Positive behaviour management and low level disruption

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					Strategies for Managing Low Level
   Disruption in the Classroom


Tuesday 22nd June 2010




          Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Overview of the Session

 Planning   for good
  behaviour
 Strategies for managing
  low level disruption
 Skills for de-escalation



          Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
NBSS Support




        Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Low Level

“ While many of the incidents of
  disruption may not appear in
  themselves to be of undue
  seriousness, taken cumulatively and
  on a recurring basis, they
  undermine the climate for teaching
  and learning in ways that are
  corrosive for the school
  community.”
School Matters 2006 p52
               Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
                           Plan for good
         Reconnect          behaviour          Separate the
         and repair                              behaviour
        relationship                           from student


Follow up on                   8
 issues that               principles                  Language of
    count                   Vass and Hook                choice
                                  04


         Model the
                                                Focus on
         behaviour                               primary
         you want           Actively build      behaviour
                              trust and
                               support



                       Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Motivational Talk

  Talking to students and
 colleagues about what you
 want and would like to see
 happening - not what you
         don't want



         Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Bill Rogers Skills
   Tactical ignoring                       Direct questions
                                              Use “what”, “when”,
   Proximity
                                                 “how” or “where?”
   Tactical pausing
                                                Avoid “why?” or “are
   Non-verbal cueing                            you”?
   ‘Take up time’                          Direct and deferred
   Behavioural direction                    choices
   Rule reminder                           Blocking – partial
   Prefacing                                agreement and
                                             refocusing
   Distraction/ diversion
                                            Assertive comment-
                                             direction – command



                     Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Keeping it Positive

   An emphasis on positive rather than
    negative statements
   Regular and sustained use of
    encouragement and rewards
   Teaching students the social skills they
    need to be successful
   Re-directing the students towards
    success, rather than highlighting their
    mistakes


                Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Battle zone or Learning zone




                                    Tim
                                    O’Brien
                                    1998

            Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
     Cycle of Acting Out Behaviour
1.   Calm
2.   Trigger
3.   Agitation                            5
4.   Acceleration            4                   6
5.   Peak
                       3
6.   De-escalation                   Engage or
                                      Enrage
7.   Recovery
                  2               Intervention       7
              1
                           Baseline behaviour

                  Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Danger Signs!
   You are in an escalating situation if:
       Answering pointless questions
       Beginning to argue
       Trying to persuade
       Justifying your requests
       Explaining things over and over
       Changing your voice
       Changing your requirements
       Making exceptions




                  Jacqui McCarron, NBSS
Escape
   Give an initiating command/choice
   Thank student before it is done
   Walk away
   This will:
       Show the class who is in charge
       Eliminate/reduce argument
       Cause minimal damage to relationship with
        student
       Not entertain the class
       Give more time to other students


                  Jacqui McCarron, NBSS

				
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