CASE STUDY TEACHING NOTES

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					Chapter 9 - CASE STUDY :                     The Tablet PC: Revolutionizing the PC Landscape?

Summary of Case

This case summarizes the state of the tablet PC in the overall computer market. While numerous advances
have occurred with this product since its introduction in the late 1990s, overall sales still hover at around
1 percent of total mobile PC sales. This qualifies tablets as a niche product at best. What do consumers
want in a tablet (a.k.a., convertible)? They want a tablet to do everything that a notebook will do, AND
have the features of a tablet. In other words, they do not want to sacrifice anything. Consumers also do not
want to have to pay the price premium for tablets. The features, the industry is dealing with pretty well.
The price is another obstacle. On top of these issues, there is a scarcity of software.


Examination of information:

This is clearly a “problem” case. Thus, there is a direct application for this material to the consumer
decision making process, and specifically the concepts of problem identification.

Based on the case information describe the different perspectives on:
      problem solving,




       extended problem solving




       limited problem solving




       habitual decision making,




        the different concepts that lead to problem recognition.
Discussion Questions

1.    Generate a list of potential “problem” situations that would motivate computer customers to
      consider buying a tablet PC.



2.    Based on the problem situations considered in question 1, trace the path through the stages of the
      consumer decision making process for the identified problems. Give a case example of each stage

         Problem recognition:




         Information search:




         Evaluation of alternatives:




         Product choice:




         Outcomes:.
Chapter 9 - CASE STUDY TEACHING NOTES
answers
Chapter 9 Case Study: The Tablet PC: Revolutionizing the PC Landscape?

Summary of Case

This case summarizes the state of the tablet PC in the overall computer market. While numerous advances
have occurred with this product since its introduction in the late 1990s, overall sales still hover at around
1 percent of total mobile PC sales. This qualifies tablets as a niche product at best. What do consumers
want in a tablet (a.k.a., convertible)? They want a tablet to do everything that a notebook will do, AND
have the features of a tablet. In other words, they do not want to sacrifice anything. Consumers also do not
want to have to pay the price premium for tablets. The features, the industry is dealing with pretty well.
The price is another obstacle. On top of these issues, there is a scarcity of software.


Suggestions for Presentation

This is clearly a “problem” case. Thus, there is a direct application for this material to the consumer
decision making process, and specifically the concepts of problem identification. Use this case to illustrate
different perspectives on problem solving, extended versus limited problem solving versus habitual
decision making, and the different concepts that lead to problem recognition.


Suggested Answers for Discussion Questions

3.     Generate a list of potential “problem” situations that would motivate computer customers to
       consider buying a tablet PC.

       Given the stated information in the case, those that would consider buying a tablet must have a
       valid reason to do so. The glitz of the added features is not enough unless people really need those
       features. A good way to address this problem would be to consider the situations that lead to
       problem recognition. 1) A person’s standard of comparison may be altered: a person may be
       accustomed to comparing the choices within the standard laptop category. Thus, manufacturers
       must address this in promotional material. 2) The quality of the consumer’s actual state can move
       downward: this would be a case where a person’s needs change, as in change of job
       responsibilities that would put a person in a position requiring the features of a tablet. 3) The
       consumer’s ideal state can move upward: This would be a situation where the needs already exist,
       but the person has been unaware of the benefits of tablets. Thus, it would be necessary to identify
       and communicate with such.

4.     Based on the problem situations considered in question 1, trace the path through the stages of the
       consumer decision making process for the identified problems.

           Problem recognition: My job responsibilities have changed and I am going to be doing more
            one-on-one sales where I will need to demonstrate my company’s software.
           Information search: I gather information on what options are available. I quickly find that
            traditional laptops will not meet my needs and discover the benefits of tablets.
           Evaluation of alternatives: I identify the few brands and models that best meet the criteria
            that I have established.
   Product choice: From my evoked set, I make the final decision.
   Outcomes: I use the product and form my own opinions as to how well it meets my needs.

				
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