Electric Charge Electric

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					Electric Charge

   Electric charge is measured in coulombs.
   The charge on an electron is _1.6x10-19C.
   A positive charge is caused by a loss of
    electrons
   A negative charge is caused by an gain of
    electrons.
   For a given process charge is conserved
    because the loss of electrons equals the gain
    of electrons.
Electric Charge

   Electric charge is measured in coulombs.
   The charge on an electron is _1.6x10-19C.
   A positive charge is caused by a loss of
    electrons
   A negative charge is caused by an gain of
    electrons.
   For a given process charge is conserved
    because the loss of electrons equals the gain
    of electrons.
Electric Charge

   Electric charge is measured in coulombs.
   The charge on an electron is _1.6x10-19C.
   A positive charge is caused by a loss of
    electrons
   A negative charge is caused by an gain of
    electrons.
   For a given process charge is conserved
    because the loss of electrons equals the gain
    of electrons.
Electric Charge

   Electric charge is measured in coulombs.
   The charge on an electron is _1.6x10-19C.
   A positive charge is caused by a loss of
    electrons
   A negative charge is caused by an gain of
    electrons.
   For a given process charge is conserved
    because the loss of electrons equals the gain
    of electrons.
Electric Charge

   Electric charge is measured in coulombs.
   The charge on an electron is _1.6x10-19C.
   A positive charge is caused by a loss of
    electrons
   A negative charge is caused by an gain of
    electrons.
   For a given process charge is conserved
    because the loss of electrons equals the gain
    of electrons.
Electric Charge

   Electric charge is measured in coulombs.
   The charge on an electron is _1.6x10-19C.
   A positive charge is caused by a loss of
    electrons
   A negative charge is caused by an gain of
    electrons.
   For a given process charge is conserved
    because the loss of electrons equals the gain
    of electrons.
Electric Charge

   Electric charge is measured in coulombs.
   The charge on an electron is _1.6x10-19C.
   A positive charge is caused by a loss of
    electrons
   A negative charge is caused by an gain of
    electrons.
   For a given process charge is conserved
    because the loss of electrons equals the gain
    of electrons.
Charging
   Charging by conduction results in the
    same charge. A negatively charged
    object will charge another object
    negatively by conduction. A positively
    charged object will charge another
    object positively by conduction.
Charging
   Charging by conduction results in the
    same charge. A negatively charged
    object will charge another object
    negatively by conduction. A positively
    charged object will charge another
    object positively by conduction.
Charging
   Charging by conduction results in the
    same charge. A negatively charged
    object will charge another object
    negatively by conduction. A positively
    charged object will charge another
    object positively by conduction.
Charging
   Charging by conduction results in the
    same charge. A negatively charged
    object will charge another object
    negatively by conduction. A positively
    charged object will charge another
    object positively by conduction.
Charging by Induction
   If a negatively rod is placed near a neutral
    electroscope electrons are repelled into the
    leafs and they separate If the electroscope
    is now grounded while the negatively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with leave the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be positively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a negatively rod is placed near a neutral
    electroscope electrons are repelled into the
    leafs and they separate If the electroscope
    is now grounded while the negatively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with leave the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be positively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a negatively rod is placed near a neutral
    electroscope electrons are repelled into the
    leafs and they separate If the electroscope
    is now grounded while the negatively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with leave the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be positively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a negatively rod is placed near a neutral
    electroscope electrons are repelled into the
    leafs and they separate If the electroscope
    is now grounded while the negatively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with leave the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be positively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a negatively rod is placed near a neutral
    electroscope electrons are repelled into the
    leafs and they separate If the electroscope
    is now grounded while the negatively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with leave the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be positively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a positively charged rod is placed near a
    neutral electroscope electrons leave the leafs
    and they separate. If the electroscope is
    now grounded while the positively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with enter the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be negatively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a positively charged rod is placed near a
    neutral electroscope electrons leave the leafs
    and they separate. If the electroscope is
    now grounded while the positively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with enter the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be negatively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a positively charged rod is placed near a
    neutral electroscope electrons leave the leafs
    and they separate. If the electroscope is
    now grounded while the positively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with enter the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be negatively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a positively charged rod is placed near a
    neutral electroscope electrons leave the leafs
    and they separate. If the electroscope is
    now grounded while the positively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with enter the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be negatively charged.
Charging by Induction
   If a positively charged rod is placed near a
    neutral electroscope electrons leave the leafs
    and they separate. If the electroscope is
    now grounded while the positively charged
    rod remains near the top of the electroscope,
    the electrons with enter the electroscope
    through the ground. If the rod is now moved
    away from the electroscope the leaves will
    separate because the electroscope will now
    be negatively charged.
Coulomb’s Law
   F = k q1q2
         r2

   k=8.99x109 N m2
                C2
Coulomb’s Law
   F = k q1q2
         r2

   k=8.99x109 N m2
                C2
Coulomb’s Law
   F = k q1q2
         r2

   k=8.99x109 N m2
                C2
Coulomb’s Law
   F = k q1q2
         r2

   k=8.99x109 N m2
                C2
Coulomb’s Law
   F = k q1q2
         r2

   k=8.99x109 N m2
                C2
Coulomb’s Law
   F = k q1q2
         r2

   k=8.99x109 N m2
                C2
Coulomb’s Law
   F = k q1q2
         r2

   k=8.99x109 N m2
                C2
Principle of Superposition
           Q1         Q3




      Q2
Principle of Superposition
           Q1         Q3




      Q2
Principle of Superposition
           Q1         Q3




      Q2
Principle of Superposition
           Q1         Q3




      Q2
Principle of Superposition
   The force of Q1 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the left.
   The force of Q2 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the right and a vertical
    component up.
   The total force on Q3 by Q1 and Q2 is equal to
    the square root of the sum of x components
    squared and the sum of the y components
    squared.
Principle of Superposition
   The force of Q1 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the left.
   The force of Q2 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the right and a vertical
    component up.
   The total force on Q3 by Q1 and Q2 is equal to
    the square root of the sum of x components
    squared and the sum of the y components
    squared.
Principle of Superposition
   The force of Q1 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the left.
   The force of Q2 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the right and a vertical
    component up.
   The total force on Q3 by Q1 and Q2 is equal to
    the square root of the sum of x components
    squared and the sum of the y components
    squared.
Principle of Superposition
   The force of Q1 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the left.
   The force of Q2 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the right and a vertical
    component up.
   The total force on Q3 by Q1 and Q2 is equal to
    the square root of the sum of x components
    squared and the sum of the y components
    squared.
Principle of Superposition
   The force of Q1 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the left.
   The force of Q2 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the right and a vertical
    component up.
   The total force on Q3 by Q1 and Q2 is equal to
    the square root of the sum of x components
    squared and the sum of the y components
    squared.
Principle of Superposition
   The force of Q1 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the left.
   The force of Q2 on Q3 has a horizontal
    component to the right and a vertical
    component up.
   The total force on Q3 by Q1 and Q2 is equal to
    the square root of the sum of x components
    squared and the sum of the y components
    squared.
Electric Fields
   E=F
      qo

    The direction of E at a point is defined
    to the direction of the electric force on
    a small positive test charge placed at
    that point.
Electric Fields
   E=F
      qo

    The direction of E at a point is defined
    to the direction of the electric force on
    a small positive test charge placed at
    that point.
Electric Fields
   E=F
      qo

    The direction of E at a point is defined
    to the direction of the electric force on
    a small positive test charge placed at
    that point.
Electric Fields
   E=F
      qo

    The direction of E at a point is defined
    to the direction of the electric force on
    a small positive test charge placed at
    that point.
Electric Fields
   E=F     qoE = F   qoE = K qo q
      qo                     r2

             E=kq
                r2
Electric Fields
   E=F     qoE = F   qoE = K qo q
      qo                     r2

             E=kq
                r2
Electric Fields
   E=F     qoE = F   qoE = K qo q
      qo                     r2

             E=kq
                r2
Electric Fields
   E=F     qoE = F   qoE = K qo q
      qo                     r2

             E=kq
                r2
Electric Field Lines
   Electric field lines begin on a positive and
    end on a negative.
   Electric Field lines never cross each other.
   The number of lines drawn leaving a positive
    or ending on a negative is proportional to the
    the magnitude of the charge.
   The electric field vector E is tangent to the
    electric field lines
Electric Field Lines
   Electric field lines begin on a positive and
    end on a negative.
   Electric Field lines never cross each other.
   The number of lines drawn leaving a positive
    or ending on a negative is proportional to the
    the magnitude of the charge.
   The electric field vector E is tangent to the
    electric field lines
Electric Field Lines
   Electric field lines begin on a positive and
    end on a negative.
   Electric Field lines never cross each other.
   The number of lines drawn leaving a positive
    or ending on a negative is proportional to the
    the magnitude of the charge.
   The electric field vector E is tangent to the
    electric field lines
Electric Field Lines
   Electric field lines begin on a positive and
    end on a negative.
   Electric Field lines never cross each other.
   The number of lines drawn leaving a positive
    or ending on a negative is proportional to the
    the magnitude of the charge.
   The electric field vector E is tangent to the
    electric field lines
Electric Field Lines
   Electric field lines begin on a positive and
    end on a negative.
   Electric Field lines never cross each other.
   The number of lines drawn leaving a positive
    or ending on a negative is proportional to the
    the magnitude of the charge.
   The electric field vector E is tangent to the
    electric field lines
Electric Field Lines
   Electric field lines begin on a positive and
    end on a negative.
   Electric Field lines never cross each other.
   The number of lines drawn leaving a positive
    or ending on a negative is proportional to the
    the magnitude of the charge.
   The electric field vector E is tangent to the
    electric field lines
Field lines Same Charge
Field lines Same Charge
Field lines –Same Magnitude
Field lines –Same Magnitude
Field lines Different Magnitudes
Field lines Different Magnitudes



 Less charge      less chargel




 Less charge                     less charge
Electric Fields in Conductors
   The electric field is zero everywhere inside
    the conducting material.
   Any excess charge on an isolated conductor
    resides entirely on its surface.
   The electric field outside a charged conductor
    is perpendicular to the conductor’s surface.
   On a irregularly shaped conductor, the charge
    accumulates at locations where the radius of
    curvature of the surface is smallest – at
    sharp points.
Electric Fields in Conductors
   The electric field is zero everywhere inside
    the conducting material.
   Any excess charge on an isolated conductor
    resides entirely on its surface.
   The electric field outside a charged conductor
    is perpendicular to the conductor’s surface.
   On a irregularly shaped conductor, the charge
    accumulates at locations where the radius of
    curvature of the surface is smallest – at
    sharp points.
Electric Fields in Conductors
   The electric field is zero everywhere inside
    the conducting material.
   Any excess charge on an isolated conductor
    resides entirely on its surface.
   The electric field outside a charged conductor
    is perpendicular to the conductor’s surface.
   On a irregularly shaped conductor, the charge
    accumulates at locations where the radius of
    curvature of the surface is smallest – at
    sharp points.
Electric Fields in Conductors
   The electric field is zero everywhere inside
    the conducting material.
   Any excess charge on an isolated conductor
    resides entirely on its surface.
   The electric field outside a charged conductor
    is perpendicular to the conductor’s surface.
   On a irregularly shaped conductor, the charge
    accumulates at locations where the radius of
    curvature of the surface is smallest – at
    sharp points.
Electric Fields in Conductors
   The electric field is zero everywhere inside
    the conducting material.
   Any excess charge on an isolated conductor
    resides entirely on its surface.
   The electric field outside a charged conductor
    is perpendicular to the conductor’s surface.
   On a irregularly shaped conductor, the charge
    accumulates at locations where the radius of
    curvature of the surface is smallest – at
    sharp points.

				
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posted:6/4/2012
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