GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT OVERVIEWSTATISTICS.doc by censhunay

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									2008 Promotion Guide
 High Plains Division




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                                                             CONTENTS
Great American Smokeout Promotion
Great American Smokeout Overview ........................................................................................................... 3
American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout Overview Statistics……………………………..…4
Secondhand Smoke Statistics........................................................................................................................ 6
Audiences for Great American Smokeout Activities……………………………………………………….7
Sample Public Address Announcements for the week of the Great American Smokeout ......................... 10
Sample Great American Smokeout Proclamation for Students .................................................................. 11
Promotion Ideas for Malls .......................................................................................................................... 12
Promotion Ideas for Restaurants ................................................................................................................. 13
Promotion Ideas for Worksites ................................................................................................................... 14
Promotion Ideas for Hospitals .................................................................................................................... 16
Promotion Ideas for Colleges and Universities........................................................................................... 17
Promotion Ideas for Military Sites .............................................................................................................. 18



Articles/Fact Sheets and more
The American Cancer Society’s Annual Great American Smokeout………………………………..……19
The Great American Smokeout Educates Americans about Costs of Tobacco .......................................... 20
American Cancer Society Announces the Great American Smokeout Video Contest ............................... 21
One Day at a Time: Stay Quit Tips from the American Cancer Society .................................................... 22
What’s in a Cigarette .................................................................................................................................. 23
Sample Proclamation for Mayor/Official ................................................................................................... 24
High Plains Quitline Promotional Information……………………………………………………………25




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                            GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
                                   OVERVIEW
This section of the Smokeout Guide is designed to give communities, workplaces, youth, businesses,
schools, and more some thought-starters for promoting the Great American Smokeout and implementing
ideas/activities surrounding the 32nd Smokeout.

Great American Smokeout activities should focus on prevention, cessation, and advocacy for all ages —
directing smokers and youth to www.cancer.org, www.greatamericansmokeout.org, and 1-800-ACS-
2345. Providing the public with the resources they need further positions the American Cancer Society as
the source for reliable tobacco control information.

In 1952, the American Cancer Society began a large study to investigate the effect of cigarette
smoking on death rates from cancer and other diseases. That initial study spawned off additional
large-scale research efforts such as the Society’s Cancer Prevention Studies, all which made
notable contributions to the science that links cigarette smoking to cancer. Galvanized by these
findings, the American Cancer Society inaugurated its first Great American Smokeout® (GASO)
in 1976, as a way to inspire and encourage smokers to quit for one day.

Today, as a result of the Society’s tireless efforts in tobacco control:
    A growing number of states and communities have passed smoke-free workplace laws.
       More than 2,300 communities and 24 states are now smoke-free.
    Smoking is banned on all domestic U.S. flights. Tampering with smoke detection devices
       in airplanes is a federal crime.
    Most states ban distribution of free cigarettes. Nationally, tobacco advertising is banned
       on broadcast media.
    Cigarette smoking has increasingly become the exception.

But most importantly, as a result of ALL of the above, lung cancer incidence and death rates
have declined in men and stabilized in women, and per capita cigarette consumption is at its
lowest since World War II. As of June 2008, the Society was funding 88 multi-year research
grants on lung cancer totaling more than $45 million, setting the Society as the top non-
governmental supporter of lung cancer research. The Society’s funding has helped lead to new
drugs to treat lung cancer, including Tarceva, Avastin, and Alimta.
In spite of all the progress in the fight against lung cancer, tobacco continues to claim lives, and
smoking still remains the leading preventable cause of death in this country and around the
world. We currently fund 34 research grants on tobacco control, totaling more than $17.5
million.

The American Cancer Society continues its tobacco control mission with a focused agenda – that
offering effective cessation resources to smokers combined with creating a healthy, smoke-free
environment is the fastest way to eliminate disease and death from tobacco use.

The Great American Smokeout presents us with an opportunity to showcase how far we’ve come
and where we need to go to eliminate deaths from lung cancer.




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                American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout®
                           OVERVIEW/STATISTICS

This year’s Great American Smokeout will be held on Thursday, November 20, 2008. Statistical
references are from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Facts & Figures, U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

History
   In 1971, Arthur P. Mullaney created an event in Randolph, Massachusetts, which asked people to
    give up cigarettes for a day and donate the money they would have spent on cigarettes to a high
    school scholarship fund.

   On Thursday, November 18, 1976, the California Division of the American Cancer Society got nearly
    one million of the state’s five million smokers to quit for the day on the Great American Smokeout.

   The first national Great American Smokeout was held on the third Thursday of November in 1977.

   The American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout has been chaired by some of America’s
    most popular celebrities, including Sammy Davis, Jr., Edward Asner, Natalie Cole, Larry Hagman,
    and Surgeon General C. Everett Koop. The event has helped millions of Americans quit by proving
    they can quit for a day and therefore, they can quit for a lifetime.

Tobacco-Related Cancers - Fact Sheet
(Source for all statistics: Cancer Facts and Figures 2008)
     Tobacco use contributed to more than 438,000 premature deaths in the U.S. each year between
        1997-2001.

       Thirty percent of all cancer deaths and 87% of lung cancer deaths can be attributed to smoking.

       Texas Lung cancer estimates:
           o New cases – 13,840
           o Deaths – 9,890
           o Five-year overall survival rate – 15%

       Kansas Lung cancer estimates:
           o New cases – 1,910
           o Deaths – 1,610
           o Five-year overall survival rate – 15%

       Nebraska Lung cancer estimates:
           o New cases – 1,240
           o Deaths – 910
           o Five-year overall survival rate – 15%

       Missouri Lung cancer estimates:
           o New cases – 5,560
           o Deaths – 4,140
           o Five-year overall survival rate – 15%

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   Oklahoma Lung cancer estimates:
       o New cases – 3,150
       o Deaths – 2,400
       o Five-year overall survival rate – 15%

   Hawaii Lung cancer estimates:
      o New cases – 710
      o Deaths – 570
      o Five-year overall survival rate – 15%

   In 2008, there will be about 215,020 new cases of lung and bronchus cancers in the US: 114,690
    male, 100,330 female. Approximately 161,840 will die: 90,810 male, 71,030 female.

   An estimated 45 million U.S. adults (20.8% of the population) are current smokers.

   Twenty-three percent of high school students in the United States are current cigarette smokers.

   Smoking is associated with increased risk for at least 16 types of cancer: nasopharnyx, nasal
    cavity, para nasal sinuses, lip, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, lung, esophagus, pancreas, uterine,
    cervix, kidney, bladder, stomach, and acute leukemia.

   In the US, tobacco use is responsible for nearly 1 in 5 deaths.

   As many as half of all Americans who continue to smoke will die from smoking-related diseases.

   Each year, about 3,000 nonsmoking adults die of lung cancer as a result of breathing secondhand
    smoke; and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) causes 35,000 nonsmoking adults to die from
    heart disease.

   Cigar smoking has health consequences and hazards similar to those of cigarettes such as: cancer
    of the lung, oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, and probably the pancreas.

   Nationwide, 14% of male high school students and 2% of female high school students were
    currently using chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip in 2005.

   The risk of cancer of the cheek and gums may increase nearly 50 fold among long-term spit
    tobacco or snuff users.

   Smokers who quit before the age of 50 cut their risk of dying in the next 15 years in half
    compared with those who continue to smoke.

   Smoking, on average, reduces life expectancy by approximately 14 years.

   Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death for both men and women.




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                            Secondhand Smoke Statistics (SHS)
Secondhand smoke, or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), contains numerous human
carcinogens for which there is no safe level of exposure. Scientific consensus groups have
repeatedly reviewed the data on ETS. (Source: Cancer Facts and Figures 2008)

Risks for Adults:

      Secondhand smoke has been classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
       (EPA) as a known cause of lung cancer in humans (Group A carcinogen).
      Secondhand smoke is estimated to cause approximately 3,000 lung cancer deaths in
       nonsmokers each year.
      An estimated 35,000 deaths are caused from heart disease in people who are not current
       smokers, but are exposed to secondhand smoke.
      Exposure may cause irritation of the eye, nose, and throat, coughing, wheezing, chest
       tightness, and reduced lung function in adult nonsmokers.
      Secondhand smoke contains over 4,000 substances, more than 50 of which are known or
       suspected carcinogens, suspected to cause cancer in humans and animals, and many of
       which are strong irritants.

Risks for Children:

      Infants and young children whose parents smoke are among the most seriously
       affected by exposure to secondhand smoke.
      Each year, exposure to secondhand smoke causes 150,000 to 300,000 lower
       respiratory tract infections (such as pneumonia and bronchitis) in infants and
       children younger than 18 months of age, resulting in between 7,500 and 15,000
       hospitalizations each year.
      Children exposed to secondhand smoke are also more likely to have reduced lung
       function and symptoms of respiratory irritation like cough, excess phlegm, and
       wheezing.
      Secondhand smoke increases the number of asthma attacks and the severity of
       asthma in about 200,000 to 1 million asthmatic children.




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 AUDIENCES FOR GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT ACTIVITIES
There are still an estimated 45 million adult Americans who smoke. Depending on the demographics of
your local community, there are several ways to educate the public about the benefits of quitting smoking
and several key locations where we’ve found it best to help people quit smoking. These include:

     • Malls                                    • Drug stores and pharmacies
     • Hospitals                                • Restaurants
     • Sporting and cultural events             • Worksites
     • Military bases                           • Colleges and universities
     • State buildings

In addition, we have very important prevention messages for young people. The best locations for
communicating and interacting with children and teenagers include:
     • Malls                                    • Elementary, middle, and high schools
     • Youth community centers/activities       • Coffee and ice cream shops
     • Social media – Facebook, Utube,
       My Space, Sharinghope.tv



           INFORMATION FOR THE GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
One of the most challenging jobs during the Great American Smokeout is involving everyone in the
community and ensuring that every audience receives the most appropriate information. Great American
Smokeout activities should focus on prevention, cessation, and advocacy for all ages — directing smokers
and youth to www.cancer.org, www.greatamericansmokeout.org, or 1-800-ACS-2345. Providing the
public with the resources they need further positions the American Cancer Society as the source for
reliable tobacco control information.

                            GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
                               YOUTH AND SCHOOLS

   Prevention programs have proven effective in the elimination of smoking.
   Youth-based community programs that identify social influences and provide skills to resist them
    have led to reduction in smoking onset.
   Programs that focus on short-term negative consequences, including social undesirability and
    physiological impairment, are most effective.
   Adding youth-oriented mass media enhances effectiveness of youth-based community programs.
   Since smoking behavior develops along a series of stages that begins when students are in sixth grade,
    smoking prevention needs to be initiated earlier than high school.
   Staying smoke-free in school probably means a person will never start.




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                                       YOUTH CONTEST IDEAS

Contests are a fun way to actively involve students in their own tobacco education. Below is a list of
contest ideas that can be incorporated into Great American Smokeout activities:

   Hold a contest for the best stop-smoking creation: a poster, essay, song, debate, radio or TV
    commercial, home video, editorial, poem, slogan, banner, cartoon, joke, comedy routine, non-
    smoking pledge, or rap.

   Work with local radio or TV stations to sponsor a public service announcement (PSA) contest.
    Students write the script for the PSA and a local radio/TV station produces it. The winning entry
    could be broadcast during the news on Thursday, November 20, as part of the Great American
    Smokeout celebrations in your community. Please coordinate with your local American Cancer
    Society communications staff person if you want to contact the media.

   Work with a local outdoor advertising company to sponsor a billboard design contest. The students
    could create an antismoking billboard that the outdoor advertising company would put on billboards
    as part of local Smokeout celebrations.

   Work with cheerleaders to develop anti-tobacco cheers. Hold a district-wide cheerleading contest.
    Select winning cheers to share on your local TV PSA, media event, or radio message.
   Enter the Great American Smokeout/ SharingHope.tv Video Contest – Encourage youth to make a
    short video urging people to quit, reasons why you shouldn’t start, or to share a story related to
    tobacco and smoking.
   Invite a cancer survivor (who had a smoking-related cancer) and/or ex-smoker to speak at an all
    school assembly. Afterwards, have each student sign pledge to either quit smoking or never start


                           ADDITIONAL YOUTH ACTIVITIES
Here are some more ideas for programs that your local American Cancer Society can help implement in
schools as part of your Great American Smokeout activities:
   Incorporate anti-tobacco messages, such as
         — smoking experiments in Science
         — essays on smoking in English
         — smoking equations in Math
         — effects of smoking in Health
         — review of cigarette ads to determine whom tobacco companies target with their ads in Social
          Studies
         — review of tobacco issues in current events
   Use American Cancer Society information found on www.greatamericansmokeout.org.
   Have students research and write stories for the school newspaper about the social and health
    consequences of smoking.

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   Invite a motivational speaker who has “quit the habit” to give youth motivation and the power to say
    no. The speaker can talk about how he/she did it successfully and how quitting smoking has improved
    his/her life.
   Ask the school newspaper to cover tobacco issues, including health effects, cost of using tobacco,
    social ramifications, and the marketing practices of the tobacco industry.
   Put on a Smokeout comedy show at a school assembly. Aspiring stand-up comedians can perform
    routines and skits about how difficult it is to quit smoking and how many people die from tobacco
    use.
   Organize high school and junior high students to put on a show for elementary school students in
    your district. The older kids learn from writing and producing a show while the younger kids learn
    from people they look up to.
   Encourage students to “adopt” their parents or other loved ones that smoke. Students can promise to
    provide moral support and keep a watchful eye on those who are trying to quit as part of the Great
    American Smokeout.
   Invite high school athletes, cheerleaders, and band members to talk to elementary or middle school
    students about why they don’t smoke or invite a high school tobacco prevention youth group or
    coalition to speak.
   Utilize school sporting events as a platform to share anti-tobacco and Great American Smokeout
    messaging (Great American Smokeout Shootout Classic basketball tournament).




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                    SAMPLE PUBLIC ADDRESS ANNOUNCEMENTS
                FOR THE WEEK OF THE GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT

Monday, November 17
In recognition of the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout, all this week we’ll be talking
about the dangers of using tobacco. For example, did you know that more Americans die from cigarettes
than AIDS, alcohol, car accidents, fires, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides combined? Call
1-800-ACS-2345 to get help in quitting smoking.

Tuesday, November 18
Cigarette companies spend billions of dollars every year on advertising that makes smoking look
glamorous. But they conveniently forget to tell you how smoking causes bad breath, yellow teeth, stained
fingers, wrinkles, and even hair loss. Not too glamorous. They also forget to tell you how difficult it is to
stop smoking once you start. Teenagers find it very difficult to quit smoking — 73 percent of teens that
have ever smoked daily have tried to quit and only 13.5 percent are successful. Call 1-800-ACS-2345 to
get help in quitting smoking.

Wednesday, November 19
If you think smoking cigars, using spit tobacco, or dipping snuff is a safe way to use tobacco, think again.
Dipping snuff is highly addictive — it has levels of nicotine equal to cigarettes, and increases your chance
of oral cancer by as much as 50 times. Some cigars contain as much tobacco as one whole pack of
cigarettes. Cigars are also addictive and increase your risk of cancer as well. Call 1-800-ACS-2345 to get
help in quitting smoking.

Thursday, November 20

Tobacco smoke contains over 4,000 chemical compounds, including at least 50 different substances that
are known or suspected to cause cancer. Some of the same ingredients found in nail polish remover and
rat poison are also in cigarettes. One poison in tobacco is nicotine. An injection of one drop of nicotine in
its purest form will kill an average-sized man. So think twice before using tobacco. Call 1-800-ACS-2345
to get help in quitting smoking.




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                   SAMPLE GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
                      PROCLAMATION FOR STUDENTS

Whereas,     The students of (name of school) take great pride in our future and our health, and

Whereas,     We show our community pride by working toward a healthier, smoke-free generation
             for those younger students who look to us to set a good example, and

Whereas,     Not starting to smoke is the healthy thing to do, and

Whereas,     We know that more Americans die each year from smoking-related diseases than from
             AIDS, alcohol, car accidents, fires, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides combined, and

Whereas,     The American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout is held the third Thursday
             in November to encourage young people not to start a lifetime of addiction to nicotine,

Therefore,   I, (name), (school president), do hereby proclaim Thursday, November 20, 2008, as
             Great American Smokeout Day at (name of school), and in doing so, I urge all
             students of (name of school) to show we are united in taking this positive action to a
             more promising, healthy future.




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                           GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
                           PROMOTION IDEAS FOR MALLS

Today’s health-conscious Americans are demanding smoke-free environments in which to shop, eat, and
relax. If you have not yet implemented a smoke-free policy, the Great American Smokeout is the perfect
opportunity to begin the process, or the best day to start your new policy. By participating in the Great
American Smokeout and providing your patrons with a smoke-free environment, you send a message that
you care about their health and well-being. Furthermore, you will be contributing to the success of a
nationwide promotion to help Americans lead healthy, smoke-free lives.

You can get involved in the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout in several ways:
Host a Smokeout event with a local fitness facility to show customers the benefits of being healthy and
smoke-free.

      Have an American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout sale where customers get special
       deals on November 20, 2008.
      Fill a jug with change and let customers guess the number of packs of cigarettes that could be
       purchased with it. (Hint: It won’t be many!) Draw a grand prizewinner from the correct guesses.
      Work with vendors in your food court to add “cold turkey” sandwiches to their menu for quitting
       smokers on Smokeout Day.
      If your mall is not smoke-free and has no plans to implement a smoke-free policy, convince them
       to go smoke-free for the day as part of Smokeout celebrations.
      Encourage retailers to offer discounts to patrons who “turn in” tobacco-related items—ad,
       ashtrays, etc.

      Have an information booth staffed by volunteers to distribute information about how to quit.

Representatives from your local American Cancer Society are happy to work closely with you to create a
successful Great American Smokeout promotion. Also, more information can be found at
www.greatamericansmokeout.org, www.cancer.org, or by calling 1-800-ACS-2345.




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                           GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
                        PROMOTION IDEAS FOR RESTAURANTS
There is a continuing movement by the tobacco industry to ensure that restaurants have smoking sections.
Two of the largest programs, the Accommodation Program and Peaceful Coexistence, are funded by
Philip Morris and RJ Reynolds, respectively. Both programs rely on using scare tactics with restaurants,
saying that they will lose business if they ban smoking.


However, the truth is that smoke in the air is like chlorine in a pool — there’s no way to separate the two.
Unless restaurants have separate ventilation systems, there is no healthy, safe way to have smoking and
nonsmoking sections. The Great American Smokeout is a perfect day for your restaurant to proclaim that
it is going to be smoke-free.


By participating in the Great American Smokeout and providing patrons with a smoke-free environment
in which to relax, eat, and drink, you are sending the message that you care about their health and well
being. You also will be contributing to the success of a nationwide promotion, helping Americans lead
healthy, smoke-free lives.


Here are some promotions you might implement in your establishment in conjunction with the American
Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout:

         Go smoke-free for the day and give quitting smokers a refuge where they won’t be tempted to
          light up.

         Add a special American Cancer Society “cold turkey” sandwich on Smokeout Day.

         Host a promotion where smokers can turn in their cigarettes or cigars or smokeless tobacco
          product for a free food item on November 20.

         Host a Smokeout event during the lunch hour and happy hour.

         Many restaurants have voluntarily chosen to go smoke-free. Use placemat and correlating table
          tents at these establishments to announce GASO, give important health information about
          secondhand smoke, highlight the Quitline, and publicly recognize the bar or institution for being
          smoke-free.

         Template letters and certificates are available to thank restaurants and bars in a very personal
          ways. Take a photo giving them the certificate and send to the local paper.

         Many communities have smoke-free dining guides that inform residents where they can dine in
          an establishment free of secondhand smoke. Local departments of health have this information
          available to the public.

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                          GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
                        PROMOTION IDEAS FOR WORKSITES
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has concluded that widespread exposure to secondhand
smoke presents serious and substantial public health problems. Workers have been awarded
unemployment, disability, and worker’s compensation benefits for illness and loss of work due to
exposure to secondhand smoke.


Many workplaces around the country are implementing smoke-free policies to provide clean indoor air
and protect employees from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. By implementing smoke-free
policies and encouraging employees to become smoke-free themselves, everyone benefits with potential
increased productivity, fewer sick days, and lowered insurance claims. The increasing public support of
smoke-free environments also makes the Great American Smokeout a perfect day to initiate new non-
smoking policies.


By participating in the Great American Smokeout and providing employees with a smoke-free
environment in which to work, you send the message that you care about the health and well-being of
your employees. You will also be contributing to the success of nationwide promotion that helps
Americans lead healthy, smoke-free lives.

The following are a few ways that your workplace can participate in the American Cancer Society’s Great
American Smokeout:
       Host No-Smoke Breaks or organized walks when everyone can take a fresh-air breather and
        relax, as they DON’T light up. You’ll encourage employees to take well-deserved breaks and
        refresh themselves with healthy snacks and exercise to become more productive instead of
        lighting up as a result of stress.
       Help pay for a membership to a nearby health club for quitting smokers who are worried about
        stress and weight gain. An aerobics class or weight training will ease the tension of quitting and
        help trim waistlines too! Some health centers may be willing to offer special discount rates for
        new members.
       Hold an informal breakfast for smokers and for adoptive non-smokers. Treat them with special
        American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout materials.
       Create a competition between different departments or regional offices to collect the most kept
        pledges to quit smoking. One prize can go for quitting for the day with a grand prize for people
        who stay smoke-free through the New Year.
       Feature a “cold turkey” special on cafeteria menus.
       Raffle a “cold turkey” for Thanksgiving among Smokeout participants.



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   Ask non-smokers to give up something like coffee, chocolate, or soft drinks to help them
    empathize with smokers.
   Set up Smokeout stations where smokers can trade cigarettes or spit tobacco products for chewing
    gum, breath mints, carrot sticks, or pretzels to help them kick the habit.
   Include a list of Smokeout participants in the company newsletter and follow up on those
    employees who make a one-month, three-month or longer commitment to stay smoke-free.
   Incorporate Smokeout into employee health promotion or wellness program. Arrange for blood
    pressure screenings, fitness activities, or healthy diet counseling.
   Where appropriate, promote the American Cancer Society cessation resources to employees at 1-
    800-ACS-2345.
   Invite a yoga or similar instructor to the company for a tension-reliever at the end of the day to
    encourage employees who stayed smoke-free to keep it up on the drive home and after dinner.




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                           GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
                         PROMOTION IDEAS FOR HOSPITALS
As one of the centers for health in the community, health care systems are great locations for promoting a
healthy lifestyle among patients and staff and for helping the American Cancer Society promote the Great
American Smokeout.

   Display Smokeout materials throughout the hospital, including employee lounges.
   Host Smokeout stations where smokers can trade cigarettes or spit tobacco products for chewing gum,
    breath mints, carrot sticks, or lollipops to help them “lick” the addiction.
   Incorporate Smokeout into a community health promotion. Arrange for blood pressure screenings,
    fitness activities, and nutrition counseling.
   The American Cancer Society offers a list of cessation resources and information to help tobacco
    users quit. The American Cancer Society Quitline services are available in some states, which offers
    free telephone counseling, advice and materials for smokers trying to quit. Refer to the ACS Quitline
    information in this packet. Call 1-800-ACS-2345 24-hours a day for more information.


Many hospitals have voluntarily become smoke-free work sites. If your local hospital now has a smoke-
free campus use GASO as a way to recognize the standard set by your local health care system by
bringing them a certificate or banner of appreciation.




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         GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT PROMOTION IDEAS FOR
                  COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Many college-age students have smoked for years because they started as teenagers. Now many college
smokers want to quit. The key to success is to hold Smokeout activities in a highly visible, popular place
where most students will go during the course of the day. The college quad, cafeteria, or student unions
are ideal locations.


   Work with the student body president to proclaim November 20 as the American Cancer Society’s
    Great American Smokeout on campus. The student council can vote on the issue to get other students
    interested in participating in Smokeout.
   If dorms are not already smoke-free, work with the student council to establish smoke-free dorms or a
    smoke-free campus policy.
   Promote the American Cancer Society cessation resources on campus. Call 1-800-ACS-2345 for
    advice and materials for smokers who are trying to quit. Posters, business cards, ad slicks, and
    postcards may be available through the American Cancer Society at
    www.greatamericansmokeout.org.
   Meet with the editor and staff of the campus newspaper to discuss the health effects of tobacco and to
    explain the propensity for starting to smoke in order to look “cool.” Ask the paper to take an in-depth
    look at the reasons people smoke, the addictive nature of cigarettes, and the marketing practices of the
    tobacco industry.
   Meet with campus radio station DJs and ask them to participate in and promote the Great American
    Smokeout activities on air.
   Ask the management at popular bars and hangouts to go smoke-free for the day.
   Ask a photographer from the college yearbook staff to take photos of Smokeout events to be included
    in the school memories.
   Work with the communications and film department to produce a public service announcement for
    local broadcast, urging students not to smoke.
   Ask the communications and film department to work with local high schools to produce a video for
    elementary schools explaining the dangers of using tobacco.
   Set up a competition among campus fraternities and sororities to help smokers quit.
   Ask your American Cancer Society to provide antismoking posters, brochures, or newsletters to
    display in the student union and cafeteria.
   Enter the Great American Smokeout/ SharingHope.tv video contest – Encourage youth to make a
    short video encouraging people to quit, reasons why you shouldn’t start, or share your tobacco-related
    story.




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                  GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT PROMOTION
                        IDEAS FOR MILITARY SITES

Historically, military personnel have used tobacco at a higher percentage rate then the general population.
Therefore, the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout is a natural promotion that works
well as an on-base activity. In addition to promoting healthy lifestyles on military bases, including Great
American Smokeout promotion contributes to the success of our nationwide promotion helping
Americans lead healthy, smoke-free lives.

Following are some promotions that can be implemented on military installations to encourage
participation in the Great American Smokeout:

  Schedule a Smokeout promotion in the base commissary during the weeks before Smokeout.
  Set up Great American Smokeout stations in recreational areas, clubs, dining facilities, and other
    central locations so quitters can trade their cigarettes and smokeless tobacco for chewing gum, carrot
    sticks, popcorn, mineral water, sunflower seeds, lollipops, and other snacks.
  Work with the dining hall to have a “cold turkey sandwich” available for quitting smokers on
    November 20.
  Promote physical fitness activities such as fun runs, “cold turkey trots,” walks, or dances to kick off
    Smokeout.
  Promote the American Cancer Society cessation resources through 1-800-ACS-2345 or
    www.cancer.org.
  Sponsor a competition among units. The unit with the highest percentage of smokers quitting could
    win a day off for all members.
  Include base newsletters, newspapers, and other media in your promotion plans. Use bulletin boards,
    marquees, public address systems, and regularly scheduled meetings to remind smokers of the
    approaching Smokeout activities.
  Display Smokeout posters wherever cigarettes and smokeless tobacco are sold.
  Place a large bin at the main entrance or in key buildings for personnel to dispose of cigarettes and
    smokeless tobacco products.
  Turn your former smokers into film stars by making a video featuring quitters explaining why and
    how they quit. Ask them to make their stories humorous by discussing things like their worst nicotine
    fit. Show the video on the base’s TV channel, at the dining hall, or during recreational activities
    during the week of Smokeout.
  Sponsor a “cold turkey” raffle where successful quitters would be eligible to win frozen turkeys.
  Ask non-smokers to give up a favorite treat or activity for the day to empathize with smokers.



                                                                                                           18
Sample Article

                       THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY’S
                     ANNUAL GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT®

November (insert date), 2008 — The American Cancer Society, the nation’s leading voluntary health
agency, today will host the 32nd annual Great American Smokeout and help millions of smokers kick the
habit, and help youth understand the importance of never starting to smoke.


The Great American Smokeout promotion is the American Cancer Society’s annual, nationally-
recognized day when we ask smokers to put down their cigarettes, cigars, spit tobacco, or any tobacco
product because they all have the potential to cause cancer. Because we know that approximately 32
million smokers (out of 46 million current smokers) want to quit smoking completely, we will continue to
offer support and education to the public. The promise of an addiction-free life has encouraged many
smokers to join in and prove to themselves that they can live a day without cigarettes, and that they can
therefore live the rest of their lives without them.

Smokers who are ready to kick the habit can find help through the American Cancer Society’s by calling
toll-free, 1-800-ACS-2345.[Insert quote from local clinical or cessation experts here]

The Great American Smokeout is not just about adult smokers and cessation. As the times change and our
understanding of the addictive cycle of nicotine increases, we’re working to prevent children from ever
becoming smokers. Ninety percent of current adult smokers started before they were 18 years old. That’s
why the Great American Smokeout is also focusing on promotions that will communicate to our children
the social disadvantages of smoking, and provide them with the tools to recognize and avoid negative
social influences.

[Insert information on local Smokeout events]

The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization
dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives and
diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy and service.

For information about cancer, call toll-free anytime 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit the American Cancer
Society Web site at www.cancer.org.




                                                                                                            19
Sample Article


                The Great American Smokeout® Educates Americans
                           About the Costs of Tobacco

The American Cancer Society is educating the public about the cost of tobacco during the Great
American Smokeout, November 20, 2008.

The number of people who die or suffer illness because of its use best measures the cost of tobacco to
society. One in five Americans die each year from tobacco use. The annual American death toll from
tobacco is estimated at more than 400,000.

Tobacco use also drains the U.S. economy of more than $160 billion in health care costs and lost
productivity. Smoking-related medical costs totaled $75.5 billion in 1998 and accounted for 8 percent of
personal health care medical expenditures.

Even though smokers die younger than the average American, over the course of their lives, current and
former smokers generate an estimated $501 billion in excess health care costs. Tobacco costs Medicare
more than $10 billion per year.

Smokers who are ready to kick the habit can find help through the American Cancer Society by calling
toll-free, 1-800-ACS-2345.

The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization
dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives and
diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy and service.

For information about cancer, call toll-free anytime 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit the American Cancer
Society Web site at www.cancer.org or www.greatamericansmokeout.org.




                                                                                                         20
Sample Article


                      American Cancer Society Announces
                  the Great American Smokeout Video Contest
           Upload your video to Sharinghope.tv for a chance to win a flip video camera


As part of the 32nd annual Great American Smokeout, the American Cancer Society is urging people to
enter the Great American Smokeout Sharinghope.tv Video Contest. “The goal of the video contest is to
engage people, especially youth, to speak out against tobacco and urge people they know either not to
start or to try and quit,” said Christina Lindholm, communications director for Health Initiatives for the
High Plains Division of the American Cancer Society. “By creating a short video, we hope to give people
a creative outlet to communicate a very important topic or to share their tobacco-related stories, with the
hopes of helping others,” said Lindholm.

The Great American Smokeout Sharinghope.tv Video Contest begins October 5 and ends November 5.
To participate, create a short, several minute video with an anti-tobacco, prevention or cessation message
and upload to www.sharinghope.tv by Midnight, Nov. 5.

There are three categories for the contest: 1.) How has tobacco impacted your life/Tell us your tobacco-
related story; 2.) What's your plan to quit on November 20, 2008 or how did you quit; and 3.) Why should
your community be smoke-free? The best video in each category will win a flip video camera.

“Anyone can enter the contest, however youth, age 14 and older, are highly encouraged to participate
because ninety percent of smokers begin before the age of 18,” said Kirsten Bruce, health initiatives field
support manager for the High Plains Division of the American Cancer Society. Recent data from the
Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says the campaign to reduce teenage smoking has stalled. Smoking by
teenagers fell sharply and steadily between 1997 and 2003, but the latest data from the CDC survey found
that proportion of teens who smoke leveled off between 2003 and 2007. “This contest is one way to
engage everyone in the fight against tobacco and help youth learn about the dangers of smoking and
reasons not to start,” said Bruce.

Every year, smokers across the nation take part in the American Cancer Society’s Great American
Smokeout® by smoking less or quitting for the day on the third Thursday of November. The event
challenges people to stop using tobacco and raises awareness of the many effective ways to quit for good.
The 32nd annual Great American Smokeout is November 20, 2008.

For more information about the Great American Smokeout Sharinghope.tv Video Contest, call your local
American Cancer Society office.

Want to quit smoking on the Great American Smokeout, we can help. Call 1-800-ACS-2345 to find a
quitline or other support in your area.

SharingHope.tv is an American Cancer Society portal of user-generated content, including videos,
photos, audio, music and more. Cancer survivors, their friends, family members and those who are simply
curious about the disease can venture to find out about how people are dealing with cancer.

The American Cancer Society is dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by saving
lives, diminishing suffering and preventing cancer through research, education, advocacy, and service.
For more information 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and in many languages, call toll-free 1-800-
227-2345 or visit www.cancer.org.



                                                                                                        21
                          ONE DAY AT A TIME: STAY QUIT TIPS
                         FROM THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

   When you get the urge to light up, remember why you chose to quit. Each smoker has his or her own
    reasons: family, children, or himself or herself. Keep reminding yourself of your reasons for quitting.
   Say it like you mean it. Repeat your reasons for quitting 10 times each night before going to bed.
   Choose a method for quitting that fits your personal needs. Discuss your options with your pharmacist
    or doctor.
   Don’t do it alone. Reach out to family members and try to recruit other smokers you know to join you
    in quitting.
   Enroll in a counseling support program, either with smoking cessation organizations or as part of an
    over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy.
   To cope with cravings, practice the four Ds:

    1. Take Deep breaths. Slowly inhale and exhale.
    2. Drink lots of water throughout the day (especially during a craving).
    3. Do something else to get your mind off the craving. Call a friend, go for a walk, and chew on a
       carrot stick.
    4. Delay reaching for a cigarette. The urge will pass.

   Remove triggers that might entice you to smoke. Throw out all your cigarettes, breaking them in half
    and wetting them down. Clean out all the ashtrays in your home, office, or car, and put them away.
    Discard matches and lighters.
   Scramble up your day and change your habits connected with smoking. Drive a different route to
    work; eat lunch in a new place; leave the “scene of an urge.”
   At meals, eat slowly and pause between bites. Leave the dinner table immediately after finishing
    eating to avoid the urge to light up.
   Try your best to stay away from alcoholic beverages; stick to club soda, nonalcoholic punch, or spicy
    drinks. This will curb the urge to light up while you’re drinking, and will keep extra pounds off.
   Eat three meals. This maintains constant blood sugar levels, thus lowering urges to smoke. Avoid
    sugar-laden foods or spicy foods that often trigger a desire for cigarettes.
   Work out; exercise, such as swimming, running, and racket sports, helps relieve tension and your urge
    to smoke. Also, you’ll enjoy holiday feasts without having to worry about dieting later.
   Cleanse your body of nicotine. Drink liquids—lots of them. Water (6-8 glasses daily), herbal teas,
    fruit juices, and caffeine-free soft drinks all fit the bill. Pass up coffee, soft drinks, and alcohol
    because they can increase your urge to smoke.
   Smokers who are ready to kick the habit can find help through the American Cancer Society’s Cancer
    Information Center by calling toll-free, 1-800-ACS-2345.
                                                                                                         22
                                WHAT’S IN A CIGARETTE?

The 1988 Surgeon General’s Report on Nicotine Addiction concluded:

      Cigarettes and other forms of tobacco are addicting.
      Nicotine is the drug in tobacco that causes addiction.
      Nicotine is absorbed readily from tobacco smoke in the lungs and from smokeless tobacco in the
        mouth or nose. With regular use, levels of nicotine accumulate in the body during the day and
        persist overnight. Thus, daily tobacco users are exposed to the effects of nicotine for 24 hours
        each day.

   Tobacco smoke contains over 4,000 chemical compounds, including at least 50 different carcinogenic
    substances of which are known or suspected to cause cancer in humans and animals.

   Fingernail polish remover, otherwise known as acetone, is a poisonous gas, an insecticide, and an
    ingredient in cigarette smoke.

   Cigarette smoke contains cyanide, a deadly poison.

   Cigarette smoke contains formaldehyde, a chemical used to preserve dead frogs for high school
    biology labs.

   Cigarette smoke contains methanol, a wood alcohol. Taken in sufficient amounts, methanol can cause
    blindness. It is also used as a gasoline additive or substitute.

   Cigarettes contain tar, a conglomeration of the solid particles found in smoke. They form a sticky
    brown substance that can stain your teeth and clog your lungs.

   Cigarette tobaccos used in the U.S. and in most Western European countries have changed over time
    to a higher nitrate content that enhances the levels of carcinogenic substances.

   Several flavor-enriching materials are added to low-yield cigarettes to make them more “consumer
    acceptable.” Little is know about the fate of such flavor enhancers during smoking.




                                                                                                         23
                      SAMPLE PROCLAMATION FOR MAYOR/OFFICIAL

                                   State of (ENTER STATE NAME)

                                       City of (CITY OR TOWN)

                                              Proclamation

                                      By Mayor/Official (NAME)

Whereas:           The American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout encourages smokers to
                   quit, and

Whereas:           Thousands of children are experimenting with a product that can produce lifetime
                   addiction with an increased risk of cancer, and

Whereas:           More Americans die every year from tobacco-related diseases than from AIDS,
                   alcohol, car accidents, fires, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides combined, and

Whereas:           Youth-related promotions such as the Great American Smokeout Pledge encourage
                   youth not to start smoking, and

Whereas:           The health benefits of not smoking are substantiated and well known,

Therefore,         I (MAYOR’S NAME), Mayor of the City of (NAME), by virtue of the authority
                   vested in me, do hereby proclaim Thursday, November (DATE), (YEAR), as

                       The American Cancer Society’s, Great American Smokeout

Day in this city, and in doing so, urge all smokers and smokeless tobacco users to demonstrate to
themselves and our children that they can quit and to further encourage our children not to start smoking
by joining the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout.

In Witness thereof,

I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the Executive Department of (name of city) be affixed
this (DATE) Day of November, (YEAR).

Mayor




                                                                                                       24
High Plains Quitline Promotional Information

State            Service             Funding Source        Available         Phone number
                 Provider                                  promotions
Hawaii           Free and Clear      State Department      Business card     1-800-ACS-2345 *
                                     of Health

Kansas           American Cancer Department of             Generic           1-800-ACS-2345
                 Society         Health and                business card
                                 Environment

Missouri         Free and Clear      Department of         Business card     1-800-ACS-2345 *
                                     Health and Senior
                                     Services

Nebraska         American Cancer Department of             Generic           1-800-ACS-2345
                 Society         Health and Human          business card
                                 Services

Oklahoma         Free and Clear      State Department      Business card     1-800-ACS-2345 *
                                     of Health

Texas            American Cancer Department of             Texas specific    1-800-ACS-2345
                 Society         State Health              brochures and
                                 Services                  generic
                                                           business card

The American Cancer Society’s toll-free number, 1-800-ACS-2345, will be used for all Quitlines
outside of the American Cancer Society. Callers will be provided American Cancer Society
materials and then referred to the caller’s state Quitline. All Society materials will
promote the Quitline through 1-800-ACS-2345.

Protocol: Kansas and Nebraska all have a five-session protocol. Nebraska has enforced a new
concept through the use of a brief intervention session used as a pre-session. They are then
asked if they want to continue with the remaining four sessions. Texas practices a four-session
protocol.




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