Celebrating Student Excellence.pdf by handongqp

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									          Fourth

                   &
Symposium of Artists     Scholars
    Celebrating Student Excellence
                       april 20, 2012
    1 Smith Memorial Building and          14 Main Hall (student center,                   27 Physical Education and
       Smith Hall Theatre and Smith           administrative offices, residence               Recreation Building
       Banquet Hall                           hall, classrooms, Dept. of Safety and        28 Leggett Building and
    2 Wright Residence Hall                   Security)                                       Thoresen Theatre
    3 Cheatham Dining Hall                 15 Even Post                                    29 Maier Museum of Art
    4 Bell Residence Hall                  16 Odd Tree                                     30 Tennis Courts
    5 Houston Memorial Chapel              17 Gazebo                                       31 Athletic Field
    6 The Pines Cottage                    18 Psychology Building                          32 Athletic Field
    7 Winfree Observatory                  19 Moore Residence Hall                         33 Margaret’s Gate
    8 The Mabel K. Whiteside Greek         20 Mary’s Garden                                34 Riding Center
       Theatre (The Dell)                  21 Lipscomb Library                             35 Doyle House
    9 Terrell Health and Counseling        22 Botanic Garden                               36 Butler House
       Centers                             23 Martin Science Building                      37 Casey Alumnae House
    10 Webb Residence Hall                 24 Presser Hall and                             38 Learning Resources Center
    11 West Residence Hall and                The Wimberly Recital Hall                    39 Campus Post Office
       Darden Center                       25 The Macon Bookshop                           40 The Rivermont House
    12 Thoresen Hall (Admissions Office)   26 Norfolk House                                P Parking Areas
    13 Sundial                                                                             AP Admissions Parking
2




                                                                                                   Martin Science Building
                                                                                                   Classroom, Martin 415




                                                                            Presser Hall
                                                                            The Wimberly Recital Hall
                                                                            Presser Hall Lobby
                                          The Symposium of Artists and
                                          Scholars celebrates the scholarship
                                          and creativity of the Randolph College student
                                          body through an afternoon devoted entirely to our
                                          students’ accomplishments.
                                                                                                 1
                                          The College’s fourth Symposium brings together
                                          students from numerous academic areas to share
                                          their research and creative projects with the campus
                                          and greater Lynchburg communities.

                                          The Symposium will feature student scholarship
                                          from subject areas ranging from physics and biology
                                          to history and art. The presentations are grouped
                                          in ways that highlight the interdisciplinary and
                                          multidisciplinary themes that emerge in a liberal
                                          arts environment.

                                          The abstracts in the program attest to the original
TABLE OF CONTENTS                         work students have produced in their courses, senior
                                          theses, summer research experiences, study abroad,
Map of College       Inside front cover   and independent projects.

Welcome                              2

Keynote Speaker                      3

Schedule                             4

Abstracts                            5

Advisory Committee   Inside back cover
    welcome   April 20, 2012

              Dear Symposium Attendee,

              Welcome to Randolph College’s 2012 Symposium of
              Artists and Scholars. As president of Randolph College,
              I continue to be impressed by the intelligence,
              creativity, and passion shown by our students both
              in and out of the classroom. Since this College was
              founded in 1891, providing a top-notch, high quality
              liberal arts education has been the priority. That has
              not changed, and our students continue to rise to
              challenges.

2             The talks, papers, exhibits, and poster sessions
              featured in this year’s Symposium reflect the variety
              of disciplines we offer at Randolph College, and they
              are just a sampling of the learning that takes place
              on this campus each year. Thanks to the dedication
              of our talented faculty members, our students have
              the opportunity to develop close relationships with
              their faculty mentors and often partner with faculty
              on important research. We are fortunate to be able
              to share the results of these endeavors during our
              annual Symposium of Artists and Scholars.

              I would like to thank the committee members who
              worked hard to organize this Symposium as well
              as all of the students who submitted proposals.
              I also want to express my appreciation to our
              talented faculty members, who go beyond their
              responsibilities in the classroom to foster and
              nurture these scholars and artists.

              Thank you for joining us for Randolph College’s
              2012 Symposium of Artists and Scholars.

                                         Sincerely,




                                         John E. Klein
                                         President
Keynote Address
by Bob Deans
“The Elegant Question”


Randolph College is pleased to welcome journalist
and environmental author Bob Deans to
Lynchburg for the 2012 Symposium of Artists and
Scholars. A native of Richmond, Deans is currently
associate director of communications for the
Natural Resources Defense Council, the nation’s
premier environmental advocacy group. A career
journalist who spent nearly three decades writing
for newspapers, Deans is a former president of the
                                                          3
White House Correspondents’ Association and the
author of four books. Deans’ history of the James
River, The River Where America Began: A Journey
Along the James, has been described as an “eloquent
narrative” that “does full justice to the story both
tragic and majestic of this historic river.” His newest
book, Reckless: The Political Assault on the American
Environment, came out April 16 in paperback and
e-book.

Deans is here to share his insights and ideas on how
sound research drives good writing:
   “Whether you’re crafting a speech, a blog,
   or a book, the best writing begins with
   sound research. And that starts with a
   strong question, a probative masterpiece,
   the pointed spear of inquiry that can pierce
   the heart of your subject. The well-shaped
   question has the power to guide your
   research, frame up your writing, and ignite
   the imagination of your audience. The goal
   is to create a question that will fuel your
   research with the thrill of discovery, keep
   your writing pointed toward true north,
   and energize your work with the spirit of
   revelation.”
    schedule
    1:45–2:45 p.m.             The Wimberly Recital Hall
                                                           4:15–5:15 p.m.                          Martin 415
    Keynote Address
       Bob Deans                                           Session 2b: “Crows, Climate, and Connections”
       “The Elegant Question”                                 • Angelina Haines, “Comparison of Group Sizes
                                                                in American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and
    3-4 p.m.                   The Wimberly Recital Hall        Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus) in Suburban and
                                                                Rural Environments”
    Session 1a: “Skinheads, Stigma, and                       • Karl Speer, “Not Rain Enough in Heaven: A Short
    Staphlococcus”                                              Story Loosely Based on Hamlet”
       • Tra My Dinh Doan, “Explicit and Implicit             • Lily Noguchi and Louise Searle, “Combating
4        Mental Illness Stigma in Young Americans               Climate Denialism: Informational Videos as a
         Across Different Racial Groups”                        Strategy to Debunk Scientific Misinformation”
       • Debra Coats, “Methicillin-resistant
         Staphylococcus aureus Isolation on a Small        5:35–6:30 p.m.                    Presser Hall Lobby
         College Campus”
       • Xavier Suarez Castanedas, “What Spirit of         Posters, Exhibition, and Reception
         ’69?: The Representation of Skinheads in Film        • Zahra Ada Adahman, “Classification and
         and Audience Perspectives”                             Analysis of the Pup Calls in a Mouse Model of
                                                                Autism”
    3-4 p.m.                                  Martin 415      • Sarah Fogle, “Empty Spaces: Graphic Words,
                                                                Lyric Drawings”
    Session 1b: “Telling Stories”                             • Christopher Hollingsworth and Alex Kwakye,
       • Emily Patton Smith, “Tales Dead Birds Tell”            “Pups Call, Mothers Rush? Determining the
       • Julianna Joyce, “‘They’re Not Like You and             Behavioral and Communicative Value of the
         Me, Which Means They Must be Evil’: The                Ultrasonic Calls Emitted by Mouse Pups”
         Racialized Other in Disney Film and Television       • Meredith Humphreys (Presenting Author),
         Animation”                                             Woyni Teklay, and Qi Zhang, “Science and
       • Danielle Robinson, “Transit: Making                    Math Links: Research-Based Teaching
         Connections with Linked Short Stories”                 Institute”
                                                              • Derrick Woods-Morrow, “Culture Shock:
    4:15–5:35 p.m.             The Wimberly Recital Hall        Photocrafiing Your Anxieties in Italy”

    Session 2a: “Value for Money”
       • Jaskirat Chhatwal, “Will You Marry Me for
         Money?
       • Ravi Shukla, “Neutrality or Virtue in a Liberal
         Society?”
       • Adam Eller, “Edible Urban Landscaping”
       • Catherine DeSilvey, “Yves Klein: Trickster or
         Trailblazer?”
abstracts
Zahra Ada Adahman ’14
“Classification and Analysis of the Pup Calls in a Mouse Model of Autism”
Faculty Mentor: Katrin Schenk, Assistant Professor of Physics
Autism is a neurological disorder that affects about 0.2% of the human population. The disorder is highly correlated with
communication deficits. Mouse pups of ages 1–2 weeks usually make calls that are ultrasonic vocalizations. The pups only
make vocalizations when separated from their mother. The data was collected by recording the vocalizations of the pups
through the maternal separation paradigm (isolating the pups from their mothers). The vocalizations were recorded with an
ultrasonic microphone for a length of 5 minutes for each pup. About 65,000 calls were recorded from the experiment. The pup
calls were segmented out from the background noise and classified into 10 types. The types were analyzed based on their rank
and the frequency of occurrence.
Project supported by the Randolph College Summer Research Program.

Jaskirat Chhatwal ’12
“Will You Marry Me for Money?”
Faculty Mentor: Elizabeth Perry-Sizemore, Associate Professor of Economics
This research uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) to determine if wage premiums for                5
married women exist, and if so, if they vary by wage strata. I divide the sample of women in the NLSY79 into quintiles to
determine if there are larger wage premiums for women in the lower strata than for those who are more socio-economically
comfortable. Regression results show that there are stronger wage premiums for poorer women. The main group for which
marriage affects wages is women in the first and second quintile, which together have the lowest 40% of wage rates in the
sample. While previous studies have shown that marriage is not an important determinant in female wage rates, it might be
that on average, higher wage rates inconsequently mitigate the benefits of marriage premiums for women.

Debra Coats ’12
“Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolation on a Small College Campus”
Faculty Mentor: Adam Houlihan, Assistant Professor of Biology
Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that is carried as normal flora by 20% of the human population. Of
that population, 20% carry methicillin-resistant strains. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) causes infections that are highly
recalcitrant to antibiotic therapy. Previous studies indicate that populations living in close quarters, such as those on a college
campus, are predisposed to higher carriage rates of MRSA. This study investigated if the population at Randolph College had
similar carriage rates for both S. aureus and MRSA when compared with the population at large. Further investigation was
conducted on the S. aureus isolates to determine if they were phylogenetically related. The information gathered by this study
can help our understanding of the importance of proper hygiene in living conditions such as those on a small college campus.
Project supported by the Randolph College Biology Department.

Tra My Dinh Doan ’14
“Explicit and Implicit Mental Illness Stigma in Young Americans across Different Racial Groups”
Faculty Mentor: Katrin Schenk, Assistant Professor of Physics and Caroline Mann, Visiting Professor of Psychology, 2010–2011
Increasingly, individuals are concerned with appearing unprejudiced. Psychologists have developed subtle methods for
studying prejudice that do not involve self-reporting. Most recently, a revolutionary new instrument known as the IAT
(Implicit Association Test) uses participants’ reaction times to elucidate underlying preconscious attitudes. Researchers find
that because of underlying prejudice, participants respond faster to negative words if the words are preceded by, for example, a
prime of an African-American face versus a Caucasian one. While such measures have been used to successfully explore racism
and ‘visible’ markers, they have never been tested with invisible stigmas. We seek to address this gap. We introduce participants
to six virtual individuals (via pictures, information), some of whom have mental illness and others not. We then use these
virtual individuals (wearing differently colored shirts to facilitate memory regarding group-membership) as primes and test
whether participants show implicit bias against the mentally ill individuals.
Project supported by the Randolph College Summer Research Program.

Catherine DeSilvey ’13
“Yves Klein: Trickster or Trailblazer?”
Faculty Mentor: Leanne Zalewski, Assistant Professor of Art
The legacy of French artist Yves Klein has vacillated wildly, specifically after his disastrous New York debut in 1961; however,
since 2000, scholars have been reevaluating his contribution to contemporary art. They concur that the following comprise
    his canonical works—the monochromes, a doctored photograph of Klein “levitating,” his sale of the immaterial for gold, and
    Anthropométries (his namesake International Klein Blue-painted imprints of nude women used as living paintbrushes). I aim to
    expand the canon to include Klein’s Planetary Reliefs and Air Architecture.

    Adam Eller ’13
    “Edible Urban Landscaping”
    Faculty Mentor: Karin Warren, Associate Professor and Herzog Family Chair of Environmental Studies
    Edible landscaping integrates species that produce edible roots, stems, flowers, leaves, fruits, or vegetables into human-made
    landscapes. Reintroducing edible cultivars into urban and suburban landscapes represents a strategy for promoting local food
    security and promoting sustainability practices. At Randolph College, we seek to expand edible landscaping on campus and
    promote it in the City of Lynchburg. In order to select appropriate sites for edible landscaping, we conducted chemical and
    physical soil analysis, including investigations into soil acidity, soil nutrient levels, organic matter content of the soil, and
    examined the soil for lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic contents. By understanding soil composition and nutrient and
    organic content, the optimal planting locations for edible landscaping can be determined, thereby reducing soil cultivation
    needs. Quantifying possible contaminants in the soil allows food safety and liability concerns to be better addressed, and can
    also be used to further research regarding the overall agricultural health and anthropogenic toxicity of soil in the region.
    Project supported by the Randolph College Summer Research Program and the Randolph College Environmental Studies Department.

    Sarah Fogle ’12
    “Empty Spaces: Graphic Words, Lyric Drawings”
    Faculty Mentor: Laura-Gray Street, Assistant Professor of English
    This presentation is a cross-pollination of two loves: art and writing. It is an artistic adaptation of a short story with the form and
    function of graphic novels in mind. The first of its kind for the English Department, the project blends visual art and text in a
6   story about LGBTQ college students as they discover themselves and face discrimination from surprising angles. The presentation
    will focus on the process of a short story’s graphic conversion, from fictional prose, to script, to storyboard, to the finalized panels.

    Angelina Haines ’12
    “Comparison of Group Sizes in American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus) in Suburban and
    Rural Environments”
    Faculty Mentor: Doug Shedd, The Catherine Ehrman Thoresen ’23 and William E. Thoresen Professor of Biology
    The environment has a direct influence on the behavior of the species that live within it. Human presence and activities
    can alter a species’ behavior from what would normally be seen in an environment uninhabited by humans. Some species
    are negatively impacted by human alterations of their environments, while others adapt to take advantage of them. Many
    species in the family Corvidae (crows, ravens, and jays) are notable for their ability to adjust to and even thrive in human-
    dominated environments. This year I am conducting honors research on American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and fish
    crows (Corvus ossifragus) by recording individuals and behaviors in suburban and rural zones to see if there are group size and
    behavioral differences in the two areas. This work allows me to draw conclusions about how human activity impacts these two
    ecologically important species.

    Christopher Hollingsworth ’15 and Alex Kwakye ’15
    “Pups Call, Mothers Rush? Determining the Behavioral and Communicative Value of the Ultrasonic Calls Emitted by
    Mouse Pups”
    Faculty Mentor: Katrin Schenk, Assistant Professor of Physics
    Our experiment assesses the response of mother mice to mouse pup calls. Mouse pups make ultrasonic calls (30kHz–180kHz),
    mostly in response to being separated from their mothers. During the 2011 summer research period, Zahra Ada Adahman ’14
    and Professor Katrin Schenk classified over 65,000 previously recorded pup calls into several types. These calls were not only
    highly complex in the frequency domain (many overtones and non-harmonic components) but also temporally complex with
    highly variable times between calls and structures such as bursts. Given this complexity, it is unknown what communicative
    purpose is played by calls with different complexity levels. Our research explores this question by playing back different
    recorded pup calls to lactating mothers and observing their elicited search behaviors. Since this work will ultimately allow
    us to more completely understand the role vocalizations play in mouse communication, it will be highly relevant to our
    understanding of any communication deficits seen in mouse models of neuropsychiatric diseases like autism.
    Project supported by the Randolph College Physics Department and a NARSAD grant from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation
    (Principal Investigator Lily Jan, Univeristy of California San Francisco).

    Meredith Humphreys ’12 (Presenting Author), Woyni Teklay ’13, and Qi Zhang ’13
    “Science and Math Links: Research-Based Teaching Institute”
    Faculty Mentors: Peggy Schimmoeller, Professor of Education and Director of Teacher Education; Peter Sheldon, Professor
    of Physics; and Tatiana Gilstrap, Associate Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies
    We continue to explore the influence of hands-on lessons (as opposed to traditional lecture and reading) on student and
    teacher attitudes toward science, with the goal of increasing engagement, keeping children interested in science, and increasing
    student achievement. We create resources including lesson plans, associated content, and video for hands-on and inquiry-
    based lessons in the K–8 classroom, and hold an annual institute for 60 local teachers to help them to implement these types
    of lessons in the classroom. We collect data through surveys, student performance measures, and classroom observation. This
ongoing research project, started in 2000, has a Web site resource, The New Science Teacher (http://tnst.randolphcollege.edu),
that we continue to enhance and augment with resources for teachers and results from research.
Project supported by the State Council for Higher Education of Virginia (SCHEV) and the Randolph College Summer Research Program.

Julianna Joyce ’13
“‘They’re Not Like You and Me, Which Means They Must be Evil’: The Racialized Other in Disney Film and Television
Animation”
Faculty Mentor: Chad Beck, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies
For more than eight decades, the Walt Disney Company has been the most prominent name in family entertainment. However,
the racial and moral ideologies of the company have been questioned due to their historically offensive portrayals of minority
groups. Through textual analysis of film and television animations from 1992 to the present, Disney’s recent productions are
determined to be ambivalent portrayals of racialized minority groups. People of color are now the protagonists, yet whiteness
is privileged through a Eurocentric depiction of these protagonists and through the embodiment of historical stereotypes
by supporting minority characters. The investigation reveals relationships between Disney’s recent business and marketing
strategies and its representations of racialized groups. This research project draws upon interdisciplinary theories of race and
is situated within scholarly conversations about contemporary cultural industries and the cultural production of race and
racism.
Project supported by the Randolph College Summer Research Program.

Alex Kwakye ’15 and Christopher Hollingsworth ’15
“Pups Call, Mothers Rush? Determining the Behavioral and Communicative Value of the Ultrasonic Calls Emitted by
Mouse Pups”
Faculty Mentor: Katrin Schenk, Assistant Professor of Physics
(See Christopher Hollingsworth, page 6)
                                                                                                                                     7
Lily Noguchi ’13 and Louise Searle ’12
“Combating Climate Denialism: Informational Videos as a Strategy to Debunk Scientific Misinformation”
Faculty Mentor: Karin Warren, Associate Professor and Herzog Family Chair of Environmental Studies
Denialism, according to Mark Hoofnagle, is “the use of rhetorical arguments to give the appearance of legitimate debate over
issues for which a strong scientific consensus exists.” Denialism should be contrasted with scientific skepticism, which is a
vital part of the scientific process. Climate denialism, instead of critically analyzing science, confuses public understanding of
current climate science. This is achieved through a variety of methods, including rhetorical techniques, cherry picking data,
and appealing to American cultural values. Education about the issues and the science backing them up is the best strategy to
combat the misconceptions. A short educational animated film is used as a tool to investigate a claim made by the Texas Public
Policy Foundation. Several common climate change myths are debunked and self-education on issues is promoted.

Danielle Robinson ’12
“Transit: Making Connections with Linked Short Stories”
Faculty Mentor: Laura-Gray Street, Assistant Professor of English
My honors project is a collection of linked stories entitled Transit. Links create movement and unity between stories, while
allowing them to remain effective independently. I incorporate three linking elements: 1) people who ride buses, drive buses, or
are connected to buses in some way; 2) the concept of life as choreographed movement; and 3) how familial relationships affect
my characters’ lives. I hope to guide my readers through the transition from embedded social consciousness to collaborative
social consciousness, prompting fresh perspectives on how we engage with the world and the people we encounter. As part
of my research, I traced the development of linked short stories beginning with Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Sherwood
Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, while finding my niche in literary history with writers like William Faulkner and Alice Munro. I
will speak briefly about my creative process and read an excerpt from the collection.

Louise Searle ’12 and Lily Noguchi ’13
“Combating Climate Denialism: Informational Videos as a Strategy to Debunk Scientific Misinformation”
Faculty Mentor: Karin Warren, Associate Professor and Herzog Family Chair of Environmental Studies
(See Lily Noguchi, page 7)

Ravi Shukla ’12
“Neutrality or Virtue in a Liberal Society?”
Faculty Mentor: David Schwartz, Professor of Philosophy
Liberalism contends that the state be neutral in matters of good. It should not aim to privilege any particular lifestyle or
virtues. It should limit itself to the provision of an equitable framework of rights and an economic safety net. Individuals
may formulate their own conceptions of good within this neutral framework. An example would be the free exercise clause
enshrined in the Bill of Rights. Perfectionism, on the contrary, asserts that a legitimate function of state is to advance human
flourishing. Public policy should encourage inculcation of desirable virtues among its citizens. An example of this viewpoint
would be the U.S. government’s promotion of marriage, family, and home ownership through its tax policy. Given the two
alternatives, which is the better way of organizing a society? Can there be an objective foundation upon which to base a
virtue-oriented society? Can evolutionary biology provide an insight? This paper addresses these and many other issues of the
contemporary debate between liberalism and perfectionism.
    Xavier Suarez Castanedas ’12
    “What Spirit of ’69?: The Representation of Skinheads in Film and Audience Perspectives”
    Faculty Sponsor: Chad Beck, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies
    This study examines how members of the skinhead subculture are represented in the films Romper Stomper (Australia, 1992),
    American History X (U.S.A 1998) and This is England (U.K. 2006) and how a local audience perceives the skinhead subculture
    though these films. These films portray issues of racism and hatred that are prevalent inside some factions of the skinhead
    subculture, yet these films fail to represent the diversity and internationality of the skinhead subculture. The project analyzes
    the issues of race and masculinity in the films and how they reflect on the subculture. While not downplaying racism, the
    study compares the history of the subculture against the films to underscore the complexity and pluralism of the subculture.
    Through a textual analysis of the films, an audience analysis, and an investigation of online skinhead forums, the paper argues
    that there is no one true or essential skinhead subculture.

    Emily Patton Smith ’12
    “Tales Dead Birds Tell”
    Faculty Mentor: Doug Shedd, The Catherine Ehrman Thoresen ’23 and William E. Thoresen Professor of Biology
    Natural history collections serve to teach about the extent and evolution of biodiversity. They also teach us about the evolution
    of the human understanding of the natural world. For my project, I examined the history behind early bird specimens in
    the biology department collections and their ties to important 19th-century scientists, collectors, and collections, including
    the Smithsonian. This history reveals that the bird specimens have relevance not only as scientific reference material, but as
    important artifacts of American cultural heritage with tales to tell us of the westward expansion of the United States, the
    development of conservation law, and the value of individual appreciation for ecological sustainability.

    Karl Speer ’12
    “Not Rain Enough in Heaven: A Short Story Loosely Based on Hamlet”
8
    Faculty Mentor: James Peterson, Associate Professor of English, Writer in Residence, and Coordinator of the Creative
    Writing Program
    Shakespeare’s Hamlet has inspired countless works—but none take the perspective of Claudius. In Not Rain Enough in Heaven,
    Claude (Claudius) is a convict, guilty of raping Gweneviere (Gertrude). He has just recently been released from his 15-year
    prison sentence. He seeks forgiveness from Gweneviere for his action, but his brother, Roy (Hamlet’s Father, the King), won’t
    allow it. After Roy’s untimely death, his son, Orwell (Hamlet), seeks to avenge his father’s death against his rapist uncle. The
    story seeks to answer the questions: What if Claudius had been innocent? What if Hamlet was genuinely insane? What would
    happen if the story occurred in contemporary times?

    Woyni Teklay ’13, Qi Zhang ’13, and Meredith Humphreys ’12 (Presenting Author)
    “Science and Math Links: Research-Based Teaching Institute”
    Faculty Mentors: Peggy Schimmoeller, Professor of Education and Director of Teacher Education; Peter Sheldon, Professor
    of Physics; and Tatiana Gilstrap, Associate Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies
    (See Meredith Humphreys, page 6)

    Derrick Woods-Morrow ’12
    “Culture Shock: Photocrafting Your Anxieties in Italy”
    Faculty Mentor: James Muehlemann, Associate Professor of Art
    This series is a reflection of my awareness of social dissonance while studying abroad in Florence during the summer of 2011.
    It is a personal expedition into exploring Italian culture. During a month-long investigation into understanding the Italian
    culture, I became more aware of the things I missed and held dear about the American culture I call my own. Tantamount to
    this idea, I found countless reasons to purposely alienate my American habits, simply in order to enjoy the finer intricacies of
    Italian culture. Overall, “Culture Shock: Photocrafting Your Anxieties in Italy” expresses how my own anxieties contributed
    to my reaction to Italian culture as seen through my photography—an aesthetic vehicle in which I convey to the audience an
    expression of myself.
    Project supported by the Randolph College Global Studies Jones Fund.

    Qi Zhang ’13, Meredith Humphreys ’12 (Presenting Author), and Woyni Teklay ’13
    “Science and Math Links: Research-Based Teaching Institute”
    Faculty Mentors: Peggy Schimmoeller, Professor of Education and Director of Teacher Education; Peter Sheldon, Professor
    of Physics; and Tatiana Gilstrap, Associate Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies
    (See Meredith Humphreys, page 6)

    Learn more about the Randolph College Summer Research Program at www.randolphcollege.edu/summer.
    Learn more about the Randolph College Innovative Student Experience at www.randolphcollege.edu/rise.
         Symposium of Artists & Scholars
             Advisory Committee

        William Bare, Associate Professor of Chemistry

               Jessica Downs, Resident Director

       Heather Garnett, Alumnae and Alumni Director

Elizabeth Perry-Sizemore, Associate Professor of Economics and
              Assistant Dean of the College, Chair
 Keeley Cordingley Tuggle, Assistant Director of Special Events

Marjorie Wheeler-Barclay, Charles A. Dana Professor of History
   2500 Rivermont Avenue
Lynchburg, Virginia 24503-1526

								
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