular and wealthy they
were the ones you know who represented sort of like you know static archaic
culture where it was the disenfranchised outsider you know my heroes who were
like you know musicians, writers architects, poets what have you they were the
ones who to me represented the outsider ideal. I started playing music about 26
years ago I’m 35 years old now and I started playing music when I was about 9
years old and I started out just sort of playing guitar and my mother had a
painting studio that she shared with a rock band so while I was waiting for her
to finish painting I would sit. I thought myself how to play drums yeah basically
just being surrounded by musical instruments my mother was also a pianist so I
would sit in front of the piano and teach myself how to play piano. music to me
was always just something that played a very significant role in my life it wasn’t
something I thought of as a job it was something I just spent all my time doing
and still I don’t think of it as a job its more like its my life’s work and its like a,
like I have friends who go to work and the job lasts from 9 in the morning until
6 in the evening five days a week and that's there job but they define
themselves through the rest of the rest of their life you know they might be an
attorney at work but that's not really how they think of themselves the think of
themselves as you know going home and going out to movies with their friends
and playing tennis where as to me I strictly define myself through my work you
that is my life’s work is my life as making music.

VO1
AT 19 MOBY MOVED TO NEW YORK TO STUDY PHILOSOPHY AT STATE
UNIVERSITY, BUT WASTED LITTLE TIME ESTABLISHING HIMSELF AS
A DJ ON NEW YORK’S CLUB SCENE.

Moby
you can’t make your living going down to the local disco and sitting playing guitar
but you can make your living out of going down the local disco and sitting around
playing guitar but you can make you living going down to the local disco playing
records I thought myself how to D J I was D J in three or four nights a week A.
because I enjoyed it but B. because it was also a way to sort of make money pay
the rent and be involved in music at the same time. , I was making music in my
bedroom which is where I make all my records I mean I think as long as I have
been making music I think I have made only made two songs or three songs in
outside studios you know I pretty much do everything at home in my bedroom
and “Go” I was working on this song and the I watched the first episode of twin
peaks and I heard the strings from a Laura Palmer song and I just fell in love
with them so then I put the strings on top of a song I was working and It made a
nice little fit.



VIDEO = GO
TRIVIA TEXT = In 1991 Moby took the Twin Peaks TV theme under the
     guise of ‘Go’ into the Top 10.

VO2
GO, WITH ITS SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING NEW FORMAT
MAY HAVE ESTABLISHED A BLUE PRINT FOR MOBY’S LATER SUCCESS,
BUT A PROPER FOLLOW UP WAS TO TAKE SOME YEARS

Moby
I was signed to this tiny little record company in New York called Instinct
records and they had put out two or three other singles the biggest selling one
had sold 4000 copies and when we first put out “GO” I was desperate I thought
ok if we sell 4000 copies I’m going to be the happiest musician in the world
because the single I put out before “GO” sold 2000 copies and I was like wow
wouldn’t that be great to be in the ranks of musicians who actually sell 4000
copies of a single and then it went on to be a top ten record in England I don’t
know I think it sold a half a million a million copies so certainly surprised me than
selling a lot more that 4000 copies. The label I was signed to in New York I was
pretty much their only artist so I would make singles under different names so
it would seem like they would a have a lot of different artists and then I spent
about a year and a half trying to get off that label they had signed me to a
terrible contract as often happens and I spent a year and a half in a nasty legal
battle trying to get off while I was trying to leave the label I spent my time
touring and doing re-mixes and so basically that's why it took a while until the
first real album ‘Everything is wrong ‘came out.

VO3
RELEASED ON MUTE RECORDS IN 1995, EVERYTHING IS WRONG IS
PROBABLY MORE REMEMBERED TODAY FOR ITS SLEEVE NOTES, A
RAMBLING ESSAY DURING WHICH MOBY EXPLAINED HOW IN THIS
WORLD, TO HIS EYE AT LEAST, EVERYTHING WAS WRONG.

Moby
When I was 16, 17 years old I was very active in the sort of hard core punk
scene and a lot of times you buy hard core records, hard core punk records and
they would have essays on them you know and this was the early eighties so the
essays would be about how bad consumer culture was and how awful Ronald
Reagan and Margaret Thatcher were and there were all naive essays you know
but seemed like nice vehicle for communication and when I was signed to
Instinct Records they wouldn’t let me put essays on my records but then
suddenly I was signed to Mute records and Daniel Miller the owner of Mute
actually encouraged me to sort of express my beliefs through the work that I
do so that's why ‘Everything is wrong’ was sort of filled with essays and quotes.
I think a lot of people A. were confused by the record because it was a very
eclectic record and B. they were kind of confused and surprised that here
someone who came from the world of dance music who had a social conscience
and who was addressing certain political issues and some people loved the fact
that I was out spoken politically and socially and some people thought it was
absurd. and if someone doesn’t like what I do I try and ignore it and I know that
might be bad but I don’t see the point in getting depressed about a bad review
because there is nothing I can do to change it, unless a bad review is really well
put together if its very cogent well sure I’ll pay attention to it but a lot of time
bad reviews just reflect the idiosyncratic biases of the journalist and they
really don’t necessarily tell me anything about the work that I’m doing.

VO4
FOR HIS NEXT ALBUM, 1996’S ANIMAL RIGHTS MOBY SEEMED TO
REJECT DANCE MUSIC COMPLETELY, RELEASING WHAT VERGED ON A
HEAVY METAL RECORD, CONFUSED, WELL YOU WERE SUPPOSED TO BE.

Moby
And a lot of my musical heroes are people that experimented with different
types of music and it seemed like it used to be kind of acceptable and I think of
The Beatles and you know compare ‘I want to Hold Your Hand’ to ‘Revolution No.
9’ compare ‘Glass Onion’ to ‘Magical Mystery Tour’ you know its like per sonically
they experimented with so many different things at some point in the eighties
or the nineties people started to expect musicians just to make one type of
music for their entire career I think that's so unhealthy and so limiting so
boring at the end of the day I mean what’s the point of buying 5 or 6 records
from a band or musician when every record sounds exactly the same you know
and my feeling is there are so many wonderful different types of music in the
world why not experiment with them so when I made ‘Animal Rights’ that was
just the records I wanted to assort of a visceral aggressive record luckily I’m
signed to a record company that let me do it. one of the nice things about being
a musician it that it is my prerogative to make what ever type of music I want
and that might sound selfish but I think that any sort of you know creative
output is kind of inherently selfish I mean you can still serve a purpose through
the work that you do.

VIDEO = RUN ON

TRIVIA TEXT = Moby, aka Richard Melville Hall is a descendant of Moby
     Dick author Herman Melville.



VO5
I LIKE TO SCORE IN 1997 MARKED A MOVE BACK TOWARDS DANCE
MUSIC, BUT EVEN WHEN PLAY WAS RECORDED MOBY’S CONTINUANCE
IN MUSIC WASN’T ASSURED AND A POTENTIAL MOVE BACK TO THE
WORLD OF STEADY EMPLOYMENT SEEMED POSSIBLE.
Moby
When I make a record I’m alone in my studio for a long time and I write the
songs in my studio and I play the instruments and I do the engineering and the
production and there is really no one else involved. So I loose perspective very
quickly. I had some sort of agenda when I was using these old vocals or when I
was making “Play” and I think I frustrated a awful lot of journalists because my
honest answer is my only agenda making a record is I wanted to make a nice
record that's all I care about and using these old vocals I really I didn’t care
whether they were old or whether they were new whether they came from
America or whether the came from Canada or whether they came from Japan I
don’t really care I don’t really care about the original context of where these
vocals came from I’m interested in it but that's not why I use them the reason I
use them is because there beautiful wonderful musical performances they could
have been recorded ten minutes ago they could have been recorded 100 years
ago it doesn’t really matter to me just what matters to me is the sort of the
universal human emotional quality that they have .

VO6
THE VOCALS ON PLAY OFTEN CONSISTS OF HISTORICAL RECORDING
OF OLD BLACK COMMUNITIES SINGING GOSPEL AND SOUL SONGS.
DANCE MUSIC CAN BE ACCUSED OF LACKING SOUL, THESE VOCALS
CERTAINLY CAN’T.

Moby
The old vocals that I used on “Play” I discovered by accident I was out to dinner
with a friend of my and he gave me some CDs that had these old vocals on them
and I just fell in love with them because they were really well recorded the had
a really beautiful quality to them so I sampled them and basically wrote new
songs based around these old vocals. , I use a lot of different criteria to judge
the records I make judge them from a song writing perspective, from a
musicians perspective from an engineer’s perspective and from a producer’s
perspective I can listen to certain songs that I have made and think that there
are awful just because I don’t like the way the kick drum sounds you know it
could be a great song but the engineer part of me says the kick drum sounds bad
therefore the song is a failure. When I finished ‘Play’ I’d lost perspective I
didn’t know it was a good record a bad record I didn't know if it was an average
record when I finished I really had no Idea all. When I first released “Play” we
got some good reviews and some average reviews one or two bad reviews and
that seemed normal and it was selling pretty well in the first six months it was
out we sold about I don’t know 400,000, 500,000 copies world wide and I was
amazed I was like wow, great we’ve sold 500.000 copies world wide that's
phenomenal that's so much more than we ever expected and now were up to
almost 5 million copies worldwide and its been No. 1 in 5 or 6 different countries
platinum in 16 different countries so much more than I ever expected I really
thought that the fate of “Play” if “Play” had been an un successful record there
is a good chance I wouldn’t of had a record contract anymore and there is a good
chance that I would have been relegated to that tear of musicians who had one
point had a little success and then went on to be I hate these expressions sort
of “has been” at least from a public perspective, and yes so when I finished
“Play” I thought that was a very real possibility that I was go and be a “has-
been”. I mean its hard when you make records and when you’re a public figure to
some extent you do bass your perception of yourself on the way your perceived
in the media and as a public figure I wish that weren’t the case you know I wish
my self esteem came from me and I wish my sense of self came exclusively from
me but no if I have a successful record it makes me feel better about myself
and if I have you know if I play a concert and people like me it makes me feel
better about myself and that's dangerous in the long run but at the same time
maybe it spurs me on the make better records you know it |I was complacent
and if I was self satisfied I don’t know if I would work as hard making the music
that |I do.



VIDEO = HONEY

TRIVIA TEXT = In 1999 Moby released Play an album that sampled
     recordings of indigenous black music from the early 20th century
     recorded by the historian Alan Lomax.

V07
PLAYS SUCCESS BROUGHT FURTHER CONTRADICTIONS A WHITE MAN
WAS PUTTING THE VOICE OF DISENFRANCHISED BLACK AMERICA
INTO IT’S MIDDLE CLASS HOMES, THE OUTSIDER WAS NOW A SHOW
BIZ INSIDER AND THE MAN WHO THOUGHT EVERYTHING WAS
WRONG, NOW HAD EVERYTHING.

Moby
My life now after “play” has been so successful is really not all that different to
my life before ’Play’ came out I live in the same apartment I live I New-York I
have the same friends I eat in the same restaurants you know a year and a half
ago we were touring Europe doing summer festivals this summer we toured
Europe doing summer festivals the only difference was were you are in the bill
and how much you get paid but really I mean the material circumstances of my
life are pretty much the same now as they were a year ago two years ago three
years ago. The thing about making money is I don’t really spend anything I mean
the only things I spend money on I constantly re invest in my career I spend an
awful lot of money on the production for live shows I can tour and you know and
in three of four months make a million dollars touring but spend one and a half
on personnel and production costs so I’m making more money yet spending more
money on my career. On myself my only indulgence is when I take long flights I
know buy myself business class tickets but you know I don’t have a fancy car I
don’t buy fancy clothes buying nice things for myself just doesn’t make me happy
it doesn’t really improve the quality of my life if I’m going to go out and buy a
watch I’d rather have a cheap watch for 20 dollars than a really fancy watch for
2000 dollars it doesn’t make time go any slower or any faster. I was at a dinner
party a few weeks ago, and one thing about New-York is that New-York is very
fashion driven and it is very difficult for me to take the world of high fashion
seriously the people who are involved in high fashion take it very seriously and
my feeling is that you are making nice clothes terrific you know big deal you
know its like why you know there are people out there who are running needle
exchanges for you know junkies and aids patients they should take their work
seriously there are people out here working on vaccines for different diseases
they should take there work seriously me I make records I take that, I take my
job very seriously but I don’t take myself very seriously and its hard when you
see someone like a fashion publicist thinking that you know that their work
makes a huge difference that their impact millions of people in a very positive
way and change the world make the world a better place, there a fashion
publicist, you know it’s a nice job but you can’t take yourself too seriously so its
strange when you go out to these fashion parties you know people are all full of
themselves and their arrogant and it is very difficult to respect that type of
arrogance. Now I’m slightly more of appear to the big rich and famous people
but it doesn’t make me like them anymore its impossible to generalise about big
groups of people the big rich famous celebrities that I have met some of them
are really nice some of them are jerks you know it’s the same as if you were to
go to your local pub some of the people in the local pub are nice some of the
people in the local pub are people you do not want to hang out with the world of
celebrity is no different than any other demographic.




V08
THE ONE THING YOU DON’T GET A SENSE OF IN MOBY’S MUSIC IS
MOBY HIMSELF. IT’S RARELY HIS VOICE, RARELY HIS LYRIC, IT’S
MOBY THE OBSERVER AND A DETACHED ONE AT THAT.

Moby
After my Mother died you know I was thinking about life and death romance and
attachment and I started wondering if you spend twenty years with someone and
have a wonderful twenty years and they die and you’re miserable. In some ways
on a very logical level doesn’t that compromise of nigate the twenty nice years
that you had, its kind of like if you’re healthy for six months and then you get a
really terrible flu when you’re desperately sick you don’t remember being
healthy you know and the same thing if you spent twenty years in love with
someone and then they die, they get sick and they die it seems like you’re just
consumed with misery and I’m not saying that's a reason not to get involved with
people but certainly something to think about you know. And why involve
yourself in something that is potentially is going to make you terribly, terribly
sad. You know like for example we were just in Spain and a friend of mine
wanted to rent mopeds for him and his girlfriend and I said you’re a fool
because you can rent a car and your car is protected, you rent mopeds neither
one of you know how to ride a moped there is a better than likely chance that
you going to fall off and get really badly hurt and ruin your vacation so why
enter into something when there is a great chance that your going to get really
hurt by and it doesn’t mean to be a shrinking violet and stay in and never go out
and expose yourself to risk, but calculated risk. There is part of me that aspires
to domestic bliss and part of me aspires to meet someone fall in love, get
married, have children, have tons of animals, live in the woods, have friends over
for dinner, make music, and go swimming and have a nice domestic life and there
is another part of me wants to just devote my life t making music even if it
means compromising my personal happiness and compromising my personal well
being there is a part of me that really thinks Sometimes I think of music as my
wife my very intense mistress and sometimes being married to music is
wonderful and the most sublime rewarding thing in the world other times its
mundane other times down right unpleasant so I have a lot of friends who have
stable domestic lives they have jobs they make a decent income they are
married to someone that they like they have children they go home every night I
don’t have any of that. I’m single I’m autominous I sleep in a different bed
every single night like when I’m able to sleep so I have made a lot of sacrifices
at the en of the day I have a life making music that I wouldn’t trade for
anything. Being a musician and being able to reach people through music is a
very noble calling and that is something that I would Like t pursue for the rest
of my life.

VIDEO = Natural Blues

TRIVIA TEXT = This video was directed by David LaChappelle celebrity
          photographer who got his break working at Andy Warhols
          Interview magazine in the early ‘80’s. The video stars actress
          Christina Ricci.



End Credits

Written & Presented by Tom Dunne

Camera
Piaras Mac Cionnaith
Mark Waldron

Sound
Finny Byrne

Post-Production & Graphics
The Element

Graphic Animation & Design
Jonathan Ridge
Diarmuid Kelly

Title Music
Cooling Eaton

Sound Mix
Masterlabs Post

Producer
Susan Broe

Director
Enda O’Looney

Executive Producer
Andrew Fitzpatrick

				
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