Blood and Guts by P-IpInteractivePu

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									Blood and Guts
Adult

Author: Gloria Burley



Age Group: 16+
Table of Contents

CHAPTER ONE 1
CHAPTER TWO 9
CHAPTER THREE 39
CHAPTER FOUR 55
CHAPTER FIVE 67
CHAPTER SIX 83
CHAPTER SEVEN 93
CHAPTER EIGHT 101
CHAPTER NINE 105
CHAPTER TEN 113
CHAPTER ELEVEN 121
CHAPTER TWELVE 127
CHAPTER THIRTEEN 131
CHAPTER FOURTEEN 139
CHAPTER FIFTEEN 147
CHAPTER SIXTEEN 155
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN 163
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN 171
CHAPTER NINETEEN 179
CHAPTER TWENTY 187
CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE 201
CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO 215
Bibliography 230
Description

Gloria Burley’s book is a compelling view of our hospital system. A nurse with experience in urban and
Outback hospitals, Gloria tells it as she saw it: the dedication of medical professionals doing their best
for their patients but also the limitations of people who are after all only human.

Her story will ring true anywhere the pressures are high and the resources scarce.

We all end up in hospital sooner or later, and myths about what we can expect abound, which accounts
for the popularity of medical TV shows. Reading this book will show you what really happens after the
anaesthetist turns up the gas...

50% of the royalties from this book will be donated to Charlie Teo’s Cure for Life Foundation to help fund
advancements in the treatment of brain cancer, which is one of the most common life-threatening tumors
in children

Gloria Burley served as a nurse on various wards and during surgical procedures at hospitals in major
cities as well as rural Outback centres such as Darwin and Katherine, Northern Territory.

She was herself a cancer patient who encountered and survived hospital treatment for a life-threatening
condition.

She lives and works in Far North Queensland (Airlie Beach), Australia.
Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE

As I walked into the operating theatre, the sight
that met my eyes made me catch my breath. Th e patient
was lying face down on the operating table. Th e only part
of him that was not covered in sterile, green drapes was
his bottom. Th e surgeon had made a circular cut about
the size of a dinner plate and the area inside the cut was
a mass of warts and red, nodular lumps.
“Do you know the history of this chap?” asked a
surgeon who had been called in to give his opinion
on whether or not the patient would need follow-up
radiotherapy for cancer.
“No, I’ve just walked in,” I managed to say, unable to
take my eyes off the scene in front of me.
“Well, he’s a prisoner who has just got engaged and
he wants to make a new start.”
It transpired that he had been frequently gangraped.
Venereal warts can be a precursor to cancer and
radiotherapy was recommended as the surgeon said
that this was a particularly bad case. An expression that
I had heard in France sprang to mind: ‘An arse like a
cauliflower’.

This was a pretty good description.
The hospital received prisoners once a week, on a
Friday. Prisoners requiring attention would put their
name down but none of them knew exactly when they
would have their operation until they were transported
to the hospital. In this way, it was hoped that no one
could plan an escape. Th ey came with two guards and
the more dangerous ones were handcuff ed. Th e guards
usually stayed until the prisoner was asleep and the
Anaesthetist would reassure them that the prisoner
‘would not be going anywhere’. Not only were they
unconscious but, as with all patients, they were given a
muscle relaxant that completely paralysed them.
The patients seemed to enjoy their ‘day out’ and
sometimes the surgical intervention was so minor and
even at times unnecessary that it became apparent that
this was a way for them to relieve the boredom and
monotony of prison life. Staff had been warned not to
have name badges showing and to avoid talking to the
patients, but of course, we all talked to them anyway,
even the Asian one who came in to have a bullet removed
from his back, a hair’s breadth from his spine.
I was under the impression that most prisoners were
having anal sex but one of the doctors put me right on
this: “I always examine them when they come to see me
and they all are very tight.”
One young, good-looking prisoner had barbed
wire tattooed around his groin, as a sort of poignant
protection. Another had I hate everyone tattooed on
his chest.
The guards showed real interest in the proceedings.
One day I heard one guard say to another, “Gee, my wife
would give anything to be here in my place. She loves
watching all the reality surgical shows.”
Author Bio
             Gloria Burley
            Gloria Burley served as a nurse on various wards and during surgical procedures at
            hospitals in major cities as well as rural Outback centres such as Darwin and Katherine,
            NT.<br><br>She was herself a cancer patient who encountered and survived hospital
            treatment for a life-threatening condition.<br><br>She lives and works in Far North
Queensland (Airlie Beach), Australia.

								
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