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STEAM CAR DESCRIPTION 1910 STANLEY STEAMER_ 5 PassengerTouring

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STEAM CAR DESCRIPTION 1910 STANLEY STEAMER_ 5 PassengerTouring Powered By Docstoc
					                           STEAM CAR DESCRIPTION


           1910 STANLEY STEAMER, 5 PassengerTouring, Model 70


            Owned by Jean and John Linderman of Glastonbury, CT

       Stanley Steamers were the creation of the twins, Francis Edgar and
Freelan Oscar Stanley, late in their lives after they had made a fortune from the
sale to George Eastman of their invention and patent rights to a machine for
making photographic dry plates in high volume. The first car was produced as a
one-off race car in 1897, and the last car was produced in 1924 in Newton,
Massachusetts. Overall about 10,600 Stanley Steamers are believed to have
been produced, and about 400 - 600 exist today.

       This 1910 Stanley is a non-condensing 20 horsepower car, and is often
referred to as a “coffin-nose” for obvious reasons.

        The car has a fire-tube boiler that operates at 600 psi. Steam is
generated in the boiler by a gasoline-fired burner, or with minor modifications
firing can be by kerosene, or various vegetable oils. If the fuel vaporizes with
heat and burns, the car can use it.

      Originally, the cars were sold to burn white gas, and when the government
saw an opportunity and started to tax gas used in internal explosion engines, the
Stanley twins, being frugal New England Yankees, converted to kerosene which
had many home uses and was not taxed. Retrofit kits were sold to existing car
owners.

       A two cylinder, double-acting steam engine receives superheated steam
from the boiler at about 600F, and is directly coupled to the rear axle with a 3:2
drive ratio. Backing up is achieved by reversing engine rotation.

       Maximum speed: over 55 mph

       Consumption:     Fuel - 8 mpg from a 26 gallon tank

                       Water - 1 mpg from a 36 gallon tank

				
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