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					Australian Sports Commission

       Annual Report



         2003–2004
© Australian Sports Commission 2004

ISSN 0186-3448

This work is copyright. Apart from any uses as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968,
no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the
Australian Sports Commission. Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction should
be directed to:

The Manager
Business Development
Australian Sports Commission
PO Box 176
BELCONNEN ACT 2616
Email: copyright@ausport.gov.au

For general enquiries concerning the Australian Sports Commission:
Tel: (02) 6214 1111
Fax: (02) 6251 2680
Email: asc@ausport.gov.au
Web site: www.ausport.gov.au


Unless otherwise stated, all images Australian Sports Commission
Produced by Australian Sports Commission Publications staff
Letter of transmittal
Senator the Hon. Rod Kemp
Minister for the Arts and Sport
Parliament House
CANBERRA ACT 2600


I am pleased to submit the twentieth Annual Report for the Australian Sports
Commission covering the period 2003–04. The report has been prepared to meet the
requirements of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 as required
under Section 48 of the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989.

The Commissioners of the Board are responsible, under Section 9 of the Commonwealth
Authorities and Companies Act 1997, for the preparation and content of the Report of
Operations in accordance with the Finance Minister’s Orders. The Board resolved to
adopt the Report of Operations at its meeting on 9 September 2004 as a true and concise
portrayal of the year’s activities.

This report assesses our performance against the accountability framework agreed with
the Government, and highlights the success of the programs of the Australian Sports
Commission, including Business Operations, the Australian Institute of Sport, and Sport
Performance and Development.

I commend this report to you as a record of our achievements.

Yours sincerely




PETER T BARTELS
Chairman
Australian Sports Commission

5 October 2004




       © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
                                             Contents
Letter of transmittal
Mission statement
Chairman’s review
Chief Executive Officer’s report

Report of operations
Organisational overview
     Introduction
     Organisational structure
     Australian Sports Foundation
     Staffing
     Organisational chart
   Corporate governance
     The Australian Sports Commission Board
     Legislative reporting requirements
     Environment and heritage
     Enterprise agreements
     Social justice and equity
     Disability Action Plan
     Occupational health and safety
     Indemnities and insurance for officers
     Freedom of information
     Privacy
     Formal reporting requirements under the
       Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997
     Fraud control
   Performance reports
     Business operations
     Outcome 1           An effective national sports system
                         that offers improved participation in quality
                         sports activities by Australians
     Outcome 2           Excellence in sports performance
                         by Australians
   Financial accountability
     Budget
     Planning and accountability framework
     Internal and external scrutiny


         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
                                                Appendixes
1      Financial report
          Australian Sports Commission
          – Independent audit report
          – Financial statements
          Australian Sports Foundation
          – Independent audit report
          – Financial statements
2      Staffing statistics
3      Australian Institute of Sport scholarship program performances,
       2003–2004
4      Grant allocations to sports, 2003–2004
5      Summary of compliance
6      Australian Institute of Sport program locations
7      Contact officers
8      Australian Sports Commission corporate partners

Errata
Index




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Mission statement

                     To enrich the lives of all Australians through sport



Australian Sports Commission objectives

The Australian Sports Commission’s (ASC’s) Strategic Plan 2002–2005 sets the
direction, strategies and broad framework that allows the ASC to meet its statutory
objectives and achieve the outcomes the Government requires. Building on previous
plans, the ASC’s key objectives are to secure an effective national sporting system that
offers improved rates of participation in quality and diverse sports activities by
Australians, and to secure excellence in sports performance by Australians.

Supporting the ASC’s objectives are several critical result areas. These are:

·        greater grassroots sports participation, particularly by youth, women, Indigenous
         Australians and people with a disability
·        increased sports participation, particularly in rural and regional communities
·        increased membership and reach of local sporting clubs
·        best-practice management and governance of sport within and through national
         sporting organisations
·        increased adoption of the values of fair play, self-improvement and achievement
·        recruitment, retention and accreditation of people within the sports sector
·        improved economic efficiency within, and commercial return to, the ASC and
         national sporting organisations
·        continued achievements in high performance sport by Australian teams and
         individuals
·        recognition of the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) as a world centre of
         excellence for the training and development of elite athletes and coaches
·        a drug-free sporting environment.




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Chairman’s review
I am constantly reminded of the strength and depth of the Australian sports system and
its resilience in addressing challenges and managing issues while maintaining focus on
the delivery of high-quality programs across sport. The 2003–04 year produced its share
of unexpected challenges, but also delivered the lengthy list of achievements
documented in this report.

As Chairman of the Australian Sports Commission (ASC), I am proud to report that the
Commission has again provided strong leadership and momentum to Australian sport
through a comprehensive range of programs and initiatives. With unprecedented levels
of support from the Australian Government, we have enhanced the operation of a
national sports system that remains a world leader in developing high performance and
community sport.

The year under review has seen further strengthening of the cooperative approach in the
delivery of our national sports system, particularly in the area of high performance
athlete development. The national network of institutes and academies of sport,
including our own Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), is working to deliver quality
programs to all elite and potential elite athletes. The AIS remains at the forefront of
sports science, innovation and cutting-edge technology, through initiatives such as our
participation in the Cooperative Research Centres for MicroTechnology and
information delivery. The advantages gained from developments in these areas can
mean the difference between success and disappointment.

At the other end of the participation scale, community sport and the volunteers that
largely deliver it remain the foundation of our national system. Initiatives such as the
projects funded through the Targeted Sports Participation Growth Program and the
exciting Active After-school Communities program announced by the Prime Minister
on 29 June 2004 proactively seek to grow the number of people participating in sport at
the community level. Contrary to the perceptions of some, this area is a key focus of the
work of the ASC.

The ASC remains at the forefront of ensuring the integrity of sport remains in place.
Australia has long been a staunch advocate for the removal of performance-enhancing
substances and practices from sport, and played an integral role in the establishment of
the World Anti-Doping Agency. Working jointly with the Australian Sports Drug
Agency as Australia’s two nominated national anti-doping organisations, during the
year the ASC has progressed the adoption and implementation of the World Anti-
Doping Code within Australian sport. Australian athletes will benefit greatly from the
development and implementation of the Code as they compete on the international
stage. The ASC is committed to the Government’s zero tolerance policy, and will
continue to lead the fight against the use of performance-enhancing drugs in sport.

There are no easy answers to some of the issues and problems we encounter in sport.
The actions and failures of a few can taint the whole sports sector, and sadly it is these
that gain the attention of the media, rather than the many ‘good news’ stories that
abound in sport. In the year under review, we have seen widespread coverage of
behavioural problems in some of our professional sports, and allegations of misconduct
by individuals involved in sport. I have confidence in the processes and procedures by
which these matters are investigated and dealt with by sport.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Indeed, I find it extremely reassuring the way our sports, our athletes and others
associated with sport respond to pressure and negativity to reinforce the strength of the
sports system. The Australian spirit and determination underpins many of our successful
onfield sporting performances. For example, the men’s under-21 basketball team and
the men’s team pursuit cycling team both won World Championships during the year,
the latter doing so twice. Our women waterskiers performed admirably in winning three
separate World Championships, and what can be said about Layne Beachley, six-time
World Champion and winner of the 2004 Laureus World Alternative Sportsperson of
the Year? These are but some of the outstanding performances reported elsewhere in
this publication, and highlight the diversity of our international success.

Congratulations to everyone involved with sport, including players, coaches, officials
and administrators at all levels. You are to be commended for your participation,
dedication and achievements, particularly the more than 1 million volunteers involved
with sport in this country. To those that have represented their country and those that
have represented the AIS, you have done yourselves and your nation proud.

As we turn our attention to the future, our athletes are in the final stages of their
preparations for the 2004 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Athens. I wish our teams
every success and I am reassured that they have been given all possible support during
their preparation. Planning and training for the 2006 Commonwealth Games in
Melbourne is well underway, and soon our focus will be on the Beijing 2008 Games.
The ASC supports athletes, coaches and other support staff on an ongoing basis as they
prepare for major competitions and championships. The behind-the-scenes preparation
and support is often of equal importance to athlete preparation, and I acknowledge the
leadership role the ASC plays in this regard.

I am grateful for the support and commitment of the ASC Board of Commissioners who
have ensured sound governance and effective operation of the organisation. I appreciate
their positive response to the additional calls on their time, and individually and
collectively they bring considerable expertise and experience to the organisation.

The professionalism and commitment of the staff of the ASC is greatly appreciated by
the members of the Board. Many of you receive little recognition, but your contribution
makes the ASC an outstanding organisation, one that I am proud to be associated with.




Peter T Bartels
Chairman
Australian Sports Commission




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Chief Executive Officer’s report

In the last 18 months, Australian athletes and teams have won world championships or
major events in 18 sports at either senior or junior level, with 60 individuals or teams
standing on the gold-medal podium. The sports range from well-known ones such as
swimming, rowing, cricket and cycling to lesser-known or publicised sports such as
bodyboarding, weight-lifting and archery.

For many athletes and teams, it was a year focused on qualifying and preparing for the
2004 Athens Olympic and Paralympic Games. On behalf of the Australian Government,
the Australian Sports Commission’s (ASC’s) ongoing support of the high performance
programs in Olympic sports has contributed to the qualification of Australia’s largest-
ever off-shore Olympic team and good prospects for Australia’s most successful away-
from-home Paralympic Games. Recognising our athletes’ need for support to allow
them to adequately prepare for Athens, the Australian Government provided $1 million
in additional funding for direct athlete support, assisting 201 Olympic and 21
Paralympic athletes with their preparation.

During the reporting period, allegations concerning inappropriate attitudes and
behaviour within sport, such as sexual misconduct by coaches and athletes, and
incidents of spectator violence and disrespect, gained substantial media coverage. In
response, the ASC convened a forum for leaders in the sports industry in April 2004 to
consider a consolidated approach to dealing with such issues. The ASC remains
committed to ensuring sport maintains its strong integrity base, and is working with
sports on strategies to support the positive values and benefits that sport brings to the
community.

Overall, 2003–04 was a year of achievement for the ASC across a range of program
areas. For me, the highlight was on 29 June 2004 when the Prime Minister announced
the Building a Healthy, Active Australia initiative to address the growing crisis in
childhood obesity. The ASC has been given carriage of the main component of the
initiative — the Active After-school Communities program — which will provide more
opportunities for children to become physically active in the after-school hours timeslot.
This initiative was the result of the ASC taking leadership across government, and I
thank staff for their substantial efforts in its development. Active After-school
Communities represents an exciting step for the ASC and will strengthen our links with
state and territory agencies, sporting organisations and local communities.

Improved governance within sport remains a key focus for the ASC. Following the
Report of the Independent Soccer Review Committee into the Structure, Governance
and Management of Soccer in Australia (the ‘Crawford Report’) in September 2003, the
Government offered financial assistance for the restructuring of soccer in Australia.
Implementation of the recommendations made by the Crawford Report continued
during the year. In March 2004, Athletics Australia invited the ASC to undertake a
review to develop strategies to deal with the acknowledged problems in the sport. It is
expected that the review will be completed by the end of 2004.


          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
During the year, significant work was undertaken towards making the ASC and national
sporting organisations compliant with the World Anti-Doping Agency Code. The ASC
anti-doping template was revised and released for adoption by national sporting
organisations. Sport-specific advice was provided to more than 30 national sporting
organisations to enable them to comply with the ASC’s core anti-doping provisions. In
conjunction with the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the
Arts and the Australian Sports Drug Agency, support was also given to state and
territory government agencies and sporting bodies to implement the World Anti-Doping
Agency Code at all levels of government. The ASC has a zero tolerance policy on the
use of performance-enhancing drugs in sport and continues to work with athletes,
coaches, staff and national sporting organisations to ensure that Australian sport remains
a leader in the world-wide fight against the use of drugs in sport.

While the Athens 2004 Olympic Games loom large on the horizon at the end of the
reporting period, work has begun on planning for Australia’s participation in future
major international events. The ASC brought together all state and territory institutes
and academies of sport and major national sporting organisations to discuss a nationally
coordinated approach to high performance planning for the 2005–09 period. This
quadrennial planning process will maximise returns on the investment in excellence in
sports performance, in order to enhance our performance in future international
competition. Discussions have also begun with Chinese sporting representatives to plan
the 2008 Olympic campaign.

As an organisation that promotes excellence in management, the ASC attained a number
of achievements in its own management during the year. The ASC Code of Conduct
was revised, and a new staff certified agreement struck. By the end of the reporting
period, the revision of the ASC’s Anti-Doping Policy to become World Anti-Doping
Agency Code compliant was also nearing completion.

I would like to publicly record my thanks to all staff for their expertise, commitment
and enthusiasm in working within the Australian sports sector to ensure that not only is
the ASC a leader in Australian sport, but that the Australian sports system continues to
be a world leader.

To the Chairman of the ASC, Mr Peter Bartels, and other Board members I extend my
personal thanks for your dedication, leadership and support throughout a productive
year.

On behalf of the Australian Government, the Minister for the Arts and Sport, Senator
the Hon. Rod Kemp, has been a strong advocate for Australian sport and the ASC, and I
am grateful for his ongoing support.




MARK A PETERS
Chief Executive Officer
Australian Sports Commission
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
               Organisational
                 overview




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Introduction

The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is the Australian Government body
responsible for coordinating the Government’s commitment and contribution to the
sporting industry. Its role is to provide national leadership in all facets of sport
development from the elite level through national sporting organisations (national
governing bodies for sport and their affiliated associations, clubs and individuals), to the
government and private sectors, schools and the wider sporting community. In addition,
the ASC focuses on encouraging and strengthening a business culture in the sporting
industry in Australia and on contributing to the development of sport both here and, via
specific programs, abroad. It also offers a range of services that enhance the
contribution of sport to the health and social wellbeing of the Australian community.
The ASC delivers its responsibilities through three groups — the Australian Institute of
Sport (AIS), Business Operations, and Sport Performance and Development.

The ASC reports to the Federal Minister for the Arts and Sport, Senator the Hon. Rod
Kemp. The senior portfolio minister is Senator the Hon. Helen Coonan, Minister for
Communications, Information Technology and the Arts.

Every four years, the ASC prepares and distributes its strategic plan. Its current strategic
plan covers the period 2002–05 and reflects the policy directions established by the
Government’s sports policy, Backing Australia’s Sporting Ability: a more active
Australia. The strategic plan is the main planning document setting out the direction and
major strategies for the organisation for the four years to 2005.




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Organisational structure

Australian Institute of Sport

During 2003–04, the AIS continued its leadership role as a world centre of excellence
for the training and development of elite athletes and coaches. The AIS provided
facilities and assistance for elite athletes, including access to world-class coaches.
Through the AIS Performance Enhancement Program, which includes a coordinated
planning and evaluation process for AIS programs, the Institute provided integrated
services in clinical and sports sciences, and career, education and welfare for AIS sports
programs and athletes.

Throughout the reporting period, the AIS conducted 35 programs in 26 sports. National
sporting organisations are responsible for the management of the overall elite athlete
pathway in their sport. However, as agreed with each national sporting organisation, the
AIS plays one of two roles in the organisation’s elite athlete pathway by conducting
sports programs targeted at either:

·      elite or senior international programs (23 sports programs in 2003–04)
·      pre-elite or developmental programs (12 sports programs in 2003–04).

The AIS also continued to provide sports science and sports medicine services to 22
national teams on a commercial basis. It also provided technical and program leadership
to Australian sport. It conducted national programs in Athlete Career and Education,
Talent Search, Elite Sports Research and the Laboratory Standards Assistance Scheme.
It also coordinated benchmarking, best-practice and innovation projects in physical
therapies and recovery. The AIS is a core participant in the national Cooperative
Research Centres for MicroTechnology. Through this participation, the AIS aims to
keep Australian sports science at the world’s leading edge by developing unique
monitoring equipment that is essentially unobtrusive and can be used in training or in
competition.

During the reporting period, the AIS, as a program of the ASC, was extensively
involved in the ASC quadrennial planning process for 2005–09 with national sporting
organisations. The focus of this planning process was to ensure that sports have an
effective elite athlete pathway. This includes an agreed and specific role for an AIS
program that complements and adds to the role that state and territory institutes and
academies of sport and other partners play in the sport’s overall elite athlete pathway.

AIS staff provided significant input into the AIS Redevelopment Project, particularly
the aquatic testing and training centre, AIS service centre, and athlete residence and
welfare facilities. This development will significantly improve training, testing and
accommodation facilities available to Australia’s elite athletes attending the AIS
Canberra campus.

Director Michael Scott headed the AIS during the reporting period.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Business Operations

Business Operations provides corporate support to the ASC in order to meet
Government obligations, provide general services to sports, improve the national sports
information network, manage communication and marketing requirements, and manage
the significant commercial businesses of the ASC. The programs within Business
Operations are:
·         Business Development
·         Commercial Operations
·         Corporate Communications
·         Corporate Planning and Research
·         Facilities Services
·         Finance
·         Human Resources
·         Information Management
·         International Relations.
During the reporting period Business Operations consolidated plans for the $65 million
redevelopment of the AIS Canberra campus to ensure state-of-the-art facilities for the
future. It has upgraded the existing information technology infrastructure to safeguard
ASC intellectual property and to meet emerging needs such as a digital video repository
and the development and implementation of an electronic records management system.

Commercial Operations manages the AIS Canberra visitors centre, its sporting and
conference facilities, and the residential accommodation complex. It promotes the use
of the AIS Canberra facilities on a commercial basis to local, national and international
sporting groups and the general public. The business activities areas of the section
generate significant off-budget revenue for the ASC.

Business Operations also increased off-budget revenue through involvement with the
Cooperative Research Centres for MicroTechnology, negotiating commercial contracts
with overseas countries, receiving further funding to deliver community development
projects for Government departments such as AusAID and the Department of Foreign
Affairs and Trade, and increasing sponsorship.

In 2003–04, responsibility for the Australian Sports Foundation was transferred from
Sport Performance and Development to Business Operations.

Also during the reporting period, a review of the Media and Public Relations section
was undertaken. The decision was subsequently made to incorporate the newly named
Media Liaison unit into the Corporate Communications section. Corporate
Communications now incorporates publications, distribution, marketing, sponsorship,
event management and media liaison.

Business Operations was headed by Lois Fordham, General Manager, during the
reporting period.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Sport Performance and Development

During 2003–04, Sport Performance and Development provided integrated and targeted
funding and services to national sporting organisations in order to support all aspects of
their operations. Through standard Funding and Service Level Agreements between the
ASC and national sporting organisations, administered by Sport Performance and
Development, the ASC allocated funding and services against sports’ strategic plans.
Each agreement was negotiated, agreed and planned based on each national sporting
organisation’s needs and priorities, and its ability to contribute to the ASC’s outcomes.

Over the year, Sport Performance and Development worked to ensure that sports were
accountable and transparent, and provided opportunities for people of all ages and
capacities to compete. Through the provision of financial resources and key services
and support, Sport Performance and Development helped to prepare national sporting
organisations to meet their obligations and objectives in the areas of anti-doping,
member protection, risk management, corporate governance, financial management,
participation and high performance success. Australian sports are being challenged to
adopt a national approach to the implementation of policy and programs across the
range of sport development and high performance activities.

During 2003–04, Sport Performance and Development assumed a lead role in ensuring
that existing national coordinating bodies, such as the Standing Committee on
ORecreation and Sport and its sub-committee, the National Elite Sports Council,
wereare better integrated, as indicated through the ASC’s Quadrennial Planning
exercise to cover the 2005/09 high performance planning cycle. . Further opportunities
for integration emerged through the recently established sport development sub-
committee of the Standing Committee on ORecreation and Sport.

Sport Performance and Development also played a key role in delivering national high
performance outcomes, both as the primary funding agent for national sporting
organisation high performance programs, and as the coordinator of the national high
performance planning processcess mentioned previously. This exercise wasFor the first
time, a national approach to the planning of high performance sport for the 2005-2009
quadrennium funding cycle (2005–09) and was implemented with a view to applying
the collective resources of the ASC, the AIS, and the state and territory institutes and
academies of sport in a coordinated fashion. The objective of this approach was to
enhance Australia’s performance in international competition.

ASC funding is carefully structured and applied to develop sport from the grassroots
through to the elite levels. The notion of both social and elite pathways for athletes,
coaches, officials and administrators lies at the heart of a sport’s effective planning
processes. The ASC, through Sport Performance and Development, directs its funding
to ensure these pathways are in place and are effective in delivering increased
participation and continued international sporting success.

During the reporting period, Sport Performance and Development continued to:

·      challenge national sporting organisations to achieve agreed higher
       organisational, membership and athlete performance targets

·      provide national leadership on key issues and challenges within the sports
       industry
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications


·        demonstrate the social, economic and health benefits of participation in
         organised sport.

Sport Performance and Development was headed by Brent Espeland, General Manager,
during the reporting period.


Australian Sports Foundation

The Australian Sports Foundation was established in 1986 to assist Australian sport by
generating funds for the development of sport from the corporate sector and the
community at large. Projects can be registered for facility development, non-recurrent
equipment needs, sports development, team travel and hosting major events. The
Australian Sports Foundation is a public company and is governed by the Australian
Sports Commission Act 1989. It is listed in the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997
(Division 30, Sections 30 to 90), which enables the Australian Sports Foundation to
offer tax deductions to donors for contributions of $2 or more. Since its inception, the
Australian Sports Foundation has helped raise over $80 million for the benefit of sport
in Australia.

Following the release of the Australian Government’s national sports policy, Backing
Australia’s Sporting Ability: a more active Australia, the Australian Sports Foundation
relocated from Sydney to Canberra in August 2001, and was reintegrated within the
administration of the ASC.

The Australian Sports Foundation continues to build awareness in the sports sector of
the importance of partnerships involving sport, business and the broader community.
Through contact with sporting clubs, associations, national bodies and schools, and
through establishing links with local government and community bodies, it has worked
to promote understanding of the benefits of its tax-deductible services and to develop a
‘self-determinant’ culture within organisations. A focus of the Australian Sports
Foundation has been raising awareness of its services in regional and rural Australia.

As required by legislation, the Australian Sports Foundation’s annual financial
statements and related audit opinion for 2003–04 are at Appendix 1.


Staffing

The ASC employs a highly diverse range of staff in vocations such as elite and
developmental coaching, sports science and sports medicine, trades and horticulture,
technical, security, retail, sports and general administration, finance and management.

Staff are employed in full-time or part-time positions, either on an ongoing or non-
ongoing basis (fixed-term or casual employment).

Substantial increases in the demand for services to national sporting organisations and
ASC programs in the lead-up to the Athens Olympic Games led to an increase in staff
during 2003–04. This demand was managed efficiently with a relatively small overall
increase in jobs, achieved in part through a nett reduction in casual employment.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications


Detailed ASC staffing data can be found at Appendix 2.


Organisational chart




          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
               Corporate
               governance




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
          The Australian Sports Commission Board

The ASC is governed by a Board of 12 Commissioners who are appointed by the
Federal Minister for the Arts and Sport, Senator the Hon. Rod Kemp. Details of all
members who served on the Board during the year ending 30 June 2004 follow.

Mr Peter Bartels AO (Chairman) FAISM, FRS

                 Peter was formerly a Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of
                 a number of leading public companies. He is currently the Chairman of
                 Starpharma Ltd and Central City Studios Ltd.

                 He is the immediate past Chairman of the Commonwealth Heads of
                 Government Meeting Committee for Cooperation through Sport, was
                 Chairman of the Royal Women’s and Royal Children’s hospitals, and
                 was formerly a Director of the Melbourne Business School (Melbourne
University).

Peter is Patron of Cycling Australia, a Director of the organising committee for the
Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games Pty Ltd and a Director of the Australian Grand
Prix Corporation.

In his youth, Peter was an outstanding cyclist, an Australian team member for many
years and a Commonwealth Games cycling gold medallist at Perth in 1962.

He attended all seven meetings of the Board during the year and was an ex-officio
member of the Audit and Emoluments Committees.

Appointed to 7 November 2004



Mr Alan Jones AO (Deputy Chairman) BA, AEd (QLD), SDES (OXON)

                  Alan is a well-known breakfast broadcaster on Macquarie Radio 2GB
                  and can be heard nationally on the Nine Network each day on The
                  Today Show. He has received numerous awards for being the best
                  current affairs commentator and best talk-back radio host in the
                  country. He is a public speaker of wide acclaim. Alan is a former
                  Australian Rugby Union coach and a former coach of Balmain and
                  South Sydney in the New South Wales rugby league competition.

Alan is the Deputy Chairman of the New South Wales Institute of Sport and a Board
member of the Sydney Cricket Ground and Sydney Football Stadium Trust.

Alan attended four of the seven scheduled Board meetings during the year and was an
ex-officio member of the ASC committees.

Appointed to 7 November 2005


         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Mr Cory Bernardi

                      Cory is an Equity Portfolio Manager for a major Australian financial
                      planning and investment firm. He was an AIS scholarship holder in
                      rowing and went on to become an Australian representative in the
                      coxless four at the 1989 World Championships and other international
                      regattas. He continues to row for recreation.

                He attended all seven of the Board meetings during the past year. Cory
                chaired the Australian Sports Foundation Board throughout the year
and was reappointed to the ASC Audit Committee in May 2004 after deputising for Ms
Puels between October and January during her leave of absence. He continued his
association with the Indigenous Sport Program by representing it at various functions
and meetings. Cory was also a member of the judging panel for the 2003 ASC Media
Awards.

Appointed to 7 November 2004



Mr John Eales AM

                     John is an Executive of the BT Financial Group and is a Director of
                     both STW Sport and Events, and Mettle. He was appointed to the ASC
                     Board in November 2002 for a period of three years and has served as a
                     member of the Emoluments Committee during the past year.

                     John attended five of the seven scheduled meetings during 2003–04.

                     Appointed to 7 November 2005



Ms Michelle Ford–Eriksson MBE MA, BA

                      As an Australian representative in swimming for ten years, Michelle
                      won a gold medal in the 800-metres freestyle and a bronze medal in the
                      200-metres butterfly events at the Moscow Olympics in 1980. A dual
                      world-record holder for the 800-metres freestyle, Michelle also won
                      Commonwealth Games gold medals in the 200-metres butterfly event
                      in 1978 and 1982. Michelle was an inaugural member of the
                      International Olympic Committee Athletes’ Commission and a member
                      of the International Olympic Academy for the International Olympic
Committee.

For the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, she was a regional manager for the National
Olympic Committee services. Previously, Michelle was a consultant on the Olympic
campaign bids for Sydney (2000), Brisbane (1992) and Melbourne (1996). She spent a
number of years in Switzerland as a director of sport and a manager of a sports science
unit at the University and Polytechnic College of Lausanne. In 2003, Michelle was a
Director of Swimming Australia and continues to work as a consultant to the sports
industry.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Michelle served as a member of the Anti-Doping Committee and the Australian Sports
Foundation Board throughout the year. She attended all seven of the ASC Board
meetings held during the year.

Appointed to 7 November 2004



Ms Margot Foster BA, LLB

                    Margot has an established legal practice in Melbourne where she
                   combines her skills and experience as a practising lawyer with her
                   considerable involvement in sports administration. Margot was a
                   successful athlete, winning bronze in the women’s coxed four at the
                   Olympic Games in Los Angeles in 1984 and gold in the women’s
                   eights at the 1986 Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh.

                 Margot has served on numerous boards and committees since she
ended her competitive career in the late 1980s, including membership of the Australian
Olympic Committee’s Athletes’ and Education Commissions, Melbourne’s 1996
Olympic Bid Committee and Secretary General of Rowing Australia. Currently she
serves on the Boards of Gymnastics Australia, World Gymnastics Melbourne 2005 Ltd
and the Melbourne University Sports Association, and has recently been appointed to
the Board of the Australian National Bobsleigh Association Inc.

Margot attended all Board meetings held during 2003–04 and served on the Audit
Committee throughout the year. Margot’s legal expertise was instrumental in her
appointment to act as Chair of the Anti-Doping Committee to oversee the inquiry into
Doping Allegations within the AIS Track Sprint Cycling Program (the ‘Anderson
Report’).

Appointed to 7 November 2004



Mr Roy Masters BA, M Litt, Dip Ed

                 Roy is a journalist with the Sydney Morning Herald. He was first
                 appointed to the ASC Board in 1984 and is its longest-serving member.
                 He pioneered the Aussie Sport program, which introduced modified
                 versions of sport for children, and was an inaugural member of the
                 Audit Committee, where he continues to serve, currently as Chairman.

                 Roy had earlier careers as a schoolteacher and then as a coach of a
                 leading rugby league team.

He attended six of the seven scheduled Board meetings during 2003–04.

Appointed to 7 November 2005
         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Mr Kieren Perkins OAM
                 Kieren went to his first international swimming meet at the Auckland
                 1990 Commonwealth Games as a 16-year-old. He was the first
                 swimmer in history to hold Olympic, world, Commonwealth and Pan
                 Pacific titles simultaneously, and has been the recipient of numerous
                 prestigious awards within the sporting fraternity. Often rated as the
                 greatest male swimmer in Australian Olympic history, he is fondly
                 remembered by most Australians for his gold medal performance in the
                 1500 metres at the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games.
Kieren was a member of the successful 1993 Australian Olympic Committee Sydney
Olympic presentation bid in Monaco, and was appointed to the Board of Swimming
Australia in December 2002. His sporting achievements were acknowledged and
honoured through his appointment as an Executive Board member of the World
Olympians Association in December 2003. Kieren is also a Board member of the
Starlight Children’s Foundation.
Kieren attended six of the seven scheduled Board meetings and served on the
Emoluments and Anti-Doping Committees throughout the year.
Appointed to 7 November 2005


Mr Charles ‘Chilla’ Porter
                 Chilla has a strong affiliation with track and field, and was appointed
                 Chairman of the Board of the Western Australian Athletics Commission
                 (trading as AthleticA) late in 2003. He has previously been a Board
                 member and Chairman of the Western Australian Institute of Sport.
                 Chilla was a silver medallist in the men’s high jump at the Melbourne
                 1956 Olympic Games and competed in the 1960 Games in Rome. He
                 was a silver medallist in high jump at both the 1958 and 1962
                 Commonwealth Games.
He attended six of the seven scheduled meetings during 2003–04 and served on the
Australian Sports Foundation Board throughout the year.
Appointed to 7 November 2004


Ms Karin Puels MBA, LLB, B Comm, FAICD
                  Karin has worked extensively with sporting organisations through her
                  former role as Chief Executive Officer of the South Australian Health
                  Promotion Foundation, the largest sponsor of sport in South Australia.
                  She is currently a producer of a global media project and works in
                  business development ventures in Australia and offshore.
                She attended five of the seven scheduled Board meetings during the
                year and was granted a leave of absence for the other two in deference
                to her work commitments overseas. Karin continued in her role as a
member of the Audit Committee and served on the Australian Sports Foundation Board
throughout the year.
Appointed to 7 November 2004
         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Ms Pamela Tye OAM, Grad Dip ECE, Grad Dip Man Admin

               Pamela had a long association with the Australian Women’s Hockey
               Association before her appointment as the inaugural President of
               Hockey Australia, the amalgamated body representing men’s and
               women’s hockey. She is also a Vice-president and member of the
               Executive Board of the Federation of International Hockey. Pamela
               was the recipient of the Federation of International Hockey Award of
               Merit in 2001. She was a Director of the Board of the Sydney
               Paralympic Games and a member of the Sydney Youth Olympic
Festival Committee. Pamela has been a member of the State Sport Centre Trust in
Sydney since 1984.

Pamela attended six of the seven Board meetings held during 2003–04. She was a
member of the Anti-Doping Committee and chaired the Emoluments Committee
meetings. Pamela has served on the Australian Sports Foundation Board since her
appointment in May 2002.

Appointed to 7 November 2005



Ms Helen Williams AO BA (Hons)

                      Helen became the ex-officio member of the Board on her appointment
                      as Secretary of the Department of Communications, Information
                      Technology and the Arts in January 2002. She had previous
                      appointments as Secretary of the Department of Education and Youth
                      Affairs, the Department of Tourism, and the Department of
                      Immigration and Multicultural Affairs prior to being appointed as the
                      Australian Public Service Commissioner in 1998.

Helen is a member of the Management Advisory Committee of the Australian Public
Service and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management. She is a member of the
Board of the Bundanon Trust and a member of the Council of the National Library of
Australia.

She attended six of the seven scheduled Board meetings during the year.

Appointed in January 2002



Board activities

The Board met on seven occasions during 2003–04 in Brisbane, Adelaide, Melbourne,
Sydney and Canberra. Minister Kemp met with the Board on three occasions to discuss
its operational agenda and objectives. The Board was appreciative of his leadership and
accessibility.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
In conjunction with its interstate meetings, the Board took the opportunity to meet
informally with coaches and technical staff from the AIS sports programs in Adelaide,
Melbourne and Canberra.

In December, the Board held a joint meeting with the Australian Sports Drug Agency
Board to discuss their respective roles in adopting and promoting the World Anti-
Doping Agency Code in Australia. The ASC and the Australian Sports Drug Agency
have both been recognised as national anti-doping organisations but have independent
and separate roles, which are complementary and supportive of each other.

During the year, the Board addressed a range of issues including the development of
new strategic directions for the ASC and the AIS post-Athens, a policy for genetic
research and the use of genetic information in sport, and the development of strategies
to encourage a higher involvement of women in all areas of sport. It also took a lead
role in addressing the issue of abusive and other unacceptable behaviour in sport.

A major focus of the Board over the past 12 months was the development of a strategy
to re-establish sport and physical activity within the school environment. The Chairman
and Deputy Chairman held pivotal discussions with the Ministers for Sport, Health,
Education, and Children and Youth Affairs to develop a strategy to address obesity and
declining activity levels in school-aged children. In June 2004, the Prime Minister, the
Hon. John Howard MP, announced the Australian Government’s new initiative —
Building a Healthy, Active Australia — to address these issues. The ASC was given a
leadership role to implement this new strategy.

The Remuneration Tribunal determines the annual fee for members of the Board and
following a review of Commissioners’ responsibilities and workloads, approved an
increase to their remuneration in October 2003. The Chairman and Deputy Chairman
declined to have their annual fees increased. Within this review, the Tribunal also
determined that members of the ASC’s Audit Committee would be paid an additional
annual fee for their services from October 2003.


Committees

In consideration of the increased activity and responsibilities associated with the
implementation of the World Anti-Doping Agency Code, the Chairman determined in
February 2004 that an Anti-Doping Committee would be formed to assist in a review of
the ASC’s anti-doping model and to look at furthering the Government’s Tough on
Drugs in Sport strategy. Ms Tye chaired the committee, with the assistance of Mr
Perkins and Ms Ford–Eriksson. The committee has met on three occasions since it was
established.
Mr Masters continued as Chair of the ASC Audit Committee, with assistance from Ms
Puels and Ms Foster. Mr Bernardi deputised for Ms Puels during her three-month leave
of absence from October to January. In May 2004, the Board agreed to appoint a fourth
member to the sub-committee to assist with its increased workload and Mr Bernardi
joined the committee as a full-time member. The committee met on four occasions
during the year and a report on its activities is included in the ‘Financial accountability’
section.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Ms Tye chaired the three meetings of the ASC Emoluments Committee that were held
during the year. Mr Perkins and Mr Eales were the other members of this committee,
which monitors the terms of employment for senior executive staff.



The Australian Sports Foundation Board

Mr Bernardi (Chair), Mr Porter, Ms Puels, Ms Tye and Ms Ford–Eriksson continued
their appointments as members of the Australian Sports Foundation Board. The
Australian Sports Foundation Board meets in conjunction with, but separate from, the
ASC Board and met on seven occasions during the year. A report on the Australian
Sports Foundation’s activities is included in Appendix 1.



Government and Board Services

The Government and Board Services section oversees the maintenance of the integrity
and reputation of the ASC among its stakeholders, Government and the general public
through the coordination of timely and quality contributions to the business of
Government, the ASC Board and the broader sports sector. This includes the provision
of advice to the Minister and the Government on policy issues affecting the
development of sport in Australia.

The section also provides high-level policy analysis and advice, together with support
services, to the Chief Executive Officer and the Executive of the ASC. Government and
Board Services also provides secretariat services for the ASC Board and its committees,
and manages the ASC’s involvement with the Sport and Recreation Ministers’ Council
and the Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport.

In 2003–04, the section processed the following documentation and advice to the
Minister:
·         531 replies to ministerial correspondence
·         266 briefing submissions
·         167 Question Time briefs
·         48 Senate Estimates questions on notice
·         seven Parliamentary questions on notice.


Legislative reporting requirements

Under Section 48 of the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989, the ASC is required to
report on the activities listed below during the 2003–04 financial year:
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
·        No significant acquisitions or disposals of real property occurred. Del Monte, an
         AIS facility in Adelaide, was offered for sale by tender in May 2004 with
         tenders closing on 24 June 2004.
·        The ASC invested a total of $3.5 million in capital works projects in 2003–04.
         The most significant of these projects was the extension to the existing rowing
         facilities, completed in September 2003 at an approximate cost of $0.65 million.
         A total of $1.1 million was spent on the AIS Redevelopment Project during the
         reporting period.
·        Judicial decisions — no complaints were filed.



Environment and heritage


Legislative compliance

Implementation of the environmental-management system for the AIS Canberra site
continued during the reporting period. The directory of legal obligations, which is part
of the environmental-management system and assists the ASC to comply with
Commonwealth and territory environmental legislation, was reviewed.



Environmental policy

The ASC’s environmental policy includes principles for managing those aspects of the
environment affected by its activities.



Effects of the Australian Sports Commission’s activities on the
environment



Environmental incidents and breaches

There were no reportable breaches of environmental legislation within the ASC during
the year.


© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Environmental aspects and effects

In the first half of 2004, the ASC joined the Greenhouse Challenge. The Greenhouse
Challenge commits the ASC to a program of environmental performance improvements
covering energy use, waste minimisation and recycling to reduce greenhouse-gas
emissions.

During the reporting period, the ASC continued a water-use reduction program and
purchased 10 per cent green power as part of its electricity supply contract.

The ASC reports its annual building and transport-related energy consumption data to
the Australian Greenhouse Office for inclusion in its annual report, Energy Use in the
Australian Government’s Operations.


Environmentally sustainable design

The AIS Redevelopment Project engaged the services of an environment sustainability
design consultant. This consultant is responsible for providing advice to the designers
on environmentally sustainable design issues.



Heritage

No heritage issues arose during the reporting period.



Enterprise agreements

During the year, the new Australian Sports Commission (Committed to Excellence)
Certified Agreement 2004–2007, incorporating employment for staff in the AIS
Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre, was finalised for commencement from July 2004.



Social justice and equity

The ASC recognises the importance and value of workplace diversity. Strategies aimed
to ensure the ASC maintains a culture that values diversity include:
·        development and training of staff in the new ASC Code of Conduct, and its
         promotion by management at all levels
·        providing access and equity for people with a disability
·        provision of induction training for all new staff including a focus on staff
         expectations and the prevention of workplace harassment
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
·        promotion of the ASC’s Employee Assistance Program for all staff

·        raising the awareness of the need to balance work and family responsibilities.

A training program promoting standards of behaviour in compliance with the Code of
Conduct and its application within ASC workplaces commenced in April 2004.



Disability Action Plan

Ongoing consultation occurred regarding maintaining and improving a Disability
Action Plan to meet requirements, including the changes required as a result of the
refurbishment of the AIS Canberra site over the next two years. Information is also
provided to employees regarding their responsibilities under the Disability
Discrimination Act 1992.



Occupational health and safety

The ASC maintained its commitment to occupational health and safety through:

·        the ongoing operations of the ASC WorkSafe Committee

·        the delivery of training to over 120 ASC staff in the identification of hazards and
         risks

·        the delivery of occupational health and safety awareness training to the ASC
         Executive and senior managers

·        ongoing training of all occupational health and safety support groups across the
         ASC (these groups include first aid officers, fire wardens [including bomb threat
         and building evacuation training], health and safety representatives, and
         workplace harassment contact officers).

The ASC’s Employee Assistance Program has been widely promoted and provides a
free and confidential counselling service to staff and their families in times of need.



Formal reporting requirements under the Occupational Health and
Safety Act 1989

Section 30                           No requests were received from health and safety
                                     representatives

Sections 45, 46 and 47               No notices of safety breaches were received from Comcare
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Section 68                           One serious personal injury was reported


Indemnities and insurance for officers

The ASC is insured through the Government’s self-managed fund, Comcover. The full
cost of commissioners’ and officers’ insurance has been met through Government
appropriations. The ASC has met all statutory requirements associated with reporting to
Comcover.



Freedom of information

The Freedom of Information Act 1982 gives the general public the right of access to
documents held by the ASC. Freedom of information statistics for 2003–04 are as
follows:

•     Requests on hand at 30 June 2004                                           3

•     Requests received during 2003–04                                           13

•     Requests granted in full                                                   1

•     Requests granted in part                                                   7

•     Requests refused                                                           1

•     Requests transferred                                                       1

•     Requests for internal review                                               1

•     Appeals to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal                             1

Information regarding accessing ASC information under the Freedom of Information
Act 1982 can be found at Appendix 7.



Privacy

The ASC’s privacy statement can be found on its web site (www.ausport.gov.au). The
statement is in accordance with guidelines issued by the Privacy Commissioner. In
2002–03, the ASC was notified it had breached the disclosure provisions of the Privacy
Act 1988. Settlement is yet to be reached on the matter. The ASC provides in-house
training on issues pertaining to privacy as part of its induction program. In-house
awareness sessions are run periodically by the ASC for staff.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Formal reporting requirements under the CAC Act
1997

The ASC has not received any notifications under Section 28 of the Commonwealth
Authorities and Companies Act 1997.



Fraud control

The ASC is committed to the minimisation of fraud through effective fraud
management and control. Its current fraud control plan, while effective in its detection
and prevention strategies, will be revised within the next 12 months. This will ensure
that the ASC’s obligations under the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2002
continue to be met.




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
                      Performance
                        reports




© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Business Operations

To assist the ASC to successfully meet its agreed outcomes, Business Operations
provides corporate support to both the AIS and Sport Performance and Development.
The associated costs of this support are distributed between the outcomes. A description
of each Business Operations section, as well as its achievements for the past year, are
listed below.



Business Development

Business Development plays an essential role in the management, protection and
commercial development of the ASC’s intellectual property assets. It also promotes the
ASC’s commercial consulting capabilities, the preparation of business cases for new
products and services, and the provision of commercial and contractual legal support.
Business Development works in a supporting and educational role across the ASC to
identify and develop commercial opportunities.

Achievements over the past year include:

·        establishment of SportZCo Pty Ltd, a joint venture with the Cooperative
         Research Centres for MicroTechnology to market new sports-monitoring
         products

·        delivery of a range of international commercial consultancies

·        management of a series of commercially funded residential training placements
         at the AIS for visiting coaches and sports scientists from the Nigerian Institute
         for Sports.



Commercial Operations

Commercial Operations manages the AIS Canberra visitors centre, its sporting and
conference facilities, and the residential accommodation complex. It promotes the use
of the AIS Canberra facilities on a commercial basis to local, national and international
sporting groups and the general public.
The business activities areas of the section generate significant off-budget revenue for
the ASC by coordinating events and functions, hiring out facilities and residential
accommodation, providing guided tours of the AIS and the Sportex exhibition, and
through the operations of the AIS retail shop and the Swim and Fitness Centre.
Commercial Operations also manages a childcare centre on a commercial basis.
During the reporting period, 410,603 people used ASC commercial programs at the AIS
Canberra site, with 123,779 of these taking a guided tour of the AIS. Commercial
Operations managed:
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
·         323 sporting and commercial camps involving 8719 people

·         31 sporting carnivals involving 27 349 participants

·         33 functions in the AIS Arena for 37 017 people

·         21 conferences for 4699 people.

The remainder of the visits were through the Swim and Fitness Centre and the AIS
Swimming Pool turnstile.

Commercial Operations also hosted a number of major events that were conducted on
the site including the Hoopfest basketball tournament, the Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids
TRYathlon Series, and various Australian Masters Games events.

Concert activity in the AIS Arena was down on the previous year, reflecting a general
trend Australia-wide. The Swim and Fitness Centre’s level of profit was adversely
affected by the opening of the Canberra International Sports and Aquatic Centre,
although not to the degree originally anticipated. The AIS Residence occupancy has
been at record levels over the last 18 months and increased by 4.2 per cent in 2003–04
over the previous year. Profits for the AIS Residence, tours and commercial camps
exceeded budget due to the higher than anticipated level of activity on site.

During the reporting period, a process commenced to re-tender for site services as the
current contract expires in March 2005. A decision was taken to tender separately for
cleaning and catering services. The tender for site-cleaning services was let in May and
submissions were being evaluated at year’s end. Specifications for the catering-services
tender were being drawn up at the end of the reporting period.



Corporate Communications

Corporate Communications has multiple objectives that are designed to build the public
profile of the ASC, its roles and responsibilities, and the role of the Australian
Government in supporting and developing Australian sport. It plays a central
coordinating role across all areas of the ASC to deliver consistent and strong positioning
of the ASC and its activities.
The section is engaged in marketing and communicating the ASC’s messages and
programs — including its commercial activities — to key stakeholder groups. It also
produces ASC publications and other resources in support of ASC programs and
manages their distribution. Corporate Communications works to protect and strengthen
ASC brands, and to generate off-budget revenue through the ASC’s commercial
activities, corporate partnership program and the sale of resources through its
distribution function. Corporate Communications staff also support ASC programs
through the provision of strategic advice and assistance in implementing marketing
plans. Event delivery is another component of the program’s work, conducting high-
profile national events that are designed to generate increased participation in sport by
all Australians.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Following an internal review in June 2004 of what was the Media and Public Relations
section, the Media Liaison unit was established and incorporated into Corporate
Communications. The Media Liaison unit concentrates on securing quality media
coverage of the ASC’s programs and initiatives. The unit works closely with the media,
national sporting organisations and other sporting bodies to protect and enhance the
reputation of the ASC and national sporting organisations.

Specific achievements for Corporate Communications during the reporting period
include:
·         further strengthening of the ASC brands through the development and stringent
          application of guidelines on logo use
·         the production of approximately 600 publications and resources to support ASC
          programs
·         further strategic and effective marketing of ASC commercial activities and
          programs
·         the implementation of a partnerships policy and sales strategy
·         successful delivery of events including 1800 Reverse Street Active, Sanitarium
          Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon Series, Ausport Awards, ASC Media Awards and the
          AIS Athlete and Coach Awards
·         effectively managing media enquiries and monitoring media reporting of the
          ASC and its programs
·         providing strategic media advice to the programs of the ASC and national
          sporting organisations.



Corporate Planning and Research

Corporate Planning and Research manages the ASC’s social research agenda and
ensures the ASC meets its statutory requirements. Responsibilities include oversight and
management of strategies to assure and effectively utilise corporate research findings.
Corporate Planning and Research provides timely, evidence-based advice and support
services, highlighting the impact of program projects and contributing reliable research
findings to corporate program development and decision-making. It also develops and
revises the underpinning policies, practices and procedures of the ASC’s governance
and risk-management framework.
The year 2003–04 saw the ASC adopt a five-year strategic approach for social sports
research. The agreement between the ASC and the Standing Committee on Recreation
and Sport to conduct the Exercise, Recreation and Sport Survey was concluded. The
Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport agreed to extend the Exercise, Recreation
and Sport Survey and following a comprehensive procurement process, a contract was
let to continue the survey until 2006. Corporate Planning and Research manages this
large survey on the Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport’s behalf. The section
also manages the Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport Research Group web
site on behalf of the state and territory departments of sport and recreation.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
The ASC’s Social Research Panel is comprised of a group of eminent Australian sports
researchers and is an important component of the ASC’s research quality assurance. The
panel met on two occasions during the year. Discussions to finalise a partnership
arrangement with Sport England and UK Sport pertaining to involvement in their Value
of Sport Monitor project are well advanced. It is envisaged that this project will involve
the collection of data from several countries in the first instance.

Corporate Planning and Research provided strategic advice to a number of ASC
programs on areas including business planning education, undertaking client-
satisfaction surveys, providing research procurement advice, designing program
evaluation frameworks and bringing online a corporate social research register. In the
latter half of the reporting period, the ASC’s business planning and risk-management
documentation was revised as part of ongoing corporate process improvements.



Facilities Services

Facilities Services provides engineering, maintenance, asset and other property
management, general services and facilities operations for the ASC.

Key activities during the reporting period include:

·         completion of the extension to the AIS rowing facility at Yarralumla

·         construction of a clothing store

·         replacement of skylights in the AIS swimming complex

·        replacement of the sheeting on the Sports Science Sports Medicine
         Biomechanics Dome

·         refurbishment of the Theatrette in the Sports Training Facility building

·        development and implementation of a contract register as part of the ASC’s
         contract-management function.

Parliament approved the AIS Redevelopment Project at an estimated cost of $65.4
million on 21 August 2003. Since then, design consultants for all major elements have
been engaged and conceptual designs have been prepared. This includes the aquatic
testing and training centre, AIS service centre, athlete residence and welfare facilities,
sports development and education centre, and site-wide engineering and air-
conditioning services. A shortlist of contractors for the construction phase has been
completed after expressions of interest were called for in early 2004.

In June 2004, a security review and risk assessment of the AIS Canberra campus was
carried out and a report prepared. Its recommendations are currently being considered.

During the reporting period, the ASC’s Facilities Operations function was transferred to
Facilities Services from Commercial Operations. This function comprises the Security
unit and the day-to-day operations of facilities, excluding the AIS Arena.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Finance

Finance is responsible for the ASC’s financial management, business support, accounts
processing and financial reporting.

The Finance section focuses on the provision of support within the ASC while
continuing to ensure that the ASC satisfies the Government’s financial-management and
accountability requirements.

Finance’s major activities during 2003–04 include:

·        increasing liaison with ASC program areas to improve financial-management
         practices across the ASC and providing direct assistance on business decisions
·        meeting the Government’s external budgetary and reporting requirements
·        preparing the ASC’s annual financial statements
·        the management of insurance issues
·        the management of travel issues.


Human Resources

Human Resources manages the employment framework and work arrangements for all
ASC staff. Its services encompass remuneration management including payroll and
salary packaging, recruitment, development and updating of human resources policies
and advice, occupational health and safety, staff development, induction and workplace
relations.

Significant initiatives during the reporting period include:

·        development and implementation of an induction program

·        finalisation and distribution of the new Code of Conduct to all staff

·        provision of occupational health and safety training for approximately 100 staff
         in hazard and risk identification

·        upgrade of the human resources information system

·        development of a new certified agreement for the ASC workforce.



Information Management

Information Management encompasses Information Technology and the National Sport
Information Centre. An Information Management Strategic Plan was developed in early
2003 and the following projects were consequently undertaken during the reporting
period:
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
·        improved remote access for coaches, AIS programs and staff by providing
         secure web email for national and international access

·        a high-level analysis to improve the athlete and sport database

·        re-design and development of the ASC web site and intranet to improve
         information access and service delivery to sports

·        development of a sport client contact system to improve service delivery to
         sports following an intensive requirement-analysis process

·        upgrading and piloting the ASC’s electronic document-management system. In
         addition, a project piloting a collaboration and portal tool recently commenced.


Information Technology

Information Technology provides technology services to the ASC, including developing
and supporting applications and all computing and communications infrastructure.

During 2003–04, Information Technology developed and enhanced a range of
application systems, including a psychology session notes system, archery tracking
system, high performance tracking system and reporting module for Project CONNECT
(a national joint venture between the ASC and the Australian Paralympic Committee to
create opportunities for people with a disability to participate in sport).

Information Technology also implemented a range of improvements to the ASC’s
technical infrastructure, including:

·        significant upgrades to the local area network at the AIS Canberra campus

·        infrastructure work for the Hockey program, including the installation of new
         network equipment

·        design, development and implementation of a new network for the Golf program

·        server replacement for the Softball program

·        completion of Microsoft Exchange (email) upgrade

·        building of new SQL cluster for applications

·        evaluation of broadband network access technologies

·        purchasing, building and installing over 140 new PCs and laptops.


© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
National Sport Information Centre

The National Sport Information Centre provides a gateway to sport-related information
and services. It enables access to electronic resources and a world-class collection of
sports books, videos and journals, and provides regular updating services. The National
Sport Information Centre is also responsible for the ASC’s records management, web
services and audiovisual services.

The National Sport Information Centre continues to develop its use of digital delivery
and storage to provide access to, and to preserve, sports information. The ASC Image
Library is now searchable via both the intranet and ASC web site. Images can be
ordered online by staff and commercial clients. The National Sport Information Centre
provides a range of digital video services supporting AIS performance-analysis
activities.

The National Sport Information Centre service statistics for the reporting period were:
·      door count (number of visitors)                           58,803
·      reference queries answered                                 8,923
·      articles copied for clients                                5,402
·      books loaned to other libraries                            3,325
·      video units dubbed                                         1,817
·      inter-library loans for ASC staff                          1,628
·      personalised National Sport Information Centre tours         550
·      Image Library orders                                         473
·      photography tasks                                            163



International Relations

International Relations fosters cooperation in sport between Australia and other
countries through the provision of resources, services and facilities related to sport. It
does this principally through managing federally funded international community sports
development programs in the Pacific, Papua New Guinea, southern Africa and the
Caribbean, and through coordinating the ASC’s relationship with foreign agencies.
Programs managed by International Relations are detailed under Outcome 1.



During 2003–034, International Relations hosted40 17 visiting delegations from 2413
countries representing various international governments and institutions,. including a
personal visit by the Crown Prince of Brunei.

In December 2003, at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Abuja,
Nigeria, leaders agreed to disband the Committee for Cooperation through Sport, which
ASC Chairman Peter Bartels had chaired. Recognising, however, the important role
sport plays in development, leaders agreed to establish a Commonwealth advisory body
on sport, which will report through the Commonwealth Secretary General to Ministers
of Sport. Its inaugural meeting is scheduled to be held soon after the Athens 2004
Olympic Games.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




Outcome 1
An effective national sports system that offers improved
participation in quality sports activities by Australians

TOTAL PRICE: $34,586,000

The Australian Government envisions a national sports system that is robust and self-
sustaining, backed by a dynamic sports industry that plays a vital role in the
development of sport in Australia at all levels. The ASC plays a central leadership role
in developing a holistic sports delivery system.

The ASC works with other sports delivery agencies, including grassroots sporting clubs,
to assist their management to offer improved participation in quality sport for all
Australians, while ensuring that Australia’s elite teams are provided with the
opportunity to excel in competition on the world stage.

The ASC also plays a vital role in fostering cooperation in sport between Australia and
other countries by providing resources, services and facilities related to sport.

The following table presents the ASC’s performance against the measures associated
with Outcome 1.


Table 1        Outcome 1: National sport system development

COST TO GOVERNMENT: $28,619,000

    Activity         Quantity                       Target                       Result         Variance   Notes
                     /quality                                                                     (%)

Activity 1.1: Programs and services and national leadership

Leadership           Quantity     70 Funding and Service Level                  70          0
and                               Agreements, including high
partnership                       performance and service
                                  commitments, jointly agreed to by
                                  funded national sporting
                                  organisations

                     Quantity     Eight Funding and Service Level               7           –12.5          1
                                  Agreements, including service
                                  commitments, jointly agreed to by
                                  funded state/territory departments
                                  and/or stakeholders

                     Quantity     70 funded national sporting                   55          –21.4          2
                                  organisations to implement or                 71          1.4            3
                                  partially implement member
                           protection policies, risk-            22   –68.6   4
                           management frameworks and the
                           Junior Sport Framework/policy

                Quantity   Ten significant targeted            12     20.0    5
                           interventions and/or initiatives to
                           assist funded national sporting
                           organisations improve their
                           business practices, such as
                           strategic planning, governance and
                           structural change

                Quantity   Six workshops to improve high         1    –83.3   6
                           performance planning and
                           implementation

                Quantity   Two specific sector leadership        2    0
                           forums for the sports industry

                Quantity   70 funded national sporting           69   –1.4    7
                           organisations to implement World
                           Anti-Doping Agency and Australian
                           Government-compliant anti-doping
                           policies in accordance with the
                           World Anti-Doping Agency’s
                           specified timeframe

                Quantity   Assist ten of the smaller national    10   0
                           sporting organisations to support
                           their administrative arrangements
                           to enable capacity building

                Quality    Conduct Year of the Official,         5    0
                           Project CONNECT, Indigenous
                           Sport Program Athlete
                           Development, and Coaching and
                           Officiating Scholarship programs

                Quality    Sport Performance and                      –       8
                           Development programs, such as
                           Targeted Sports Participation
                           Growth Program, Indigenous
                           Sport, Project CONNECT,
                           Coaching and Officiating, and
                           Junior Sport, achieve rural and
                           regional reach in conjunction with
                           funded national sporting
                           organisations and other funded
                           stakeholders

                Quality    Work with select national sporting    ?    –       ?
                           organisations to support a national
                           initiative to improve sporting
                           experiences and skills of primary
                           school-aged children

Participation   Quantity   23 funded national sporting           23   0
                           organisations accessing numerous
                           program initiatives across the
                           Sport Performance and
                           Development program areas,
                           including coaching and officiating,
                           Indigenous, disability, junior,
                           women, club development,
                           Targeted Sports Participation
                           Growth Program and high
                           performance

                Quantity   Club membership through ASC                  –       9
                           programs significantly increased
                           (target: 1 million additional
                           members over four years, 2001–02
                           to 2004–05)

                Quality    Adapt the National Coaching                  –       10
                           Accreditation Scheme and the
                           National Officiating Accreditation
                           Scheme to adjust to the changing
                           needs of the funded national
                           sporting organisations and other
                           stakeholders

                Quality    Four major partnerships with the     4       0
                           Aboriginal and Torres Strait
                           Islander Commission, Australian
                           Council for Health, Physical
                           Education and Recreation,
                           VicHealth and the Australian
                           Paralympic Committee to support
                           initiatives in sports programs

Activity 1.2: Systems improvement

                Quality    80 per cent of funded national       91%     11.0
                           sporting organisations satisfied
                           with Sport Performance and
                           Development program
                           performance and service delivery

Activity 1.3: Research

                Quality    Review of data collection systems    Compl   0
                           to improve understanding of sport    eted
                           involvement by young people and
                           sporting club membership

                Quality    Review of data linking sport with    Compl   0
                           social, health and economic          eted
                           outcomes

                Quantity   Quarterly collection of adult        Compl   0
                           participation data and annual        eted
                           reporting of findings

Activity 1.4: Commercial activities

                Quantity   Generate and manage three new        9       200.0   11
                           off-budget commercial initiatives

Activity 1.5: International development assistance

                Quality    Maintain and strengthen the          4       0
                           management of four international
                           sports-development assistance
                                  programs

© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




Variance from targets
The following notes provide an explanation for variations between set targets and the
results achieved for Outcome 1.
1        Negotiations have taken place with the eighth state (Queensland) for joint
         delivery of programs outside the Funding and Service Level Agreement. As a
         result, the ASC worked with Queensland on Year of the Official and
         harassment-free sport projects during the year.
2        Fifty-five national sporting organisations are at various stages of developing or
         implementing a member protection policy nationally. It is anticipated that the
         remainder of the national sporting organisations will have a member protection
         policy and procedures in place by June 2005.
3        Seventy-one national sporting organisations have commenced or continued
         implementation of the risk-management framework (weight-lifting is yet to
         address risk management). An assessment against the risk-management
         framework revealed that 45 sports have significantly progressed their risk-
         management processes.
4        As part of their Funding and Service Level Agreement, all Targeted Sports
         Participation Growth Program national sporting organisations were required to
         attend a workshop to provide feedback on the draft Junior Sport Framework and
         formulate an action plan for the development of their respective junior sport
         policies. Twenty-two of the 23 national sporting organisations attended and
         drafted action plans. The ASC has identified nine pilot sports for the Junior
         Sport Framework (basketball, volleyball, swimming, hockey, netball, tennis,
         soccer, wrestling and golf). All sports have submitted proposals on their
         development and implementation process. Three sports have draft policies. The
         process undertaken by these sports will be documented and shared with all other
         national sporting organisations. A re-assessment of the junior sport policy
         mandatory requirement under the Funding and Service Level Agreements now
         means only those national sporting organisations that identify junior sport as a
         priority in their strategic plan will be required to develop a junior sport policy.
5        Management-improvement activities with national sporting organisations were
         above those forecast due in part to a focus on the implementation of the ASC
         sport governance principles by the ASC Board.
6        Following completion of the first generic workshop to assist sports with high
         performance planning, the quadrennial planning process was implemented. This
         was a more direct approach to assisting national sporting organisations to
         improve high performance planning and implementation, and replaced the
         previous workshop approach.??
7        The ASC worked with all ASC-funded national sporting organisations in the
         development of World Anti-Doping Agency Code-compliant anti-doping
         policies. Sixty-nine national sporting organisations have agreed to adopt specific
         anti-doping policies, rules and programs that conform with the Australian
         Government’s anti-doping strategy, World Anti-Doping Agency and the relevant
         international federation. Cricket and rugby league anti-doping policies have
         variations to the standard World Anti-Doping Agency component, however
         reference to Australian Government core principles relating to the World Anti-
         Doping Agency have been incorporated.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




8        Six national sporting organisations utilise ASC sport development funding to
         implement specific rural and regional strategies.

         Of the Targeted Sports Participation Growth Program sports that could report on
         their rural and regional/metropolitan status, 60 per cent of programs were
         conducted in metropolitan areas and 40 per cent were conducted in regional and
         rural areas.

         Of the 4703 members of the Club Development Network, 2081 (44 per cent) are
         from rural and regional areas.

         In early February 2004, the ABC Heywire forum was held with 38 young people
         from rural and regional Australia participating. The ASC Junior Sport unit ran a
         workshop session as part of the program.

         All state out-of-school-hours sports program pilots have involved participation
         by rural, regional and urban communities.

         The Active Australia Schools Network has 1080 members that comprise
         representatives from metropolitan, regional and rural locations.

         All coaching courses associated with the National Coaching Accreditation
         Scheme and all officiating courses associated with the National Officiating
         Accreditation Scheme are required to abide by the course design guidelines
         regarding access and equity, including catering for those in rural and regional
         areas. The Regional Sport Education Centre in Warrnambool, Victoria, has
         commenced conducting a series of generic education programs for local sporting
         associations and clubs. Level 2 Coaching Principles are provided online to cater
         for the rural and regional population.

9        Overall, 17 sports are 1.7 per cent above targeted participation to date. The
         reported result is from the 17 sports that have completed and reported on year
         one or year two of their programs. The remaining sports are either yet to report
         on year one or are only part way through their first year.

10       All national sporting organisations have been advised, through seminars,
         conferences and correspondence, of the capacity to vary their frameworks. Many
         national sporting organisations are currently assessing their frameworks and
         some have already made modifications to better suit their needs.

11       Commercial activity opportunities were stronger than anticipated due to an
         increase in approaches and a better than expected conversion rate on
         international visit initiatives.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




Programs



Planning and Reporting


Funding and Service Level Agreements

In 2003–04, Funding and Service Level Agreements were developed to bring together
all grant arrangements across the ASC Sport Performance and Development group into
a single agreement between the ASC and each national sporting organisation.
Previously, the ASC could have had up to seven separate agreements with one national
sporting organisation. The development of a single integrated agreement with each
national sporting organisation was seen as central to improving Sport Performance and
Development’s service delivery.

The planning documentation of national sporting organisations was used to define an
agreed set of performance measures that were included in each sport’s Funding and
Service Level Agreements. Satisfactory progress against these measures is a condition
of continued ASC funding.

As part of the Funding and Service Level Agreement approach, a revised monitoring
program has been implemented that focuses on the activities of national sporting
organisations in three priority areas:

·        ASC operational plan strategies
·        accountability for ASC funds
·        formal and informal performance reporting against the strategies and
         performance measures agreed and listed in each sport’s Funding and Service
         Level Agreement.

State and territory relations

During the reporting period, sport development service agreements were negotiated
with seven state and territory departments of sport and recreation for the delivery of
programs and services. The agreements covered activities in the areas of coaching and
officiating (including Year of the Official), junior sport, disability sport, organisational
development, club development and harassment-free sport. Discussions with
Queensland resulted in work on Year of the Official and harassment-free sport projects
being undertaken outside of the sport development service agreement.

Anti-doping
Funding and Service Level Agreements with national sporting organisations for 2003–
04 contained seven mandatory anti-doping performance measures and strategies. The
ASC worked with national sporting organisations to ensure they developed,
implemented and enforced anti-doping policies that complied with the ASC’s core anti-
doping provisions.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications


During the reporting period, the ASC also:

·        revised and released the ASC anti-doping template for national sporting
         organisations in accordance with the World Anti-Doping Agency program

·        actively participated in domestic and international anti-doping forums

·        worked with the Department of Communications, Information Technology and
         the Arts and the Australian Sports Drug Agency to harmonise and implement the
         Code at all levels of government

·        provided sport-specific advice and assistance to more than 30 national sporting
         organisations.

Harassment-free sport

Ongoing publicity surrounding allegations of sexual misconduct by coaches and
athletes, and incidences of spectator violence and disrespect have raised concerns about
whether sport is engendering or tolerating violent and other inappropriate attitudes and
actions. The ASC convened a meeting of leaders in the sports industry in April 2004 to
discuss an industry-wide approach to dealing with issues of inappropriate attitudes and
behaviours in sport. The ASC, in consultation with the sports industry, is progressing
with the following key areas:
·        developing national guiding ethical principles for the sports industry
·        conducting comprehensive research to determine what attitudes and behaviours
         exist in Australian sporting culture and what strategies may be effective in
         achieving any necessary cultural change
·        educating members and training role models to develop and promote positive
         and appropriate attitudes and behaviours
·        identifying and sharing good practice strategies.
Other activities relating to harassment-free sport undertaken during the reporting period
include:

·        commissioning a major review and evaluation of the ASC’s harassment-free
         sport strategy to determine if changes were required to ensure the strategy
         remains an effective risk-management tool that meets best-practice standards
         and the needs of the sports industry

·        assisting over 20 national sporting organisations with the development of
         member protection policies and related strategies
·      increasing the number of people trained as member protection officers by 40 per
       cent (a network now totalling over 580 people across 78 sports, local and state
       government agencies, and community groups)

·      educating coaches, officials and administrators on their rights and
       responsibilities in relation to child-protection and anti-discrimination legislation


          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




·      developing a new comprehensive ethics in sport web site that provides
       guidelines, templates, information, resources, contacts, research and relevant
       links to other sites (www.ausport.gov.au/ethics)

·      assisting with revision of the national Play by the Rules web site, including the
       addition of online information and training modules on child-protection issues in
       sport (www.playbytherules.net.au).

Direct Athlete Support

The Australian Government allocated $1 million in its 2003–04 budget to provide direct
funds to targeted elite athletes, selected on the basis of medal potential and individual
need, to assist in their daily living and training environment while they prepared for the
2004 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Direct Athlete Support allocations were made to
201 Olympic and 21 Paralympic athletes from 18 sports.


Sport Innovation and Best Practice

During the reporting period the ASC, through Sport Innovation and Best Practice,
providedassisted the development of the national sports system through the provision of
consultancy services and advice tofor 12 national sporting organisations in relation to
their structure, governance, management and strategic direction, with the aim of
increasing their capacity and capability to work towards their strategic objectives. This
included the implementation of the recommendations of the Report of the Independent
Soccer Review into the Structure, Governance and Management of Soccer in Australia
(the ‘Crawford Report’), and completed governance reform projects in equestrian,
triathlon and cycling.

Sport Innovation and Best Practice also worked on a number of other initiatives
includingthe facilitation and coordination of::
·      two pilot projects to assess the capacity of online learning to increase access for
       athletes, coaches and administrators to risk-management and athlete personal
       development courses
·      an organisational development conference and teleconferences with state
       departments of sport and recreation to coordinate national approaches to issues
       including governance reform, club development and risk management
·      the development of a performance improvement process to support national
       sporting organisation development based on the strategic priorities identified in
       planning documentation and broader sports industry requirements. The initial
       stage of the project included identifying the characteristics of a benchmark
       organisation to facilitate the comparison of national sporting organisation
       performance against industry and organisational standards. The project is now
       focused on bringing the performance improvement component together with
       strategic planning guidelines, the new ASC funding model (to be implemented
       in 2005–06) and a revised service delivery model to enable the ASC to better
       support national sporting organisations to achieve their strategic objectives and
       meet ASC outcomes
           © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




·      investigations into making ‘high-speed sport’ available to a wider audience,
       including:

       –         use of a high-speed network to deliver video to coaches

       –         the establishment of a corporate digital repository that will allow users
                 from a range of areas both inside and outside the ASC to access digital
                 resources

       –         a performance tracking system that will provide current international
                 performance snapshots as well as providing a tool for analysis and
                 prediction.


Business Support Centre

The ASC Business Support Centre has completed the second year of a three-year pilot.
The Business Support Centre’s key objective is to provide leadership, advice and
support to selected national sporting organisations with a view to improving their
operational capacity and business practices to ensure their continued viability. The
Business Support Centre undertook an interim review of its activities in February 2004.
The review provided overwhelming support for the program with a number of specific
references to the quality and range of services provided.

There are ten national sporting organisations currently supported by the Business
Support Centre. It has been recognised that increasing the participation rates within
these sports is critical to their continued viability. The success of these participation
initiatives is strongly linked to the sports’ capacity to self-manage their affairs so they
are better able to support their growth strategies. The following sports are currently
developing participation programs as a direct result of their relationship with the
Business Support Centre: polocrosse/pony club, handball, modern pentathlon, table
tennis (athletes with a disability), wrestling and badminton.


Sport Programs
Disability Sport

Project CONNECT (Creating Opportunities Nationally through Networks in Education,
Classification and Training) is a national joint venture between the ASC and the
Australian Paralympic Committee that aims to create more opportunities for people with
a disability to participate in sport. During 2003–04, Athletics Australia, Swimming
Australia, Tennis Australia, Tenpin Bowling Australia, Yachting Australia and
Basketball Australia worked with the ASC to develop and refine their disability action
plans, which not only meet their legislative requirements under the Disability
Discrimination Act 1992, but also provide the sports with an opportunity to ensure that
current programs and services are inclusive of people with a disability and that planning
for inclusion becomes an accepted practice within their sport.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications

The sports measured their progress against a set of broad industry benchmarks. These
are set at the bronze, silver and gold levels. ASC funding supported the sports in
achieving their targets at bronze and silver levels, while the attainment of gold level
indicates that the sport has successfully embedded these standards at all levels of their
organisation. By the end of the year, all the sports had fulfilled Bronze level
requirements, and had begun working towards Silver level attainment. In addition, each
sport registered its disability action plan with the Human Rights and Equal
Opportunities Commission.By 30 June 2004, all six Project CONNECT sports had their
disability action plans registered with the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity
Commission.
The Disability Education Program, a national initiative operating since 1994, assisted
the national sporting organisations involved in Project CONNECT by providing the
vehicle for them to educate and train coaches, administrators, volunteers and officials to
appropriately include people with a disability. The Disability Education Program
courses are delivered by a network of specialist agencies throughout Australia and are
tailored to meet the needs of sports.
Disability Education Program courses continued to provide practical and theoretical
information to a range of sport and physical activity providers across Australia. Over
4800 attendances were recorded at Disability Education Program courses in 2003–04.
During 2003–04, the ASC’s Disability Sport unit proposed an inclusive games program
called Sports Ability, as part of a program of initiatives to maximise national benefits
and legacies arising from the Commonwealth Games in Melbourne 2006. This proposal
was accepted and will enable the ASC to provide increased opportunities for young
people with a disability in special education over the next three years.




Coaching and Officiating

The National Coaching Accreditation Scheme and the National Officiating
Accreditation Scheme are the industry-standard quality-assurance programs for coach
and official education programs. National sporting organisations that have their training
programs registered with the schemes and adhere to the standards set by them provide
approved education and training for their coaches or officials in accordance with the
guidelines. Coaches or officials who are duly assessed as meeting the standard set by
the sport are registered on the National Coaching Accreditation Scheme/National
Officiating Accreditation Scheme database, maintained by the ASC.
The increased flexibility that has been provided by modifying the framework of the
National Coaching Accreditation Scheme in 2003–04 has been embraced by national
sporting organisations. Sports are no longer required to adhere to a Level 1 to 3
structure, but are free to determine the number, name and level of accreditation that best
suits that sport. This has led to many national sporting organisations revising their
accreditation structures to better meet the individual needs of the sport.
The numbers of coaches and officials recorded on the National Coaching Accreditation
Scheme/National Officiating Accreditation Scheme database is constantly changing as
new coaches and officials are accredited and others allow their accreditation (normally
four years’ duration) to lapse.

National Coaching Accreditation Scheme

A total of 75,226 coaches were registered as being accredited at 30 June 2004. This is a
reduction of 7983 (9.6 per cent) compared to 30 June 2003 and is consistent with the
trend reflected in the broader Australian Bureau of Statistics coaching data.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




·      Total new accreditations for 2003–04                        12,433
·      Total re-accreditations for 2003–04                         10,452

National Officiating Accreditation Scheme

A total of 8788 officials were registered as being accredited at 30 June 2004. This
represents an increase of 876 compared to 30 June 2003, and is attributable to more
sports seeking to formalise officiating structures and recognising the value of the
National Officiating Accreditation Scheme in this process.
·      Total new accreditations for 2003–04                          1140
·      Total re-accreditations for 2003–04                               91

National coaching and officiating scholarships

Twenty coaching scholarships were provided under the National Coaching Scholarship
Program. Coaches in this program undertake a full-time one-year coaching
apprenticeship with an AIS or state or territory institute or academy of sport head coach.
A review of the National Coaching Scholarship Program identified that 95 per cent of
previous scholarship holders who responded to the survey (72 per cent response rate)
have since been employed in sport, with 75 per cent of those in coaching positions. The
review, together with feedback gained through the quadrennial planning process, High
Performance Advisory Panels and the Coaching and Officiating ’03 conference,
identified that one of the major issues for sports in this area is providing comprehensive
coach development pathways. This pointed to the need for the ASC to consider the
endorsed the effectiveness of the current program and provided the ASC some direction
for future direction of the National Coaching Scholarship Programs, especially with
respect to. I increased flexibility in its implementationprogram. This will be a focus area
over the next reporting period.
Seven officiating scholarships were provided under the 2004 National Officiating
Scholarship Program. The National Officiating Scholarship Program provides potential
high performance officials with an intense learning program. The program is flexible in
order to meet the individual needs of the sport and can vary from four to 52 weeks’
duration. Officials were required to participate in hands-on officiating as well as to
undertake professional development courses and update/upgrade their National
Officiating Accreditation Scheme level.

Sport education delivery networks

State delivery networks were maintained during the reporting period, with the ASC
providing financial assistance, through annual Sport Programs and Organisational
Development funding, to sport education centres located within each state and territory
department of sport and recreation.
During 2003–04, a total of 142 active sport education agencies (schools, TAFEs,
universities and local councils) were registered with the ASC to deliver the General
Principles of Officiating and Coaching courses across Australia. This number was down
from the previous year as most national sporting organisations now integrate these
courses into their sport-specific training programs.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




In 2003–04, ASC staff held a series of meetings with representatives from the
Australian National Training Authority and Sport and Recreation Training Australia to
clarify the position of those national sporting organisations that are presently within the
Sports Industry Training Package. The ASC will continue to work closely with national
sporting organisations to ensure that their interests are met when dealing with the
vocational education and training sector.

The ASC continued to provide quality advice and support to over 90 national sporting
organisations in order to improve the quality of their education and training programs
for coaches and officials within the National Coaching Accreditation Scheme and
National Officiating Accreditation Scheme frameworks.

Year of the Official

The Year of the Official program was initiated to redress the significant decline in the
number of officials participating in sport in recent years and was conducted for the
duration of 2003.

Administrator education workshops were conducted throughout Australia and targeted
the decision-making sports administrators at state, territory and local association levels.
In excess of 600 sports administrators participated in the workshops. Grants to some 21
state sporting organisations were provided as an extension of the workshops to assist
them to implement projects to address the behaviour and competency issues within their
sports.
A community awareness media campaign was undertaken to implement the strategies.
The major components of this campaign were the national launch, radio and television
commercials, posters and an intensive media servicing program.

A national telephone survey, conducted by Newspoll in May 2004, to evaluate the
effectiveness of the Year of the Official campaign has indicated that:

20% of those surveyed have heard of the Year of the Official, and

20% of those surveyed have heard of the tagline “Time to respect the official, sport”.

The success of the Year of the Official initiative has enabled the ASC to commit to
maintaining a focus on the issues of officiating beyond 2003–04.

Coaching and Officiating ’03: investing in the future

Over 300 delegates representing a range of organisations including national and state
sporting organisations, local sporting clubs, state departments of sport and recreation,
and peak industry groups attended Coaching and Officiating ’03: investing in the future.
The conference provided an opportunity for increased knowledge sharing, which is vital
if the ongoing issues surrounding coaching and officiating are to be addressed
effectively within the Australian sporting system.
Coaching and Officiating ’03: investing in the future provided heightened recognition of
the role that the ASC can play in working with national sporting organisations to build
better structures and provide guidance in the development of coaching and officiating.
The need for the ASC to provide leadership in this area led to an internal review by the
ASC of the issues affecting coaching and officiating in Australia.


© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




Indigenous Sport

During the reporting period, the Indigenous Sport Program underwent a major
independent review that was jointly funded by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Commission and the ASC. The review findings were very positive overall with only
minor amendments requested. The review’s central finding was that a new
memorandum of understanding between the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Commission and the ASC be developed.
The Australian Government subsequently abolished the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Commission and devolved its programs and services to other Government
departments. As a result, funding previously provided to the ASC from the Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander Commission to conduct the Indigenous Sport Program has
been transferred to the Department of Communications, Information Technology and
the Arts. A new memorandum of understanding between the Department and the ASC
to continue the Indigenous Sport Program has been agreed for 2004–05, which
incorporates the findings of the independent review.
The ASC has consolidated its work with 16 national sporting organisations to enhance
links with the national network of Indigenous sport development officers. This approach
has resulted in approximately 300 programs specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people being conducted during 2003–04. The majority of these programs have
resulted in the development of regular organised competition and sound club structures
that provide pathways and opportunities for Indigenous Australians.
The ASC continues to receive recognition and support from the Laureus Sport for Good
Foundation. During 2003–04 through the assistance provided by Laureus, the Australian
Soccer Association launched a program to provide equipment and uniforms for remote
Indigenous communities. The program was launched in Dajarra, Queensland, and was
promoted through the attendance of Frank Farina (Australian Socceroos coach), Fred
Agius (Australian under-23 Olympic squad member) and Belinda Dawney (Matildas
squad member).
The ASC Indigenous Athlete Development Program continued with the allocation of
100 Indigenous Sporting Excellence Scholarships to athletes, coaches and officials
competing in 18 sports.

Women and Sport

The Women and Sport unit worked to develop and implement a leadership program for
national sporting organisations to increase the involvement of women and girls in
identified areas within sport. The pilot of the program was undertaken with women in
Bowls Australia in March 2004. Completion of the Women and Sport Analysis
Framework and Performance Report Card tools is expected by November 2004.

The ASC continued to develop partnerships with other agencies. The Sport Leadership
Grants for Women in Rural and Remote Communities program was funded by the
Office of the Status of Women and managed in collaboration with the ASC. A sum of
$200,000 was made available in four key areas: Indigenous women, women in disability
sport, women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and women in
general sports leadership. The funds were distributed throughout the states and
territories to meet the needs of women in rural and remote communities. Funds were
allocated to 62 projects in 2003–04.
         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




Membership Growth and Club Development

The Club Development Network is a free web-based program aimed at supporting the
development and management capacity of sporting clubs. Network membership
increased during 2003–04 from 3142 to 4703 (up 50 per cent). Rural and regional clubs
are well represented in the Network, with 44 per cent of the 4703 members coming from
rural and regional areas.

Twenty-seven national sporting organisations were involved in the Club Development
Network workshops organised by the ASC. These national sporting organisations have
actively promoted the Club Development Network on their web sites and newsletters, as
well as at national forums and seminars.

During the year, a short DVD was produced that outlined the operational aspects and
benefits of the Club Development Network. The DVD was distributed to all recognised
national sporting organisations and additional copies were provided to a number of
sports for use by their state-based development officers. In partnership with Swimming
Australia, a copy of the DVD was sent to every swimming club in Australia as part of
their club development strategy.

Targeted Sports Participation Growth Program

The Targeted Sports Participation Growth Program provides a small number of sports
with support to expand active memberships and improve the reach of their affiliated
clubs and associations.

The ASC’s approach is to create a three-way relationship between the ASC, the national
sporting organisation and a corporate sponsor to deliver a program of continuing growth
and participation.

During 2003–04, the ASC Board approved investment in one program of $235,000 over
three years. This brought the total number of approved Targeted Sports Participation
Growth Program sports to 21, and total funding to $11.53 million for the period of the
program. Two further sports secured sponsorship for their programs, bringing total
sponsorship funding to more than $11 million, which is marginally below the ASC
investment of $11.53 million for the 21 sports.

Seventeen sports completed either year one or year two of the program during 2003–04.
Reports show that for those sports, participation targets have, on average, been
exceeded by 1.7 per cent.

During the year, successful program launches were held in conjunction with cricket,
cycling, lawn bowls, rugby league, sailing and surfing.

The Targeted Sports Participation Growth Program has resulted in many other tangible
benefits to sports including bringing stakeholders at all levels of the sport together to
work towards common objectives, improving communication within the sport and
challenging traditional strategies for delivering sport development programs.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




National Junior Sport

On 29 June 2004, Prime Minister John Howard announced the Building a Healthy,
Active Australia initiative to address the growing crisis in childhood obesity. This
package has four components:

·      Active After-school Communities

·      Healthy School Curriculum

·      Healthy School Communities

·      Healthy Eating and Regular Physical Activity: information for Australian
       families.
The ASC has carriage of the Active After-school Communities component, a program
aimed at providing more opportunities for children to become physically active in the
after-school hours environment. The Australian Government has allocated $90 million
to this program to be administered by the ASC over a four-year period beginning 1 July
2004 with the delivery framework of the program to span three school years beginning
in Term 2, 2005.

With the close relationship between Active After-school Communities and the ASC’s
Junior Sport activities, these two functions were combined under one program called
National Junior Sport.

Junior Sport

Through Junior Sport initiatives, the ASC aims to enhance sporting opportunities and
experiences for all young people from grassroots to elite-level sport. The ASC has been
working with key partners to ensure they provide safe junior sporting environments, and
develop and deliver quality programs that address the needs of young people.
The ASC continued to provide leadership in these areas by supporting national sporting
organisations in adopting the Junior Sport Framework and building sport-specific
policies. The University of Queensland completed the final draft of the Junior Sport
Framework. A key part of the development phase included workshops held in
conjunction with state and territory departments of sport and recreation and national
sporting organisations to gather feedback on the draft. The ASC also held a workshop
with 21 national sporting organisations to assist in the drafting of action plans for the
development process of their junior sport policies.
During the reporting period, the ASC also implemented the following:
·      Out of School Hours Sports Program — In partnership with VicHealth,
       Northern Territory Health, South Australian Office for Recreation and Sport,
       New South Wales Department of Sport and Recreation, and Western Australian
       Department of Sport and Recreation, the ASC has been involved in piloting out
       of school hours sports programs in their respective states. Following on from the
       success of these pilot programs, the ASC developed a proposal for a national
       after-school hours structured physical activity program. This proposal was
       adopted by the Australian Government and the Active After-school
       Communities program development will begin in 2004–05.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




·      Active Australia Schools Network — The ASC continued its partnership with
       the Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation to assist
       the development of school–club links. The Active Australia Schools Network
       has 1080 member schools.
·      Good Sport Monitor — The Good Sport Monitor program supports safe, fun
       and nurturing junior sport environments by making resources and strategies
       available to sporting clubs and organisations that can be modified and
       implemented to address ‘ugly’ issues. These resources and strategies are being
       piloted with four sports within the Australian Capital Territory before a final
       review and national roll-out. Examples of strategies being piloted include the
       establishment of player/parent/coach/spectator contracts, stakeholder education,
       and the red and yellow card penalty system.
Active After-school Communities

Commencing in the 2004/05 financial year, the AASC program is a free, after school
hours structured physical activity and health program. It will be offered to all Australian
primary schools and approved out of school hours care services during the 3.00-5.30pm
time slot.Approximately 20–25 per cent of Australian children are overweight or obese
and this statistic is increasing, particularly since the mid-1980s — a trend that reflects
international patterns. At the same time, the aerobic fitness of children has taken a sharp
downward turn since 1970–80. Around 40 per cent of Australian children do not
participate in organised sport outside of school hours. With this translating to an
estimated 1.5 million young people under the age of 18 being overweight or obese, there
is a large proportion of the population that may be at risk of preventable chronic
conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

In launching the Building a Healthy, Active Australia package, Prime Minister John
Howard stressed his hope that the program would represent a watershed in the process
of encouraging Australians of all ages to undertake more physical activity and to
embrace more healthy eating habits.

The Active After-school Communities program, part of the Building a Healthy, Active
Australia initiative, is one of the most significant undertakings of the ASC in recent
years. It is a practical means of improving the health and wellbeing of Australian
children, recognising that a balanced approach to nutrition and physical activity is
necessary to promote healthy habits for life. Active After-school Communities will help
address the growing crisis in childhood obesity and has the additional focus of
unsupervised activity during the 3.00–5.30pm timeslot and declining motor skill
development in children.



Commencing in 2004–05, the Active After-school Communities program will be a free
after-school hours structured physical activity and health program. It will be offered to
all Australian primary schools and approved out of school hours care services and will
cater for at least 3250 schools and approved after-school hours care centres, involving a
minimum of 150,000 children.




          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




This program is one ofthe


1800 Reverse Street Active

1800 Reverse Street Active supports Backing Australia’s Sporting Ability: a more
active Australia through the ASC’s shift to visible programming and activities in
preference to general awareness raising and education about the benefits of sport. It also
builds partnerships between the Australian Government, national sporting organisations
(Skate Australia and Freestyle BMX) and the corporate sector (1800 Reverse, Kewday,
Roces and Mongoose).
1800 Reverse Street Active attracted 2910 participants in 2003–04. Every participant
also became a paying national sporting organisation member. Targeted at 6 to 14-year-
olds, coaching sessions and competitions were conducted by Australia’s first-ever
accredited coaches in street sports. The focus of the program in 2004 has been to ensure
a cost-effective structure is in place so the two national sporting organisations involved
are able to effectively implement their own street sports programs.
The first two of seven events conducted in 2004 attracted 1357 participants. Of these,
808 are now paying members of Skate Australia and 453 are paying members of
Freestyle BMX. The remaining 96 consisted of paying national sporting organisation
members who participated in more than one session (that is, repeat visitors). This
initiative continues to encourage the formation of membership pathways for street
sports. Through newly formulated coaching programs and competitions, these pathways
will provide participants with coordinated skills-based opportunities for development.
Skate Australia and Freestyle BMX (part of Bicycle Motocross Australia) have
implemented management structures to support each of the new disciplines.
Skate Australia has appointed a National Skateboarding Committee and a National
Inline Committee. Freestyle BMX has appointed a Freestyle BMX Committee. These
have been crucial in providing both organisations with direction for these disciplines
within the sport, and credibility in the street sports industry.


Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon Series

In its third and final year, the 2003–04 Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon Series
was delivered under a three-way partnership between the ASC, Sanitarium Health Food
Company and Triathlon Australia. It provided participation opportunities for all children
aged 7–13 years and promoted the messages of healthy living, good nutrition, fun,
challenge and a sense of achievement through sport. The ASC’s investment in, and
support of, the TRYathlon Series presented Triathlon Australia with an opportunity to
increase the profile of the sport among juniors and parents, and to secure increased
junior club memberships.

Year three of the TRYathlon Series has achieved the goal of significantly increased
participant numbers on year two, with a total of 9102 children registering for the seven
TRYathlon events. This represented a 16 per cent increase on year two results and an
increase of 54 per cent from year one.

Events were held in both metropolitan and regional areas across Australia between
November 2003 and April 2004 and the series was the largest-ever series of triathlon
events for children in Australia.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




International Relations
The ASC continued to deliver international services through the four federally funded
(AusAID/DFAT) international community sports development programs. The programs
are:

·      Australia–South Pacific Sports Program (this includes the successful Oceania
       Olympic Training Centre)

·      Australia–Papua New Guinea Silver Jubilee Sports Program

·      Australia–Africa 2006 Community Sports Development Program

·      Australia–Caribbean Community Sports Development Program.

Activities of particular note during the reporting period within these programs include:

·      Australia–South Pacific Sports Program:
       –         completion of the Pacific Sporting Needs Assessment (a comprehensive
                 review conducted with each of the 14 participating countries to identify
                 means of better focusing development activities over the next three
                 years)
       –         coordination of 19 training scholarships for athletes, coaches,
                 administrators and sports scientists from nine countries under the
                 Oceania Olympic Training Centre
       –         commencement of a major disability sport initiative, with disability sport
                 workshops conducted in Vanuatu, Tonga and Fiji to develop the skills of
                 athletes, coaches and administrators, as well as the placement of an
                 Australian Volunteers International volunteer in Fiji for a seven-month
                 term to deliver disability sport programs for the Fiji Sports Council
       –         continuation of the development of an innovative sport education course
                 for sports administrators.
·      Australia–Papua New Guinea Silver Jubilee Sports Program:
       –         the delivery of an interactive sports administration program
       –         the development of an event-management program
       –         a major drive to develop Papua New Guinea facilitators for the delivery
                 of the sports education program at the provincial level
       –         a review of the national sports policy
       –         capacity building for provincial youth and sports officers
       –         grants provided to 20 provinces and 14 national sports federations to
                 foster sports development programs at the grassroots level
       –         a major review of physical education and the ground work for some
                 innovative research into the benefits of sport in a community.
       The Silver Jubilee Sports Program has been seen as the most innovative sports
       program in the country in the past eight years, taking sport to the community
       under the theme of ‘There’s more to sport than just playing the game’.
           © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
·      Australia–Caribbean Community Sports Development Program — The
       restructure of the program in 2003–04, with local in-region management and
       delivery under ASC supervision, was particularly successful. This is best
       illustrated by the Government of Trinidad and Tobago’s decision to second two
       officers on full pay to assist with program delivery throughout the region. Gains
       were made in regional coordination of development assistance. The major
       initiatives of the year were a regional disability sports program providing skills
       training for coaches and teachers, and promoting participation in sport and
       physical activity for people with a disability. The focus continues on developing
       local skills and expertise of people working in the areas of sport for people with
       a disability, youth at risk, sports administration and school-sector programs such
       as curriculum development.
·      Australia–Africa 2006 Community Sports Development Program — The
       program continued to focus on establishing a community sport model for the
       developing countries of southern Africa through the Active Community Club
       concept. The program was also reviewed during the year with a view to moving
       towards a similar management model as the Caribbean program. Additional
       funding for the final two years of the program was announced by the Prime
       Minister. The results of the research program designed to measure the impact of
       the project on the pilot communities was published.


Conclusion

Sport is an integral part of Australian society. However, Australia’s national sports
system continues to be challenged, whether it is in maintaining participation rates,
addressing issues of integrity and poor behaviour, or ensuring Australians perform at the
level the nation expects. The ASC has continued to be innovative in the development
and delivery of targeted programs to improve the health of the national system so that
sport can continue to deliver benefits for all Australians across the full spectrum of
participation from the grassroots to elite levels.




         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Outcome 2
Excellence in sports performance by Australians

TOTAL PRICE: $113,363,000

Maintaining Australia’s level of success in international sport remains a challenge. The
ASC is committed to strengthening Australia’s high performance sports system and
backing Australia’s sporting ability to enable Australian athletes to excel in
international competition.

Each AIS program has a unique role in the international elite sport pathway with
programs focused at either the elite senior or developmental level. Through the AIS, the
ASC provides a world-class training environment to support AIS athletes and coaches,
including services such as planning and evaluation, athlete and coach support and
technical direction.

The Sports Excellence Program, delivered through the ASC, underpins the sustained
success of Australian athletes through continued international competition and the
support of world-class coaches. The Sports Excellence Program provides essential
funding to national sporting organisations based on individual strategic plans with an
emphasis on high performance.

The following table provides information on, and an assessment against, the agreed
strategies chosen to deliver Outcome 2.


Table 2      Output 2.1: National elite athlete development

COST TO GOVERNMENT: $96,973,000


                                                                                   Variance
 Quantity/quality                      Target                           Results      from      Notes
                                                                                  target (%)

Activity 2.1: AIS programs and services, and national leadership

Quantity              AIS scholarship programs in 26 sports. 35    35             0
                      sport programs’ annual plans, including
                      service commitments, jointly agreed to by
                      national sporting organisations and the
                      AIS

Quantity              Conduct four national programs: Athlete      4              0
                      Career and Education, Talent Search,
                      Laboratory Standards Assistance Scheme
                      and Elite Sports Research

Quantity              Conduct two technical benchmarking           2              0
                      projects

Quantity              Conduct 20 approved applied research         31             55
                      projects

Quantity              Provide service provision to a maximum of    22             10
                      20 national teams on a commercial basis
Quantity                Conduct at least three commercially               0                       –3       1
                        funded projects

Quality                 60 per cent of eligible AIS athletes              74%                     14       2
                        annually chosen to represent Australia in
                        international competition

Quality                 Annual reviews conducted for all AIS              35                      0
                        programs

Quality                 80 per cent of national sporting                  Athletes: 93%           13       3
                        organisation and AIS satisfaction with
                        sport program performance and service             AIS/NSO: 85%            5        4
                        delivery effectiveness

Quality                 80 per cent of national sporting                  100%                    20
                        organisation and AIS satisfaction with
                        national team service delivery
                        effectiveness

Activity 2.2: Sports Excellence Program

Quantity               One major initiative to facilitate a nationally    1                       0
                       coordinated approach to high performance
                       planning for the 2005–09 quadrennium

Quantity               Six sport-specific workshops to improve            3                       –50      5
                       high performance planning and
                       implementation

Quantity               70 national sporting organisations                 70                      0
                       benefiting from high performance grants

Quantity               One major initiative to assist funded              1                       0
                       national sporting organisations in
                       implementing drug-free sport policies and
                       understanding their ‘drugs in sport’
                       responsibilities

Quantity               Conduct two anti-doping assessment                 2                       0
                       processes against the ASC’s Funding and
                       Service Level Agreements for all funded
                       national sporting organisations (in
                       conjunction with the Australian Sports Drug
                       Agency)




           © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Variance from targets


The following notes provide an explanation for variations between the set targets and
the results achieved for Outcome 2.

1      Following a restructure of the ASC Commercial Operations area, this specific
       AIS function was incorporated into the overall ASC structure and is reported on
       in Outcome 1.

2      Of the 718 athletes who held an AIS scholarship during 2003–04 who were
       eligible to represent Australia, 529 (74 per cent) were selected to represent
       Australia in international competition.

3      Ninety-three per cent (445) of the 477 AIS athletes who completed the AIS
       athlete survey indicated that they were either meeting the expectations (292
       athletes) or were above the expectations (150 athletes) of their AIS scholarship.

4      At the May/June 2004 Performance Enhancement Program review meetings, the
       AIS and national sporting organisations agreed that 30 of the 35 programs (85
       per cent) reviewed were meeting or exceeding agreed expectations in terms of
       program performance and service delivery effectiveness.

5      High Performance Advisory Panel workshops were conducted for athletics,
       bowls and skiing. The analysis process was completed for rugby union before
       the sport decided not to proceed to the workshop stage of the process. Work on
       the remaining two sports has commenced.



National sports performance highlights



Archery

David Barnes won bronze in the 2003 World Target Championships. Tim Cuddihy
finished fourth at the same event and is the newly crowned 2004 World Junior
Champion. The Australian Olympic team finished first at the European Grand Prix in
Germany in June 2004, beating the world number-one ranked team, Korea. A total of
six archers qualified for the Athens 2004 Olympics.


Athletics

Jana Pittman continued her climb up the international standings with a memorable win
in the 400-metres hurdles at the Paris World Championships, beating the world-record
holder from Russia.


            © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Australian football

Australia defeated Ireland on aggregate in the 2003 Foster’s International Rules Series.


Australian University Sport

Australia had its best-ever World University Summer Games in Daegu, Korea, in
August 2003 with an unprecedented 12 medals — two gold, five silver and five bronze.


Baseball

Australia won the Oceania Championships in January–February 2004, qualifying the
team to play South Africa in the Africa/Oceania play-off. Australia won this best of five
series 3–0 to qualify for the Athens 2004 Olympics. In 2003, Australian baseball had
experienced a 30 per cent increase in the number of Australians signing professional
contracts with major league baseball clubs in the United States. Australia now has 103
signed professional players with US major league baseball clubs.


Basketball

Australia had another strong year in basketball, winning the men’s under-21 World
Championship, with Australian Andrew Bogut winning the Most Valuable Player award
for the tournament. Lauren Jackson became the first non-American to win the US
Women’s National Basketball Association’s Most Valuable Player award.


BMX

The 2003 BMX World Championships were held in Perth in July. Australia emerged as
the second-ranked nation in the world following the championships.


Boxing

The Australian boxing team competed in the World Championships in Thailand
followed by the Commonwealth Cup held in Malaysia. Good performances by
Australian boxers culminated in three gold, one silver and three bronze medals. Of the
11 weight divisions at the Athens Olympics, Australia was eligible to contest nine
following wins in the Oceania qualifying tournament in Tonga.


           © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Bowls

The Australian combined men’s and women’s team took out the Trans Tasman Test
Series against New Zealand in February. The men’s team won the home series against
England in April, Scotland in May and Wales in June. The men’s team also won the
Centenary Quadrangular Tournament in South Africa in June. The women’s team won
the Test Series against Scotland in February and the Four Nations Series in April.


Canoeing

·     Flat water — Nathan Baggaley is the current World Champion in the K1 500 and
      finished third in the K1 1000 at the 2003 World Championships in Atlanta. At the
      same championships, the women’s K4 1000 won a bronze medal and Vince
      Fehervari won silver in the K1 200. A total of 11 Australian athletes qualified for
      the Athens 2004 Olympics.
·     Slalom — Five Australian athletes qualified in four classes of slalom events for
      the Athens 2004 Olympics. Australia qualified for the men’s C1 event at the
      Slalom Racing World Championships in July 2003 and qualified for a further
      three Olympic events (men’s C2 and K1, and women’s K1) at the World Cup in
      Athens in April 2004. Robin Bell finished the 2003–04 season in third position in
      overall World Cup standings.


Cricket

The Australian men’s cricket team maintained its number-one ranking on the
International Cricket Council Test Championship table following another productive
season. The highlight was the enthralling test series against India, which tied at 1–1, and
Australia’s successful VB One-day Series victory, also against India, 2–0.
The Australian women’s team — the Southern Stars — won the 2003–04 One-day Rose
Bowl Series against New Zealand with a convincing 5–1 victory.


Cycling

The strong performances of Australian cyclists continued in 2003–04 with Michael
Rogers coming second in the men’s time trial at the World Road Championships in
Hamilton, Canada. The International Cycling Union subsequently awarded the gold
medal to Rogers after the winner confessed to using performance-enhancing drugs at the
time of the victory. In the Tour de France, Brad McGee held the leader’s yellow jersey
while Baden Cooke held off fellow Australian Robbie McEwan to win the green jersey
for sprinters.

Australia’s performance on the track continued to be exceptional, with the men’s team
pursuit winning the World Championships and setting a new world record in August in
Stuttgart, Germany, and then successfully defending its title at the World
Championships in Melbourne in May. Anna Meares also won gold in Melbourne in the
500-metres time trial.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Sam Hill and Lisa Mathison also won gold medals at the Mountain Bike World
Championships in Switzerland.
Diving

Australia kept at the forefront of world diving with a strong performance at the 2003
World Championships. In all, the Australians won four medals. Mathew Helm and
Robert Newbery won gold in the men’s ten-metre synchronised platform as did Irina
Lashko in the one-metre women’s springboard. Silver medals went to Loudy Tourky
and Lynda Dackiw in the women’s ten-metre synchronised platform and Mathew Helm
in the men’s ten-metre platform. Australia also picked up seven medals in the 14th
FINA World Cup and another five at the 7th FINA Diving Grand Prix Super Final.
Equestrian

Australia qualified with five riders/horses for the inaugural World Cup eventing final in
Pau, France. The best performance was by Olympic gold medallist Matt Ryan (on
Bonza Puzzle) who finished eighth in the three-day event. Australia was represented in
the World Cup dressage final in Düsseldorf, Germany, with Kristy Oatley–Nist (on
Quando–Quando) achieving the best-ever result in a World Cup grand prix, placing
13th out of 18 riders.
Golf

Australian professional and amateur golfers figured in fewer than 80 top-three finishes
in golf tours around the world. Particular mention should be made of Nick Flanagan’s
win in the US Amateur Championship, the first time an Australian has achieved this
honour in 100 years. The Australian amateur men’s team also took out the Asia-Pacific
Teams Championship and the Four Nation’s Team Championship. In the strong US
professional tours, Stuart Appleby, Adam Scott, Craig Parry and Karrie Webb won
tournaments.
Gymnastics

Australia’s leading gymnasts built on their growing international reputations,
highlighted by the women’s artistic gymnastics team finishing third at the World
Championships in 2003 behind the United States and Romania to record Australia’s
first-ever women’s gymnastics medal. Philippe Rizzo had consistent strong
performances on the World Cup circuit, which led to a fourth place in the high bar
apparatus final at the World Championships. Both Philippe Rizzo and the women’s
team, along with Penelope Blackmore (rhythmic gymnastics) and Lesley Daly
(trampoline), all qualified for the Athens Olympics. Lauren Farry also recorded
consistent outstanding performances on the sport aerobics international circuit, resulting
in three individual gold medals. The trio of Tara Busbridge, Veronica Gravolin and
Jessica Stamenovic received Australia’s first sports acrobatics silver medal at the 2004
World Championships. Kieran Gorman (individual junior male division) won gold at
the 2004 Sport Aerobics World Age Games.


          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Hockey

The Australian women’s hockey team — the Hockeyroos — recaptured the type of
form that had seen them dominate international hockey leading up to the Sydney
Olympics when they won the 2003 Champions Trophy in Sydney in December,
defeating China 3–2 in the final. The men’s team had to be satisfied with silver when
they were beaten by the Netherlands 4–2 in the final of the men’s Champion Trophy in
Amstelveen, Netherlands.


Judo

Maria Pekli (57 kilograms) beat the gold medallist from the Sydney Olympics to
achieve fifth place at the 2003 Judo World Championships in Osaka, Japan, which
automatically qualified her for the Athens Olympics. Maria also won gold at the US
Open, as did Semir Pepic (+100 kilograms). Australia also achieved three bronze
medals at this event. As a result of good performances at the Oceania Championships
held in April, along with Maria Pekli’s previous performances, Australia was eligible to
contest 12 of the 14 available weight divisions at the Athens Olympics.


Netball

New Zealand defeated Australia 49–47 at the World Championships in Jamaica,
avenging defeats from the 2002 Commonwealth Games and the 1999 World
Championships.


Paralympic sport

Members of the powerlifting squad competed at the European Championships. The
results of two medals and a further two top-six finishes at this key event were better
than the results Australia obtained at last year’s World Championships.
Paul Harpur won silver in the 400 metres at the International Blind Sports Association
World Championships held in Quebec, Canada.
Natalie Cordowiner won a silver medal at the International Paralympic Committee
World Archery Championships in Madrid.
Australia dominated the International Paralympic Committee European Cycling
Championships, with a total of four gold, two silver and four bronze medals for road
events. However, Australia managed to stay ahead of all nations in the overall medal
tally after both track and road competitions, and left the championships as the number-
one ranked nation. The total medal count for Australia was ten gold, five silver and 11
bronze.
Australia’s David Hall, the world number-one men’s singles and world number-two
doubles wheelchair tennis player, won his seventh singles title at the prestigious US
Open in San Diego, United States.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Peter Brooks returned from the 2003 Open European Cycling Championships with two
medals out of four races — silver in the one-kilometre time trial and then bronze in the
four-kilometre individual pursuit.

At the 2004 International Paralympic Committee Alpine Skiing Championships,
Cameron Rahles–Rabula and Michael Milton shared top honours with gold medals,
giving Australia four gold medals from four races in the LW2 class.


Rowing

The Australian team competed at the 2003 World Championships in Milan, Italy. The
men’s pair of James Tomkins and Drew Ginn finished with a gold medal, as did the
women’s quad scull. The team also won two gold, two silver and two bronze medals in
adaptive events at the Championships.


Rugby league

The Australian Kangaroos maintained their dominance in the international arena,
playing two tests against New Zealand as well as internationals against a French XIII
and Wales, and then overcame a fierce British challenge to record a 3–0 series win to
retain the Ashes Trophy.


Rugby union

After its stunning 22–10 win over the New Zealand All Blacks in the semifinal of the
2003 Rugby World Cup in Sydney, the Wallabies narrowly lost to England in the final.


Sailing

Australian sailors again stamped their authority on the sport with no fewer than 15
world championship titles contributing to more than 30 top-three finishes. The sailors
won titles across the full spectrum of the sport including senior and youth women,
senior and youth men, masters and sailors with a disability.


Shooting

Australia qualified 29 Olympic shooting places across all rifle, shotgun, running target
and pistol events at the Oceania Championships in Auckland in November 2003.


           © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Soccer

During the reporting period, the Socceroos participated in a number of international
matches. They also qualified after the Oceania Football Confederation Nations Cup to
play Solomon Islands in a two-match series in October for the right to represent Oceania
at the FIFA Confederations Cup in Germany in June 2005. Both the men’s and
women’s teams qualified for the Athens Olympics after winning at Oceania
qualification tournaments. The women’s team participated in the FIFA Women’s World
Cup in the United States in September.


Softball

The Australian women’s team finished second in the final of the 2003 Canada Cup. The
Australian men’s team won the bronze medal at the 2004 International Softball
Federation Men’s Softball World Championships, held in Christchurch, New Zealand,
in February.


Squash

The year 2003–04 proved to be another great year for Australian squash on the world
stage. The senior men’s team won the World Championship, defeating France 3–0 in
the final. The Australian 2006 Commonwealth Games squash squad commenced its
preparation for the Games with a doubles test match against England in Manchester.
Australia won the test match 12–3.

In individual competition, Australian athletes achieved notable victories during the
reporting period. Australians won both the women’s and men’s British Opens (the
sport’s most established titles), with Rachael Grinham and David Palmer winning,
respectively.


Surf lifesaving

Two Australian development squads were selected in 2003–04. The Australian
development team selected to compete at the inaugural DHL Asia-Pacific Lifesaving
Challenge won the championship, while the team contesting the German Cup finished
second.


Surfing

It was another outstanding year for Surfing Australia and its Association of Surfing
Professionals Australasia division. International results saw Australians in five of the
top-ten women’s places for 2003, with Layne Beachley taking the Association of
Surfing Professionals world crown. In the men’s division, six of the top-ten places for
2003 were Australians, with Taj Burrow (third) Australia’s top performer.
           © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
In International Surfing Association events, Australia took out first place team honours
at the World Surfing Games in Ecuador, with individual world championships going to
Kira Llewellyn (women’s bodyboard) and Andrew Lester (men’s bodyboard).

On the Association of Surfing Professionals competition schedule, Australia held four
of the top-ten world qualifying series final ratings for both men and women for 2003.
The top place men’s position went to Trent Munro (second), and women’s to Chelsea
Georgeson (third).


Swimming

The Australian swimming team won 22 medals at the World Championships in
Barcelona, Spain. Eighteen of these medals were in Olympic events. Overall, the
Australians, with six gold, ten silver and six bronze, finished second on the medal tally
behind the United States. Australians also broke two world records, clocking 0:23.43,
and Leisel Jones broke the existing world record in the 100-metres breaststroke,
recording 1:06.37. Along the way, Ian Thorpe became the first swimmer to win the
same event three times, winning the 400-metres freestyle gold medal. A few days later,
Grant Hackett equalled Ian’s feat by winning the 1500-metres freestyle title for the third
time. In winning the race, Hackett extended his unbeaten run in the 1500 metres to five
years. By the end of the championships, Ian Thorpe had won three gold, a silver and a
bronze to stretch his record number of world championship titles to 11, three more than
his nearest rival, East German Kornelia Ender, who swam in the 1970s. Throughout the
year, Australian swimmers broke a total of three world and 15 Commonwealth records.
In addition to the two records mentioned above, Lisbeth Lenton became the world’s
fastest female over 100-metres freestyle in clocking 0:53.66 at the Telstra Australian
Championships and Olympic trials in Sydney in March.
In January, the Australian team competed in the 2004 International Sports Federation
for Persons with Intellectual Disability World Swimming Championships in Hong
Kong, winning 16 gold, eight silver and eight bronze medals. Siobhan Paton completed
another exceptional meet, winning a total of 17 medals, 14 of them gold.


Tennis

At Wimbledon in July, Mark Philippoussis achieved another career highlight finishing
runner-up in the men’s singles final, while Todd Woodbridge partnered with Jonas
Bjorkman (Sweden) in a winning performance in the men’s doubles. Todd Woodbridge
continued his form with another win in the men’s doubles at the US Open. In the Davis
Cup, the Australian team of Lleyton Hewitt, Mark Philippoussis, Wayne Arthurs and
Todd Woodbridge defeated Spain 3–1 to win the final in November.


Triathlon

Australia recorded its best-ever result at the 2003 World Championships in Queenstown
in New Zealand, with gold medals in senior competition to Peter Robertson and Emma
Snowsill. Australia won eight of the 18 medals on offer to dominate the event.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
At the 2004 World Championships in Portugal, Loretta Harrop came second in the
senior women’s event.


Volleyball

The senior men’s volleyball team qualified for the Athens Olympics, securing the single
berth available for Asia. The youth boy’s volleyball team finished eighth at the 2003
Youth World Championships. In beach volleyball, Natalie Cook and Nicole Sanderson
finished third at the 2003 World Championships and secured fourth place on the 2003
World Tour.


Water polo

The Australian women’s and men’s water polo teams both finished seventh at the World
Championships in Barcelona.


Water skiing

In the open women’s division of the Wakeboard World Championships, Amber Wing
came first and Hayley Smith came third. Australia won the overall team result.

At the Tournament Skiing World Championships, Emma Sheers came first in the
women’s slalom and jump events. In addition, Joel Wing placed third in the men’s
tricks and Curtis Sheers third in the men’s jump. Australia placed second in the overall
team result.

At the Barefoot Skiing World Championships, Gizella Halasz won the senior women’s
tricks event and Australia placed third overall in the team result.


Weight-lifting

Sergo Chakhoyan placed third at the World Championships in the 85-kilograms
category.

AIS sports performance highlights

During the reporting period, the AIS provided facilities and assistance for elite athletes,
including access to world-class coaches, leading sports science support and an
unrivalled career and education program. Through this approach, the AIS provided
integrated support services to the AIS sports programs, which contributed to the
successful achievement of Outcome 2 — excellence in sports performance by
Australians — in 2003–04.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
During 2003–04, the AIS conducted 35 programs in 26 sports. As of May 2004, the AIS
provided 684 scholarships to athletes in these programs. As agreed with national
sporting organisations, the AIS plays one of two roles in the organisation’s elite athlete
pathway by conducting sports programs targeted at either:

·      elite or senior international programs (23 sports programs)
·      pre-elite or developmental programs (12 sports programs).

The AIS conducts residential programs, where the athletes live in one location to train
under the direction of an AIS head coach. The AIS also conducts camps-based
programs, where the athlete’s daily training is conducted in their home environment and
the AIS brings the athletes together for training camps throughout the year.

As of May 2004:

·      Fourteen residential programs were based in Canberra. There were 210
       scholarship holders in the Canberra-based programs (31 per cent of all AIS
       scholarships).

·      Seven residential programs were based in state locations. Diving and Squash
       were based in Brisbane, and Golf and Tennis were based in Melbourne. Hockey
       (men’s and women’s) was located in Perth. During the reporting period, Men’s
       Cricket relocated from Adelaide to Brisbane. The AIS Cricket program is a
       component of the Cricket Australia Centre of Excellence and caters for athletes
       for up to two months annually. There were 120 scholarship holders in these
       state-based programs.

·      A component of the AIS under-23 Road Cycling program is based in Italy for
       nine months of the year. There were 12 scholarship holders in this program.

·      There were 342 scholarship holders in the 13 camps-based programs.

·      There was a total of 462 scholarship holders (67 per cent of all AIS scholarship
       holders) who were in either state-based or camps-based programs.

Details of AIS programs’ role and structure, and a comprehensive report on AIS sport
performances in 2003–04 can be found at Appendix 3.

Some of the highlights of AIS athlete and coach performances in 2003–04 follow.


2003 AIS Athlete and Coach Awards

·      Nathan Baggaley (AIS/NSWIS) (Sprint Canoe) won the 2003 AIS Athlete of the
       Year Award. Nathan won the 2003 K1 500 and finished third in the K1 1000 at
       the 2003 world championships. In the 2003 Men’s World Cup, Nathan was
       ranked number two.
·      David Barnes (Archery) won the 2003 AIS Junior Athlete of the Year Award.
       David won the bronze medal in the men’s individual event at the senior 2003
       World Target Archery Championships and a bronze medal at the Croatia Grand
       Prix.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
·     Amber Bradley, Dana Faletic, Kerry Hore and Jane Robinson (AIS/ACTAS)
      (Rowing) won the 2003 AIS Team of the Year Award. The Australian women’s
      quad scull crew won the world championships in Milan, Italy, in August 2003.
      This achievement marks the first time an Australian crew has won the event and
      only the second time an Australian crew has won a medal in the event. It also
      ended the German’s 13-year domination of the events.

·     Lyall McCarthy (Rowing) was the winner of the 2003 AIS Coach of the Year
      Award. Lyall guided the all-AIS Australian women’s quad scull crew to the gold
      medal at the world championships in Milan, Italy. Lyall has now coached five
      crews to gold medals in four separate world championships.

·     The Diving program won the 2003 AIS Program of the Year Award. This new
      award recognises the role a sport program plays in establishing an environment
      conducive to individual and team success and the pursuit of excellence. The
      results achieved by the AIS divers at the FINA World Championships in
      Barcelona, Spain, in 2003 contributed significantly to the Australian team’s best-
      ever diving performance at a world championship, with two gold and two silver
      medals.

2003 AIS Education Achievement and Vocation Achievement Awards

·     Adam Pine (Swimming) was awarded a 2003 AIS Vocation Achievement
      Award. Adam works as a sports consultant in the Membership Growth and Club
      Development unit of the ASC and primarily looks after the Club Development
      Network, a free web-based program that supports the development and
      management capacity of sporting clubs. Since moving into the club development
      area, Adam has helped increase membership of the Club Development Network
      from 2700 members to over 4000 members nationally.

·     Mark Hickman (Hockey) was also awarded a 2003 AIS Vocation Achievement
      Award. Mark has demonstrated outstanding achievements in his studies and
      sporting career, having qualified as an accountant in 2000. A scholarship holder
      since 1995, he has diligently worked at developing his career.

·     Travis Moran (Volleyball) was awarded a 2003 AIS Education Achievement
      Award. Travis graduated from Lake Ginninderra College with a Universities
      Admission Index score of 81. During his final year at school, he was a member
      of the Student Representative Committee and a member of the senior national
      volleyball squad. Travis has been an exemplary student and positive role model
      for other AIS athletes.

·     Rachel Imison (Hockey) was also awarded a 2003 AIS Education Achievement
      Award. Rachel is a full-time student at La Trobe University. She achieved
      outstanding results in 2003 as dux of the year with a straight-A average.
        © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
2003 Australian Institute of Sport memorial scholarship winners

·      Michael Sim (Golf) was awarded the Ross Herbert Memorial Scholarship.

·      Andrew Richards (Swimming) was awarded the Brent Harding Memorial
       Scholarship.

·      Mathew Helm (Diving) was awarded the Nathan Meade Memorial Scholarship.

·      Aaron Kemps (AIS/QAS) (Road Cycling) was awarded the Darren Smith
       Memorial Scholarship.

·      Tobby Sutherland (Athletics) was awarded the Gary Knoke Memorial
       Scholarship.


Other significant performances by Australian Institute of Sport athletes

·      Annabel Luxford (Triathlon) won a gold medal at the 2004 International
       Triathlon Union Championships in the under-23 age group.

·      Felicity Abram (AIS/QAS) (Triathlon) at age 17 won the 2003 World Junior
       Triathlon Championship for athletes aged 16–19. She also won the 2003
       Australian Championships — Sprint Distance for 16–19-year-olds and the 2003
       Cup in Germany.

·      Nikki Egyed (AIS/QAS) (Triathlon) won the 2003 Under 23 World Triathlon
       Championship. She was also a member of the Australian team that won the
       women’s event at the inaugural Triathlon World Teams Championships.

·      Belinda Archer and Jacqui Dunn (Gymnastics) were members of the Australian
       women’s team that placed third at the 2003 World Gymnastics Championships.
       This was a historic first-ever team medal in a world championship for Australia.

·      Andrew Bogut (Basketball) was voted the Most Valuable Player at the 2003
       World Junior Championships, won by Australia. He was also selected in the
       Australian Basketball Association All Star 5 and won the Most Valuable Player
       and Youth Player of the Year awards in the Australian Basketball Association
       East Conference.

·      Jobie Dajka (AIS/SASI) (Cycling) won a silver medal in the men’s sprint and
       the men’s keirin at the 2003 World Track Championships.

·      Peter Dawson (AIS/WAIS), Luke Roberts (AIS/SASI) and Stephen Wooldridge
       (AIS/NSWIS) (Cycling) won the 4000-metres team pursuit at the 2003 World
       Track Cycling Championships. Their gold medal-winning ride also broke the
       world record. Luke Roberts also won a silver medal in the 4000-metres
       individual pursuit.

·      Shane Kelly (AIS/VIS) (Cycling) won a silver medal in the one-kilometre time
       trial at the 2003 World Track Cycling Championships.
         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
·   Oenone Wood (Road Cycling), during the 2004 World Cup Series, became the
    first Australian to win the time trial title.

·   Henry Gundry (Rowing) won a gold medal in the men’s quad scull at the Under
    23 World Rowing Championships held in Belgrade, Serbia, in 2003.

·   Mathew Helm and Robert Newbery (Diving) won the men’s platform
    synchronised diving gold medal at the world championships. This was
    Australia’s first gold medal in men’s diving in the 30-year history of the world
    championships. Mathew Helm also won a silver medal in the men’s individual
    platform event at the world championship. At the 2004 FINA Diving Grand Prix
    Super Final, Mathew and Robert won gold in the men’s platform synchronised
    event.

·   Linda MacKenzie (Swimming) became the first swimmer since Anna McVann
    in 1984 to win the 200, 400 and 800-metres freestyle treble at the 2004 Telstra
    Olympic Team Swimming Trials.

·   Michael McBryde (Rowing) won a silver medal in the men’s lightweight quad
    scull at the 2003 World Rowing Championships and a gold medal in the
    lightweight quad scull at the Lucerne World Cup.

·   Malcolm Page (AIS/NSWIS) and Nathan Wilmot (Sailing) won a silver medal
    in Spain in the men’s Olympic 470 class at the 2003 World Championships. At
    the 2004 World Championships, they also won a gold medal.

·   Darren Bundock (AIS/NSWIS) and John Forbes (AIS/NSWIS) (Sailing) won
    their third consecutive world championship. This was John’s sixth world
    championship title and Darren’s fourth. The pair also won a gold medal at the
    2003 Tornado Class European Championships.

·   Grant Schubert (Hockey) was named World Young Player of the Year in men’s
    hockey and won a silver medal with the Australian senior team in the 2003
    Champions Trophy.

·   Michael Milton (AIS/NSWIS) (APC Skiing) in 2003 broke the world speed-
    skiing record for a skier on one leg and outriggers, with a speed of 193.16
    kilometres per hour at the Pro Mondial Event in France. At the 2004 IPC Alpine
    Skiing World Championships, he won two gold and two silver medals.

·   Alisa Camplin (AIS/VIS), Lydia Ierodiaconou (AIS/VIS) and Liz Gardner
    (AIS/VIS) (Aerial Skiing) in the 2003–04 World Cup season won more medals
    for Australia than ever before. They won a total of 19 medals and the Australian
    team (all AIS scholarship holders) retained their world number-one ranking.
    Leading the charge, Alisa Camplin and Lydia Ierodiaconou finished the season
    retaining their first and second World Cup rankings.


      © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Other Australian Institute of Sport programs and activities

In 2003–04, the AIS’s three sections contributed to the Institute achieving its annual
objectives. A summary of the activities of each of these sections in 2003–04 is set out
below.


Sport Programs Planning and Evaluation

The Sport Programs Planning and Evaluation section is responsible for the
implementation of the AIS Performance Enhancement Program across the 35 AIS sport
programs, and the ongoing effective management of these programs. During the
reporting period, Sport Programs Planning and Evaluation:

·      coordinated all planning and reporting functions across the AIS

·      developed and evaluated comprehensive annual plans for 35 AIS sport
       programs. All plans were endorsed by the AIS and the relevant national sporting
       organisations. Each program was reviewed mid-year and at end of year,
       assessing performance against the agreed targets and service delivery levels

·      coordinated AIS input into the ASC quadrennial planning process for 2005–09
       with national sporting organisations

·      completed the annual performance planning review of AIS-employed coaching
       staff

·      coordinated the selection and annual presentation of the 2003 AIS Athlete and
       Coach Awards

·      coordinated a formal drugs education program for AIS scholarship holders,
       delivered by Australian Sports Drug Agency staff and AIS medical practitioners

·      coordinated a social drugs education program with particular emphasis on the
       responsible use of alcohol, delivered by AIS nutritionists and drug and alcohol
       educators

·      supported the AIS Athletes’ Commission, which addresses athlete issues and
       provides advice to AIS management.

Twenty-eight AIS coaches and one administrative staff member were appointed as
Australian coaches and management staff for the Australian team for the Athens 2004
Olympic Games.


Athlete and Coach Services

The major responsibility of Athlete and Coach Services is the delivery of integrated
support services in the areas of clinical and sports science, athlete career and education,
and athlete welfare to AIS sport programs. These services were delivered during the
reporting period as agreed between the coach and the service provider in the AIS
Performance Enhancement Program planning process.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
In 2003–04, Athlete and Coach Services staff provided services to national teams under
negotiated commercial arrangements with national sporting organisations, consistent
with the adoption of the ASC policy on one-line appropriation of funding to national
sporting organisations. The AIS agreed to second 20 AIS-employed Athlete and Coach
Services staff to the Australian Olympic Committee to provide services to the
Australian Olympic team. The provision of such services is regarded as part of the
ASC’s contribution to the national sporting effort.
During the reporting period, staff in Athlete and Coach Services also conducted
considerable research to identify best practice to support elite athlete development and
to provide innovations to the AIS and Australian elite sport network. A brief report on
these activities is set out below.
Clinical Services

Sports Medicine

Research within Sports Medicine in 2003–04 focused on haematological and
biochemical screening of athletes, the interpretation of blood test results in elite athletes,
tendon injuries and osteitis pubis. The department also commenced a PhD program in
association with the University of Western Sydney. PhD research focused on concerns
the effects of a range of alternative therapies on muscle soreness and inflammation.
Strength and Conditioning

Strength and Conditioning continued its proactive coordination of, and quality-
assurance role for, AIS sports located in the states and Canberra. It also played a
leadership role with state and territory institutes and academies of sport personnel in the
ongoing development of national protocols for testing and exercise prescription to
provide consistency for elite athlete development.
Physical Therapies

An Olympic year brings special challenges for Physical Therapies. In the first six
months of 2004, the combined time away for staff providing training and competition
support was approximately 54 weeks. Ongoing involvement with research continued.
The Beiersdorf PhD Fellow presented some of his research findings regarding the
differences between cyclists and triathletes in electromyographic patterns of the lower
limb during cycling at both national and international conferences. Physical Therapies
also created a further PhD scholarship position, which will be examining the
relationship between bicycle set-up and performance and injury.
Performance Psychology

As a result of the AIS Benchmarking Report, Performance Psychology revised the type
of services it is delivering to coaches and athletes by placing a greater emphasis on
practical activities with measurable outcomes. The use of online delivery of mental
skills training is also starting to provide a flexible learning approach for athletes around
Australia. The Skill Acquisition team achieved significant research outcomes,
particularly in basketball and netball, where they have used video-based decision-
making training.


          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Sports Science

Physiology

Physiology services to AIS sports and national sporting organisations were supported by
further development in the areas of fatigue and recovery management and
neuromuscular physiology, and by the continuation of Physiology’s involvement in the
Cooperative Research Centres for MicroTechnology. New devices for athlete
monitoring in rowing and swimming were developed and are now being trialled by AIS
coaches and athletes. Education and research activities were extensively pursued
through the pilot Sport-based PhD Scheme with ten full-time PhD scholars now
carrying out their PhD studies in Physiology.
Major areas of research included environmental physiology (altitude hypoxia and
cooling strategies), exercise immunology, strength/power development and competition
analysis. The technical area of Physiology embarked on significant technical advances,
such as the development of new technologies to ‘water proof’ Australian rowing boats
for the Athens Olympics and, in partnership with RMIT University in Melbourne, the
development of a new cooling jacket that utilises molecular technology for cooling the
body.

Biomechanics

Biomechanics has continued its cutting-edge reputation in the areas of technique
enhancement, competition analysis and specialised feedback procedures for the coach
and athlete in a variety of AIS sports. Biomechanics is organised into six streams with
each stream focusing on servicing a particular sport (track and field, canoe/kayak,
cricket [significantly funded by Cricket Australia], cycling, rowing and swimming). In
addition to focusing on these sports, Biomechanics provided access to all other AIS
sports for biomechanics services as required. There was also a considerable number of
service requests for commercial work with national sporting organisations and private-
sector organisations. Much of the development and research in the area of equipment
and technology was developed and produced in-house. During the reporting period,
Biomechanics had six postgraduate scholars, each for a 12-month period, and two staff
completing their PhDs.

Nutrition

During the reporting period, Nutrition released its third book in the successful Survival
cookbook series — Survival Around the World. This book contains a diverse range of
recipes from around the world, which is important given AIS athletes spend
considerable time travelling domestically and internationally. Nutrition further
developed the Nutrition Recovery Bar program to assist athletes maximise their exercise
performance and facilitate recovery following training and competition. The Nutrition
Recovery Bar is part of the AIS Supplement Program, which is now in its fourth year.
The Nestlé Fellowship program continued, and opportunities for mentorship within
Nutrition increased with the commencement of the Gatorade Fellowship position as part
of the new sponsorship arrangement between the AIS and Gatorade.


            © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Performance Analysis

Performance Analysis supports coaches in their observations and analyses of athlete
performance. Staff work with coaches to identify how innovations in information and
communication technologies can improve their effectiveness as coaches. Staff also work
closely with colleagues in Athlete and Coach Services to develop integrated approaches
to performance excellence. In the last year, Performance Analysis worked with a variety
of programs to prepare for the Athens Olympics. Performance Analysis was also
involved in developing an internet-based approach to sharing video and other
information among coaches.

Technical Workshop

The Technical Workshop staff provide electronic and mechanical expertise for all
Clinical Services and Sports Science departments within the Athlete and Coach Services
section. In 2003–04, considerable support was provided to develop new equipment and
technologies. This includes the fabrication of a vibration plate for the Australian
Wallabies, a throwing chair for Athens Paralympians, new prosthetic technology, and
the construction and installation of a wireless networked three-dimensional camera-
analysis system for basketball and boxing.

AIS Software Development

In January 2003, the AIS and the Cooperative Research Centres for MicroTechnology
jointly funded a position to design and develop leading-edge software for coaches and
scientists. Successful projects include the integration of sensor and timing data with
video in a number of areas including cycling, rowing and archery, a hand-held system to
measure netball player performance indicators during a game, and an athlete self-
monitoring tool based on personal digital assistants. Two new initiatives commenced
during the reporting period — a project to automatically track swimmers in the pool
during competition, and the integration of three-dimensional video into a computer-
based skill-testing system.

AIS Athlete Career and Education

AIS Athlete Career and Education staff provide a high-quality and innovative career and
education service, study hall program and ongoing education assistance to both
residential and non-residential athletes. Services to non-Canberra-based residential
athletes were delivered on behalf of the AIS through the state and territory institute and
academy of sport network. The AIS Athlete Career and Education program
commissioned a review into developing research and assistance material to support
scholarship holders to continue with their career and education action plan while away
from their home base. Employment opportunities reflecting the scholarship holder’s
action plan have increased both in Canberra and in the states, complemented by a
partnership with the Coles Myer group.



          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Residences Welfare
The AIS Residence provides a homely environment for 160 live-in athletes. There are
six live-in houseparents and 15 block supervisors providing a high standard of welfare,
services, recreation and supervision. During the reporting period, the Residential
Athlete Committee was formed. The aim of this committee is to address any concerns
and ideas relating to life in the AIS Residence.
Technical Direction

The focus of Technical Direction is to provide leadership to Australia’s high
performance sport through national programs in athlete career and education, elite
sports research, talent identification and laboratory standards, in addition to providing
benchmarking of services and facilitating discussion on topics of current interest.
Technical Direction also enables international partnerships with elite training
institutions and universities.
Cooperative Agreements
Technical Direction has established working partnerships with the Institut National du
Sport et de l’Education Physique in Paris, the University of Birmingham,
Loughborough University in Leicestershire, United Kingdom, and Free University of
Brussels. Agreements have also been initiated with centres in Spain and the University
of North Carolina in the United States.
National Laboratory Standards Assistance Scheme
The AIS and two state institutes and academies of sport — South Australian Sports
Institute and Queensland Academy of Sport — renewed accreditation with the
Laboratory Standards Assistance Scheme for the third quadrennial period. Interest in the
Laboratory Standards Assistance Scheme exercise physiology accreditation program
was also forthcoming from a number of organisations outside the state and territory
institute and academy of sport network. During the reporting period, progress was made
towards implementing a national accreditation model (facilities and individual
accreditation) in strength and conditioning as a discipline. The Laboratory Standards
Assistance Scheme also held a workshop to assist the development and implementation
of national standards of best practice in biomechanics. In addition, workshops were held
to address and discuss issues of interest to sports scientists such as interpretation of
results and data from testing of elite athletes, and quantification of training and
competition loads.
National Talent Search
Throughout 2003–04, the National Talent Search program continued to fund and
support six of the state and territory institute and academy of sport partners. Six regional
academies of sport within New South Wales have supported a pilot scheme. Additional
funding was also made available through a competitive tendering process to a range of
stakeholders wishing to pursue novel science-based talent identification programs.
Talent Search athletes performed impressively at national and international competition.
During the reporting period, 30 athletes competed for, or were selected to represent,
Australia with gold, silver and bronze medals won at junior world championships and a
gold medal won at a senior world championship. One hundred and thirty-two junior and
81 senior medals were also won at national championships. Research was undertaken to
describe the development pathways and processes of elite Australian athletes, and a
consultancy was commissioned to assess the viability of a national system of talent
transfer in high performance athletes from sport to sport.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
National Elite Sports Research Program

During 2003–04, the National Elite Sports Research Program conducted a workshop to
determine research directions leading up to the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. Along
with coaches and scientists from the AIS, representatives of the various state and
territory institutes and academies of sport participated in the workshop to ensure that
research continues to have a targeted and practical approach.

AIS research through the National Elite Sports Research Program and the AIS/National
Elite Sports Council’s discretionary research program continued to deliver research
outcomes that are recognised for their contribution to the body of scientific knowledge
and their practical application to the preparation of Australia’s elite athletes. The AIS
Research Publications Database at www.ais.org.au/research provides information on
research outcomes presented at conferences and/or published by AIS researchers.

National Athlete Career and Education

During the reporting period, National Athlete Career and Education provided advice and
support to 32 national sporting organisations on the integration of athlete career and
education programs into their high performance plans. Links with international partners
were strengthened through the establishment of an International Athlete Services
Steering Committee, which the National Athlete Career and Education Manager chairs.
Following on from research into athletes’ needs in the education sector, partnerships
were explored with tertiary institutions to establish a national network of ‘athlete-
friendly’ universities.

Benchmarking, Best Practice and Innovation


Benchmarking

This AIS initiative was established in 2002 to ensure world’s best practice, particularly
in the areas of sports science and sports medicine. During 2003–04, Benchmarking was
undertaken for the Physical Therapies department and Recovery as a discipline. The
deliberations of this benchmarking process were made available to state and territory
institutes and academies of sport and to national sporting organisations.

Seminars and workshops

Seminars and workshops were held on strategic directions for research in high
performance, and diagnosing and managing fatigue in athletes. The proceedings of these
seminars and workshops were made available to state and territory institutes and
academies of sport and to national sporting organisations.




          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Cooperative Research Centres for MicroTechnology

To keep Australian sports science at the world’s leading edge, the AIS is collaborating
with the national Cooperative Research Centres for MicroTechnology. This
collaboration aims to develop unique and unobtrusive monitoring equipment that can be
used in training and/or competition. The project commenced in July 2001 and in the
lead-up to the Athens Olympics, all AIS and Olympic rowing crews used world-class
prototype equipment co-developed with the Cooperative Research Centres for
MicroTechnology. Concurrently, the Australian swimming squad conducted initial trials
with another prototype that incorporates micro-electromechanical components. A joint
spin-off company, SportZCo Pty Ltd, has been formed between the ASC and the
Cooperative Research Centres for MicroTechnology to investigate commercial
opportunities that may emanate from these devices. Commercialisation will be
prudently controlled to ensure that a competitive advantage for AIS and Australian
athletes is not compromised.

Other activities

Technical Direction staff also provided technical advice to the Australian Olympic
Committee to assist athlete performance at the Athens Olympics. Areas covered include
recovery, intravenous rehydration, weight-making strategies and nutrition.



Sports Excellence Program

Under the Sports Excellence Program, the ASC provides grants and advice to national
sporting organisations with an emphasis on high performance. The Sports Excellence
Program is managed by the Sport Services section of Sport Performance and
Development.

Approximately one quarter of the ASC’s 2003–04 budget was directly invested in the
high performance programs of national sporting organisations (excluding funds that
were spent directly on AIS programs). The ASC’s principal point of contact for national
sporting organisations with respect to this funding is the Sport Services section. The
nature of this relationship was integral in strengthening national sporting structures so
that Australian athletes and coaches had the support systems and programs to sustain
and build international sporting success.

Through the provision of strategic advice and assistance, the ASC challenged national
sporting organisations to strive to achieve higher organisational, participation and
athlete performance targets. With an in-depth knowledge of each of their sport’s high
performance programs, Sport Services consultants administered the provision of ASC
funding and services in a coordinated way such that sports achieved improved
efficiency and effectiveness. Through the combined efforts of Sport Services and the
quality-assurance role provided by the Planning and Reporting section, the ASC also
monitored agreed national sporting organisation high performance targets and
outcomes.
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Planning and Reporting
Nadine (high performance grants – make reference to sports’ strategic plans, major initiative to assist implementation of Drug
Free Sport policies, anti-doping assessment processes)

The ASC, through the Planning and Reporting section, played a number of key roles in
delivering national high performance outcomes, including being the primary funding
agent for national sporting organisation high performance programs. The contractual
vehicle with national sporting organisations for this was the rough Funding and Service
Level Agreements that wasere negotiated and agreed between the ASC and each sporte
ASC and national sporting organisations. The Funding and Service Level Agreements
ensured an, the ASC emphasis oned the application of ASC high performance funding
and services against sports’ strategic plans.

The ASC also educated national sporting organisations and other stakeholders on their
requirements and obligations in accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, the
Australian Government’s Tough on Drugs in Sport Strategy and ASC funding terms and
conditions via information workshops, email bulletins, published articles and
information on the internet. Two national sporting organisation anti-doping assessment
processes were undertaken to assist with these activities, and to monitor the progress of
national sporting organisations in meeting their anti-doping obligations.

The ASC worked closely with the National Elite Sports Council to implement a
nationally coordinated approach to high performance planning for the 2005–09 funding
period. This approach applied the coordinated collective resources of the ASC, AIS and
state and territory institutes and academies of sport in order to achieve the maximum
return in terms of elite performance across a range of sports, with the overall objective
of enhancing Australia’s performance in international competition.

During the reporting period, the ASC conducted High Performance Advisory Panels to
provide a detailed assessment of a national sporting organisation’s high performance
program and produced an action plan for improving it. Advisory panels were conducted
for athletics, bowls and alpine skiing.

Results of Australian performances in international events were also tracked. An
analysis of results was performed to meet a range of requirements, including Olympic
medal predictions.


Conclusion

In an environment of increased international competition, Australian elite athletes
continued to excel both in Australia and abroad. The delivery of integrated services to
AIS sport programs, the leadership provided to sport to adopt a philosophy of
continuous improvement and the fostering of a cooperative approach to develop and
implement the national system has ensured that Australia remains at the forefront of
developing successful high performance athletes and coaches. In doing so, the ASC met
its agreed outputs under Outcome 2.
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications




       Financial
     accountability
© Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Budget

The Australian Government appropriation to the ASC for the 2003–04 financial year
was $125.592 million. In addition, the ASC generated in the order of $22.357 million in
revenue from corporate sources such as sponsorship, hire of facilities and interest, from
external sources such as Government departments and agencies, and from national
sporting organisations.

The independent audit report and financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2004
are incorporated in Appendix 1. The disbursement of funds across the ASC is depicted
below.

Through its sports grants program, the ASC provides financial assistance to 75 sports.
Details of grant allocations to sports are at Appendix 4.


Figure 1 Disbursement of the budget across the Australian Sports Commission, 2003–
2004




Planning and accountability framework

The ASC has in place a planning and accountability framework that is based on the
Government’s outcomes and outputs framework. The framework is designed to ensure
the ASC meets its legislative responsibilities as described in the Australian Sports
Commission Act (1989) and effectively meets on its objectives, which are:

·      to secure an effective national sports system that offers improved participation in
       quality sports activities by Australians

·      to secure excellence in sports performance by Australians.

The Operational Plan 2003–2004 stems from the Strategic Plan 2002–2005, and reflects
these outcomes to ensure consistent reporting on performance measures identified in the
Government’s budget papers.
         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
The planning and accountability framework is continually being reviewed and refined to
take account of emerging needs and better-practice approaches.

Internal and external scrutiny
The Audit Committee, which is a standing committee of the ASC Board, develops and
delivers the ASC’s financial-management and accountability framework (for more
information see ‘The Australian Sports Commission Board’). It helps the ASC to fulfil
its accountability responsibilities by reviewing audits conducted by the Australian
National Audit Office and internal auditors (KPMG), and by monitoring the adequacy
of the ASC’s administrative, operational and accounting controls.
There were four Audit Committee meetings in 2003–04. Attendance by committee
members was as follows:
Name                      Position                Meetings attended
Karin Puels           Chairperson/member                  2
Roy Masters           Chairperson/member                  3
Cory Bernardi         Member                              2
Margot Foster         Member                              4
During 2003–04, the Audit Committee considered the report from the Australian
National Audit Office on the financial statements audit for 2002–03 (for which an
unqualified appraisal was obtained).
In addition, the committee was informed of the ASC’s actions against the
recommendations of 14 across-agency Australian National Audit Office reports, tabled
in Parliament in 2003–04.
The committee reviewed the following internal audit reports:
·      record keeping
·      publications inventory management
·      fringe benefits tax
·      salary packaging
·      review of costing analysis and overhead allocation (Swim School).
The committee also considered reports provided on the ASC’s progress in the following
areas:
·      2003–06 strategic internal audit plan
·      2003–04 internal audit program
·      tendering of cleaning and catering services
·      end of financial year treatment of grant payments owed.




          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendixes


1   Financial report

       Australian Sports Commission

       – Independent audit report

       – Financial statements

       Australian Sports Foundation

       – Independent audit report

       – Financial statements

2   Staffing statistics

3   Australian Institute of Sport scholarship program performances,
    2003–2004

4   Grant allocations to sports, 2003–2004

5   Summary of compliance

6   Australian Institute of Sport program locations

7   Contact officers

8   Australian Sports Commission corporate partners




        © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 1              Financial report


[See PDF]




       © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 2                   Staffing statistics
The following statistics, as at 30 June 2004, are measured in terms of full-time
equivalent jobs.

Table 1         Jobs by employment type
Ongoing employment — full time and part time                                                          309.2
Non-ongoing employment — fixed term (full time and part time) and casual                              148.8
Total                                                                                                 458.0


Table 2         Jobs by employment type by group
                     Australian Institute       ASC Executive and             Sport Performance             Total
                           of Sport            Business Operations             and Development
Ongoing (full time)          87.0                      145.0                             49.0               281.0
Ongoing (part time)          12.9                        13.5                             1.8                28.2
Fixed term (full time)       78.0                        20.0                            11.0               109.0
Fixed term (part time)         5.6                        0.0                             1.0                 6.6
Casual                         4.0                       27.7                             1.5                33.2
Total                      187.5                       206.2                             64.3               458.0


Table 3         Jobs by location
Australian Capital Territory                                     431.7
New South Wales                                                     3.0
Queensland                                                          8.3
Victoria                                                            7.0
South Australia                                                     6.0
Western Australia                                                   2.0
Total                                                            458.0


Table 4       Staffing by level and gender (excluding casual employment)
                                         Female                            Male                      Total
Executive                                   1.0                             3.0                       4.0
Sports Officer Grade 4                     49.2                           120.7                    169.9
Sports Officer Grades 1–3                165.5                             84.3                    249.8


Staff separation rate

The total separation rate for the ASC in 2003–04 was 13 per cent. This comprises
employee and employer-initiated separations and separations due to contract expiration,
but excludes casual employment.
            © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 3 Australian Institute of Sport scholarship
           program performances, 2003–2004

AIS scholarship program contribution to sporting performances of Australia’s elite and
potential elite athletes and teams


   Sport           Program              Performance             Achievements during
                  description            indicator                    2003–04

Archery       Residential program   At least 80 per cent of   100 per cent of the
              for national squad    the Australian recurve    Australian recurve team for
              and development       team selected for the     the 2003 World
              athletes              2003 World                Championships, held in
                                    Championships to be       July, were current or former
                                    current or former AIS     AIS scholarship holders
                                    scholarship holders

                                    At least 80 per cent of   100 per cent of the
                                    archers selected in the   Australian recurve team for
                                    national recurve team     the 2004 Junior World
                                    for the World Junior      Championships, to be held
                                    Championships to be       in July, are current AIS
                                    current or former AIS     scholarship holders
                                    scholarship holders
                                                              100 per cent of the selected
                                                              Australian Olympic archery
                                                              team are current AIS
                                                              scholarship holders

                                    Performances in major     David Barnes: World
                                    international             Championships — bronze;
                                    competitions              Athens Test Event —
                                                              bronze; European GP,
                                                              Wyhl, Germany — 7th

                                                              Tim Cuddihy: 2003 World
                                                              Championships — 4th

                                                              Jade Beatty: 2003 World
                                                              Championships — 28th

                                                              Men’s team (Tim Cuddihy,
                                                              David Barnes and Simon
                                                              Fairweather): European
                                                              GP, Wyhl, Germany — gold

                                                              Australian/AIS team (David
                                                              Barnes, Tim Cuddihy and
                                                              Andrew Lindsay): men’s
                                                              teams event, senior
                                                              division, Croatia Grand Prix
                                                              Archery Tournament — 4th

Australian    Camps-based           2004 World                Michael Milton
Paralympic    program for senior    Championships results     (AIS/NSWIS): giant slalom
    Sport             Program              Performance          Achievements during
                     description            indicator                 2003–04
Committee       elite athletes                                — gold; slalom —gold;
Alpine Skiing                                                 super G — silver; downhill
                                                              — silver

                                                              Cameron Rahles–Rahbula
                                                              (AIS/VIS): downhill — gold;
                                                              super G — gold; slalom —
                                                              silver

                                                              Toby Kane: super G —
                                                              bronze

                                                              Michael Milton
                                                              (AIS/NSWIS) broke his own
                                                              world speed record for
                                                              skiing on one leg when he
                                                              achieved 198.68 km/h at
                                                              the 2004 World Speed
                                                              Skiing Championships

Australian      Camps-based           2004 Paralympic         21 AIS/APC scholarship
Paralympic      program for senior    Games selection         holders were selected for
Committee       elite athletes                                the 2004 Paralympic
Swimming                                                      swimming team, comprising
                                                              72 per cent of the team

Athletics       Residential program   International results   2003 IAAF World
                for senior elite                              Championships
                athletes and camps-
                based program for                             Luke Adams: 20-kilometre
                junior distance                               walk — 5th
                runners
                                                              Stuart Rendell: hammer
                                                              throw — 10th

                                                              2003 IBSA World Marathon
                                                              Championship

                                                              Roy Daniel — silver

                                                              Heath Francis set a new
                                                              world best time of 48.88
                                                              seconds in the T46 400
                                                              metres (arm amputee)

                                      Four to six athletes    2004 Olympic selection
                                      selected for the 2004
                                      Olympic team            Nathan Deakes: 20-
                                                              kilometre walk and 50-
                                                              kilometre walk

                                                              Luke Adams: 20-kilometre
                                                              walk

                                                              Sisay Bezebah: marathon

                                                              Stuart Rendell: hammer
                                                              throw
   Sport          Program               Performance             Achievements during
                 description             indicator                    2003–04

                                                              Patrick Johnson: 4x100-
                                                              metres relay

                                    Four to six athletes      2004 Paralympic selection
                                    selected for the 2004
                                    Paralympic team           Roy Daniel: marathon

                                                              Heath Francis: 100 metres,
                                                              200 metres, 400 metres,
                                                              4x400-metres relay and
                                                              4x100-metres relay

                                                              Amanda Fraser: discus,
                                                              shot put and 100 metres

                                                              Hamish MacDonald: discus
                                                              and shot put

                                                              Lisa MacIntosh: 100
                                                              metres, 200 metres and
                                                              400 metres

                                                              Amy Winters: 100 metres,
                                                              200 metres and long jump

                                    80 per cent of            15 out of 17 eligible
                                    scholarship holders to    athletes (88 per cent)
                                    finish in the top three   achieved top-three results
                                    at the 2004 National
                                    Championships

Australian   Camps-based            Level of performance      Ireland defeated Australia
Football     program for            in international          2–1 in the 2004 U17
(AIS/AFL     development athletes   competition               International Rules Series
Academy)                                                      in Australia

                                    Number of players         AFL clubs drafted 25
                                    drafted to AFL clubs      former scholarship holders
                                                              in the 2003 national draft

Basketball   Residential program    Men                       11 AIS athletes out of 12
             for development        Ten AIS athletes          positions selected for the
             athletes               selected for the 2003     Australian junior men’s
                                    Australian junior men’s   team for the World
                                    team for the World        Championships
                                    Championships

                                    Top-five finish in the    1st — World
                                    2003 Junior Men’s         Championships
                                    World Championships

                                    Women                     91 per cent (ten AIS
                                    80 per cent of current    athletes out of 11 positions)
                                    AIS athletes to make      selected for the Australian
                                    up the 2003 Australian    young women’s team for
                                    young women’s team        the World Championships
                                    for the World
                                    Championships
   Sport          Program             Performance             Achievements during
                 description           indicator                    2003–04

                                  75 per cent of the        90 per cent (nine AIS
                                  2003 Opals team to        athletes out of ten
                                  compete in the            positions) current or former
                                  Olympic qualifying        AIS scholarship holders
                                  series to be current or   selected for the Olympic
                                  former AIS scholarship    qualifying series
                                  holders

Boxing       Residential and      Improved international    Jarrod Fletcher: 69kg, 2003
             camps-based          results                   Commonwealth
             program for senior                             Championships, Malaysia
             elite athletes                                 — gold

                                                            Adam Forsyth: 91kg, 2003
                                                            Commonwealth
                                                            Championships, Malaysia
                                                            — gold

                                                            Todd Kidd: 64kg, 2003
                                                            Commonwealth
                                                            Championships, Malaysia
                                                            — bronze

                                                            AIS boxers also won
                                                            medals at the 2004
                                                            Oceania Championships in
                                                            Tonga, the 2004 Olympic
                                                            Test Event in Greece, the
                                                            2004 Chemistry Cup in
                                                            Germany and the 2004
                                                            Grand Prix in the Czech
                                                            Republic

Canoeing —   Camps-based          World Championship        2003 World Championships
sprint       program for senior   results and boats
             elite athletes       qualified for Olympics    Nathan Baggaley
                                                            (AIS/NSWIS): K1 500 —
                                                            gold; K1 1000 — bronze

                                                            Olympic qualifications (as
                                                            at 30 June 2004)

                                                            Nathan Baggaley
                                                            (AIS/NSWIS): K1 500, K1
                                                            1000

                                                            Nathan Baggaley
                                                            (AIS/NSWIS) and Clint
                                                            Robinson (AIS/QAS): K2
                                                            500

                                                            Daniel Collins (AIS/NSWIS)
                                                            and David Rhodes
                                                            (AIS/NSWIS): K2 1000

                                                            Amanda Rankin (AIS/QAS),
                                                            Chantal Meek
                                                            (AIS/NSWIS), Lisa
   Sport          Program               Performance              Achievements during
                 description             indicator                     2003–04
                                                               Oldenhof (AIS/WAIS) and
                                                               Kate Barclay (AIS/SASI):
                                                               LK4

Canoeing —   Camps-based           World Championship          2003 World Championships
slalom       program for senior    results and boats
             elite athletes        qualified for Olympics      Kynan Maley (AIS/WAIS):
                                                               C1 class — 9th

                                                               2004 Olympic qualifications

                                                               Robin Bell (AIS/WAIS): C1

                                                               Warwick Draper (AIS/VIS):
                                                               K1

                                                               Louise Natoli (AIS/NSWIS):
                                                               LK1

                                                               Lachlan Milne (AIS/NSWIS)
                                                               and Mark Bellofiore
                                                               (AIS/NSWIS): C2

Cricket —    Short-term            Number of scholarship       12 of the 25 residential
men          residential program   holders progressing to      scholarship holders for
             for development       first-class cricket         2003 have progressed to
             athletes                                          play first-class cricket for
                                                               their state

                                   Graduates selected to       Nine of the 13 players who
                                   play test and one-day       played in the Australian
                                   international cricket for   team in the test series
                                   Australia                   against India in the
                                                               Australian summer of
                                                               2003–04 were former AIS
                                                               scholarship holders

                                                               11 of the 15 players who
                                                               played in the Australian
                                                               team in the international
                                                               one-day series in the
                                                               Australian summer of
                                                               2003–04 were former AIS
                                                               scholarship holders

                                                               Former AIS scholarship
                                                               holder Mike Hussey made
                                                               his one-day international
                                                               debut and Nathan Bracken
                                                               and Andrew Symons made
                                                               their test debut in 2003-04

Cricket —    Camps-based           90 per cent of the          92 per cent of the
women        program for senior    Australian team             Australian team were
             elite athletes        selected from AIS           current or former AIS
                                   squad                       scholarship holders during
                                                               2003–04
   Sport         Program                Performance              Achievements during
                description              indicator                     2003–04

                                   Performance of the          Australia won five out of six
                                   national team in            one-day internationals
                                   international               against New Zealand
                                   competitions

Cycling —   Residential program    Performances in             Michael Rogers (former
road        (Italy)                significant international   AIS/current ACTAS): time
                                   events                      trial, 2003 Road World
            For women — senior                                 Championships, Canada —
            elite                                              2nd

            For men —                                          Baden Cooke (former
            development athletes                               AIS/current VIS): Tour de
            (under 23)                                         France — stage win; Tour
                                                               de France — green jersey

                                                               Brad McGee (former
                                                               AIS/current NSWIS): time
                                                               trial stage, Tour de France
                                                               — 1st; 1st time trial stage,
                                                               Tour of Italy — yellow
                                                               jersey; 1st Route du Sud —
                                                               pink jersey

                                                               Robbie McEwen (former
                                                               AIS/current QAS): Tour of
                                                               Italy — stage win; Tour of
                                                               Swiss — two stage wins

                                                               Oenone Wood
                                                               (AIS/ACTAS): World Cup
                                                               — one win; Australian
                                                               Road Title — 1st;
                                                               Australian Time Trial Title
                                                               — 1st

                                                               Gene Bates (AIS/SASI):
                                                               Giro due Province, Italy —
                                                               1st; GP Linz, Austria (U23
                                                               World Cup Race) — 1st

                                                               Aaron Kemps (AIS/QAS):
                                                               Citta di Asti, Italy (U23
                                                               World Cup Race) — 1st

                                                               Olivia Gollan (AIS/NSWIS):
                                                               two top-three places in
                                                               World Cup events

                                                               Sara Carrigan (AIS/QAS):
                                                               three top-three places in
                                                               World Cup events

                                                               Australian Road Nations
                                                               Ranking — Men 5th,
                                                               Women 3rd

Cycling —   Camps-based            Performances in             2003 Track Cycling World
   Sport        Program              Performance              Achievements during
               description            indicator                     2003–04
track      program for senior   significant international   Championships
           elite athletes       events
                                                            Luke Roberts (AIS/SASI),
                                                            Stephen Wooldridge
                                                            (AIS/NSWIS), Brett
                                                            Lancaster (former AIS/VIS),
                                                            Graeme Brown (former
                                                            AIS/NSWIS) and Peter
                                                            Dawson (AIS/WAIS): men’s
                                                            4000-metres team pursuit
                                                            — 1st

                                                            Luke Roberts (AIS/SASI):
                                                            men’s 4000-metres
                                                            individual pursuit — 2nd

                                                            Jobie Dajka (AIS/SASI):
                                                            men’s sprint — 2nd; men’s
                                                            keirin — 2nd

                                                            Shane Kelly (AIS/VIS):
                                                            men’s 1000-metres time
                                                            trial — 2nd

                                                            Katie Mactier (AIS/VIS):
                                                            women’s 3000-metres
                                                            individual pursuit — 2nd

                                                            Rochelle Gilmore
                                                            (AIS/NSWIS): women’s
                                                            scratch race — 2nd

                                                            Anna Meares (AIS/QAS):
                                                            women’s keirin — 2nd

                                                            Australia’s medal tally was
                                                            one gold and seven silver

                                                            2004 Track Cycling World
                                                            Championships

                                                            Peter Dawson (AIS/WAIS),
                                                            Ashley Hutchinson
                                                            (AIS/QAS), Luke Roberts
                                                            (AIS/SASI) and Stephen
                                                            Wooldridge (AIS/NSWIS):
                                                            men’s 4000-metre team
                                                            pursuit — 1st

                                                            Anna Meares (AIS/QAS):
                                                            women’s 500-metres time
                                                            trial — 1st; women’s sprint
                                                            — 2nd

                                                            Katie Mactier (AIS/VIS):
                                                            women’s three-kilometre
                                                            individual pursuit — 2nd

                                                            Ryan Bayley (AIS/WAIS):
Sport    Program      Performance     Achievements during
        description    indicator            2003–04
                                    men’s sprint — 3rd

                                    Australia’s medal tally was
                                    two gold, two silver and one
                                    bronze
Diving   Residential program   Performance at World   2003 FINA World
         for senior elite      Championships, World   Championships
         athletes              Cup and Olympic        Mathew Helm and Robert
                               Games                  Newbery: men’s platform
                                                      synchronised — gold
                                                      Mathew Helm: men’s
                                                      platform –– silver
                                                      Linda Dackiw (with Loudy
                                                      Tourky, NSWIS): women’s
                                                      platform synchronised —
                                                      silver
                                                      Five AIS divers were
                                                      selected for the Australian
                                                      World Championships team
                                                      2004 FINA World Cup
                                                      Steven Barnett and Robert
                                                      Newbery: men’s three-
                                                      metre synchronised ––
                                                      silver
                                                      Loudy Tourky
                                                      (AIS/NSWIS): women’s
                                                      platform –– silver
                                                      2004 Olympic qualification
                                                      Chantelle Newbery
                                                      Linda Dackiw
                                                      Steven Barnett
                                                      Robert Newbery
                                                      Mathew Helm
                                                      Loudy Tourky (AIS/NSWIS)
                                                      2004 FINA Diving Grand
                                                      Prix Super Final
                                                      Mathew Helm and Robert
                                                      Newbery: men’s platform
                                                      synchronised — gold
                                                      Steven Barnett and Robert
                                                      Newbery: men’s three-
                                                      metre synchronised —
                                                      silver
                                                      Loudy Tourky
                                                      (AIS/NSWIS): women’s
                                                      platform — silver
                                                      Chantelle Newbery:
                                                      women’s platform —
                                                      bronze; women’s three-
                                                      metre synchronised —
                                                      bronze
   Sport          Program               Performance             Achievements during
                 description             indicator                    2003–04

Golf         Residential program    80 per cent of AIS        86 per cent of AIS players
             for development        players selected for      were selected for state or
             athletes               state or national teams   national teams

                                    National and              Men
                                    international
                                    performances              Andrew Martin: 2004
                                                              Australian Amateur
                                                              Championships — 1st

                                                              James Nitties: 2004
                                                              International Amateur
                                                              Championships — 2nd;
                                                              2004 Mandurah Easter
                                                              Open — 1st

                                                              Michael Sim: 2004
                                                              Riversdale Cup — 1st

                                                              Luke Hickmott: 2004
                                                              Mandurah Easter Open —
                                                              5th

                                                              Women

                                                              Dana Lacey: 2004 Lake
                                                              Macquarie Women’s
                                                              Championship — 3rd; 2004
                                                              New Zealand Stroke Play
                                                              — 2nd; 2004 Victorian
                                                              Stroke Play — 3rd

                                                              Sarah Kemp: 2004
                                                              Australian Strokeplay
                                                              Championship — 3rd; 2004
                                                              Australian Amateur
                                                              Championship — 2nd;
                                                              2004 Victorian Stroke Play
                                                              — 2nd; 2004 WA Stroke
                                                              Play — 1st

                                                              Bree Turnbull: 2004
                                                              Victorian Stroke Play —
                                                              1st; 2004 WA Stroke Play
                                                              — 2nd

                                                              Emma Bennett: 2004
                                                              Victorian Stroke Play — 5th

                                                              Michelle Williams: 2004
                                                              Victorian Stroke Play — 7th

Gymnastics   Residential program    Men                       Philippe Rizzo: high bar —
             for senior elite and   One gymnast in 2003       4th
             development athletes   World Championships
                                    finals                    Philippe Rizzo qualified for
                                                              the Olympics with the IGF
                                                              wildcard entry
   Sport        Program               Performance             Achievements during
               description             indicator                    2003–04

                                  Women                     Belinda Archer and Jacqui
                                  Two current AIS           Dunn selected for the
                                  athletes selected for     World Championships team
                                  the 2003 Women’s
                                  Artistic Gymnastics       Australia — bronze medal
                                  World Championships       (first-ever Women’s Artistic
                                  team                      Gymnastics World
                                                            Championship medal for an
                                                            Australian team)

                                  Australian                Australian Championships,
                                  Championships,            National Juniors — three
                                  National Juniors —        AIS gymnasts in top-three
                                  one gymnast in top        all round and on each
                                  three in all round and    apparatus (Victoria
                                  on each apparatus         Williams, Hollie Dykes and
                                                            Melody Hernandez)

Hockey     Caters for both        Men                       Australia (all AIS
           senior and             Top-three finish at       scholarship holders)
           development athletes   2003 Champions            finished 2nd to the
           for short and long-    Trophy                    Netherlands
           term residential
           periods depending
           on the focus of the
           four-year cycle

                                  Qualify for the Olympic   Australia (all AIS
                                  Games                     scholarship holders)
                                                            qualified for the Olympics
                                                            with a 3–0 series win over
                                                            New Zealand

                                  Women                     Australia (all AIS
                                  Top-three finish at       scholarship holders)
                                  2003 Champions            finished 1st defeating China
                                  Trophy

                                  Qualify for the Olympic   Australia (all AIS
                                  Games                     scholarship holders)
                                                            qualified for the Olympics
                                                            with a 3–0 series win over
                                                            New Zealand

Netball    Residential program    Nine out of 12 current    Ten out of 12 AIS
           for development        AIS scholarship           scholarship holders
           athletes (under 21)    holders to be selected    selected for Australian 21
                                  for Australian 21 and     and under team
                                  under team

                                  Six out of 12 former      Seven out of 12 former AIS
                                  AIS scholarship           scholarship holders were
                                  holders to be selected    selected for Australian
                                  for Australian Open       Open team to compete at
                                  team to compete at        World Championships
                                  World Championships

Rowing     Residential program    70–75 per cent of         80 per cent (16 out of 20)
           for senior elite       scholarship holders       scholarship holders were
   Sport           Program                Performance             Achievements during
                  description              indicator                    2003–04
              athletes                selected for a national   selected for the national
                                      team                      team to compete in the
                                                                2003 World Championships

                                      Number of top-eight       2003 Rowing World
                                      places in Olympic         Championships
                                      Games and World
                                      Championships             Amber Bradley, Kerry Hore,
                                                                Dana Faletic and Jane
                                                                Robinson (AIS/ACTAS):
                                                                women’s quad scull — gold

                                                                Michael McBryde: member
                                                                of the men’s lightweight
                                                                quad scull — silver

                                                                Craig Jones, Mitchell
                                                                Punch, Shaun Coulton and
                                                                Brendan Long (AIS/TIS):
                                                                men’s quad scull — 4th

                                                                Sally Robbins and Rebecca
                                                                Sattin: members of the
                                                                women’s eight — 4th

                                                                Under 23 World
                                                                Championships

                                                                Henry Gundry: men’s quad
                                                                scull — gold

                                                                George Jelbart: men’s
                                                                lightweight single scull —
                                                                silver

Rugby         Camps-based             Number of athletes        Of the 19 players who
League        program for             graduating to National    graduated from the AIS
              development athletes    Rugby League              program in December
              in rural and regional   environment               2003, 16 (84 per cent) were
              locations                                         recruited by National Rugby
                                                                League clubs

Rugby Union   Camps-based             Graduation to elite       77 per cent of players who
              program for             programs                  graduated in November
              development athletes                              2003 were recruited into
                                                                Provincial Academy or
                                                                Super 12 squads

                                                                15 members of the 2004
                                                                Wallabies were graduates
                                                                of the AIS program

                                                                18 members of the 2003
                                                                World Cup Squad were
                                                                former AIS scholarship
                                                                holders

Sailing       Camps-based             Performance of AIS        Top-three finishes at World
              program for senior      scholarship holders in
Sport         Program           Performance              Achievements during
             description         indicator                     2003–04
        elite athletes     Olympic-class world         Championships
                           championships
                                                       Darren Bundock
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS) and John
                                                       Forbes (AIS/NSWIS):
                                                       tornado class, 2003 World
                                                       Championships — 1st;
                                                       2004 World Championships
                                                       — 3rd

                                                       Nathan Wilmot
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS) and Malcolm
                                                       Page (AIS/NSWIS): men’s
                                                       470 class, 2003 World
                                                       Championships — 2nd;
                                                       2004 World Championships
                                                       — 1st

                                                       Michael Blackburn
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS): laser class,
                                                       2004 World Championships
                                                       — 3rd

                           Performance of AIS          Top-three finishes at
                           scholarship holders in      significant international
                           significant international   events
                           competitions
                                                       Jenny Armstrong
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS) and Belinda
                                                       Stowell (AIS/WAIS):
                                                       women’s 470 class, 2004
                                                       Kiel Week Regatta — 1st

                                                       Darren Bundock
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS) and John
                                                       Forbes (AIS/NSWIS):
                                                       tornado class, 2003
                                                       European Championships
                                                       — 1st; 2004 European
                                                       Championships — 1st

                                                       Nathan Wilmot
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS) and Malcolm
                                                       Page (AIS/NSWIS): men’s
                                                       470 class, 2004 Kiel Week
                                                       Regatta — 2nd

                                                       Alison Shreeve
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS): women’s
                                                       mistral class, 2004 Kiel
                                                       Week Regatta — 2nd

                                                       Colin Beashel (AIS/NSWIS)
                                                       and David Giles
                                                       (AIS/NSWIS): star class,
                                                       2003 European
                                                       Championships — 3rd

                                                       Sarah Blanck (AIS/NSWIS):
    Sport        Program               Performance             Achievements during
                description             indicator                    2003–04
                                                             Europe class: 2004 Kiel
                                                             Week Regatta — 3rd

Soccer —    Residential program    50–70 per cent of         72 per cent (13 out of 18)
men         for development        current or former AIS     current or former AIS
            athletes (under 20)    scholarship holders to    scholarship holders were
                                   be selected for           selected for Australian
                                   Australian youth team     youth team (under 20s)
                                   (under 20) to compete
                                   at the World Youth
                                   Cup

                                   AIS Men’s Soccer          AIS Men’s Soccer team
                                   team to make the          were National Youth
                                   semifinals of the         League minor premiers and
                                   National Youth League     runners-up in finals series

Soccer —    Camps-based            Qualify for the Olympic   The Matildas (all AIS
women       program for senior     Games                     scholarship holders)
            elite athletes                                   qualified for the Olympics
                                                             through the Oceania Zone
                                                             Qualifier

Softball    Camps-based            Australian senior and     Australian senior women’s
            program for senior     under-19 team world       softball team is currently
            elite athletes         rankings                  ranked fifth in the world

                                   Team results in annual    Australian team (all AIS
                                   international             scholarship holders) results
                                   competition
                                                             Canada Cup — 2nd

                                                             Japan Tour — 9 wins, 2
                                                             losses

                                                             Hobart International
                                                             Tournament — 2nd

                                                             Blacktown International
                                                             Challenge — 1st

Squash      Residential program    75 per cent of current    100 per cent of current or
            for senior elite and   or former AIS             former AIS scholarship
            development athletes   scholarship holders to    holders were selected for
                                   be selected for the       the Australian men’s team.
                                   Australian men’s team     Australia finished 1st
                                   to compete at the         without dropping a set in
                                   World Men’s Team          the competition
                                   Championships

                                   AIS scholarship           Of the ten scholarship
                                   holders demonstrate       holders, eight
                                   sustained                 demonstrated improvement
                                   improvement in world      and one remained the
                                   ranking                   same

Swimming    Residential program    Representation of AIS     Ten athletes (45 per cent of
            for senior elite       athletes on national      the AIS squad) selected for
                                   teams and results of      the Australian 2004
   Sport        Program               Performance             Achievements during
               description             indicator                    2003–04
           athletes               those athletes at major   Olympic team
                                  international events
                                                            AIS athletes won a total of
                                                            27 medals (9 gold, 10 silver
                                                            and 8 bronze)

                                                            82 per cent of AIS
                                                            swimmers set personal
                                                            bests in at least one of their
                                                            identified priority events

                                                            Linda MacKenzie won the
                                                            200, 400 and 800-metres
                                                            freestyle treble at the 2004
                                                            Telstra Olympic Team
                                                            Swimming Trials

                                  Performances at 2004      12 athletes (55 per cent of
                                  National Long Course      the AIS squad) selected for
                                  Championships             the Australian team for the
                                                            World Long Course
                                                            Championship

                                                            Craig Stevens and Antony
                                                            Matkovitch: 200-metres
                                                            freestyle relay — gold
                                                            medal

                                                            Linda MacKenzie and Heidi
                                                            Crawford: 200-metres
                                                            freestyle relay — silver

Tennis     Residential program    Improvement in ITF        100 per cent of AIS
           for development        world junior rankings     scholarship holders
           athletes and a         and/or ATP/WTA world      improved their ITF or
           camps-based            senior rankings           ATP/WTA rankings
           program for targeted
           emerging junior                                  Todd Reid’s ATP ranking
           athletes                                         went from 252 to 127

                                                            Chris Guccione’s ATP
                                                            ranking went from 657 to
                                                            312

                                                            David Jeflea’s ITF ranking
                                                            went from 262 to 91

                                                            Natalie Tanevska’s ITF
                                                            ranking went from 141 to
                                                            105

                                  Performances in           Todd Reid: won two 2004
                                  international             Australian Futures events;
                                  competition               member, Australian Davis
                                                            Cup-winning squad 2003;
                                                            2004 Australian Open —
                                                            3rd round

                                                            Chris Guccione: 2003
   Sport         Program               Performance          Achievements during
                description             indicator                 2003–04
                                                          Wimbledon junior singles
                                                          and doubles events —
                                                          finalist

                                                          Raphael Durek: 2004
                                                          Queensland Satellite event
                                                          — winner; 2004 Munakata
                                                          Futures event, Japan —
                                                          semifinalist

                                                          Adam Feeney: 2003
                                                          Wimbledon junior doubles
                                                          — finalist

                                                          David Jeflea: 2004
                                                          Australian Open junior
                                                          doubles — finalist

Triathlon   Camps-based            Percentage of AIS      13 out of 15 (87 per cent)
            program for            scholarship holders    AIS scholarship holders
            development athletes   selected on national   were selected for national
            (under 23)             teams                  teams

            From 1 May 2004,
            the program changed
            to focus on the
            senior elite team

                                   Performance in         2003 ITU World
                                   international and      Championships
                                   national competition
                                                          Felicity Abram: junior
                                                          women — gold

                                                          Nikki Egyed: under 23
                                                          women — gold

                                                          Mirinda Carfrae: under 23
                                                          women — silver

                                                          Nick Hornman: under 23
                                                          men — silver

                                                          Emma Snowsill (former
                                                          AIS): elite women — gold

                                                          2004 ITU World
                                                          Championships

                                                          Annabel Luxford: under 23
                                                          women — gold

                                                          2004 Olympic qualification

                                                          Simon Thompson

                                                          Peter Robertson
   Sport             Program               Performance     Achievements during
                    description             indicator            2003–04

                                                         Brad Kahlefeldt (reserve)

Volleyball      Residential program    Performances in   The Australian senior
                for senior elite men   national and      men’s team (all AIS
                and women              international     scholarship holders)
                                       competition       qualified for the 2004
                                                         Olympic Games — the first
                                                         time an Australian
                                                         volleyball team has
                                                         achieved Olympic
                                                         qualification

                                                         The Australian men’s youth
                                                         team finished 8th in the
                                                         2003 World Youth
                                                         Championships — the best
                                                         result ever achieved by an
                                                         Australian youth volleyball
                                                         team

                                                         The AIS men’s team won
                                                         the 2003 Australian
                                                         Volleyball League

                                                         The AIS women’s team
                                                         was 2004 Australian
                                                         Volleyball League runners-
                                                         up

Water polo      Residential program    National team     83 per cent of squad
— men           for development        selections        selected for national teams
                athletes (under 19)
                                                         Current scholarship holder
                                                         Mitchal Ainsworth selected
                                                         for the Australian senior
                                                         squad

                                                         15 out of 17 (88 per cent) of
                                                         the Australian senior squad
                                                         are current or former AIS
                                                         scholarship holders

Water polo      Camps-based            Performances in   The Australian senior team
— women         program for senior     international     (all AIS scholarship
                elite athletes         competition       holders) finished 7th at the
                                                         2003 World Championships

                                                         The Australian team
                                                         qualified for 2004 Olympics

Winter sports   Camps-based            Performances in   The Australian aerials team
                program for senior     international     maintained its number-one
                elite athletes         competition       world ranking in 2004 after
                                                         winning 19 medals in World
                                                         Cup competition in 2003–
                                                         04

                                                         Alisa Camplin (AIS/VIS):
Sport               Program                      Performance                   Achievements during
                   description                    indicator                          2003–04
                                                                           ranked number one in the
                                                                           world; achieved ten top-
                                                                           three performances in
                                                                           World Cup events

                                                                           Lydia Ierodiaconou
                                                                           (AIS/VIS): ranked number
                                                                           two in the world; achieved
                                                                           seven top-three
                                                                           performances in World Cup
                                                                           events

                                                                           Liz Gardner (AIS/VIS):
                                                                           ranked number eight in the
                                                                           world

                                                                           The Australian half-pipe
                                                                           snowboard team achieved
                                                                           nine top-ten performances
                                                                           in World Cup competition

                                                                           The Australian mogul ski
                                                                           team achieved five top-ten
                                                                           performances in World Cup
                                                                           competition




        © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 4                 Grant allocations to sports, 2003–2004
Sport                 Australian Institute      High       Sport Development        Other*                Total

                           of Sport          Performance

                               $                 $                $                   $                    $

Archery                    546,702             318,300         25,000                     –            890,002

Athletics                1,077,157           2,692,000        135,000             270,000             4,174,157

Australian football        200,000             111,000        200,000             275,000              786,000

Badminton                          –           155,000         25,000                     0            180,000

Baseball **                        –         1,206,000        135,000              15,000             1,356,000

Basketball               1,067,512           2,238,000        200,000             267,000             3,772,512

BMX                                –            89,000         97,500               5,000              191,500

Bocce                              –            26,000         25,000                     0             51,000

Bowls                              –           378,000        135,000             106,000              619,000

Boxing                     309,221             105,000                    5,000               5,000    424,221

Calisthenics                       –                   0       25,000                     0             25,000

Canoeing                   680,569           1,303,000        100,000              20,000             2,103,569

Cricket                    481,111             361,000        190,000             310,000             1,342,111

Croquet                            –                   0       10,000                     0             10,000

Cycling                  1,196,797           2,352,800        110,000              73,500             3,733,097

Diving                     442,454             470,000         25,000                     0            937,454

Equestrian                         –         1,249,950         80,000              10,000             1,339,950

Fencing                            0                 70,600    25,000                     0             95,600

Golf (W)                   180,217             201,000         20,000              55,000              456,217

Golf (M)                   180,217             242,000         60,000             172,000              654,217

Golf (PGA)                         –                   –       60,000                     0             60,000

Gymnastics               1,029,422           1,008,000        200,000             109,667             2,347,089

Handball                           0                 30,000           0             3,000               33,000

Hockey                     957,954           3,270,500        150,000             117,667             4,496,121

Ice racing                         –            65,000          5,000                     0             70,000

Ice skating                        –            52,000         10,000                     0             62,000
Indoor cricket                 –     219,000     15,000          0     234,000

Judo                           –     393,680     15,000          0     408,680

Karate                         –     158,000     25,000          0     183,000

Lacrosse (M)                   –           0     25,000          0      25,000

Lacrosse (W)                   –           0     25,000          0      25,000

Modern pentathlon              –      40,000         –       3,000      43,000

Motor sports                   –     277,000     60,000          0     337,000

Motorcycling                   –     308,000     60,000          0     368,000

Netball                  561,796     726,000    170,000    194,138    1,651,934

Orienteering                   –      76,000     60,000          0     136,000

Parachuting                    –      38,000         –           0      38,000

Polocrosse                     –      61,000     60,000          0     121,000

Pony clubs                     –      30,000     25,000          0      55,000

Powerlifting                   –      32,000      5,000          0      37,000

Roller sports                  –     189,000    195,000          0     384,000

Rowing                  1,310,664   3,138,120    80,000          0    4,528,784

Rugby league             200,000     111,000    150,000    200,000     661,000

Rugby union              200,000     111,000    170,000    251,000     732,000

Sailing                  386,340    2,356,600   135,000    265,000    3,142,940

Shooting, association          –    1,166,721    35,000     10,000    1,211,721

Skiing                   370,000     570,000     15,000          0     955,000

Soccer                  1,042,992   1,233,000   135,000   3,066,667   5,477,659

Softball**               370,393    1,315,000   150,000    185,000    2,020,393

Squash                   355,189     370,000    110,000     16,000     851,189

Surf lifesaving                –     270,000    150,000    120,000     540,000

Surf riders                    –     380,000     80,000    195,000     655,000

Swimming                1,082,168   3,355,000   110,000    187,000    4,734,168

Synchronised swimming          –      60,000         –           0      60,000

Table tennis                   –      85,000     45,000          0     130,000

Taekwondo                      –     644,100     25,000          0     669,100

Tenpin bowling                 –     283,000     80,000     40,000     403,000

Tennis                   430,625     305,000    150,000    212,000    1,097,625

Touch                          –     251,000    135,000    125,666     511,666
Triathlon                        294,258          840,000          90,000             325,000               1,549,258

Universities                            –         210,000               –                    0               210,000

Volleyball                       990,988        1,162,000          60,000              80,000               2,292,988

Water polo                       945,783        1,452,000          40,000                    0              2,437,783

Water skiing                            –         331,000          20,000                 6,000              357,000

Weight-lifting                          –         325,129          20,000                    0               345,129

Wrestling                               –           33,500              –                 8,000               41,500

Total                   16,890,528             40,810,000      4,777,500         7,268,305                 69,871,334
 (excluding Aussie Able grants)




                                                  High performance        Non-Paralympic          Other         Total

                                                    infrastructure international competition

                                                      allocation            and camps

                                                           $                      $                $             $

Australian Athletes with a Disability                  180,000                        0                0      180,000

Australian Blind Sports Federation                       45,000              22,500                    0        67,500

Riding for the Disabled                                  70,000                       0                0        70,000

Disabled Winter Sports                                   45,000                       0                0        45,000

AUSRAPID                                                 50,000              32,000                    0        82,000

Special Olympics Australia                               45,000                       0                0        45,000

Australian Deaf Sports Federation                        60,000              45,000           25,000          130,000

Australian Transplant Sports Association                 45,000              48,500                    0        93,500

Australian Paralympic Committee                      3,750,000                        0       50,000         3,800,000

Total                                                4,290,000              148,000           75,000         4,513,000



* Incorporates the Targeted Sports Participation Growth Program, Indigenous Sport Program, soccer
restructuring grant, etc.

** The ASC invested in a joint Targeted Sports Participation Growth Program proposed by Softball
Australia and the Australian Baseball Federation. Approved funds for the project are paid through Softball
Australia.




               © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 5                 Summary of compliance

This index details the page numbers on which information is provided in response to
legislation and Commonwealth practices:

ASC contact officer
Audit Committee report
Auditor’s report
Board membership, qualifications and attendance
Board committees
Certification
Chairman’s Review
Corporate overview
Chief Executive Officer’s Report
Commonwealth Disability Strategy
Enabling legislation
Financial statements
Freedom of Information
       Officer
·      Privacy
Indemnities
Judicial decisions
Occupational health and safety
Organisational chart and senior executive staff
Reports against objectives and functions
Responsible minister
Review of organisational structure
Social justice and equity
Staffing overview
Statutory requirements




          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 6                 Australian Institute of Sport program
locations

Sydney

Rugby Union

Australian Rugby Union Ltd

Rugby House

Level 7

181 Miller Street

NORTH SYDNEY NSW 2060

Tel: (02) 9956 3480 Fax: (02) 9929 7966

Rugby League

AIS/ARL Rugby League

GPO Box 4415

SYDNEY NSW 2001

Tel: (02) 9232 7566 Fax: (02) 9232 7242

Sailing

Yachting Australia

Locked Bag 806

MILSONS POINT NSW 2061

Tel: (02) 9902 2155 Fax: (02) 9906 2366

Slalom Canoe

Sydney International Regatta Centre

PO Box 4246

PENRITH NSW 2750

Tel: (02) 4729 4256 Fax: (02) 4729 4257
          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Water Polo (women)

PO Box 476

SYDNEY MARKETS NSW 2129

Tel: (02) 9763 0207 Fax: (02) 9763 0250



Melbourne

Australian Football

AIS/AFL Academy

Box 1449N GPO

MELBOURNE VIC 3001

Tel: (03) 9643 1973 Fax: (03) 9643 1878

Olympic Winter Institute of Australia

Level 1

1–3 Cobden Street

SOUTH MELBOURNE VIC 3205

Tel: (03) 9686 2977 Fax: (03) 9686 2988

Cricket (women)

Women’s Cricket Australia

60 Jolimont Street

JOLIMONT VIC 3002

Tel: (03) 9653 9912 Fax: (03) 9653 9900

Golf

Moonah Links Golf Course

Peter Thomson Drive

FINGAL VIC 3939

Tel: (03) 9588 5520 Fax: (03) 9588 5521


          © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Tennis

c/- Melbourne Park

Private Bag 6060

RICHMOND SOUTH VIC 3121

Tel: (03) 9286 1534 Fax: (03) 9654 6867



Brisbane

Diving

PO Box 91

CARINA QLD 4152

Tel: (07) 3823 1444 Fax: (07) 3823 1363

Softball

PO Box 280

WILSTON QLD 4051

Tel: (07) 3357 1577 Fax: (07) 3357 2081

Cricket (men)

1 Bogan Street

BREAKFAST CREEK QLD 4010

Tel: (07) 3624 8300 Fax: (07) 3624 8310

Squash

Office 9, Sports House

Cnr Castlemaine and Caxton Streets

MILTON QLD 4064

Tel: (07) 3367 3200 Fax: (07) 3367 3320


           © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Gold Coast

Sprint Canoe

PO Box 190

ROBINA QLD 4226

Tel: (07) 5576 4386 Fax: (07) 5535 1325



Perth

Hockey

PO Box 478

COMO WA 6952

Tel: (08) 9458 5355 Fax: (08) 9458 9747



Adelaide

Track Cycling

PO Box 646
ENFIELD PLAZA SA 5085
Tel: (08) 8360 5888
Fax: (08) 8360 5800



Canberra
Archery
Athletics
Boxing
Basketball
Gymnastics
Netball
Triathlon
Soccer (men and women)
Swimming
Volleyball (men and women)
            © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Waterpolo (men)

PO Box 176

BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Tel: (02) 6214 1111 Fax: (02) 6251 2680




         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 7                Contact officers

The Chairman/Chief Executive Officer

Australian Sports Commission

Leverrier Crescent

BRUCE ACT 2617

or

PO Box 176

BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Tel: (02) 6214 1111

Fax: (02) 6251 2680



Distribution Officer

Shirley Jones

Corporate Communications

Australian Sports Commission

PO Box 176

BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Tel: (02) 6214 1795

Fax: (02) 6214 1995

Email: pubs@ausport.gov.au



Annual Report Information Contact Officer

Michaela Forster

Corporate Communications

Australian Sports Commission

PO Box 176
         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Tel: (02) 6214 1910

Fax: (02) 6214 1995



Freedom of Information Officer

Nicholas West

Government and Board Services

Australian Sports Commission

PO Box 176

BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Tel: (02) 6214 1675

Fax: (02) 6214 1485

Members of the public may make requests in writing to the Minister for the Arts and
Sport, Senator the Hon. Rod Kemp, or to officers of the ASC regarding a range of
policy and other matters.

Enquiries for access to documents under the Freedom of Information Act can be made
to:

Freedom of Information Officer

Australian Sports Commission

PO Box 176

BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Alternatively, the Freedom of Information Officer can be contacted at
FOI_Officer@ausport.gov.au.

Each request must be in writing, must specify an address for return mail to be sent and
be accompanied by a $30 application fee. The ASC’s policy on charges and fees is that
they should be imposed for processing requests. Fees and charges may be remitted in
circumstances as defined by the Freedom of Information Act.

Documents that are available free of charge can be found on the ASC web site at
www.ausport.gov.au.


         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Appendix 8                    Australian Sports Commission corporate
partners

Accommodation                                  Corporate partner

                                               Rydges Hotels and Resorts

Athlete Career and Education                   Corporate partners

                                               Australian College of Legal Education and Training

                                               Nestlé Australia Ltd

                                               Computer Power (formerly Spherion Group Ltd)

                                               Victoria University

Basketball                                     Corporate partner

                                               And 1 Australia

Beverage Service                               Corporate partners

                                               Coca-Cola Amatil (Australia) Pty Ltd

                                               Capital Chilled Foods (since January 2004)

                                               Carlton & United Breweries

                                               Gatorade Australia Pty Ltd (since October 2003)

                                               Nestlé Australia Ltd

Boxing                                         Corporate Partner

                                               Signature Mouthguards Pty Ltd

Business Operations                            Corporate Partners — Media Awards 2003

                                               ACNielsen Australia

                                               Minter Ellison Lawyers

                                               Qantas Airways Limited

                                               Staging Connections

Cricket                                        Corporate partner

                                               Commonwealth Bank

Cycling — road                                 Corporate partners

                                               Trek/Clarence Street Cyclery

                                               GKA Sports Distribution (Vittoria Tyres)

                                               Shimano Australia

Engineering                                    Corporate partners

                                               SRI Sports Pty Ltd
             © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
                                              Culligan Australia Pty Ltd

                                              HG Turf

Finance                                       Corporate partners

                                              System Union Pty Ltd (SunSystems)

Food Service                                  Corporate partner

                                              Kellogg (Aust) Pty Ltd

                                              Nestlé Australia Ltd

Golf                                          Corporate partner

                                              Acushnet Company

Human Resources                               Corporate partner

                                              Frontier Software (since April 2004)

Nutrition                                     Corporate partners

                                              Gatorade Australia Pty Ltd (since October 2003)

                                              Kellogg (Aust) Pty Ltd

                                              Nestlé Australia Ltd

                                              Wyeth Consumer Healthcare

Sport Development (Street Active)             Corporate partner

                                              1800 Reverse Pty Ltd

Sport Education                               Corporate partner

                                              Nestlé Australia Ltd

Sports Science/Sports Medicine                Corporate partners

                                              Ego Pharmaceuticals (Medicine)

                                              BOC Gases (Physiology)

                                              Bio-Mediq DPC Pty Ltd (Biochemistry)

                                              Nordstrom International Pty Ltd (Physiology)

                                              Ambulance Service Australia (Physiology)

                                              Carter Products (Australia) Pty Ltd (Physiotherapy)

                                              Beiersdorf Australia Ltd (Physiotherapy)

                                              United Pacific Industries (Physiotherapy)

                                              Float Tank Australia (Psychology)

Swimming                                      Corporate partner

                                              Speedo Australia Ltd (for Swim Meet 2004)

Strength and Conditioning                     Corporate partner

                                              Fitball Therapy and Training Pty Ltd
            © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Transport                                      Corporate partner

                                               Avis Australia Pty Ltd

Video Production                               Corporate partner

                                               Alcam Film and Video Production

Volleyball                                     Corporate partner

                                               Gerflor Australasia




             © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications
Errata

Figure 1 (Disbursement of the budget across the Australian Sports Commission, 2002–
2003) on page 78 of the Australian Sports Commission Annual Report 2002–2003
should read:




In Figure 2 (Medals won by sport, Commonwealth Games, 2002) on page 151 of the
Australian Sports Commission Annual Report 2002–2003, the sport of netball won gold,
not bronze as indicated.




         © Australian Sports Commission 2004, Annual Report 2003-2004, www.ausport.gov.au/publications

				
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