; 1 Scuse ME _ 2 _deleted_ _ 3 Me and her stands for The two .rtf
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1 Scuse ME _ 2 _deleted_ _ 3 Me and her stands for The two .rtf

VIEWS: 47 PAGES: 319

  • pg 1
									# 1. ’Scuse ME.
# 2. (deleted)
# 3. “Me and her” stands for “The two people consisting of me and her”.
# 4. “No problem!” is short for “That is not a problem for me.”.
# 5. “No problems!” is short for “Don’t give me any problems.”.
# 6. “no pun intended” usually means “pun very much intended”.
# 7. “Oh.”
# 8. “the second Tuesday of next week” means “never”.
# 9. A baby will keep you busy.
# 10. A baby’s attention-span is short.
# 11. (deleted)
# 12. A battle of Titans.
# 13. A beach bum.
# 14. A beast of burden.
# 15. A Bible-thumper.
# 16. A bicycle came whipping around the corner.
# 17. A bicycle whipped around the corner.
# 18. A big fish in a small pond.
# 19. A big mystery.
# 20. A bird in hand is worth two in the bush.
# 21. A blast from the past.
# 22. A brazen attack on our civil liberties.
# 23. A brazen attack.
# 24. A bunch of crud came out of the pipe at first.
# 25. A bundle of joy.
# 26. A burnt offering to the gods.
# 27. A bus comes every ten minutes or so.
# 28. A call like that should go to customer support.
# 29. A can of worms.
# 30. A candid shot.
# 31. A candy bar wrapper.
# 32. A card laid is a card played.
# 33. A chain reaction.
# 34. A charisma man.
# 35. A charley horse sounds funny, but is very painful.
# 36. A cliff-hanger.
# 37. A command performance.
# 38. A concerted effort.
# 39. A confession of love.
# 40. A confrontation.
# 41. (deleted)
# 42. A copy of the skeleton is in the museum.
# 43. A cornucopia.
# 44. (deleted)
# 45. (deleted)
# 46. A cracker-barrel philosopher.
# 47. A critical juncture.
# 48. A curve ball.
# 49. A dangerous source of income.
# 50. A database management system.
# 51. A day late and a dollar short.
# 52. A day of reckoning.
# 53. A day without sunshine is like night.
# 54. A deathbed confession.
# 55. A deathless quip.
# 56. A declaration of love.
# 57. A declaration of war.
# 58. A defective weld may have been the cause of the hull collapse.
# 59. A degree in Communication that doesn’t include Esperanto is a mockery.
# 60. A dialog.
# 61. A dime a dozen.
# 62. A dinner party is best looked-upon as a business meeting.
# 63. A discrepancy.
# 64. A distinction must be made between various levels of thought.
# 65. A distinguished American.
# 66. A distinguished gentleman.
# 67. A diversionary maneuver.
# 68. A doctor’s degree is also called, synonymously, a doctorate.
# 69. A dog is man’s best friend.
# 70. A dog shows great wisdom in wagging its tail instead of its tongue.
# 71. A double cheeseburger, large fries, and a large Pepsi.
# 72. A double take.
# 73. A dull knife is dangerous.
# 74. A dumb ox.
# 75. A failure of imagination.
# 76. A failure of nerve.
# 77. A failure to communicate.
# 78. A fair-weather friend.
# 79. A far-flung empire.
# 80. A fast of that length certainly isn’t going to hurt me any.
# 81. A fearless freep.
# 82. A feeding frenzy.
# 83. A few people saw it.
# 84. (deleted)
# 85. A fire breaks out every year.
# 86. A fire started in one of the compartments.
# 87. A fish fry.
# 88. A foregone conclusion.
# 89. A fortnight.
# 90. A free email of “the word of the day” is available from Merriam-Webster.
# 91. A friend would know what I meant.
# 92. A friend wouldn’t disregard my explicitly-stated wishes like that.
# 93. A frosted root beer would sure meet with my approval about now.
# 94. A fudge factor.
# 95. A gas leak is very dangerous.
# 96. A gatekeeper.
# 97. A gaucherie.
# 98. A general sense of outrage.
# 99. A gentleman and a scholar.
# 100. A gentleman is a man who is never unintentionally rude.
# 101. A get-acquainted party.
# 102. A gift for you.
# 103. A good fighter does not telegraph his moves.
# 104. A good movie is on.
# 105. A good night’s sleep.
# 106. (deleted)
# 107. A good time was had by all.
# 108. A good time.
# 109. A great man is always willing to be little, but never willing to belittle.
# 110. A Guggenheim fellowship.
# 111. A half-bath near the front door is ideal.
# 112. A half-confidence is worse than a full confidence.
# 113. A half-eaten cookie.
# 114. A half-eaten cracker.
# 115. A hand of steel in a glove of velvet.
# 116. A happy camper.
# 117. (deleted)
# 118. A hard life.
# 119. A hard-boiled egg.
# 120. A hayride is always a delight.
# 121. A heinous crime.
# 122. A hit dog always yelps.
# 123. A hole in the wall.
# 124. A holistic approach.
# 125. A home remedy.
# 126. A hoot and a holler.
# 127. A horror story.
# 128. A horse opera.
# 129. A house made of brick.
# 130. A human being is a symbol-processing organism.
# 131. A hundred years from now, they will smile at our presumption and naïveté.
# 132. A hurricane is headed this way.
# 133. A Johnny-come-lately.
# 134. (deleted)
# 135. (deleted)
# 136. A joyous reunion.
# 137. A juggernaut.
# 138. A just cause.
# 139. A just war.
# 140. A keen observer.
# 141. A key observation.
# 142. (deleted)
# 143. A labor of love.
# 144. A last minute rush.
# 145. A last-minute reprieve.
# 146. A late-comer.
# 147. A lick and a promise.
# 148. (deleted)
# 149. (deleted)
# 150. A little bird told me.
# 151. (deleted)
# 152. A little Esperanto goes a long way.
# 153. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
# 154. A little lower.
# 155. A little self-denial goes a long way.
# 156. A live performance.
# 157. A living creature.
# 158. A lot depends on what you allow to come up for discussion.
# 159. (deleted)
# 160. A lousy so-and-so.
# 161. A lukewarm response.
# 162. A major discovery.
# 163. A major invention.
# 164. A man for all seasons.
# 165. A man is as good as he has to be; a woman is as bad as she dares to be.
# 166. A man’s home is his castle.
# 167. A man’s not complete until he’s married.
# 168. A matter of principle.
# 169. A meeting of minds.
# 170. A meeting will be held in the first floor conference room.
# 171. A memorable witticism.
# 172. A momentous decision.
# 173. A money order drawn in blank is at your own risk.
# 174. A monologue.
# 175. A moot point.
# 176. A mop-up operation.
# 177. A moron presumes that anything unfalsifiable must be true.
# 178. A moron thinks that if you do him a good turn, you want to be pals with
him.
# 179. A mover-and-shaker.
# 180. A munition of war.
# 181. A mystery.
# 182. A nanny can have a tough time keeping up with her charges.
# 183. A natural disaster is not usually referred to as an “accident”.
# 184. A naval blockade.
# 185. A neck duster is popularly known as a “barber brush”.
# 186. A negotiated peace.
# 187. A nervous wreck.
# 188. A nest of bugs.
# 189. A neutral, easy-to-learn, international auxiliary language – what a concept!
# 190. A new lease on life.
# 191. A New Year’s resolution.
# 192. A new-comer.
# 193. A ninety-day wonder.
# 194. A number of English words contain a silent letter.
# 195. A number of the Titanic victims died from hypothermia.
# 196. A number of words in English, such as “curious”, are used in both
directions.
# 197. A pack of wolves.
# 198. A painful procedure.
# 199. A parallel draft in Esperanto serves as the proofreader’s Rosetta Stone.
# 200. A parcel of land.
# 201. A partner of a firm is one who starts things that others have to finish.
# 202. A partner, not a puppet.
# 203. A pendulum gives proof that the Earth rotates.
# 204. A penny for your thoughts.
# 205. A penny saved is a penny earned.
# 206. A people.
# 207. (deleted)
# 208. A phenomenally successful venture.
# 209. A pie in the face is an example of slapstick.
# 210. A pit stop.
# 211. A poor-quality item.
# 212. A position of privilege.
# 213. A positive identification was made through dental records.
# 214. A pre-emptive attack.
# 215. (deleted)
# 216. A private agenda.
# 217. A problem that’s not reported is not a problem.
# 218. A prominent member of society.
# 219. A prominent politician.
# 220. A proxy fight.
# 221. A puddle of urine remained on the supermarket floor.
# 222. A rabble-rouser.
# 223. A radical need such as that now suggested.
# 224. A raggedy Ann doll.
# 225. A rain helped put out the fire.
# 226. A reality-check.
# 227. A recent college grad would consider themself lucky to land such a job.
# 228. A recent study focused on that question.
#229. A red flag.
# 230. A Renaissance man.
# 231. A rhetorical question.
# 232. A rite of passage.
# 233. A room with a view.
# 234. A rude reminder of reality.
# 235. A rude shock.
# 236. A rug rat.
# 237. A rule of thumb.
# 238. A sacrificial lamb.
# 239. A second chance.
# 240. A second lease on life.
# 241. A secret sorrow.
# 242. A security deposit.
# 243. A self-fulfilling prophecy.
# 244. A self-made man.
# 245. A self-sustaining reaction.
# 246. A semi-synonym for “New York City” is “Gotham City”.
# 247. A sense of urgency.
# 248. A sentence does not have to be factually correct to be linguistically
instructive.
# 249. A shot in the dark.
# 250. A silly thing to say.
# 251. A simple “yes” or “no” will do.
# 252. A single mother of two.
# 253. A situation comedy is known as a “sitcom”.
# 254. A skeleton in the closet.
# 255. A sly fox.
# 256. A soap opera.
# 257. A sobering thought.
# 258. A sock should be of genus zero.
# 259. A software project.
# 260. A song and dance.
# 261. A space heater is dangerous for a toddler.
# 262. A special trip.
# 263. A standing ovation.
# 264. A stand-up comic.
# 265. A statistician is someone who doesn’t take chances.
# 266. A stay of execution.
# 267. A stick in the mud.
# 268. A stopping point.
# 269. A stranger helped me pick up my things.
# 270. A stroke of genius.
# 271. A structured walk-through.
# 272. A sucker is born every minute.
# 273. A survival tactic.
# 274. A tall pedestal for a small man.
# 275. A tax/fine on incorrect published English would bring in lots of revenue.
# 276. A telemarketer reached the cabinet member.
# 277. A ten-percent increase.
# 278. A terminal illness.
# 279. A thief stole my bicycle.
# 280. A three-inch snowfall would paralyze this city.
# 281. A tiger is a cat with an operating system.
# 282. A ton of bricks.
# 283. A total wreck.
# 284. A tree can’t grow in sand.
# 285. A trial balloon.
# 286. A trifling sum.
# 287. A truce was called at Gallipoli to bury the stinking corpses.
# 288. A true education keeps you from repeating garbage that you hear.
# 289. A tub of lard.
# 290. A tub of water.
# 291. A TV is the next-best-thing to a grandmother.
# 292. A two-way air ticket is very inexpensive.
# 293. A verdict of guilty was a foregone conclusion.
# 294. A very big mystery.
# 295. A vicious circle.
# 296. A wake-up call.
# 297. A war story.
# 298. A warning shot.
# 299. A weekend warrior.
# 300. A whodunit.
# 301. A wild goose chase.
# 302. A willing suspension of disbelief.
# 303. A wolf at the door.
# 304. A wolf is a dog with an operating system.
# 305. A woman without her man is nothing.
# 306. A woman: without her, man is nothing.
# 307. Abandon ship!
# 308. Abbreviation leads to grammar that causes the hyper-correct to
hyperventilate.
# 309. Aboard the train were several police officers.
# 310. About face!
# 311. About half of them.
# 312. Above board.
# 313. Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
# 314. Absolutely, positively!
# 315. Acceptable losses.
# 316. Access to the hotel balcony should be padlocked until construction is over.
# 317. Accessible truth is what this is all about.
# 318. Accuracy of quotation is not the issue here, but what actually gets said.
# 319. Accusing others of what you yourself are guilty is still an effective ploy.
# 320. Acquired knowledge and ordered economy of means.
# 321. Act your age!
# 322. Action is always based on particulars.
# 323. Actually, there’s a little left.
# 324. Actually, there’s a lot left.
# 325. Actually, to be honest, I think it’s too ostentatious.
# 326. Actually, yes, that’s pretty much what I intend to do.
# 327. Add a little sugar.
# 328. Add more water to the rice when it needs it.
# 329. Add more water to the teapot.
# 330. Add salt, and it will be just right.
# 331. Admin has instituted this new security procedure.
# 332. Admittedly, this is an exceptional case.
# 333. After all that, I still forgot!
# 334. After all this time, the bathroom heater is still not working.
# 335. After all, we went to the same school together.
# 336. After all, we’ll be seeing them during the holidays.
# 337. After all, we’ve been friends for a long time.
# 338. After dinner, walk a mile.
# 339. After doing an update to the software, we need to restart the computer.
# 340. After driving for forty years, he fell asleep at the wheel.
# 341. After eating corn-on-the-cob, I have to pick my teeth.
# 342. After five years he “couldn’t remember” his felony conviction.
# 343. After getting one from the fridge, she closes the drawer, and closes the door.
# 344. After his wife died, he crawled in a bottle.
# 345. After I have left, you’ll have it all to yourself.
# 346. After I taste it, I can tell you.
# 347. After it’s opened, it has to be refrigerated.
# 348. After returning from the hospital, she was ravenous for meat.
# 349. After so much noise, the silence was deafening.
# 350. After that, I went back to bed.
# 351. After the break, the starting times of the afternoon classes will be earlier.
# 352. After while, crocodile!
# 353. Afternoon classes now start earlier.
# 354. Afterwards, she was her usual sunny self again.
# 355. Against all odds.
# 356. Age brings more wisdom, but there is no limit to how foolish one may have
been.
# 357. Age has mellowed me.
# 358. Ahoy!
# 359. Aisle seat, or window?
# 360. Alert the fire department if you see smoke.
# 361. Algebra is the basis of all technical endeavor.
# 362. Alive and well.
# 363. All aboard the “Thresher” perished.
# 364. All aboard!
# 365. All else will be added later.
# 366. All fact or occurrence which demands and may arouse profitable attention.
# 367. All gone.
# 368. All great ideas go through the same three stages.
# 369. All I do is shuffle papers.
# 370. All I know is, I give her money, and she comes back with good things.
# 371. All is lost.
# 372. All it takes is a bag of cash.
# 373. All my friends speak Esperanto.
# 374. All of the above.
# 375. All of them have been eliminated, or marginalized.
# 376. All of them were villagers.
# 377. All others pay cash.
# 378. All parties in the vicinity must be aware of that fact.
# 379. All politics is applesauce.
# 380. All present and accounted-for.
# 381. All progress takes place in subspaces.
# 382. All right, already!
# 383. All right, throw it away.
# 384. All signatories to that law should be prosecuted.
# 385. All systems are go.
# 386. All that I asked was that you not bother me.
# 387. All the comforts of home.
# 388. All the doctors remember her.
# 389. All the easy problems have been solved.
# 390. All the rest are stubs.
# 391. All the same, sitting on the right track is the safest place to sit.
# 392. All they do is skim off the cream.
# 393. All they’re interested in is quick fixes.
# 394. All those who think Northrop Frye should have done this, raise your hands.
# 395. All told, twenty crossed the river.
# 396. All we could do was pick up the pieces.
# 397. All we’re asking for is power, brilliance, clarity, and intimacy.
# 398. All you can do is move the probabilities in your favor.
# 399. All you’ve ever done is listen to your stupid ignorant friends.
# 400. All’s well that ends well.
# 401. Allan Krill has a method for memorization of long numbers.
# 402. Alley Oop!
# 403. Allow me to remind you that December 15th is Zamenhof’s birthday.
# 404. Almost heaven.
# 405. Along the waterfront.
# 406. Also this.
# 407. Always this.
# 408. Am I complaining too much?
# 409. Am I doing this right?
# 410. Am I growling too much?
# 411. Am I hearing things?
# 412. Am I in your way?
# 413. Am I invited to the party?
# 414. Am I invited?
# 415. Am I losing it?
# 416. Am I my brother’s keeper?
# 417. Am I on Candid Camera?
# 418. Am I seeing things?
# 419. Am I the first one you asked?
# 420. Am I the last to know?
# 421. Am I the one who has to clean up the mess?
# 422. Am I the one who has to tell him?
# 423. Am I your keeper?
# 424. Amazingly enough, aspirin comes from the willow tree, at least originally.
# 425. Ambiguity could be resolved by referring to the Esperanto version.
# 426. Ambrose Bierce disappeared into Mexico.
# 427. America always shows up late to every war.
# 428. America has people of every ethnic extraction.
# 429. Americans greatly admire the martial arts of Japan.
# 430. Americans think that a hundred years is a long time.
# 431. Among others, Mark Fettes has written about it.
# 432. Amphibious assault.
# 433. An academic has to publish to progress in his career.
# 434. An act of God.
# 435. An activity report is required.
# 436. An Advanced Learner’s Dictionary is available from Oxford.
# 437. An all-cotton garment is very comfortable, but very expensive.
# 438. An ambulance was dispatched to the scene.
# 439. An American milieu.
# 440. An anagram is a permutation of a given sequence of characters.
# 441. An apology is called for.
# 442. An apple a day keeps the doctor away.
# 443. An appropriate sense of urgency.
# 444. An attempt was made on his life.
# 445. An audit means that the IRS is going to scrutinize your claims.
# 446. An earnest freshman puppy.
# 447. An eleventh hour appeal.
# 448. An emery board.
# 449. An employee of a firm is one who has to finish things started by others.
# 450. An endurance test.
# 451. An example of an anagram is, “the eyes = they see”.
# 452. An exercise corpus is an “artificial” corpus.
# 453. An exercise corpus is simply a set of exercises so large that it looks like a
corpus.
# 454. An expeditionary force.
# 455. An ice-breaker.
# 456. An identity crisis.
# 457. An idle mind is the devil’s workshop.
# 458. An ignorant ninny.
# 459. An impartial judge.
# 460. An important purpose of “a lot” is to disambiguate “really”.
# 461. An inanimate object.
# 462. An influence on later developments.
# 463. An inside job.
# 464. An international language cannot be as complicated as English is.
# 465. An obvious discrepancy.
# 466. An old guy with a cigarette dangling from his mouth shuffles in to tidy up.
# 467. An onerous task.
# 468. An on-going investigation.
# 469. An on-going lawsuit.
# 470. An opportune moment.
# 471. An ulterior motive.
# 472. An understatement.
# 473. An undisclosed settlement.
# 474. An unenthusiastic response.
# 475. An unmarried rich man must be in search of a wife.
# 476. An untenable position.
# 477. Anchors away!
# 478. Ancient myth and superstition still have a strong hold on the human mind.
# 479. And beyond.
# 480. And how.
# 481. And neither do you.
# 482. And she keeps her mother busy too.
# 483. And she laughed!
# 484. And so are you.
# 485. And so it goes.
# 486. And so you are.
# 487. And that wasn’t good enough for you.
# 488. And then he’s finished.
# 489. And then some.
# 490. And they lived happily ever after.
# 491. And yet, and yet –
# 492. And you expect to go to heaven?
# 493. And your point is…?
# 494. Animals act strangely before a natural disaster.
# 495. Another deeply-buried bug is that the record-locking logic is flawed.
# 496. Another epidemic has broken out.
# 497. Another example of an anagram is, “dormitory = dirty room”.
# 498. Another mess.
# 499. Another one?
# 500. Another technique of ambiguity resolution is semantic constraints.
# 501. Another treat from Tinsel Town.
# 502. Answer me that.
# 503. Any academic who doesn’t learn Esperanto is a fraud.
# 504. Any broken bones?
# 505. Any foreign-language instruction not based on Esperanto is a fraud.
# 506. Any news?
# 507. Any objections?
# 508. Any program called “Integrated Studies” has to begin with Esperanto.
# 509. Any regrets?
# 510. Any work that needs to be done outside, men can do.
# 511. Any world literacy program will have to be based on Esperanto.
# 512. Anymore, I’ll refuse a cab if the driver is smoking.
# 513. Anyone can become president.
# 514. Anyone can play the violin, if quality doesn’t count.
# 515. Anything and everything.
# 516. Anything is better than nothing.
# 517. Anything is easy if you’re not the one who has to do it.
# 518. Anything is possible.
# 519. Anything she finds on the floor, she puts in her mouth.
# 520. Anytime no one is here, this door is locked.
# 521. Anyway, this is what we have to do.
# 522. Appeal!
# 523. Applying this ointment to your skin will ward off mosquitoes.
# 524. April showers bring May flowers.
# 525. Are his feelings fragile?
# 526. Are matching funds provided?
# 527. Are refills free?
# 528. Are refills on coffee free?
# 529. Are the trains running on time?
# 530. Are there any exercises that I should do?
# 531. Are there any hidden costs?
# 532. Are there any messages for me?
# 533. Are there any questions?
# 534. Are there any side-effects?
# 535. Are there dirty dishes in the sink?
# 536. Are there English subtitles?
# 537. Are these the clothes to be washed?
# 538. Are they all the same?
# 539. Are they Americans?
# 540. Are they being reasonable?
# 541. Are they dating?
# 542. Are they in a relationship?
# 543. Are we all on the same page?
# 544. Are we all set?
# 545. Are we better astronomers than the builders of Stonehenge?
# 546. Are we comfy, or what?
# 547. Are we ever going to buy a house?
# 548. Are we having fun yet?
# 549. Are we ready to sign the contract?
# 550. Are we ready?
# 551. Are you a member of the Universal Esperanto Association?
# 552. Are you a southerner?
# 553. Are you a tree-hugger?
# 554. Are you able to get your phone calls returned?
# 555. Are you acquainted with the invisible pink unicorn?
# 556. Are you afraid?
# 557. Are you all right?
# 558. Are you allergic to any drugs?
# 559. Are you allergic to monosodium glutamate or any other food additive?
# 560. Are you alone?
# 561. Are you always in pain?
# 562. Are you an American?
# 563. Are you an eternal beginner?
# 564. Are you asking, or telling.
# 565. Are you aware of the intended irony of that expression?
# 566. Are you bragging, or complaining.
# 567. Are you catching a cold?
# 568. Are you catching cold?
# 569. Are you cold?
# 570. Are you coming back to bed again?
# 571. Are you coming down with something?
# 572. Are you computer-literate?
# 573. Are you decent?
# 574. Are you done?
# 575. Are you familiar with ISO 216?
# 576. Are you familiar with the diatonic scale?
# 577. Are you familiar with the divergence of the harmonic series?
# 578. Are you familiar with the ERIC database?
# 579. Are you familiar with the Peachtree Accounting software package?
# 580. Are you familiar with the spelling-reform movement?
# 581. Are you familiar with the wit and wisdom of senator Snort?
# 582. Are you familiar with using “steep” as a verb?
# 583. Are you feeling any better?
# 584. Are you finished so soon?
# 585. Are you finished with drinking tea?
# 586. Are you finished with this?
# 587. Are you following me, or something?
# 588. Are you following me?
# 589. Are you free for dinner tomorrow around seven o’clock?
# 590. Are you free tomorrow afternoon?
# 591. Are you getting sick?
# 592. Are you going steady with her?
# 593. Are you going to change clothes now?
# 594. Are you going to do the dishes?
# 595. Are you going to go shopping today?
# 596. Are you going to go to class tomorrow?
# 597. Are you going to have the buffet?
# 598. Are you going to itemize your deductions?
# 599. Are you going to learn Esperanto, or aren’t you?
# 600. Are you going to settle in China?
# 601. Are you going to share it with us?
# 602. Are you going to the Zamenhof feast?
# 603. Are you going to turn over a new leaf?
# 604. Are you happy in this hovel?
# 605. Are you happy now?
# 606. Are you happy?
# 607. Are you having second thoughts about it?
# 608. Are you having sinus problems?
# 609. Are you having trouble staying focused?
# 610. Are you his messenger?
# 611. Are you hourly?
# 612. Are you hungry?
# 613. Are you in a good mood?
# 614. Are you in a relationship?
# 615. Are you in a rush?
# 616. Are you in earnest?
# 617. Are you in lots of pain?
# 618. Are you in pain?
# 619. Are you in the know?
# 620. Are you interested in the samples you have seen just now?
# 621. Are you just putting me off?
# 622. Are you leaving now?
# 623. Are you looking for sympathy?
# 624. Are you married?
# 625. Are you near a stopping point?
# 626. Are you nursing your baby?
# 627. Are you on lunch?
# 628. Are you on the phone?
# 629. Are you one of the English teachers here?
# 630. Are you part of the problem, or part of the solution?
# 631. Are you playing mind games with me?
# 632. Are you practicing your English?
# 633. Are you pulling my leg?
# 634. Are you ready to get to work?
# 635. Are you re-booting?
# 636. Are you running from anything?
# 637. Are you saving any for a rainy day?
# 638. Are you saving for your child’s college education?
# 639. Are you self-employed?
# 640. Are you serious about it?
# 641. Are you serious?
# 642. Are you sharp shooting me?
# 643. Are you speaking from experience?
# 644. Are you still on lunch?
# 645. Are you still seeing her?
# 646. Are you sure it’s safe?
# 647. Are you sure?
# 648. Are you talking about next year?
# 649. Are you telling the truth?
# 650. Are you testing my patience?
# 651. Are you THAT tightly wound?
# 652. Are you the messenger?
# 653. Are you thirsty?
# 654. Are you through with this?
# 655. Are you together?
# 656. Are you trying to beat the system?
# 657. Are you trying to cause trouble?
# 658. Are you trying to make up your mind?
# 659. Are you trying to prove something?
# 660. Are you trying to wow me with science?
# 661. Are you up to speed in symbolic logic?
# 662. Are you warm enough under the covers?
# 663. Are you working hard, or hardly working?
# 664. Are you worried?
# 665. Are your parents still living?
# 666. Are your shoes tied?
# 667. Aren’t you going to shave?
# 668. Aren’t you supposed to be taking care of this?
# 669. Aren’t you tired yet?
# 670. Argue for you limitations, and they are yours.
# 671. Arm’s-length transactions.
# 672. Arnold Ehret discovered the true nature of disease.
# 673. Around -450, Sophocles pointed out that bad advice is the worst enemy.
# 674. Around here, a dollar IS change.
# 675. Arrangements.
# 676. Arthur has a doctorate in Electrical Engineering.
# 677. As a teacher, I live by the clock.
# 678. As an assistant for this project, I need a native Chinese with good English.
# 679. As Bacon pointed out, the barrier to progress is not error, but confusion.
# 680. As common as dirt.
# 681. As deep as a well, and as wide as a church door.
# 682. As Dostoevsky pointed out, developing ideas is no easy matter.
# 683. As E. Dodge pointed out, Esperanto can be an instrument of mental training.
# 684. As far as I know, it’s trash.
# 685. As far as I’m concerned, it’s all the same.
# 686. As far as I’m concerned, it’s trash.
# 687. As free as the air.
# 688. As God is my witness.
# 689. As good as gold.
# 690. As he passed each window, he cried out, “So far, so good!”.
# 691. As his health deteriorated, he became a recluse.
# 692. As I said earlier, this is what you need to study for the exam.
# 693. As I said, this work is in the Public Domain.
# 694. As if I didn’t know.
# 695. As if that had anything to do with anything.
# 696. As is often the case.
# 697. As Joe Bob suggested, one should be allowed to hunt only in the altogether.
# 698. As Laszlo Polgar said, geniuses are made, not born.
# 699. As little as possible.
# 700. As long as I can pick which laws to enforce, I care not what laws there be.
# 701. As long as I get three squares a day, I’m not too concerned.
# 702. As long as it’s readable, it can serve as backup.
# 703. As long as they didn’t hit any Esperanto clubs, I guess it’s OK.
# 704. As Mary Poppins would say: First things first.
# 705. As mean as a junkyard dog.
# 706. As often as not.
# 707. As opposed to what?
# 708. As smooth as silk.
# 709. As soon as it starts to rain, we’ll go inside.
# 710. As soon as possible.
# 711. As soon as she wakes up, she grabs my hair.
# 712. As soon as you realize that you’re hoi polloi, you’re no longer hoi polloi.
# 713. As Sophocles pointed out, bad advice is the worst enemy.
# 714. As the call, so the echo, as the Russians say.
# 715. As they say, he has made final transition.
# 716. As time goes by.
# 717. As usual.
# 718. As we speak, they’re cutting the cake.
# 719. As we speak, they’re on their way to the concert.
# 720. As well as YOU can.
# 721. As you know, of course.
# 722. As you sow, so shall you reap.
# 723. As you were.
# 724. As you wish.
# 725. Ashes to ashes.
# 726. As-is.
# 727. Ask Abelard for the abacus.
# 728. Ask Julia.
# 729. Ask me if I care.
# 730. Ask me no questions, I’ll tell you no lies.
# 731. Ask not what Voltaire would have said; his thought is plain to see.
# 732. Asking that shows that you are confused.
# 733. Asleep at the wheel.
# 734. At a party, few people beat me to the punch, or to the hors d’oeuvres.
# 735. At ease.
# 736. At first I thought I would go on the trip, but then I decided to stay home.
# 737. At home, I only have dialup access to the internet.
# 738. At last, I understand this formula!
# 739. At last, we have peace and quiet.
# 740. At least give her the option.
# 741. At least he’s no longer suffering.
# 742. At least I got your attention.
# 743. At least it can serve as a warning to others.
# 744. At least let them know, for crying out loud.
# 745. At least now we know his true colors.
# 746. At least stay out of the way.
# 747. At least they had a roof over their heads.
# 748. At least turn it down a bit.
# 749. At least when he was bought, he stayed bought.
# 750. At least you know now where you stand.
# 751. At Millersville University, a state school, you get an ivy-league education.
# 752. At risk.
# 753. At some risk to himself.
# 754. At stake.
# 755. At Taiyuan University of Technology, they do research on coal.
# 756. At that age, I will be eligible for a government pension.
# 757. At that rate, it will take us many years to buy a house.
# 758. At that school, the teaching is done by professors, not assistants.
# 759. At that time, I was a beginner.
# 760. At the end of the day.
# 761. At the very least, I have to take a bottle of water with me.
# 762. At this early hour, it’s not crowded.
# 763. At this late date, nothing much can be done.
# 764. At what age do you plan to retire?
# 765. At what time does the bank open?
# 766. At your command.
# 767. Attention K-Mart shoppers!
# 768. Audio is used by the Merriam-Webster learners website.
# 769. Avoid loud and aggressive people.
# 770. Awesome!
# 771. Axiomatics is a way of avoiding succumbing to the Sunken Cost Fallacy.
# 772. Back by popular demand.
# 773. Back to basics.
# 774. Back to square one.
# 775. Back to the beginning.
# 776. Back to the drawing board.
# 777. Back to the salt mine.
# 778. Back to you again.
# 779. Bad command or file name.
# 780. Bah, humbug!
# 781. Ba-LON-ey.
# 782. Baltimore!
# 783. Bambi’s mother was shot by some feckless moron.
# 784. Bambie’s mother was caught in the open.
# 785. Bankruptcy is the defining result of bad management.
# 786. Barnstorming.
# 787. Basic English is a form of controlled English.
# 788. Batten down the hatches!
# 789. Battle stations!
# 790. Be alert.
# 791. Be aware that “better before” and “better than before” are antonymous.
# 792. Be aware that “outspoken” has antonymous meanings.
# 793. Be careful of the ice on the streets.
# 794. Be careful of this.
# 795. Be careful to distinguish between the words “affect” and “effect”.
# 796. Be careful to distinguish between the words “cold” and “code”.
# 797. Be careful to distinguish between the words “eyes” and “ice”.
# 798. Be careful to distinguish between the words “harmony” and “hominy”.
# 799. Be careful to distinguish between the words “hear” and “hair”.
# 800. Be careful to distinguish between the words “island” and “Ireland”.
# 801. Be careful to distinguish between the words “no” and “now”.
# 802. Be careful to distinguish between the words “pepper” and “paper”.
# 803. Be careful to distinguish between the words “say” and “see”.
# 804. Be careful to distinguish between the words “smile” and “smell”.
# 805. Be careful to distinguish between the words “towel” and “toll”.
# 806. Be careful to distinguish between the words “walk” and “work”.
# 807. Be careful to distinguish between the words “war” and “wear”.
# 808. Be careful you don’t get poked in the eye.
# 809. Be famous, or be famished.
# 810. Be reasonable.
# 811. Be sure to check the security seal before you buy it.
# 812. Be sure to cut the deck.
# 813. Be sure to get a receipt.
# 814. Be the change you want to see in the world.
# 815. Be there, or be square.
# 816. Be true to your teeth, or they’ll be false to you.
# 817. Be yourself.
# 818. Beach bathers are sometimes jokingly called sun-worshipers.
# 819. Bear in mind that some of these expressions are intentionally rude.
# 820. Bear in mind that there are many disputed points of English grammar.
# 821. Bearded in his own den.
# 822. Beaumarchais reduced English to one word.
# 823. Because I said so.
# 824. Because it’s foolish.
# 825. Because men do not seek to improve themselves, they remain bound.
# 826. Because of constant volcanic activity, Io has few craters.
# 827. Because of irony, “Yeah, right.” might be a denial rather than an admission.
# 828. Because of the blockage, oxygenated blood could not reach his heart.
# 829. Because of this.
# 830. Because she didn’t use the stove exhaust fan, she set off the fire alarm.
# 831. Because the street was so narrow, the fire truck could not get close to the
blaze.
# 832. Because they have a common enemy.
# 833. Because you are my husband.
# 834. Been there, done that.
# 835. Before asking me that, you have to empty the lint trap.
# 836. Before using a glue-on hook, you should let the glue dry for a day.
# 837. Before you can have bad management, you first have to have management.
# 838. Beggars can’t be choosers.
# 839. Behave.
# 840. Behind you!
# 841. Being a village girl, she wasn’t used to using the stove exhaust fan.
# 842. Being married is punishment enough.
# 843. Being shot beats falling down the cellar stairs.
# 844. Believe in yourself.
# 845. Believe it or not, aspirin comes from the willow tree, at least originally.
# 846. Believe it or not, he speaks ten languages.
# 847. Believe it or not, he walked that whole distance.
# 848. Believe it or not, I was young once too.
# 849. Bells and whistles.
# 850. Benign neglect.
# 851. Benjamin Franklin was no procrastinator.
# 852. Bertram belched behind my back.
# 853. Bertram wasn’t as dumb as he pretended to be.
# 854. Better late than never.
# 855. Better not.
# 856. Better safe than sorry.
# 857. Between a rock and a hard place.
# 858. Between any two numbers, there is another number.
# 859. Between the devil and the deep blue sea.
# 860. Between you and me, he’s not a very good co-worker.
# 861. Between you, me, and the fencepost.
# 862. Beware of the sunken-cost fallacy.
# 863. Beware that the word “anxious” has antonymous meanings.
# 864. Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
# 865. Beyond a reasonable doubt.
# 866. Bicoastal elitism.
# 867. Big Blue.
# 868. Bill heard the bell.
# 869. Bingo!
# 870. Bite the bullet.
# 871. Bite your tongue.
# 872. Blah-blah-blah!
# 873. Blast off!
# 874. Blood is thicker than water.
# 875. Blood was dripping to the floor.
# 876. Boarding of the train will begin at seven o’clock.
# 877. Bobbie sang the blues.
# 878. Boldly they rode, and well.
# 879. Bones bleached in the sun.
# 880. Books in Print is published by Bowker.
# 881. Born of.
# 882. Boston is the home of the bean and the cod.
# 883. Both bosses took the bus.
# 884. Both fire extinguishers are missing.
# 885. Both her nostrils were stopped up.
# 886. Both of them are in a meeting right now.
# 887. Bottoms up!
# 888. Boundary violation.
# 889. Boys will be boys.
# 890. Brace yourself.
# 891. Brand loyalty.
# 892. Bread was once used as a pencil-mark eraser.
# 893. Breaking news.
# 894. Brian gets angry, but Tom says, “I’m just letting you know.”
# 895. Bridging the gap – that’s what Esperanto is all about.
# 896. Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed.
# 897. Brilliant execution of a poor idea.
# 898. Bring a note from your mother.
# 899. Bring back some grapes too.
# 900. Bring both pillows.
# 901. Bring it on!
# 902. Bring me a pair of her socks.
# 903. Bring me more chalk.
# 904. Bring me some socks for her.
# 905. Bring me some water.
# 906. Bring me the bottle.
# 907. Bring me the dirty clothes to wash.
# 908. Bring me the fan.
# 909. Bring me the other wastebasket.
# 910. Bring me the tub of water.
# 911. Bring me up-to-date.
# 912. Bring out the baby crib.
# 913. Bring that stool over here.
# 914. Bring the book here.
# 915. Bringing Esperanto up to an intruder is like holding up a crucifix to a
vampire.
# 916. Bringing up the past.
# 917. Brinkmanship.
# 918. Broken already?
# 919. Brother, can you spare a dime?
# 920. Buckle up!
# 921. Bug-ridden.
# 922. Bulfinch’s Mythology is a standard reference.
# 923. Bummer.
# 924. Burden of proof.
# 925. Buried under generalities.
# 926. Bury TEN of them!
# 927. But a herring doesn’t whistle!
# 928. But better never late.
# 929. But he didn’t say anything.
# 930. But I LIKE burnt toast!
# 931. But I rinsed it out two times.
# 932. But it’s the truth.
# 933. But my how we improve our style, after we’ve practiced a while!
# 934. But none of this.
# 935. But the dog didn’t bark.
# 936. But then, you never did.
# 937. But this I know, and know full well.
# 938. But to really mess things up, you need a computer.
# 939. But what about you?
# 940. But when it does, it usually says GOODBYE.
# 941. But you’re saving the cream filling for yourself, aren’t you.
# 942. Buy some more laundry detergent while you’re at the store.
# 943. Buyers and sellers don’t find each other automatically.
# 944. Buying that is expensive.
# 945. Buzzard lips.
# 946. By age twelve, one should be thoroughly conversant in multivariate
calculus.
# 947. By coincidence, Asimov’s story “Profession” uses “Olympics” as the motif.
# 948. By doing that he put his job on the line.
# 949. By leaps and bounds.
# 950. By learning Esperanto, you pay your dues in the human race.
# 951. By my hand.
# 952. By popular demand.
# 953. By studying the history of Esperanto, you study the history of everything.
# 954. By that age, you should have an ID card.
# 955. By that time, I was an expert.
# 956. By the time we leave, that may happen.
# 957. By the time you get back, it’s already dark outside.
# 958. By word of mouth.
# 959. By your leave.
# 960. C.K. Ogden formulated Basic English, and I.A. Richards promoted it.
# 961. C.S. Lewis notwithstanding, self-expression is an important process.
# 962. Cafeteria wisdom.
# 963. Calamity claimed the country.
# 964. Calculus is the distillation of the concerted effort of geniuses.
# 965. Calculus is the entrée, not a side dish for you to choose or refuse.
# 966. Call him tomorrow morning after nine.
# 967. Call it – heads or tails?
# 968. Call me a cab.
# 969. Call me anything but late to supper.
# 970. Call me if you need me.
# 971. Call me when it’s ready.
# 972. Call me when you arrive, and I’ll come pick you up.
# 973. Call security on them if they refuse to leave.
# 974. Call the intro math course whatever you want, but teach algebra.
# 975. Call UPS for a pick-up.
# 976. Calm down.
# 977. Can a building be constructed robotically?
# 978. Can a single mother of multiple children get away with things others can’t?
# 979. Can a tiger change its stripes?
# 980. Can an order-entry system be retro-fitted to interrogate a corpus?
# 981. Can any bugs get in here?
# 982. Can do.
# 983. Can fifty million Frenchmen be wrong?
# 984. Can he walk on water?
# 985. Can I borrow a piece of paper?
# 986. Can I borrow your pen?
# 987. Can I borrow your stapler?
# 988. Can I bum a piece of paper off you?
# 989. Can I come in?
# 990. Can I come to your room now?
# 991. Can I get a refund?
# 992. Can I go now?
# 993. Can I have a sheet of paper?
# 994. Can I have your phone number?
# 995. Can I help you make a selection from the menu?
# 996. Can I help you place your order?
# 997. Can I help you?
# 998. Can I join you?
# 999. Can I leave a message?
# 1000. Can I lick the spoon?
# 1001. Can I make a suggestion?
# 1002. Can I put it on my account?
# 1003. Can I put my two cents in?
# 1004. Can I see your ID card?
# 1005. Can I show you my portfolio?
# 1006. Can I take a message?
# 1007. Can I turn my homework in now?
# 1008. Can I watch?
# 1009. Can the impact of the language barrier be quantified?
# 1010. Can the process of entropy be reversed?
# 1011. Can we afford it?
# 1012. Can we sit over there?
# 1013. Can we talk?
# 1014. Can you account for that?
# 1015. Can you be bonded?
# 1016. Can you believe the way prices are going up?
# 1017. Can you blame me?
# 1018. Can you count backwards to zero?
# 1019. Can you count to ten?
# 1020. Can you defend against multiple attackers?
# 1021. Can you follow what I’m saying?
# 1022. Can you give me a thumbnail sketch of it?
# 1023. Can you grasp the concept of Esperanto as facilitator?
# 1024. Can you guess why?
# 1025. Can you handle it?
# 1026. Can you hear it out the window?
# 1027. Can you hear the fireworks outside?
# 1028. Can you help me find my walking stick?
# 1029. Can you help me?
# 1030. Can you imagine a stainless steel rat?
# 1031. Can you imagine that?
# 1032. Can you introduce me to her?
# 1033. Can you keep a secret?
# 1034. Can you locate the paperwork associated with your last hospital visit?
# 1035. Can you multi-task?
# 1036. Can you name a non-trivial automorphism of the plane?
# 1037. Can you name a word pronounced like “die”, but spelled differently?
# 1038. Can you name an ocean liner that sank in 1912?
# 1039. Can you play chess?
# 1040. Can you play it by ear?
# 1041. Can you play the piano?
# 1042. Can you provide a solution within these constraints?
# 1043. Can you provide an embedding for this high-valence expression?
# 1044. Can you put any numbers to it?
# 1045. Can you read between the lines?
# 1046. Can you recite the Military Alphabet?
# 1047. Can you remember the melody?
# 1048. Can you see the board?
# 1049. Can you see the potential?
# 1050. Can you see your way clear to do that?
# 1051. Can you spell that without any r’s?
# 1052. Can you take her by yourself to see the doctor?
# 1053. Can you take penicillin?
# 1054. Can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?
# 1055. Can you tell the age of the internet by counting its webrings?
# 1056. Can you wait for me?
# 1057. Can you wait until I get dressed?
# 1058. Can you wait until I leave?
# 1059. Can you write down the name of the dish for me?
# 1060. Can’t we do better than this?
# 1061. Can’t we let bygones be bygones?
# 1062. Can’t you come earlier?
# 1063. Can’t you get a refund?
# 1064. Can’t you go any faster?
# 1065. Can’t you take a joke?
# 1066. Can’t you tell?
# 1067. Can’t you wait until I leave?
# 1068. Candide, like Melville, had a whale of an adventure.
# 1069. Candles are a fire hazard, so let’s do without them.
# 1070. Cannon fodder.
# 1071. Carbon dioxide erupting from Lake Nyos spilled into the valley below.
# 1072. Careers are destroyed by embarrassment.
# 1073. Careful she doesn’t pull the iron over on herself.
# 1074. Careful, he can smell fear.
# 1075. Careful, it’s hot.
# 1076. Careful, the floor is still wet from mopping.
# 1077. Carefully considered.
# 1078. Carmel-covered apples.
# 1079. Caroline was looking out the window of the train.
# 1080. Carrie moved from Chicago to New York, and I can’t say I blame her.
# 1081. Carry on.
# 1082. Carry this back to where it goes.
# 1083. Cash and carry.
# 1084. Cash on the barrelhead.
# 1085. Cash only – no credit.
# 1086. Cataclysmic collapse.
# 1087. Catch!
# 1088. Catty corner from the supermarket is a foreign language bookstore.
# 1089. Caught in the act.
# 1090. Caught in the open.
# 1091. Cause for complaint.
# 1092. Cause for war.
# 1093. Cave diving is as dangerous as trying to beat the train across the track.
# 1094. Cease and desist!
# 1095. Cease fire!
# 1096. Central heating and air conditioning is a great convenience.
# 1097. Certainly!
# 1098. Cessation of hostilities.
# 1099. Chalk it up to experience.
# 1100. Changing “glisters” to “glitters” is one of many such changes.
# 1101. Chap stick is a very welcome commodity in the wintertime.
# 1102. Charge it.
# 1103. Charge!
# 1104. Cheaper by the dozen.
# 1105. Check and see if the baby has had a bowel movement.
# 1106. Check and see.
# 1107. Check for broken bones.
# 1108. Check it for yourself.
# 1109. Check it out.
# 1110. Check out The Best Loved Poems of the American People.
# 1111. Check out the Internet Anagram Server.
# 1112. Check to see if the rice is done.
# 1113. Check!
# 1114. Check, please!
# 1115. Checkmate!
# 1116. Childhood is fleeting.
# 1117. Children are cruel.
# 1118. Children become citizens automatically.
# 1119. Children dart out from behind cars parked on the street.
# 1120. Children love our dog.
# 1121. Children should be seen and not heard.
# 1122. Chinese is my native language.
# 1123. Chinese neglect to say “say”, saying “speak” instead.
# 1124. Chinese think that “Have a nice day.” is declarative, not imperative.
# 1125. Chinese think that “Have a nice day.” means “It is a nice day.”.
# 1126. Chinese use “have” for existential quantification.
# 1127. Chinese who have studied English eight years don’t even know “thermos
bottle”.
# 1128. Choose a partner.
# 1129. Choose another one – that one’s taken.
# 1130. Choose one.
# 1131. Choose one: Esperanto, a failure to communicate.
# 1132. Choose three: the flag, motherhood, apple pie, Esperanto.
# 1133. Choose two.
# 1134. Choose two: quality, service, price.
# 1135. Choose whatever subset of this you like.
# 1136. Choose your rut carefully, because you’re going to be in it a long time.
# 1137. Chug-a-lug.
# 1138. Cicero was a great orator.
# 1139. Circling the drain.
# 1140. Clandestine operations.
# 1141. Class is dismissed.
# 1142. Class is in session.
# 1143. Clean shirts attract food.
# 1144. Cleaned of.
# 1145. Cleaned off.
# 1146. Cleanliness is next to Godliness.
# 1147. Clear and present danger.
# 1148. Clichés are a beacon for beginners.
# 1149. Climbing these stairs is tiring.
# 1150. Close enough for government work.
# 1151. Close out of the document before going on break.
# 1152. Close the door.
# 1153. Close, but no cigar.
# 1154. Clout.
# 1155. Coal dust is in the air.
# 1156. Coals to Newcastle.
# 1157. Cockroaches are Nature’s way of reminding the world to learn Esperanto.
# 1158. Cockroaches scatter when the light comes on.
# 1159. Coherence is no guarantee of truth.
# 1160. Colin has a good command of calculus.
# 1161. Combat-ready.
# 1162. Come and get it!
# 1163. Come back here!
# 1164. Come back soon.
# 1165. Come find me when you’re done.
# 1166. Come here for a minute.
# 1167. Come in, please.
# 1168. Come in.
# 1169. Come New Year’s, I’m sure she’ll be able to say “Mommy” and “Daddy”.
# 1170. Come off it.
# 1171. Come on in and have a seat.
# 1172. Come on in!
# 1173. Come one, come all.
# 1174. Come over here.
# 1175. Come see us again sometime.
# 1176. Come see what she’s doing.
# 1177. Come straight home.
# 1178. Come straight to the point.
# 1179. Come tell me some lies.
# 1180. Come to bed.
# 1181. Come to the point.
# 1182. Come to think of it, sitting on the right track is the safest place to sit.
# 1183. Come to think of it, we haven’t seen them in nearly a year.
# 1184. Comedy is difficult.
# 1185. Comment is surely needless.
# 1186. Common parlance takes no notice of trademarks.
# 1187. Communication is the key.
# 1188. Compared with what?
# 1189. Complete defeat.
# 1190. Comrades in arms.
# 1191. Confession is good for the soul.
# 1192. Congratulations on your new position!
# 1193. Congress holds the purse-strings.
# 1194. Consider it done.
# 1195. Considering how close it was, it wasn’t much of a feat.
# 1196. Contact lenses are an alternative to eyeglasses.
# 1197. Continued on other side.
# 1198. Contraband.
# 1199. Controlled substances.
# 1200. Cooking gas is very expensive nowadays.
# 1201. Cooking oil, trash bags, and butter.
# 1202. Corpses should be cremated.
# 1203. Correct me if I’m wrong.
# 1204. Correct usage is defined by the actual utterances of the people.
# 1205. Corrections are made from bottom to top, to retain line-numbering.
# 1206. Could his finances bear scrutiny?
# 1207. Could I have another piece of chicken?
# 1208. Could I have some ketchup?
# 1209. Could I look at the instruction manual?
# 1210. Could I see you for a minute in my office?
# 1211. Could they have chosen anyone ditsier?
# 1212. Could we have some more tartar sauce?
# 1213. Could you come here for a moment?
# 1214. Could you get me one?
# 1215. Could you lend me the key?
# 1216. Could you pass this on to her for me?
# 1217. Could you repeat that?
# 1218. Could you write it down?
# 1219. Couldn’t you help it?
# 1220. Couldn’t you see the car?
# 1221. Count me in.
# 1222. Count the letters in each word of that sentence.
# 1223. Count your blessings.
# 1224. Counting sheep.
# 1225. Court has adjourned for the weekend.
# 1226. Cover your left eye and read the chart.
# 1227. Covert operations.
# 1228. Crazy.
# 1229. Cross my heart and hope to die.
# 1230. Crumbling infrastructure.
# 1231. Crying over spilled milk is a form of succumbing to the Sunken Cost
Fallacy.
# 1232. Cultivation of talent is the key to prosperity.
# 1233. Currently, I’m teaching a Canadian Chinese.
# 1234. Cut the deck.
# 1235. Cut the fat, not the services.
# 1236. Cut to the chase.
# 1237. Cut-throat competition.
# 1238. Cutting to the chase…
# 1239. Daddy, I need a new apartment.
# 1240. Daily lessons could be based on this file.
# 1241. Damage-control.
# 1242. Danger would come from that direction.
# 1243. Dangers on the ground abound.
# 1244. Dangers unthought-of will attend delay.
# 1245. Dante wrote about the divine comedy.
# 1246. Data loss is simply a form of death.
# 1247. Databases are of two types: analytic and operational.
# 1248. David and Goliath.
# 1249. David Wolff not only knows Esperanto, but also has fire-fighting
experience.
# 1250. Davy Crockett had three ears: a right ear, a left ear, and a wild frontier.
# 1251. Day is done.
# 1252. Dead and buried.
# 1253. Dead as a doornail.
# 1254. Deal with it.
# 1255. Dealing with this temperamental copy machine is exasperating.
# 1256. Death Valley isn’t called that for no reason, you know.
# 1257. Debit or credit?
# 1258. Debits on the left, credits on the right.
# 1259. Decidedly.
# 1260. Decisions, decisions!
# 1261. Decorum was lacking, I’m afraid.
# 1262. Deep expertise.
# 1263. Deep pockets.
# 1264. Deeply-ingrained habits are not easily changed.
# 1265. Delayed gratification confers great advantage.
# 1266. Delicious food is any food I don’t have to prepare.
# 1267. Delicious!
# 1268. Delivery!
# 1269. Denigrating the disenfranchised.
# 1270. Designed by geniuses, and run by idiots.
# 1271. Detective stories are all I read anymore.
# 1272. Development of talent.
# 1273. Dewey B. Larson solved the enigma of gravitation.
# 1274. Did he behave himself when you took him to the museum?
# 1275. Did he get the message?
# 1276. Did he give you his word?
# 1277. Did he keep his promise?
# 1278. Did he make the grade?
# 1279. Did he name names?
# 1280. Did he own up to his mistake?
# 1281. Did he promise?
# 1282. Did he take umbrage at your remarks?
# 1283. Did I miss a meeting?
# 1284. Did I push one of your buttons?
# 1285. Did I say that?
# 1286. Did it snow last night?
# 1287. Did she bear false witness?
# 1288. Did she climb up there all by herself?
# 1289. Did she fall out of bed again?
# 1290. Did she hit her head against that thing again?
# 1291. Did she tell you to tell me?
# 1292. Did she throw up again?
# 1293. Did she wet her pants again?
# 1294. Did someone die and make you God?
# 1295. Did the class make?
# 1296. Did the wound fester?
# 1297. Did they catch the perpetrators?
# 1298. Did they clean up after themselves?
# 1299. Did they come to blows?
# 1300. Did they come to terms?
# 1301. Did they default on their loan repayment?
# 1302. Did they follow protocol?
# 1303. Did they get away with that?
# 1304. Did they pin it on you?
# 1305. Did we lose it?
# 1306. Did you acknowledge receipt of the package?
# 1307. Did you allow for a margin of error?
# 1308. Did you attend his lecture?
# 1309. Did you bear false witness?
# 1310. Did you bring enough for everybody?
# 1311. Did you bring the document I gave you last time?
# 1312. Did you buy a camera?
# 1313. Did you call the office-supply company for the paper order?
# 1314. Did you catch his act?
# 1315. Did you cause them any problems?
# 1316. Did you check for the word in the New Words Supplement?
# 1317. Did you check under here for that lid?
# 1318. Did you come by yourself?
# 1319. Did you come empty-handed?
# 1320. Did you come to an understanding?
# 1321. Did you confront him about that?
# 1322. Did you decide to go it alone?
# 1323. Did you do a save on it?
# 1324. Did you do a wash?
# 1325. Did you document the problem?
# 1326. Did you draw straws to see who would stay?
# 1327. Did you drop the course?
# 1328. Did you eat your veggies?
# 1329. Did you find a nut for it?
# 1330. Did you forget about it?
# 1331. Did you forget your brain at home this morning?
# 1332. Did you get a receipt?
# 1333. Did you get the go-ahead for the project?
# 1334. Did you get the message?
# 1335. Did you get your money’s worth?
# 1336. Did you get your security deposit back?
# 1337. Did you give him a chance to cooperate?
# 1338. Did you go to summer camp?
# 1339. Did you graduate from Harvard?
# 1340. Did you have a friend on that ship?
# 1341. Did you have insurance on it?
# 1342. Did you have to do that at your own expense?
# 1343. Did you have to do that?
# 1344. Did you hear that?
# 1345. Did you hear those magic words?
# 1346. Did you hurt his feelings?
# 1347. Did you inspect the premises?
# 1348. Did you know that he committed suicide?
# 1349. Did you know that there is an Office of English Language Acquisition?
# 1350. Did you leave a tip for the waiter?
# 1351. Did you leave it running unattended?
# 1352. Did you look in here?
# 1353. Did you make him beg?
# 1354. Did you make reservations?
# 1355. Did you make the grade?
# 1356. Did you mean it?
# 1357. Did you pass your bar exam?
# 1358. Did you put on your long johns?
# 1359. Did you read her biography?
# 1360. Did you run the spell-checker on your document?
# 1361. Did you see action?
# 1362. Did you see that slam-dunk?
# 1363. Did you seek counseling?
# 1364. Did you stay up late last night?
# 1365. Did you succumb to the Intentional Fallacy?
# 1366. Did you take that literally?
# 1367. Did you take your vitamins?
# 1368. Did you think she wasn’t going to have any childhood diseases?
# 1369. Did you turn off the stove?
# 1370. Did you turn the hot water switch back on?
# 1371. Did you want to see me?
# 1372. Did your ancestors arrive on the Mayflower?
# 1373. Did your mother get the pictures we sent her?
# 1374. Didn’t Beaumarchais reduce English to one word?
# 1375. Didn’t dogs bark behind the building?
# 1376. Didn’t Doyle have some connection with Shropshire?
# 1377. Didn’t duty dictate differently?
# 1378. Didn’t I tell you about that?
# 1379. Didn’t I tell you so?
# 1380. Didn’t T.S. Eliot write a book about cats?
# 1381. Didn’t you buy any apples?
# 1382. Different means there’s a difference.
# 1383. Different results were obtained under the same conditions.
# 1384. Different strokes for different folks.
# 1385. Dinner is ready.
# 1386. Dinner is served.
# 1387. Diplomacy comes before Esperanto only in the dictionary.
# 1388. Dirty clothes go in the hamper.
# 1389. Dirty tricks.
# 1390. Disambiguation.
# 1391. Discussing Esperanto in English is a great ESL exercise.
# 1392. Disease is an attempt on the part of the body to cleanse itself.
# 1393. Distance equal rate times time.
# 1394. Distinctive instead of haphazard use.
# 1395. Disturbing news.
# 1396. Ditto.
# 1397. DIY stands for “Do It Yourself”.
# 1398. Do a lookup on that.
# 1399. Do any of them speak Esperanto?
# 1400. Do as I say, not as I do.
# 1401. Do as I say.
# 1402. Do crows like corn?
# 1403. Do eels endeavor to eat eggs?
# 1404. Do I get a discount?
# 1405. Do I have any mail?
# 1406. Do I have time to do this?
# 1407. Do I have to apologize for that?
# 1408. Do I have to choose between them?
# 1409. Do I have to go with you?
# 1410. Do I have to spoon-feed you?
# 1411. Do I have to?
# 1412. Do I have your word on that?
# 1413. Do I know you?
# 1414. Do I know your name?
# 1415. Do I need to come back for another session?
# 1416. Do I really have to go out in this weather?
# 1417. Do I sound hoarse to you?
# 1418. Do I understand this correctly?
# 1419. Do it over again.
# 1420. Do it yourself.
# 1421. Do pigs have wings?
# 1422. Do the best you can, and let the chips fall where they may.
# 1423. Do the exercises for homework.
# 1424. Do the math.
# 1425. Do the right thing.
# 1426. Do they accept the American Express card?
# 1427. Do they give relocation assistance?
# 1428. Do they have a safe on the premises?
# 1429. Do they own, or rent.
# 1430. Do they understand English?
# 1431. Do this now.
# 1432. Do we get free refills?
# 1433. Do we get overtime pay?
# 1434. Do we have a deal?
# 1435. Do we have another printer toner cartridge?
# 1436. Do we have to ask their permission?
# 1437. Do we have to do this?
# 1438. Do we have to fight about this?
# 1439. Do we have to go to the store today?
# 1440. Do what you can.
# 1441. Do whatever you want to do.
# 1442. Do you abide by the principle of minimal sufficiency?
# 1443. Do you accept late homework?
# 1444. Do you agree with that?
# 1445. Do you agree with the assertion that all functions in Nature are analytic?
# 1446. Do you approve?
# 1447. Do you bear him a grudge?
# 1448. Do you believe in God?
# 1449. Do you believe in love at first sight?
# 1450. Do you believe in omens?
# 1451. Do you believe in the Tooth Fairy?
# 1452. Do you claim to be good at that?
# 1453. Do you deny that you did that?
# 1454. Do you deny the charges?
# 1455. Do you DIY?
# 1456. Do you do any knitting or quilting or sewing?
# 1457. Do you even know what you want?
# 1458. Do you feel pain when I do this?
# 1459. Do you feel put-upon?
# 1460. Do you get any benefits?
# 1461. Do you have a copy of Dr. Spock’s book on baby care?
# 1462. Do you have a copy of the Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary?
# 1463. Do you have a dictionary?
# 1464. Do you have a high school diploma?
# 1465. Do you have a Phillips-head screwdriver?
# 1466. Do you have a problem with that?
# 1467. Do you have a question?
# 1468. Do you have a recycling program?
# 1469. Do you have a reservation?
# 1470. Do you have a steady?
# 1471. Do you have a tardy pass?
# 1472. Do you have an “off” switch?
# 1473. Do you have an account with us?
# 1474. Do you have an Allen wrench?
# 1475. Do you have an appointment?
# 1476. Do you have an audit trail?
# 1477. Do you have another one for me?
# 1478. Do you have any aspirin?
# 1479. Do you have any bad habits?
# 1480. Do you have any dietary restrictions or special requirements?
# 1481. Do you have any felony convictions?
# 1482. Do you have any hobbies?
# 1483. Do you have any reservations about this idea?
# 1484. Do you have back issues?
# 1485. Do you have broadband access to the internet?
# 1486. Do you have change for a dollar?
# 1487. Do you have class tomorrow morning?
# 1488. Do you have CPR training?
# 1489. Do you have deep expertise in anything?
# 1490. Do you have direct deposit?
# 1491. Do you have enough money to pay the toll?
# 1492. Do you have experience?
# 1493. Do you have insurance on it?
# 1494. Do you have kinfolk there?
# 1495. Do you have leave for your absence?
# 1496. Do you have picture postcards?
# 1497. Do you have reservations?
# 1498. Do you have sick leave?
# 1499. Do you have something to tell her?
# 1500. Do you have the baby’s birth certificate?
# 1501. Do you have the bandwidth to take on another task?
# 1502. Do you have the big picture?
# 1503. Do you have the contact information?
# 1504. Do you have the identification number?
# 1505. Do you have to break my concentration for such a trivial matter?
# 1506. Do you have to tell her something?
# 1507. Do you have your book?
# 1508. Do you have your GED?
# 1509. Do you have your gloves?
# 1510. Do you have your ID card?
# 1511. Do you have your key with you?
# 1512. Do you have your teaching certificate?
# 1513. Do you have your treatment booklet with you?
# 1514. Do you keep a file on this?
# 1515. Do you keep a log?
# 1516. Do you keep regular hours?
# 1517. Do you know about the Duden Picture Dictionary?
# 1518. Do you know about the farmer who had a rock a million and one years
old?
# 1519. Do you know about the Lagrangian points of an orbital system?
# 1520. Do you know about the mathematics encyclopedia created by the
Japanese?
# 1521. Do you know anything about this?
# 1522. Do you know Boolean logic?
# 1523. Do you know Esperanto?
# 1524. Do you know how Isadora Duncan died?
# 1525. Do you know how it works?
# 1526. Do you know how to do a file transfer?
# 1527. Do you know how to extract a subset?
# 1528. Do you know how to operate this equipment?
# 1529. Do you know how to play the accordion?
# 1530. Do you know how to touch-type?
# 1531. Do you know Murphy’s Law?
# 1532. Do you know my name?
# 1533. Do you know Parkinson’s Law?
# 1534. Do you know the 158-method for learning English?
# 1535. Do you know the address?
# 1536. Do you know the Chinese magic square?
# 1537. Do you know the collocation for that idea?
# 1538. Do you know the conundrum about the unexpected hanging?
# 1539. Do you know the difference between a countable and uncountable noun?
# 1540. Do you know the difference between a necessary and sufficient condition?
# 1541. Do you know the difference between an urgent and important matter?
# 1542. Do you know the difference between specification and implementation?
# 1543. Do you know the difference between the letter of the law, and the spirit of
the law?
# 1544. Do you know the formula for the sum of increasing powers of a fixed
number?
# 1545. Do you know the game of Botticelli?
# 1546. Do you know the hidden meaning?
# 1547. Do you know the Military Alphabet?
# 1548. Do you know the nickname for death?
# 1549. Do you know the Queen’s English?
# 1550. Do you know the riddle about the missing dollar?
# 1551. Do you know the rules of the game?
# 1552. Do you know the Second Law of Thermodynamics?
# 1553. Do you know the solution?
# 1554. Do you know the story about the man with the twisted lip?
# 1555. Do you know the three rules of life?
# 1556. Do you know the various meanings of “die”?
# 1557. Do you know the way to the Hundred Acre Wood?
# 1558. Do you know the way to the place?
# 1559. Do you know those people?
# 1560. Do you know what “a.k.a.” stands for?
# 1561. Do you know what “adiabatic” means?
# 1562. Do you know what “alphabetical order” means?
# 1563. Do you know what “btw” stands for?
# 1564. Do you know what “fat chance” means?
# 1565. Do you know what “overloading” means?
# 1566. Do you know what “w/o” means?
# 1567. Do you know what a blind test is?
# 1568. Do you know what a check digit is?
# 1569. Do you know what a controlled experiment is?
# 1570. Do you know what a dog-to-cat error is?
# 1571. Do you know what a double-blind test is?
# 1572. Do you know what a loss-leader is?
# 1573. Do you know what a Markov chain is?
# 1574. Do you know what a metaphor is?
# 1575. Do you know what a phrasal verb is?
# 1576. Do you know what a phrase-builder system is?
# 1577. Do you know what a proxy fight is?
# 1578. Do you know what a scalar is?
# 1579. Do you know what a tautology is?
# 1580. Do you know what a thrombus is?
# 1581. Do you know what a tracheotomy is?
# 1582. Do you know what a vicious circle is?
# 1583. Do you know what an “em dash” is?
# 1584. Do you know what an acronym is?
# 1585. Do you know what an euphemism is?
# 1586. Do you know what an Oxford comma is?
# 1587. Do you know what is meant by “assonance”?
# 1588. Do you know what is meant by “irony”?
# 1589. Do you know what is meant by “scare quotes”?
# 1590. Do you know what is meant by a “metalanguage”?
# 1591. Do you know what is meant by an “auxiliary language”?
# 1592. Do you know what is meant by the “categorical imperative”?
# 1593. Do you know what it involves?
# 1594. Do you know what Mamikon’s brilliant observation was?
# 1595. Do you know what pencil-sharpening is?
# 1596. Do you know what self-censorship is?
# 1597. Do you know what she said?
# 1598. Do you know what Teilhard de Chardin said about that?
# 1599. Do you know what that acronym stands for?
# 1600. Do you know what the dative case is?
# 1601. Do you know what the first non-trivial theorem of General Topology is?
# 1602. Do you know what the instep is?
# 1603. Do you know what the purpose was?
# 1604. Do you know what the radius of convergence of that power series is?
# 1605. Do you know what time it is?
# 1606. Do you know what you are doing?
# 1607. Do you know what you’re asking?
# 1608. Do you know what’s meant by “alliteration”?
# 1609. Do you know what’s meant by “closure” and “interior”?
# 1610. Do you know where your children are?
# 1611. Do you know where your parents are?
# 1612. Do you know who T.C. Mits is?
# 1613. Do you know why the bear died?
# 1614. Do you know Zorn’s Lemma?
# 1615. Do you like classical music?
# 1616. Do you like Kipling?
# 1617. Do you like riddles?
# 1618. Do you like the Chinese medicine that I prescribed for you?
# 1619. Do you like this?
# 1620. Do you like turkey dressing?
# 1621. Do you mean it?
# 1622. Do you mind if we call you “Charlie”?
# 1623. Do you mind?
# 1624. Do you moisturize?
# 1625. Do you need a flashlight?
# 1626. Do you need a helping hand?
# 1627. Do you need anything?
# 1628. Do you need for me to come with you?
# 1629. Do you need my passport?
# 1630. Do you play chess?
# 1631. Do you promise?
# 1632. Do you really think so?
# 1633. Do you recognize an allegory when you see one?
# 1634. Do you recycle?
# 1635. Do you remember how it goes?
# 1636. Do you remember the password?
# 1637. Do you remember what I told you earlier?
# 1638. Do you rinse out the shower stall after she urinates in it?
# 1639. Do you say this to everybody?
# 1640. Do you smell anything?
# 1641. Do you speak Esperanto?
# 1642. Do you still make castles out of your mashed potatoes?
# 1643. Do you still need this?
# 1644. Do you suffer from monolingualism?
# 1645. Do you think Chinese food is more fattening than American food?
# 1646. Do you think he acted alone?
# 1647. Do you think he’s serious?
# 1648. Do you think I did it on purpose?
# 1649. Do you think it was an inside job?
# 1650. Do you think it’s significant?
# 1651. Do you think my desire to go to America is right?
# 1652. Do you think she will be tall?
# 1653. Do you think that that is significant?
# 1654. Do you think there was a conspiracy behind it?
# 1655. Do you think they’ll walk down the aisle together?
# 1656. Do you think we can win the war against the cockroaches?
# 1657. Do you think we should lend her the money?
# 1658. Do you understand the concept?
# 1659. Do you understand what is at stake?
# 1660. Do you understand?
# 1661. Do you want a lump-sum, or periodic payments?
# 1662. Do you want a refund?
# 1663. Do you want a taste?
# 1664. Do you want an answer, or an argument?
# 1665. Do you want another forkful?
# 1666. Do you want any of this?
# 1667. Do you want any?
# 1668. Do you want me to come over there?
# 1669. Do you want me to do the dishes?
# 1670. Do you want me to prove it to you?
# 1671. Do you want me to starve to death?
# 1672. Do you want our house to have a basement?
# 1673. Do you want some water?
# 1674. Do you want this to continue?
# 1675. Do you want to buy anything else?
# 1676. Do you want to charge it?
# 1677. Do you want to come back tomorrow?
# 1678. Do you want to come with me?
# 1679. Do you want to dance?
# 1680. Do you want to do the cooking, or just have a snack?
# 1681. Do you want to get involved?
# 1682. Do you want to give the crumbs to the birds?
# 1683. Do you want to go for a stroll?
# 1684. Do you want to go for a stroller ride?
# 1685. Do you want to go halves on a bucket of KFC?
# 1686. Do you want to go to the concert?
# 1687. Do you want to hang out with us?
# 1688. Do you want to hear about it?
# 1689. Do you want to hear this story?
# 1690. Do you want to help trim the tree?
# 1691. Do you want to order from the menu?
# 1692. Do you want to pay extra to have a private room?
# 1693. Do you want to pet the dog?
# 1694. Do you want to play for keeps?
# 1695. Do you want to pose for a picture?
# 1696. Do you want to rest for a while?
# 1697. Do you want to take a break?
# 1698. Do you want to try a new brand?
# 1699. Do you work well as a team member?
# 1700. Do you worry about it?
# 1701. Do your best.
# 1702. Do your duty.
# 1703. Do your job.
# 1704. Do your parents approve?
# 1705. Do, rey, me, fah, so, lah, tee, do!
# 1706. Doctor Livingstone, I presume.
# 1707. Doctor, where are my legs?
# 1708. Doctor’s orders.
# 1709. Document everything in sight.
# 1710. Does a baby run to its mother?
# 1711. Does anyone know where she is?
# 1712. Does he bear you ill will?
# 1713. Does he ever stop talking?
# 1714. Does he get hazardous-duty pay?
# 1715. Does he have a police record?
# 1716. Does he have an advanced degree?
# 1717. Does he have an attitude?
# 1718. Does he have some kind of disease?
# 1719. Does he hold any remunerative position?
# 1720. Does he pay his debts?
# 1721. Does he want to go to graduate school?
# 1722. Does it ever occur to you that I might be thinking?
# 1723. Does it have English subtitles?
# 1724. Does it have to do with the telephone?
# 1725. Does it hold water?
# 1726. Does it hurt a lot?
# 1727. Does it hurt any?
# 1728. Does it smell to you?
# 1729. Does it stink to you?
# 1730. Does she have a fever?
# 1731. Does she have money in her own name?
# 1732. Does she take vitamins?
# 1733. Does she want to go for a stroller ride?
# 1734. Does she worry about it?
# 1735. Does that mean you’re not going to borrow any more money from me?
# 1736. Does that sound like a fun thing to do?
# 1737. Does the apple pie come à la mode?
# 1738. Does the baby like this food?
# 1739. Does the baby want to nurse?
# 1740. Does the director know this?
# 1741. Does the manager know you’re doing that?
# 1742. Does the manager know you’re saying that?
# 1743. Does the name “Polgar” mean anything to you?
# 1744. Does the scale groan when you step on it?
# 1745. Does the school approve of that?
# 1746. Does their house have a basement?
# 1747. Does this meet with your approval?
# 1748. Does your company have a dental plan?
# 1749. Doesn’t anyone tend to things like this?
# 1750. Dog is man’s best friend.
# 1751. Dog-to-cat errors can be hard to catch, such as using “like” to mean
“want”.
# 1752. Doing that would jeopardize your future with this company.
# 1753. Doing well by doing good.
# 1754. Don’t “try” – either do or don’t do.
# 1755. Don’t ask for trouble.
# 1756. Don’t ask me – ask your friends.
# 1757. Don’t ask me about that.
# 1758. Don’t ask me such questions.
# 1759. Don’t ask my why.
# 1760. Don’t ask.
# 1761. Don’t be a dope.
# 1762. Don’t be a dupe.
# 1763. Don’t be a fool.
# 1764. Don’t be a smart aleck.
# 1765. Don’t be a sucker for that.
# 1766. Don’t be a turkey.
# 1767. Don’t be a worrywart.
# 1768. Don’t be afraid.
# 1769. Don’t be cute.
# 1770. Don’t be scared.
# 1771. Don’t be smart with me.
# 1772. Don’t be so pushy.
# 1773. Don’t be so selfish.
# 1774. Don’t believe everything you hear.
# 1775. Don’t believe it.
# 1776. Don’t blame me.
# 1777. Don’t block the door.
# 1778. Don’t bother her.
# 1779. Don’t bother me about that.
# 1780. Don’t bother me with your stupid questions now.
# 1781. Don’t bother me.
# 1782. Don’t bump my elbow.
# 1783. Don’t burn your bridges.
# 1784. Don’t buy a pet if you can’t care for it properly.
# 1785. Don’t call me – I’ll call you.
# 1786. Don’t cause trouble.
# 1787. Don’t cause us any problems.
# 1788. Don’t change horses in the middle of the stream.
# 1789. Don’t cloud the issue.
# 1790. Don’t come up to me on my blind side.
# 1791. Don’t complain, and don’t explain.
# 1792. Don’t crowd me.
# 1793. Don’t cry wolf.
# 1794. Don’t decide tonight.
# 1795. Don’t delay.
# 1796. Don’t do anything that throws up a red flag with them.
# 1797. Don’t drop the dishes.
# 1798. Don’t eat that.
# 1799. Don’t even THINK about parking here!
# 1800. Don’t even try to pull that on me.
# 1801. Don’t exaggerate.
# 1802. Don’t expect me to remember that.
# 1803. Don’t fall prey to hyper-correctness.
# 1804. Don’t feel sorry for yourself.
# 1805. Don’t follow too closely.
# 1806. Don’t force my hand.
# 1807. Don’t forget it’s there.
# 1808. Don’t forget the bank passbook.
# 1809. Don’t forget to take the supplies.
# 1810. Don’t forget you said that.
# 1811. Don’t forget your umbrella.
# 1812. Don’t get angry.
# 1813. Don’t get any fatter.
# 1814. Don’t get involved.
# 1815. Don’t get me started.
# 1816. Don’t get sick on me.
# 1817. Don’t get sick.
# 1818. Don’t get smart with me.
# 1819. Don’t get uptight about it.
# 1820. Don’t gild the lily.
# 1821. Don’t give her too much, or she’ll get it on her clothes.
# 1822. Don’t give me any flak about it.
# 1823. Don’t give me any flak.
# 1824. Don’t give me backtalk.
# 1825. Don’t give them an excuse to get rowdy.
# 1826. Don’t hang around fools.
# 1827. Don’t have any fun until you’re fifty.
# 1828. Don’t have too much cake and ice cream, or you’ll get sick.
# 1829. Don’t interfere.
# 1830. Don’t interrupt my work.
# 1831. Don’t interrupt!
# 1832. Don’t jump the gun.
# 1833. Don’t jump to conclusions.
# 1834. Don’t keep her waiting.
# 1835. Don’t keep valuables in your room.
# 1836. Don’t laugh.
# 1837. Don’t learn the hard way.
# 1838. Don’t leave home without it.
# 1839. Don’t leave the food out where the bugs can get it.
# 1840. Don’t leave the television running when you go out.
# 1841. Don’t let anyone in while I am gone.
# 1842. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.
# 1843. Don’t let her put that in her mouth.
# 1844. Don’t let him wow you with science.
# 1845. Don’t let it happen again.
# 1846. Don’t let it pile up.
# 1847. Don’t let me down.
# 1848. Don’t let me influence you.
# 1849. Don’t let that distract you.
# 1850. Don’t let the bedbugs bite.
# 1851. Don’t let their loose tongues deter you.
# 1852. Don’t let them get away with that.
# 1853. Don’t let them nickel-and-dime you to death.
# 1854. Don’t let your hair get caught in the shredder.
# 1855. Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.
# 1856. Don’t look to me for sympathy.
# 1857. Don’t look upon it as an expense, but as an investment.
# 1858. Don’t make a liar out of me.
# 1859. Don’t make a special trip just for me.
# 1860. Don’t make her cry.
# 1861. Don’t make me beg.
# 1862. Don’t make me laugh.
# 1863. Don’t make so much noise.
# 1864. Don’t make trouble.
# 1865. Don’t marry young.
# 1866. Don’t mention it.
# 1867. Don’t muddy the waters.
# 1868. Don’t play with me!
# 1869. Don’t praise the day until the evening.
# 1870. Don’t put in too much.
# 1871. Don’t put on airs.
# 1872. Don’t put words in my mouth.
# 1873. Don’t rock the boat.
# 1874. Don’t rub salt in my wounds.
# 1875. Don’t run with that in your mouth.
# 1876. Don’t rush me.
# 1877. Don’t say “bowl” if you mean “tub”.
# 1878. Don’t say “we had better” if you mean “it would be best for us to”.
# 1879. Don’t say anything that might set him off.
# 1880. Don’t say I never gave you nothing.
# 1881. Don’t say that, even in jest.
# 1882. Don’t schedule me!
# 1883. Don’t send him away empty-handed.
# 1884. Don’t shirk your work.
# 1885. Don’t sit on it.
# 1886. Don’t sit on that.
# 1887. Don’t sit so close to the TV.
# 1888. Don’t sit yet – I’m using your chair to hold the wet clothes.
# 1889. Don’t slip on those icy steps.
# 1890. Don’t sneak up on me like that.
# 1891. Don’t speak unless you’re spoken to.
# 1892. Don’t stand in the doorway.
# 1893. Don’t stand there talking – get her out of there.
# 1894. Don’t start.
# 1895. Don’t stay away so long next time.
# 1896. Don’t steal my thunder.
# 1897. Don’t step in my cornflakes!
# 1898. Don’t step in that water.
# 1899. Don’t stop!
# 1900. Don’t sugar-coat it for me – give it to me straight.
# 1901. Don’t take it at face value.
# 1902. Don’t take it personally.
# 1903. Don’t take me for granted.
# 1904. Don’t take me literally.
# 1905. Don’t talk out of turn.
# 1906. Don’t talk to me about other guys.
# 1907. Don’t talk with your mouth full.
# 1908. Don’t tell me I don’t understand.
# 1909. Don’t tell me to calm down.
# 1910. Don’t tell me what to do.
# 1911. Don’t tell me you’ve never heard of Esperanto.
# 1912. Don’t they ever trim the trees around here?
# 1913. Don’t trip over your shoe laces.
# 1914. Don’t trouble trouble, ’til trouble troubles you.
# 1915. Don’t trust anyone who can’t find the time to learn Esperanto.
# 1916. Don’t trust anyone who doesn’t know calculus.
# 1917. Don’t try me too high.
# 1918. Don’t try that wheeze on me.
# 1919. Don’t try to do that by yourself alone.
# 1920. Don’t try to guess my reason, just do as I say.
# 1921. Don’t try to second-guess me.
# 1922. Don’t use that tone of voice with me.
# 1923. Don’t waste your time trying to recover it.
# 1924. Don’t waste your valuable time talking to me.
# 1925. Don’t who-who me – your feet don’t grab no limb!
# 1926. Don’t wipe your hands on your shirt.
# 1927. Don’t work harder, work smarter.
# 1928. Don’t worry about it.
# 1929. Don’t worry about me.
# 1930. Don’t worry about this.
# 1931. Don’t you have a handkerchief?
# 1932. Don’t you have a tickler file?
# 1933. Don’t you have an umbrella?
# 1934. Don’t you have enough to keep you busy?
# 1935. Don’t you know how the world works?
# 1936. Don’t you know what that means?
# 1937. Don’t you think she’ll be cold like that?
# 1938. Don’t! Stop!
# 1939. Dostoevsky’s observation, and that of Willa Cather, seem equivalent.
# 1940. Double time!
# 1941. Doubleknit uses only letters and numbers, no special symbols.
# 1942. Down in the doldrums.
# 1943. Down through history, the law has required interpretation.
# 1944. Downtown Chicago was flooded in 1992.
# 1945. Dr. Roach gave me the task of proving the covering theorem.
# 1946. Dr. Watson saw a man silhouetted against the moon.
# 1947. Dream on.
# 1948. Dressed to kill.
# 1949. Drinking during class is OK.
# 1950. Drinking red sugar is a home-remedy in China.
# 1951. Drop and give me fifty.
# 1952. Drop me a line.
# 1953. Drop what you’re doing and take care of this.
# 1954. Duck!
# 1955. Duct tape is very strong tape.
# 1956. Due process.
# 1957. Due to the severe winter weather, there are four provinces without power.
# 1958. Duh.
# 1959. Dumpster diving.
# 1960. During a sermon, people get their hands lapped, and their hands slapped.
# 1961. During New Year’s, where will you go?
# 1962. During the day, there are a lot of interruptions.
# 1963. During the next few days sometime.
# 1964. During this holiday period, please be especially cautious about fire and
theft.
# 1965. Dustless chalk doesn’t erase completely on these boards.
# 1966. Dying is easy.
# 1967. Each entry in this file will be separately documented, in Esperanto.
# 1968. Each main diagonal adds to fifteen.
# 1969. Each villager has a parcel of land to cultivate.
# 1970. Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.
# 1971. Easier said than done.
# 1972. East or west, north or south, to diet best, just shut your mouth.
# 1973. Easy come, easy go.
# 1974. Easy does it.
# 1975. Eat wisely, which means not too well.
# 1976. Eat your broccoli.
# 1977. Eat your heart out.
# 1978. Eating during class is forbidden.
# 1979. Eating that will give you gas.
# 1980. Echoes enter any empty enterprise.
# 1981. Editors come down from the hills after the battle to shoot the wounded.
# 1982. Education for the world’s children should be a priority, not a privilege.
# 1983. Education is a drawing-out, not a putting-in.
# 1984. Edwin Markham seems to support the idea of “moral victory”.
# 1985. Either you leave, or I’ll leave.
# 1986. Elaborate on that, if you would.
# 1987. Electrical Engineering is a key discipline for advancing technology.
# 1988. Employment agencies don’t find jobs for people, they find people for jobs.
# 1989. En garde!
# 1990. Enacting such a law would be a crime against humanity.
# 1991. Endless acrimony could be called the eternal flame.
# 1992. Engage with your ordinary troops, and win with your elite troops.
# 1993. Engineers should be kept away from people who can’t handle the truth.
# 1994. English as a Second Language is abbreviated ESL.
# 1995. English for Special Purposes is abbreviated ESP.
# 1996. English has been promoted to its level of incompetence.
# 1997. English is an example of trying to make an inefficient system a standard.
# 1998. English is cripplingly expensive and relatively unusable.
# 1999. English is like riding the bus, but Esperanto is like driving a Mercedes.
# 2000. English spelling is crazy.
# 2001. English spelling needs to be updated.
# 2002. English would actually be better off not being mangled by the masses.
# 2003. Enjoy the show.
# 2004. Enlighten me.
# 2005. Enough about Yiddish, already!
# 2006. Enough of this.
# 2007. Entropy means that the dying of the light is all the rage.
# 2008. Errors perpetuated by textbooks.
# 2009. Escalation of the conflict.
# 2010. ESL hacks reinforce currently-operative myths.
# 2011. ESL is the ideal dumping ground for casual workers.
# 2012. ESL lessons, with audio, are at www(dot)learnersdictionary(dot)com.
# 2013. ESL students are often referred to as “learners”.
# 2014. ESL students are to abstract the language logic from this lexis.
# 2015. ESL students should not use the grammar-checker.
# 2016. Esperantists will translate this file into their native languages.
# 2017. Esperanto – what a concept!
# 2018. Esperanto allows you to be evasive without being impolite.
# 2019. Esperanto can also be used as a tie-breaker.
# 2020. Esperanto can be a stepping stone to your real-life goals.
# 2021. Esperanto can be used as a metalanguage for English.
# 2022. Esperanto can serve as the proofreader’s Rosetta Stone.
# 2023. Esperanto cannot be said to have failed – it has never been given a chance.
# 2024. Esperanto does not need OLPC, but rather, it is OLPC that needs
Esperanto.
# 2025. Esperanto enables DIY tourism.
# 2026. Esperanto extends self-respect to everyone.
# 2027. Esperanto greatly enlarges the win-win subset of Game Theory.
# 2028. Esperanto has been bouncing around longer than basketball, if not as high.
# 2029. Esperanto has developed tremendously.
# 2030. Esperanto has never had its day in court.
# 2031. Esperanto helps in re-connecting with friends and family.
# 2032. Esperanto helps with the breaking down of unidirectional communications
structures.
# 2033. Esperanto helps you dodge a fast ball.
# 2034. Esperanto helps you feel everywhere at home.
# 2035. Esperanto helps young people meet other young people.
# 2036. Esperanto is a classic example of a growth stock.
# 2037. Esperanto is a great retort for controlling the chemistry.
# 2038. Esperanto is a lot of fun.
# 2039. Esperanto is a universal, permanent solution to the language barrier.
# 2040. Esperanto is an accurate barometer of the authenticity of an academic.
# 2041. Esperanto is an international auxiliary language created by L.L. Zamenhof.
# 2042. Esperanto is as much something to talk about as a way of talking.
# 2043. Esperanto is both revolutionary and sensible.
# 2044. Esperanto is just the refinement of cave-man-originated languages.
# 2045. Esperanto is more equal than other languages.
# 2046. Esperanto is near poets.
# 2047. Esperanto is not about changing census figures, but about mental training.
# 2048. Esperanto is on the horizon.
# 2049. Esperanto is something that runs in my family.
# 2050. Esperanto is still awaiting its sea trials.
# 2051. Esperanto is ten times easier than English.
# 2052. Esperanto is the best vehicle for learning about the world in a nuanced and
critical fashion.
# 2053. Esperanto is the cure for ethnic strife.
# 2054. Esperanto is the cure for monolingualism.
# 2055. Esperanto is the epitome of commonsense knowledge.
# 2056. Esperanto is the means for inter-relating the other languages.
# 2057. Esperanto is the Moby-Dick of languages.
# 2058. Esperanto is the most modern of the modern languages.
# 2059. Esperanto is the most popular part of popular culture.
# 2060. Esperanto is the Ogden Nash of languages.
# 2061. Esperanto is the only alternative most people have to remaining
monolingual.
# 2062. Esperanto is the only language for which educational goals can be met.
# 2063. Esperanto is the only reliable remedy against linguistic isolation.
# 2064. Esperanto is the stainless steel language.
# 2065. Esperanto is useful in clearing the way to useful languages.
# 2066. Esperanto is, like, made-to-order for networking.
# 2067. Esperanto keeps outliving its obituary-writers.
# 2068. Esperanto lubricates the engine of communication.
# 2069. Esperanto makes a great probe.
# 2070. Esperanto makes it easier to forge partnerships.
# 2071. Esperanto makes the ideal bridge language.
# 2072. Esperanto protects your privacy.
# 2073. Esperanto provides a speed-bump against intruders.
# 2074. Esperanto should be one of the languages that you know.
# 2075. Esperanto spreads by word of mouth, no pun intended.
# 2076. Esperanto was created by L.L. Zamenhof.
# 2077. Esperanto was the first achievement in the field of Artificial Intelligence.
# 2078. Esperanto will eventually prevail, because it is more self-replicating.
# 2079. Esperanto will make life easier for everybody.
# 2080. Esperanto, like it or not, made it to the happy shores of posterity.
# 2081. Esperanto: A Language You Can Learn.
# 2082. Esperanto: A tradition since 1887.
# 2083. Esperanto: use it now, improve it later.
# 2084. Esperanto’s star is rising.
# 2085. Eternal September is an illustration of the Law of the Universe.
# 2086. Ethnic languages are the embodiment of squalor.
# 2087. Ethnic strife.
# 2088. Euler was a mathematician of the first rank.
# 2089. Euler’s output was phenomenal.
# 2090. Even a blind hen hits a grain of corn now and then.
# 2091. Even a moron in a hurry could tell the difference.
# 2092. Even an educated native speaker of English might not know that.
# 2093. Even at this late date, they’re still making racket.
# 2094. Even breaching the topic is offensive.
# 2095. Even Euler knuckled under to currently-operative myth.
# 2096. Even Houdini couldn’t get out of this.
# 2097. Even native speakers of English sometimes use “effect” for “affect”.
# 2098. Even silt can be dangerous under the right circumstances.
# 2099. Even-handedly.
# 2100. Every big city has an Esperanto club.
# 2101. Every city ought to name a street after Zamenhof.
# 2102. Every column adds to fifteen.
# 2103. Every day lots of friends-and-relations came to the house.
# 2104. Every family should have one.
# 2105. Every little bit helps.
# 2106. Every little thing has to be just right for this trick to work.
# 2107. Every man and his brother.
# 2108. Every man for himself!
# 2109. Every man is a complete fool five minutes out of every day.
# 2110. Every man should be an Esperanto-speaking astro-physicist.
# 2111. Every man wishes he were Cary Grant, including Cary Grant.
# 2112. Every mother’s son.
# 2113. Every non-trivial system is either inconsistent or incomplete.
# 2114. Every row adds to fifteen.
# 2115. Every spare minute went into that project.
# 2116. Every ten-year-old knows that.
# 2117. Every year a fire breaks out.
# 2118. Everyone does it.
# 2119. Everyone does this.
# 2120. Everyone else is thinking the same thing.
# 2121. Everyone has died or moved away.
# 2122. Everyone is entitled to their opinion.
# 2123. Everyone knows that.
# 2124. Everyone knows what that means.
# 2125. Everyone knows what that’s about.
# 2126. Everyone please take your seat.
# 2127. Everyone who’s anyone has been there.
# 2128. Everyone’s favorite oxymoron to despise is “military intelligence”.
# 2129. Everyone’s gone for the holidays.
# 2130. Everyone’s hindsight is twenty-twenty.
# 2131. Everything came unraveled.
# 2132. Everything is hunky-dory.
# 2133. Everything is negotiable.
# 2134. Everything is ready.
# 2135. Everything is so expensive.
# 2136. Everything is up for grabs.
# 2137. Everything would be a lot easier if we would all learn Esperanto.
# 2138. Evidently not.
# 2139. Evidently.
# 2140. Exactly how many bytes is a kilobyte?
# 2141. Examine your conscience.
# 2142. Except where void, or prohibited by law.
# 2143. Excuse me a moment.
# 2144. Excuse me while I get out of your way.
# 2145. Excuse me.
# 2146. Excuse my French.
# 2147. Exit on the curb side only.
# 2148. Expensive food isn’t necessarily rich.
# 2149. Experiments are funded mostly for their potential propaganda value.
# 2150. Expertise is born of doing lookups.
# 2151. Expired files are automatically deleted.
# 2152. Extenuating circumstances.
# 2153. Eyes only.
# 2154. Fact or fiction?
# 2155. Fair and square.
# 2156. Fair to middlin’.
# 2157. Fairy tales let children know that dragons can be killed.
# 2158. Falling fast.
# 2159. False auto-alarms were going off.
# 2160. Familiarity with counter-intuitive results greatly sharpens one’s thinking.
# 2161. Fancy that!
# 2162. Farce is the highest form of humor.
# 2163. Farewell!
# 2164. Far-flung.
# 2165. Fashion and logic are often at odds.
# 2166. Fashionable clothes.
# 2167. Fast and easy.
# 2168. Fat and fifty.
# 2169. Fattening food.
# 2170. Fear not those who argue but those who dodge.
# 2171. Feature presentation.
# 2172. Fee, Fie, Foe, Fum!
# 2173. Feeling fine.
# 2174. Fencing.
# 2175. Ferocious mediocrity.
# 2176. Few people know about those tunnels.
# 2177. Few people saw it.
# 2178. Fibonacci was no feeble mockery of a mathematician.
# 2179. Fiddlesticks!
# 2180. Fill ’er up!
# 2181. Finally, a break in the traffic.
# 2182. Finally, I understand.
# 2183. Finally, we have sunshine!
# 2184. Finding time to do it is the problem.
# 2185. Fire at will!
# 2186. Fire!
# 2187. First aid.
# 2188. First and foremost.
# 2189. First I need to do some ironing.
# 2190. First one, then the other.
# 2191. First set out the placemats.
# 2192. First things first, as James Bond would say.
# 2193. First, let me start the cooking.
# 2194. First, let me thank all of you for coming here in such bad weather.
# 2195. First, let’s have everyone introduce themselves.
# 2196. First, let’s open the windows for some fresh air.
# 2197. First-hand knowledge.
# 2198. Fish or cut bait.
# 2199. Fit as a fiddle.
# 2200. Five hundred miles, or six months, whichever comes first.
# 2201. Flight of fancy.
# 2202. Fly by night.
# 2203. Folk etymology.
# 2204. Folly follows even more than a friendly dog.
# 2205. Fools are not fond of solitude.
# 2206. Fools fly from solitude.
# 2207. Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.
# 2208. Football is used as a metaphor for life.
# 2209. For a long time its existence was considered a state secret.
# 2210. For a long time.
# 2211. For all his thoroughness, he missed this one.
# 2212. For all I know these could be them.
# 2213. For all we know, he’s already there.
# 2214. For all you know, they could have put sand in it.
# 2215. For breakfast, I like shredded wheat.
# 2216. For dessert we had butterscotch pudding.
# 2217. For external use only.
# 2218. For future reference.
# 2219. For God and country.
# 2220. For here, or to go?
# 2221. For lunch, we had submarine sandwiches.
# 2222. For my money, it’s the best restaurant in town.
# 2223. For my money, the salad was the best part of that meal.
# 2224. For office use only.
# 2225. For once, I got it right.
# 2226. For once, your mother agrees with me.
# 2227. For reasons of state.
# 2228. For richer or poorer.
# 2229. For someone else.
# 2230. For supper, we’re having leftovers from lunch.
# 2231. For that, you need lots of money.
# 2232. For the birds.
# 2233. For the nonce.
# 2234. For the record.
# 2235. For the time being, let’s do without meat.
# 2236. For what it’s worth.
# 2237. For whom the bell tolls.
# 2238. For your homework, write a summary of this story.
# 2239. For your information.
# 2240. For your punishment, you have to study Esperanto for one hour.
# 2241. Forceful exhaling makes the baby laugh.
# 2242. Foreign soldiers destroyed that imperial park.
# 2243. Foreigners have driven up the price of antiques.
# 2244. Forget I said anything.
# 2245. Forget it.
# 2246. Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed.
# 2247. Forward march!
# 2248. Four minutes to go.
# 2249. Four squad cars were dispatched to the scene.
# 2250. Four students were absent.
# 2251. Fragile.
# 2252. Frankly, my dear, I prefer tofu to tenderloin.
# 2253. Free at last.
# 2254. Freedom of inquiry.
# 2255. Freedom of speech gets lost in translation outside of America.
# 2256. Free-lance work.
# 2257. Fried okra is great, but boiled okra is for the birds.
# 2258. Friend or foe?
# 2259. Friends come and go, but enemies are forever.
# 2260. Frivolous nonsense like that is very popular.
# 2261. From abyss to abyss.
# 2262. From dawn to dusk.
# 2263. From dust to dust.
# 2264. From Esperanto, this file will then be translated into other languages.
# 2265. From many, one.
# 2266. From Russia, with love.
# 2267. From sea to shining sea.
# 2268. From the throne to the gutter is but a single step.
# 2269. Front center stage.
# 2270. FUD stands for Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt.
# 2271. Full speed ahead!
# 2272. Functional specifications.
# 2273. Further study of the situation is just a farce.
# 2274. Future cooperation will be facilitated by using Esperanto.
# 2275. FYI stands for “for your information”.
# 2276. G.B. Shaw wanted to reform English orthography.
# 2277. Gag me with a spoon!
# 2278. Galileo Prison is a fictive construct, like Camp Green Lake.
# 2279. Galileo was neither the first, nor the last, to encounter inquiry-deniers.
# 2280. Gangrene is death of soft tissue due to loss of blood circulation.
# 2281. Garbage in, garbage out.
# 2282. Garbage in, gospel out.
# 2283. Gather ’round, folks!
# 2284. General Patton had the perfect plan of action, namely, “Do it now!”
# 2285. General Topology helps cultivate the capability for abstract thought.
# 2286. Genius without education is silver in the mine.
# 2287. George Platen found himself in the House for the Feeble-Minded.
# 2288. Germs don’t cause disease any more than flies cause garbage.
# 2289. Get ’em while they’re hot!
# 2290. Get a better grip on her!
# 2291. Get a firmer grip on it.
# 2292. Get a grip!
# 2293. Get a job!
# 2294. Get a life!
# 2295. Get a load of that.
# 2296. Get her out of here.
# 2297. Get involved.
# 2298. Get it in writing.
# 2299. Get it?
# 2300. Get off my back, will you?
# 2301. Get off my back.
# 2302. Get out of the way!
# 2303. Get over it.
# 2304. Get real!
# 2305. Get set for a feast.
# 2306. Get set for a long speech.
# 2307. Get set for a long wait.
# 2308. Get set for a long winter.
# 2309. Get set for some rough weather.
# 2310. Get some more money from the ATM while you are out.
# 2311. Get that out of her mouth.
# 2312. Get the baby dressed for the day.
# 2313. Get the bed ready for the baby.
# 2314. Get the lead out.
# 2315. Get the tea ready.
# 2316. Get the tub of water ready.
# 2317. Get the water ready.
# 2318. Get used to it.
# 2319. Get well soon.
# 2320. Get well.
# 2321. Get your act together!
# 2322. Get your hands off my things.
# 2323. Getting a haircut is always a pleasure.
# 2324. Getting slim and trim is easier said than done.
# 2325. Getting there is half the fun.
# 2326. Give Daddy a kiss.
# 2327. Give her a piece of bread.
# 2328. Give her an inch, and she takes a mile!
# 2329. Give her some attention.
# 2330. Give her some low-grade paper to scribble on.
# 2331. Give her some soup.
# 2332. Give her some water.
# 2333. Give her some.
# 2334. Give it a minute.
# 2335. Give it a rest.
# 2336. Give me a baby wipe.
# 2337. Give me a cotton ball.
# 2338. Give me a diaper.
# 2339. Give me a kleenex.
# 2340. Give me a wake up call at seven o’clock.
# 2341. Give me five minutes at my desk.
# 2342. Give me five!
# 2343. Give me her pajamas.
# 2344. Give me my water.
#2345. Give me some cotton wadding.
# 2346. Give me some money to give to her for carfare.
# 2347. Give me the earphones.
# 2348. Give me the red one.
# 2349. Give me the remote.
# 2350. Give me the trash basket.
# 2351. Give my regards to Broadway.
# 2352. Give the dog a bone to gnaw on.
# 2353. Give them back to me.
# 2354. Give them this note.
# 2355. Give until it hurts.
# 2356. Giving information on English – that’s the purpose of this project.
# 2357. Gluttony is the door through which all other vices enter.
# 2358. Go ahead and ask her.
# 2359. Go ahead and buy two more while you are there.
# 2360. Go ahead and cry.
# 2361. Go ahead and give her a call.
# 2362. Go ahead and start without me.
# 2363. Go ahead and tell – I don’t care.
# 2364. Go answer the door.
# 2365. Go away, you bother me.
# 2366. Go back to sleep.
# 2367. Go figure.
# 2368. Go for it.
# 2369. Go get me more.
# 2370. Go get some fresh air.
# 2371. Go home.
# 2372. Go in.
# 2373. Go on inside.
# 2374. Go on.
# 2375. Go right ahead.
# 2376. Go right on in.
# 2377. Go see what she’s doing.
# 2378. Go see your supervisor about that.
# 2379. Go stand over there.
# 2380. Go straight ahead and take a right at the next corner.
# 2381. Go stretch your arms and legs.
# 2382. Go tell her what-for.
# 2383. Go to bed.
# 2384. Go to the department office about that.
# 2385. Go to the other room.
# 2386. Go wash your hands.
# 2387. Go with the flow.
# 2388. Go with what you’ve got.
# 2389. Go, cat, go!
# 2390. Going there is better than staying here.
# 2391. Gone, but not forgotten.
# 2392. Good day.
# 2393. Good deeds are better than good talk.
# 2394. Good evening.
# 2395. Good food.
# 2396. Good for nothing.
# 2397. Good for you.
# 2398. Good grief!
# 2399. Good heavens!
# 2400. Good heavens, this is Grand Central Station!
# 2401. Good idea.
# 2402. Good intentions do not make up for lack of professionalism.
# 2403. Good Lord willing, and the creek don’t rise.
# 2404. Good luck!
# 2405. Good morning, Sunshine.
# 2406. Good morning.
# 2407. Good night, ladies.
# 2408. Good night.
# 2409. Good question.
# 2410. Good show!
# 2411. Good writing is the result of re-writing.
# 2412. Good, better, best.
# 2413. Goodbye.
# 2414. Google for “Scientific Reading”,“Taiyuan”.
# 2415. Gottcha!
# 2416. Govern yourself accordingly.
# 2417. Graduates in that major get a good starting salary.
# 2418. Grammar-checkers are still at a primitive level of development.
# 2419. Grand Central Station.
# 2420. Great pains.
# 2421. Greybeard, and thoughtless youth.
# 2422. Grin and bear it.
# 2423. Gripped by the need to exhort his fellow man.
# 2424. Gross.
# 2425. Gross-out.
# 2426. Guess how much it cost.
# 2427. Guess which hand.
# 2428. Guilty as charged.
# 2429. Guns or butter?
# 2430. Had he lived, Novalis would have created Esperanto.
# 2431. Half a loaf is better than none.
# 2432. Half and half?
# 2433. Half of it winds up on the floor.
# 2434. Hali Omani must be at least thirty.
# 2435. Halleluiah!
# 2436. Hamilton died in a duel.
# 2437. Hand me a tissue.
# 2438. Hand me one.
# 2439. Hand me the pliers.
# 2440. Hand me the remote.
# 2441. Hand-eye coordination.
# 2442. Handle with care.
# 2443. Hand-me-downs.
# 2444. Hand-to-hand combat.
# 2445. Hang in there.
# 2446. Hang it in there.
# 2447. Hang it on the doorknob.
# 2448. Hang your clothes here.
# 2449. Happiness is positive cash flow.
# 2450. Happy birthday!
# 2451. Happy holidays!
# 2452. Happy New Year!
# 2453. Happy or sad, she makes noise.
# 2454. Hard of hearing.
# 2455. Hard work and good management.
# 2456. Hard-boiled.
# 2457. Hardy har har.
# 2458. Harmony.
# 2459. Has everyone signed-in?
# 2460. Has he been broken-in?
# 2461. Has he gone senile?
# 2462. Has he gotten fatter?
# 2463. Has he regained his appetite?
# 2464. Has it been confirmed?
# 2465. Has it been translated into English?
# 2466. Has it been translated into Esperanto?
# 2467. Has it been vetted?
# 2468. Has it happened before?
# 2469. Has she had breakfast?
# 2470. Has that horse been broken-in?
# 2471. Has the baby dirtied its diaper?
# 2472. Has the baby eaten already?
# 2473. Has the turkey been dressed?
# 2474. Has to do with.
# 2475. Has your baby gotten well?
# 2476. Hasn’t she taken the exam yet?
# 2477. Haute cuisine.
# 2478. Have a good one.
# 2479. Have a good time.
# 2480. Have a good weekend.
# 2481. Have a nice day.
# 2482. Have a nice weekend.
# 2483. Have a safe trip.
# 2484. Have a seat!
# 2485. Have fun.
# 2486. Have I been here that long?
# 2487. Have I been remiss in my duty?
# 2488. Have I made my point?
# 2489. Have no fear.
# 2490. Have some cake.
# 2491. Have some more cake.
# 2492. Have the burned-out light bulbs replaced.
# 2493. Have the construction workers been paid?
# 2494. Have the printer toner cartridge refilled.
# 2495. Have they done an autopsy?
# 2496. Have they made a movie out of it?
# 2497. Have to do with.
# 2498. Have we been introduced?
# 2499. Have we ever had a surplus of people that think?
# 2500. Have we lost it?
# 2501. Have you been taking your medication on schedule?
# 2502. Have you been to the doctor about that?
# 2503. Have you been to the museum of Modern Art?
# 2504. Have you been to the New York Esperanto club?
# 2505. Have you changed your mind?
# 2506. Have you checked his credentials?
# 2507. Have you come to an understanding?
# 2508. Have you considered all your options?
# 2509. Have you considered the consequences?
# 2510. Have you counted your blessings?
# 2511. Have you deposited your paycheck?
# 2512. Have you done a controlled experiment on it?
# 2513. Have you done this before?
# 2514. Have you done your good deed for today?
# 2515. Have you done your homework?
# 2516. Have you eaten already?
# 2517. Have you filed your income tax return?
# 2518. Have you filed your insurance claim yet?
# 2519. Have you filled-out an application?
# 2520. Have you finished your master’s thesis?
# 2521. Have you finished your work for today?
# 2522. Have you forgotten your password?
# 2523. Have you got your satellite dish yet?
# 2524. Have you gotten used to the weather here?
# 2525. Have you had a chance to look at my essay?
# 2526. Have you had a chance to talk to her?
# 2527. Have you had a chance to try Peking duck?
# 2528. Have you had a chance to try their coffee?
# 2529. Have you had a change of heart?
# 2530. Have you had breakfast?
# 2531. Have you had enough to eat?
# 2532. Have you had your eyes checked?
# 2533. Have you had your medical exam?
# 2534. Have you heard about the brain-eating amoeba?
# 2535. Have you heard about the English teaching robot created by the Koreans?
# 2536. Have you heard the news?
# 2537. Have you heard the scuttlebutt?
# 2538. Have you heard Tom Lehrer’s song about pollution?
# 2539. Have you lost your mind?
# 2540. Have you made your New Year’s resolutions?
# 2541. Have you met your quota?
# 2542. Have you paid off your mortgage?
# 2543. Have you paid off your student loan?
# 2544. Have you paid your dues?
# 2545. Have you paid your Esperanto club dues?
# 2546. Have you passed your orals?
# 2547. Have you propitiated the gods?
# 2548. Have you put it on the shopping list?
# 2549. Have you put on a wash?
# 2550. Have you put on weight?
# 2551. Have you read The Art of War?
# 2552. Have you read the Bible?
# 2553. Have you seen my blog?
# 2554. Have you seen my keys?
# 2555. Have you seen the movie “My Fair Lady”?
# 2556. Have you seen the photo album?
# 2557. Have you seen the sights?
# 2558. Have you signed out of your email?
# 2559. Have you signed-in?
# 2560. Have you started yet?
# 2561. Have you studied Linear Point Set Theory?
# 2562. Have you updated your anti-virus software?
# 2563. Have you verified his credentials?
# 2564. Have you washed your face?
# 2565. Have your child sit in the rear of the shopping cart.
# 2566. Haven’t horses been replaced by cars?
# 2567. Haven’t you been paying attention at all?
# 2568. Haven’t you bought an umbrella yet?
# 2569. Haven’t you finished yet?
# 2570. Haven’t you had enough yet?
# 2571. Having money is not as good as not having money is bad.
# 2572. Having rice soup – is that enough?
# 2573. Having to use a squat-pot came as a rude surprise to me.
# 2574. Hawaii is in the Pacific Ocean.
# 2575. Hazardous waste is costly to process.
# 2576. He absent-mindedly put his hat on backwards.
# 2577. He actually has a good chance of being nominated.
# 2578. He almost checked out with that intestinal blockage.
# 2579. He also ate all the strawberries.
# 2580. He always has something to do.
# 2581. He always takes a long time to do it.
# 2582. He arrived in the nick of time.
# 2583. He arrived none too soon.
# 2584. He arrived safe at first.
# 2585. He ate my lunch.
# 2586. He attended a workshop on statistical inference.
# 2587. He backed out carefully.
# 2588. He beat me to the punch.
# 2589. He beat the system.
# 2590. He became an astro-physicist and took a position at a great research center.
# 2591. He became king.
# 2592. He began to doubt himself.
# 2593. He belched loudly in appreciation.
# 2594. He belongs to a lodge.
# 2595. He belongs to the ages.
# 2596. He bit the bullet.
# 2597. He bought a unit on the fifth floor.
# 2598. He bought an expensive spoon for the baby.
# 2599. He bought it.
# 2600. He bought the farm.
# 2601. He broke up with his girlfriend.
# 2602. He button-holed me.
# 2603. He called in sick.
# 2604. He came from deep in the woods.
# 2605. He came in a distant second.
# 2606. He came in last.
# 2607. He came in second.
# 2608. He came in third place.
# 2609. He came late and left early.
# 2610. He came to scoff, but stayed to pray.
# 2611. He can breathe easier now.
# 2612. He can dish it out, but he can’t take it.
# 2613. He can do the same for you.
# 2614. He can neither be duped nor bribed.
# 2615. He can walk on water.
# 2616. He can’t even buy what he wants, let alone buy her a house.
# 2617. He can’t hit the side of a barn.
# 2618. He can’t see the forest for the trees.
# 2619. He can’t seem to hold a job.
# 2620. He can’t take a hint.
# 2621. He championed unpopular things, like justice and brotherhood.
# 2622. He choked to death on a piece of meat.
# 2623. He collared me in the hallway.
# 2624. He comes to China twice a year.
# 2625. He conceded the race.
# 2626. He considers himself an astute observer of the human scene.
# 2627. He cornered the market.
# 2628. He could create enough ruckus to spoil the party.
# 2629. He cracked me up.
# 2630. He cut his hand while washing dishes.
# 2631. He cuts himself plenty of slack.
# 2632. He decided to go it alone.
# 2633. He delivered his concession speech.
# 2634. He demanded a recount.
# 2635. He deserved it.
# 2636. He did a double take over that.
# 2637. He did a drop-kick.
# 2638. He did his duty.
# 2639. He did it after the situation was SPLAINED to him.
# 2640. He did it under duress.
# 2641. He did it with insolent skill.
# 2642. He did not attempt to improve his mind.
# 2643. He did not keep our rendezvous.
# 2644. He did not let grass grow under his feet.
# 2645. He did the dirty on me.
# 2646. He did well by doing good.
# 2647. He did well for himself.
# 2648. He didn’t check it well enough beforehand.
# 2649. He didn’t do anything wrong.
# 2650. He didn’t fit into the culture here.
# 2651. He didn’t know if it was a temptation or the answer to a prayer.
# 2652. He didn’t sound coherent to me.
# 2653. He didn’t take any notice of it.
# 2654. He died at the age of twenty two.
# 2655. He died in a plane crash.
# 2656. He died in my arms.
# 2657. He died last month, after a long illness.
# 2658. He died of natural causes.
# 2659. He died right after saying, “Watch this, everybody!”.
# 2660. He died two years ago.
# 2661. He died unexpectedly.
# 2662. He died yesterday.
# 2663. He disappeared into the witness-protection program.
# 2664. He disappeared.
# 2665. He dissed me.
# 2666. He does an honest day’s work.
# 2667. He does things only halfway.
# 2668. He doesn’t care.
# 2669. He doesn’t deserve any sympathy.
# 2670. He doesn’t have any experience.
# 2671. He doesn’t have both oars in the water.
# 2672. He doesn’t have the courage to ever split an infinitive.
# 2673. He doesn’t hesitate to contravene convention for his convenience.
# 2674. He doesn’t realize what a precarious position he is in.
# 2675. He doesn’t seem to have a coherent plan.
# 2676. He doesn’t want to be bothered with all that sort of thing.
# 2677. He doesn’t want to do it.
# 2678. He doesn’t want to do the task.
# 2679. He doesn’t want to talk about it.
# 2680. He dresses like a villager.
# 2681. He drives a Mercedes.
# 2682. He dropped a brick.
# 2683. He dropped himself in the chair.
# 2684. He dropped it to the ground.
# 2685. He educated himself into heresy.
# 2686. He eked out a living hauling trash.
# 2687. He emptied his purse into his head.
# 2688. He enlisted in the navy.
# 2689. He entered a plea of no-contest.
# 2690. He failed to completely understand the book.
# 2691. He feels put-upon.
# 2692. He fell down the stairs.
# 2693. He fell for her.
# 2694. He fell into the sunken cost fallacy, no pun intended.
# 2695. He fell to his death, after losing his footing.
# 2696. He felt he had nothing to lose.
# 2697. He felt it was beneath his notice.
# 2698. He fired a warning shot.
# 2699. He flung it out the window.
# 2700. He forced my hand.
# 2701. He forgot he told me to stand over there.
# 2702. He fought them tooth and claw.
# 2703. He found himself.
# 2704. He found his niche.
# 2705. He gave it a lick and a promise.
# 2706. He gave me some flak about it.
# 2707. He gave me the ol’ fisheye.
# 2708. He gave them a song and dance, and they bought it.
# 2709. He gave up the struggle.
# 2710. He gets all the exercise he needs just pushing his luck.
# 2711. He gets angry easily.
# 2712. He gives me the creeps.
# 2713. He goes over the road.
# 2714. He gorged himself on strawberries.
# 2715. He gorged himself on sweets.
# 2716. He got his comeuppance.
# 2717. He got his hands slapped, that’s all.
# 2718. He got his knuckles rapped.
# 2719. He got his necktie caught in the shredder.
# 2720. He got very angry.
# 2721. He graduated from Dunbar Vocational High School.
# 2722. He grew old gracefully.
# 2723. He ground me in the dust like a wet french fry.
# 2724. He had a coherent philosophy.
# 2725. He had a sheltered upbringing.
# 2726. He had an ace up his sleeve.
# 2727. He had been seriously ill for some time.
# 2728. He had difficulty breathing.
# 2729. He had his chance.
# 2730. He had his picture taken with her.
# 2731. He had just come from the computer science department.
# 2732. He had next to nothing when he came to this country.
# 2733. He had one hand to his ear.
# 2734. He had quite a following.
# 2735. He had something important to attend to.
# 2736. He had to go to a job interview.
# 2737. He hadn’t been heard from for twenty years.
# 2738. He has a bachelor’s degree.
# 2739. He has a beer belly.
# 2740. He has a charley horse.
# 2741. He has a chip on his shoulder.
# 2742. He has a clean record.
# 2743. He has a copy of June Welch’s book on Texas courthouses.
# 2744. He has a cushy job.
# 2745. He has a dark complexion.
# 2746. He has a doctor’s degree in Chemistry.
# 2747. He has a doctorate in Chemistry.
# 2748. He has a hollow leg.
# 2749. He has a past.
# 2750. He has a police record.
# 2751. He has a screw loose.
# 2752. He has a sister who is a thespian.
# 2753. He has a soft job.
# 2754. He has a technical background.
# 2755. He has a torn ligament in his pinkie.
# 2756. He has a tough row to hoe.
# 2757. He has all the charisma of a damp dish rag.
# 2758. He has all the intelligence of a jellyfish.
# 2759. He has an attitude.
# 2760. He has an outside chance of being nominated.
# 2761. He has become mellow with age.
# 2762. He has both education and experience.
# 2763. He has completed his doctor’s degree.
# 2764. He has curly hair.
# 2765. He has detailed and comprehensive knowledge of the system.
# 2766. He has done serious wrong in the past.
# 2767. He has experience.
# 2768. He has first-hand knowledge of the matter.
# 2769. He has gone out.
# 2770. He has great stage presence.
# 2771. He has impeccable credentials.
# 2772. He has impressive credentials.
# 2773. He has issues.
# 2774. He has joined the great majority.
# 2775. He has no brain.
# 2776. He has no chance of being nominated.
# 2777. He has no visible means of support.
# 2778. He has not yet been given the key to his house.
# 2779. He has one foot in the grave.
# 2780. He has only a tourist visa.
# 2781. He has poor eyesight.
# 2782. He has private means.
# 2783. He has snow on the roof.
# 2784. He has the key to the foreign teachers’ office.
# 2785. He has the most seniority of the foreign teachers here.
# 2786. He has the perspective of a working mathematician.
# 2787. He has to think about it a long time.
# 2788. He has too much time on his hands.
# 2789. He hasn’t done a day’s work in his life.
# 2790. He hasn’t learned calculus, but he says he has nothing to do.
# 2791. He hasn’t missed anything.
# 2792. He held a series of odd jobs.
# 2793. He held a teaching position, but left a trail of trash.
# 2794. He hid in the restroom during fire drills.
# 2795. He hit a home run.
# 2796. He holds his cards close to his vest.
# 2797. He inherited just enough money to ruin him.
# 2798. He insulted me.
# 2799. He is a first year graduate student.
# 2800. He is a generous man.
# 2801. He is a loose cannon.
# 2802. He is a man of consummate ability.
# 2803. He is a northerner.
# 2804. He is a private security guard.
# 2805. He is a security guard at a hospital.
# 2806. He is a southerner.
# 2807. He is a tool and die operator.
# 2808. He is a tool of the Establishment.
# 2809. He is a Yankee.
# 2810. He is afraid of nothing.
# 2811. He is alive and well.
# 2812. He is an American.
# 2813. He is an evil man.
# 2814. He is drunk.
# 2815. He is from America.
# 2816. He is from the east.
# 2817. He is in a meeting right now.
# 2818. He is not an evil man, just a weak one.
# 2819. He is on his way.
# 2820. He is only a nominal president.
# 2821. He is open-handed.
# 2822. He is possessed of private means.
# 2823. He is preparing for his examination.
# 2824. He is safely dead.
# 2825. He is self-employed.
# 2826. He is sick.
# 2827. He is the brains behind it.
# 2828. He is the brains of the outfit.
# 2829. He is the one.
# 2830. He is the project manager.
# 2831. He is to be shot at dawn.
# 2832. He is under a denial-of-services attack.
# 2833. He is well-behaved.
# 2834. He is well-coordinated.
# 2835. He issued transit visas as fast as he could write.
# 2836. He joined the army.
# 2837. He joined the great majority.
# 2838. He jumped the gun.
# 2839. He just let it drop.
# 2840. He keeps getting fired.
# 2841. He kicked the bucket.
# 2842. He killed himself.
# 2843. He knew you would like that.
# 2844. He knows he’s not supposed to, but he just doesn’t care.
# 2845. He learned Esperanto while in prison.
# 2846. He left an hour ago.
# 2847. He legitimized Esperanto as an intellectual movement.
# 2848. He let it down to the ground.
# 2849. He likes to live in the present tense.
# 2850. He likes to live in the present, tense.
# 2851. He lives the luxurious expat lifestyle.
# 2852. He looked up briefly from his book.
# 2853. He looks spiffy.
# 2854. He lost his job due to downsizing.
# 2855. He lost his place.
# 2856. He lost his shirt playing poker.
# 2857. He lost his voice.
# 2858. He lost the race.
# 2859. He made a name for himself.
# 2860. He made funny faces at the baby.
# 2861. He made hay out of it.
# 2862. He made me an offer I couldn’t refuse.
# 2863. He made no bones about it.
# 2864. He made political hay out of it.
# 2865. He made the grade.
# 2866. He married the boss’s daughter.
# 2867. He married the girl next door.
# 2868. He means well.
# 2869. He meant it figuratively, of course.
# 2870. He missed by a mile.
# 2871. He must be at least forty years old.
# 2872. He must be dead.
# 2873. He needs a keeper.
# 2874. He never amounted to anything.
# 2875. He never behaved like that at home.
# 2876. He never did that at home.
# 2877. He never did things like that at home.
# 2878. He never made anything of himself.
# 2879. He never talks about it.
# 2880. He obviously doesn’t have a clue.
# 2881. He obviously doesn’t have the clout to do that.
# 2882. He obviously took great pains about it.
# 2883. He paid dearly for it.
# 2884. He paid for his mistakes.
# 2885. He paid for it.
# 2886. He paid his debt to society.
# 2887. He painted himself into a corner.
# 2888. He parked the car with insolent skill.
# 2889. He passed the bar a year ago.
# 2890. He picked up samples for the clinical lab throughout the city.
# 2891. He pioneered the field.
# 2892. He played it safe.
# 2893. He played the piano.
# 2894. He plead insanity.
# 2895. He promised he would.
# 2896. He provided oversight for the project.
# 2897. He put his foot in his mouth.
# 2898. He put together a computer for me from components.
# 2899. He put up quite a struggle.
# 2900. He raised his eyes to heaven in supplication before answering.
# 2901. He ran as fast as lightning.
# 2902. He refused to attend.
# 2903. He refuses to play ball with us.
# 2904. He resigned in protest.
# 2905. He rode off into the sunset.
# 2906. He rolled over on his stomach and peered over the foot of his bed.
# 2907. He rubs me the wrong way.
# 2908. He said he wouldn’t have done it if he hadn’t been drunk.
# 2909. He said it in a stage whisper.
# 2910. He said it not so much in anger as in exasperation.
# 2911. He said not a word, but went straight to his work.
# 2912. He said they said the internet should be working OK now.
# 2913. He seems to have had a change of heart.
# 2914. He seems to think we’re to bend the rules for him.
# 2915. He served as a lookout while the others ate.
# 2916. He set his traps and went away for a few days.
# 2917. He set off on a long journey.
# 2918. He set the alarm off.
# 2919. He shoots first, and asks questions later.
# 2920. He shot himself in the foot.
# 2921. He should be defrocked.
# 2922. He showed up late to the party.
# 2923. He silently slipped away.
# 2924. He simply let it drop.
# 2925. He skidded into a wall.
# 2926. He slid in safe at home.
# 2927. He slinked through the store, with his lighted cigarette cupped in his hand.
# 2928. He snatched victory from the jaws of defeat.
# 2929. He speaks English with an Irish brogue.
# 2930. He speaks only broken English.
# 2931. He speaks radio English.
# 2932. He spun around.
# 2933. He started his own company.
# 2934. He started in the mailroom, and wound up company president.
# 2935. He started it.
# 2936. He stayed the course.
# 2937. He stood me up.
# 2938. He struck it rich.
# 2939. He succumbed to cancer.
# 2940. He sustained a head injury.
# 2941. He takes the bus home, and has soup for supper.
# 2942. He takes the presence of an ashtray as an invitation to smoke.
# 2943. He talks the talk, but does he walk the walk?
# 2944. He taught me how to do that.
# 2945. He tends to the building.
# 2946. He thinks of himself as a hunter, but others think of him as a Bambi-killer.
# 2947. He thinks we’re on a first-name basis.
# 2948. He thought I bought a camera.
# 2949. He threw down the gauntlet.
# 2950. He threw himself upon the mercy of the court.
# 2951. He threw me a curve ball.
# 2952. He tied one on last night.
# 2953. He told on me.
# 2954. He took a shot at me.
# 2955. He took great pains to get it right.
# 2956. He took her to wife.
# 2957. He took the money and ran.
# 2958. He took the path of least resistance.
# 2959. He traveled incognito.
# 2960. He travels fastest who travels alone.
# 2961. He tried to go it alone.
# 2962. He tried to swallow it whole.
# 2963. He turned it every which way but loose.
# 2964. He turned the wrong way down a one-way street.
# 2965. He used his position as department head to feather his nest.
# 2966. He visited them last summer.
# 2967. He volunteered.
# 2968. He walked into a glass door.
# 2969. He wanted to be cool.
# 2970. He wanted to borrow a screwdriver.
# 2971. He wanted to get in some trigger-time.
# 2972. He wants a boat so badly he can taste it.
# 2973. He wants to go visit a colleague here in town.
# 2974. He wants to listen to this song.
# 2975. He was a child prodigy.
# 2976. He was a door-to-door salesman.
# 2977. He was a fool to do that.
# 2978. He was a Fulbright scholar.
# 2979. He was a gag-writer for Jack Benny.
# 2980. He was a legend in his own time.
# 2981. He was a marked man.
# 2982. He was a nervous wreck by the time he got there.
# 2983. He was a no-show.
# 2984. He was a pioneer.
# 2985. He was a presidential speech-writer.
# 2986. He was a prisoner of war.
# 2987. He was a runaway.
# 2988. He was abducted.
# 2989. He was absent without leave.
# 2990. He was accused of treason.
# 2991. He was always borrowing things from me.
# 2992. He was an outsider.
# 2993. He was assassinated.
# 2994. He was bad news.
# 2995. He was badly cut and bruised.
# 2996. He was bullied at school.
# 2997. He was buried at sea.
# 2998. He was caught as if in a bear trap.
# 2999. He was caught red-handed.
# 3000. He was charged with disturbing the peace.
# 3001. He was charged with manslaughter.
# 3002. He was convicted of murder in the first degree.
# 3003. He was convicted of two counts of burglary.
# 3004. He was cremated.
# 3005. He was dead on arrival.
# 3006. He was decapitated by the helicopter propeller.
# 3007. He was denounced by his former partner.
# 3008. He was dismissed for cause.
# 3009. He was disqualified for jumping the gun.
# 3010. He was disrespecting me.
# 3011. He was doubled-up in pain.
# 3012. He was dressed to the nines.
# 3013. He was drunk last night.
# 3014. He was expelled from school.
# 3015. He was falsely accused.
# 3016. He was fined for littering.
# 3017. He was from Arkansas.
# 3018. He was given up for dead.
# 3019. He was goofing off during class.
# 3020. He was great, but he never won an Oscar.
# 3021. He was impeached, but not convicted.
# 3022. He was just another homicidal maniac.
# 3023. He was keeping time with the music.
# 3024. He was kidnapped.
# 3025. He was killed by friendly fire.
# 3026. He was killed in action.
# 3027. He was left holding the bag.
# 3028. He was made a partner of the firm.
# 3029. He was made manager, despite critics.
# 3030. He was marooned on a desert island.
# 3031. He was missing in action.
# 3032. He was never heard from again.
# 3033. He was not prepared for what he encountered there.
# 3034. He was on a binge.
# 3035. He was out cold.
# 3036. He was out of his depth.
# 3037. He was playing dead.
# 3038. He was presumed dead.
# 3039. He was sandbagging.
# 3040. He was sent to Galileo Prison.
# 3041. He was sent up the river.
# 3042. He was Sherlock Holmes’s only friend.
# 3043. He was shot in the leg.
# 3044. He was sleeping at his desk.
# 3045. He was smuggling bicycles!
# 3046. He was speaking through clenched teeth.
# 3047. He was standing in the motor boat when it passed under a low bridge.
# 3048. He was stricken last month, and died last week.
# 3049. He was taken prisoner.
# 3050. He was tarred and feathered.
# 3051. He was the fall guy.
# 3052. He was the richest man in California.
# 3053. He was the scapegoat.
# 3054. He was trying to make me some kind of offer.
# 3055. He was wanted dead or alive.
# 3056. He was wearing brass knuckles.
# 3057. He wasn’t ready for that broadside.
# 3058. He wasn’t such a bad guy after all.
# 3059. He wasn’t watching where he was going.
# 3060. He went away.
# 3061. He went AWOL.
# 3062. He went crazy.
# 3063. He went door-to-door selling brushes.
# 3064. He went home.
# 3065. He went it alone.
# 3066. He went on foot to a neighboring village.
# 3067. He went stateside.
# 3068. He went to bed.
# 3069. He went to Europe.
# 3070. He went to France.
# 3071. He went to heaven.
# 3072. He went to jail.
# 3073. He went to Mississippi.
# 3074. He went to prison.
# 3075. He went to sleep in his easy chair.
# 3076. He went to sleep.
# 3077. He went to the beach.
# 3078. He went to the East Indies.
# 3079. He went to The Hague.
# 3080. He went to the hospital.
# 3081. He went to the meeting.
# 3082. He went to the Mississippi River.
# 3083. He went to the museum.
# 3084. He went to the Netherlands.
# 3085. He went to the office.
# 3086. He went to the park.
# 3087. He went to the prison to visit his brother.
# 3088. He went to the restaurant.
# 3089. He went to the store.
# 3090. He went to the White House.
# 3091. He went to the zoo.
# 3092. He went to Vegas in a car, and came back on a bus.
# 3093. He went to work.
# 3094. He who controls the electromagnetic spectrum controls the universe.
# 3095. He who has the best iron will have the gold.
# 3096. He who has the gold makes the rules.
# 3097. He who keeps a software pirate on the payroll is also a software pirate.
# 3098. He who laughs last didn’t get the joke in the first place.
# 3099. He who never visits your house does not want you in his.
# 3100. He who pays the piper calls the tune.
# 3101. He who seeks the good of others has already assured his own.
# 3102. He will be executed in the morning.
# 3103. He will look after my interests in my absence.
# 3104. He will turn twenty one next week.
# 3105. He will use the money to buy some Esperanto books for the library.
# 3106. He won the race.
# 3107. He won’t listen to reason.
# 3108. He won’t make that mistake again.
# 3109. He won’t stand for that.
# 3110. He worked as a dispatcher for eleven years.
# 3111. He worked eleven years hourly before being put on salary.
# 3112. He works as a handyman at an apartment complex.
# 3113. He would be late to his own funeral.
# 3114. He would cut off his nose to spite his face.
# 3115. He would sympathize with me.
# 3116. He would use the Dead Sea Scrolls for kindling.
# 3117. He wouldn’t turn loose of it for love nor money.
# 3118. He wound up in the Pacific Northwest.
# 3119. He’ll be his old self again soon.
# 3120. He’ll be right here.
# 3121. He’ll come back later with the right one.
# 3122. He’ll gladly retract it, of course, after the damage is done.
# 3123. He’ll make a two-month project out of it.
# 3124. He’ll pull through, I’m sure.
# 3125. He’ll try to wow you with science.
# 3126. He’s a bee-keeper.
# 3127. He’s a blue-collar worker.
# 3128. He’s a bore.
# 3129. He’s a bull in a china shop.
# 3130. He’s a bully.
# 3131. He’s a bum.
# 3132. He’s a city slicker.
# 3133. He’s a college professor.
# 3134. He’s a cut-up.
# 3135. He’s a deserving fellow.
# 3136. He’s a diamond in the rough.
# 3137. He’s a drifter.
# 3138. He’s a dunce.
# 3139. He’s a fiend for fries.
# 3140. He’s a fourth-degree black belt.
# 3141. He’s a friend of the family.
# 3142. He’s a good example of a bad example.
# 3143. He’s a good man, but his speech is holding him back.
# 3144. He’s a graduate of the grab-and-pull school of engineering.
# 3145. He’s a graduate of the school of hard knocks.
# 3146. He’s a high priest of the scientific establishment.
# 3147. He’s a high-school dropout.
# 3148. He’s a job hopper.
# 3149. He’s a loser.
# 3150. He’s a mooch.
# 3151. He’s a parasite.
# 3152. He’s a pest.
# 3153. He’s a pre-med student.
# 3154. He’s a real pro.
# 3155. He’s a rocket scientist.
# 3156. He’s a schlemiel.
# 3157. He’s a self-made man.
# 3158. He’s a smart aleck.
# 3159. He’s a sore loser.
# 3160. He’s a space cadet.
# 3161. He’s a technician at a recording studio.
# 3162. He’s a Titan in his field.
# 3163. He’s a true believer.
# 3164. He’s a worrywart.
# 3165. He’s adept at that.
# 3166. He’s afraid of his own shadow.
# 3167. He’s after me.
# 3168. He’s aged well.
# 3169. He’s all grown up.
# 3170. He’s always borrowing things from me.
# 3171. He’s always shooting from the lip.
# 3172. He’s an adept of Esperanto.
# 3173. He’s an angel, or soon will be.
# 3174. He’s an idiot.
# 3175. He’s an ignorant ninny.
# 3176. He’s an insider.
# 3177. He’s an old acquaintance.
# 3178. He’s an out-patient.
# 3179. He’s an outsider.
# 3180. He’s as common as dirt.
# 3181. He’s as proud as a peacock.
# 3182. He’s at Hausdorff University, majoring in mathematics.
# 3183. He’s at sea.
# 3184. He’s back.
# 3185. He’s behind the eight-ball.
# 3186. He’s bogus.
# 3187. He’s brain-dead.
# 3188. He’s brainless.
# 3189. He’s circling the drain.
# 3190. He’s crazy about her.
# 3191. He’s crazy.
# 3192. He’s disruptive in class.
# 3193. He’s doing good just to know what day of the week it is.
# 3194. He’s error-prone.
# 3195. He’s feeling sorry for himself.
# 3196. He’s fighting for his life.
# 3197. He’s fighting temptation.
# 3198. He’s from the deep south.
# 3199. He’s from the far north.
# 3200. He’s going to be expelled from class if he doesn’t shape up and fly right.
# 3201. He’s gone native.
# 3202. He’s gone to the colors.
# 3203. He’s good for nothing.
# 3204. He’s got a tiger by the tail.
# 3205. He’s got it made.
# 3206. He’s hard of hearing.
# 3207. He’s having a meeting with the support staff.
# 3208. He’s his own worst enemy.
# 3209. He’s in bad shape.
# 3210. He’s in charge of the key to the foreign teachers’ office.
# 3211. He’s in charge.
# 3212. He’s in college, majoring in mathematics.
# 3213. He’s in the market for a jacuzzi.
# 3214. He’s in the woods.
# 3215. He’s innocent.
# 3216. He’s into bee-keeping.
# 3217. He’s into model trains.
# 3218. He’s just a bum.
# 3219. He’s just an employee, but he acts like a partner.
# 3220. He’s just coasting in his career.
# 3221. He’s just doing his job.
# 3222. He’s just goofing off.
# 3223. He’s just shooting blanks.
# 3224. He’s killing me with kindness.
# 3225. He’s light on his feet.
# 3226. He’s loaded for bear.
# 3227. He’s looking out for number one.
# 3228. He’s making a list and checking it twice.
# 3229. He’s making good money.
# 3230. He’s mellow, I think.
# 3231. He’s more slippery than a greased pig.
# 3232. He’s my only friend.
# 3233. He’s never been to prison, and he doesn’t wear socks with sandals.
# 3234. He’s no brain surgeon.
# 3235. He’s no friend of mine.
# 3236. He’s not a player.
# 3237. He’s not a systems person.
# 3238. He’s not the sharpest tool in the shed.
# 3239. He’s not to be trifled with.
# 3240. He’s not to be trusted.
# 3241. He’s old enough that he has to clarify what war he was in.
# 3242. He’s on his own.
# 3243. He’s on sabbatical.
# 3244. He’s on the take.
# 3245. He’s one of the lords of the realm.
# 3246. He’s only interested in amusing himself.
# 3247. He’s out of commission.
# 3248. He’s out sick.
# 3249. He’s out-of-pocket.
# 3250. He’s out-of-touch.
# 3251. He’s playing mind games.
# 3252. He’s putting you on.
# 3253. He’s setting the world on fire.
# 3254. He’s slower than molasses in January.
# 3255. He’s so naïve, he believes the college catalogs!
# 3256. He’s sore about losing.
# 3257. He’s speaking figuratively, of course.
# 3258. He’s still learning his beat.
# 3259. He’s such a tree-hugger!
# 3260. He’s the brains behind it.
# 3261. He’s the head of the company.
# 3262. He’s the motor of the local Esperanto club.
# 3263. He’s the one in charge of the day-to-day operations of the company.
# 3264. He’s the real McCoy.
# 3265. He’s trying to beat the system.
# 3266. He’s trying to corner the market.
# 3267. He’s trying to figure out a way of having his cake and eating it too.
# 3268. He’s trying to get out of doing the task.
# 3269. He’s undoubtedly forgiven himself for that by now.
# 3270. He’s well-connected.
# 3271. He’s with God now.
# 3272. He’s your son.
# 3273. Heads or tails?
# 3274. Heads up!
# 3275. Heaven can wait.
# 3276. Heaven doesn’t pay dividends.
# 3277. Heaven forbid!
# 3278. Heaven on Earth.
# 3279. Hello, David.
# 3280. Hello, young lady.
# 3281. Hello.
# 3282. Help me keep an eye on the time.
# 3283. Help me look for it.
# 3284. Help me make the bed.
# 3285. Help me out of this.
# 3286. Help me put up the side of the crib.
# 3287. Help me shove the mattress in that direction.
# 3288. Help yourself to more.
# 3289. Help yourself to the hot water.
# 3290. Help yourself to the strawberries.
# 3291. Help yourself.
# 3292. Her boyfriend broke up with her.
# 3293. Her cell phone is powered off.
# 3294. Her daddy will baby-sit her while I go shopping.
# 3295. Her elbow was in my back.
# 3296. Her eyelashes are very long.
# 3297. Her face is much better this morning.
# 3298. Her fingernails need clipping.
# 3299. Her first choice is to eat at my mother’s house.
# 3300. Her grandmother is German.
# 3301. Her health is not bad.
# 3302. Her husband doesn’t get a pension either.
# 3303. Her husband is home for the holidays.
# 3304. Her job was to meet and greet the callers.
# 3305. Her jump suit is on the coffee table.
# 3306. Her mother died yesterday.
# 3307. Her mother-in-law is very ill.
# 3308. Her name is Julia.
# 3309. Her nose and chin are like yours.
# 3310. Her nose looks better today.
# 3311. Her pants need for the cuffs to be rolled up.
# 3312. Her shoes are on her too tight.
# 3313. Her teeth look dark, or stained, to me.
# 3314. Herbert Hoover was once the chief engineer in China.
# 3315. Here and there.
# 3316. Here comes the bride, all dressed in white.
# 3317. Here comes trouble.
# 3318. Here goes nothing.
# 3319. Here is a copy of our confidential price list.
# 3320. Here is my business card.
# 3321. Here is my homework.
# 3322. Here is my passport.
# 3323. Here is the menu.
# 3324. Here it is, warts and all.
# 3325. Here she comes with the jar of jelly.
# 3326. Here she comes.
# 3327. Here we are together again.
# 3328. Here we go again.
# 3329. Here’s looking at you, kid.
# 3330. Here’s something for her to gnaw on.
# 3331. Here’s TEN dollars.
# 3332. Here’s where we part company.
# 3333. Here’s your coat – what’s your hurry?
# 3334. Here’s your coat.
# 3335. Here’s your water.
# 3336. Herein we give not “standard” English, but “actual” English.
# 3337. Heresy is what truth is called when it is first revealed.
# 3338. Herman Wouk had a caustic comment about “moral victory”.
# 3339. Hey, compact fluorescent lights are the way to go!
# 3340. Hey, Esperanto is the way to go!
# 3341. Hidden costs.
# 3342. Hide-and-seek.
# 3343. High risk is associated with a high rate of return.
# 3344. Him getting fired came as a surprise.
# 3345. His academic record reveals that he never took a course in Esperanto.
# 3346. His aim was true.
# 3347. His appeal was denied.
# 3348. His bark is worse than his bite.
# 3349. His birthday is on the twenty third of this month.
# 3350. His car broke down.
# 3351. His check bounced.
# 3352. His degree is in Chemistry.
# 3353. His entire strength was behind the blow.
# 3354. His face fell.
# 3355. His father deleted his expletive.
# 3356. His getting fired came as a surprise.
# 3357. His girlfriend broke up with him.
# 3358. His hair is curly.
# 3359. His hand twitched.
# 3360. His hand-picked successor.
# 3361. His heart wasn’t in it.
# 3362. His house is still being built.
# 3363. His house is still under construction.
# 3364. His inventiveness is legendary.
# 3365. His love letter to her contained some plagiarized poetry.
# 3366. His mother was a mail-order bride, believe it or not.
# 3367. His name is Stephen.
# 3368. His only claim to fame was that Rosie M. Banks once served him lunch.
# 3369. His pay was a paltry sum.
# 3370. His personal effects were given to his mother.
# 3371. His police record is a long as your arm.
# 3372. His pride was hurt.
# 3373. His remains were cremated.
# 3374. His resource-utilization scheme leaves something to be desired.
# 3375. His ship came in.
# 3376. His speech is what’s holding him back.
# 3377. His strength isn’t what it used to be.
# 3378. His testimony is regarded as factual.
# 3379. His toes were curled-under in his shoes.
# 3380. His word is his bond.
# 3381. Historic opportunities have often been missed.
# 3382. History classes support currently-operative myths.
# 3383. History ended in 1936 – after that, there was only propaganda.
# 3384. History is gossip that ages well.
# 3385. History is just gossip that ages well.
# 3386. History proves that proofs can be ignored.
# 3387. Hit or miss.
# 3388. Hither, tither, and yon.
# 3389. Hold it steady.
# 3390. Hold it until I ask for it.
# 3391. Hold it.
# 3392. Hold on there!
# 3393. Hold on to what you’ve got.
# 3394. Hold still!
# 3395. Hold that end steady.
# 3396. Hold the onions.
# 3397. Hold your fire!
# 3398. Holidays are for children.
# 3399. Home, sweet home.
# 3400. Home-made is usually better than store-bought.
# 3401. Home-schooling was championed by John Holt.
# 3402. Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.
# 3403. Honk if the twins fall out.
# 3404. Hook, line, and sinker.
# 3405. Hopefully it will happen in a couple of weeks.
# 3406. Houston, we have a problem.
# 3407. How ’bout THEM apples?
# 3408. How about emptying the lint trap?
# 3409. How about some tea?
# 3410. How about that?
# 3411. How am I supposed to compete with that?
# 3412. How are we doing on time?
# 3413. How are we doing?
# 3414. How are we going to get out of this?
# 3415. How are you doing?
# 3416. How are your DIY skills?
# 3417. How can we do without that?
# 3418. How can you let him do that?
# 3419. How can you say that?
# 3420. How can you work for justice without learning Esperanto?
# 3421. How charming.
# 3422. How chic!
# 3423. How come you never finished college?
# 3424. How convenient that he speaks English.
# 3425. How corny!
# 3426. How could you forget a thing like that?
# 3427. How dare you.
# 3428. How did I do?
# 3429. How did that happen?
# 3430. How did the burglars gain access to the building?
# 3431. How did you do on the test?
# 3432. How did you escape?
# 3433. How did you justify that?
# 3434. How did you two meet?
# 3435. How did your job interview go?
# 3436. How do I do that?
# 3437. How do I get into these situations?
# 3438. How do I get there?
# 3439. How do things like that happen?
# 3440. How do those working conditions sound to you?
# 3441. How do you deal with that?
# 3442. How do you do that?
# 3443. How do you do?
# 3444. How do you explain that?
# 3445. How do you justify that?
# 3446. How do you know?
# 3447. How do you like it?
# 3448. How do you like my new coat?
# 3449. How do you like your coffee?
# 3450. How do you pronounce this?
# 3451. How do you say “Hello” in Esperanto?
# 3452. How do you say that in Chinese?
# 3453. How do you say that in English?
# 3454. How do you say that in Esperanto?
# 3455. How do you say that in French?
# 3456. How do you say that in German?
# 3457. How do you say that in Russian?
# 3458. How do you say that in Spanish?
# 3459. How do you spell it?
# 3460. How do you think I got my computer so cheaply?
# 3461. How far above sea-level is it?
# 3462. How far can a dog run into the woods?
# 3463. How far?
# 3464. How gauche.
# 3465. How good is your algebra?
# 3466. How important is this to you?
# 3467. How inconsiderate of me.
# 3468. How is his Chinese?
# 3469. How is his English?
# 3470. How is his Esperanto?
# 3471. How is his French?
# 3472. How is his German?
# 3473. How is his Japanese?
# 3474. How is his Russian?
# 3475. How is his Spanish?
# 3476. How is that supposed to help me?
# 3477. How is your Chinese?
# 3478. How is your English?
# 3479. How is your Esperanto?
# 3480. How is your French?
# 3481. How is your German?
# 3482. How is your health?
# 3483. How is your Japanese?
# 3484. How is your Russian?
# 3485. How is your Spanish?
# 3486. How long ago did that happen?
# 3487. How long do you think that will last?
# 3488. How long have you been here and you don’t know that?
# 3489. How long have you been in this country?
# 3490. How long have you had this pain?
# 3491. How long is the commute?
# 3492. How long will it be in effect?
# 3493. How long will it take?
# 3494. How long will we stay here?
# 3495. How long will we stop here?
# 3496. How lovey-dovey!
# 3497. How many Bambi-killers does it take to change a light bulb?
# 3498. How many children did she bear?
# 3499. How many children in the world have to sit in unheated classrooms?
# 3500. How many chin-ups can you do?
# 3501. How many ESL hacks does it take to change a light bulb?
# 3502. How many expatriates, do you think, are there in this city?
# 3503. How many hours did it take?
# 3504. How many hours should we bill them for this?
# 3505. How many light bulbs does it take to change the world?
# 3506. How many people work in your office?
# 3507. How many people, on their deathbed, will wish they had learned
Esperanto?
# 3508. How many people, on their deathbed, will wish they had worked longer?
# 3509. How many questions are you going to ask me?
# 3510. How many synonyms for “fat” can you think of?
# 3511. How many times have I told you that?
# 3512. How many Unix utilities do you know?
# 3513. How many wizards does it take to change a light bulb?
# 3514. How medieval!
# 3515. How much did it cost?
# 3516. How much do I owe?
# 3517. How much does all that weigh against so much as the idle sigh of a true
poet?
# 3518. How much does this cost?
# 3519. How much does this mean to you?
# 3520. How much expertise do you have in Unix?
# 3521. How much in outstanding checks do you owe?
# 3522. How much is two plus two?
# 3523. How much is two to the tenth power?
# 3524. How much is your allowance?
# 3525. How much longer do we have to wait?
# 3526. How much money did you lend her?
# 3527. How much money do we have?
# 3528. How much money do you have?
# 3529. How much money is in the account?
# 3530. How much was in it to start with?
# 3531. How much was the taxi fare?
# 3532. How now brown cow?
# 3533. How old are you?
# 3534. How old is she?
# 3535. How sad.
# 3536. How soon they forget!
# 3537. How was I supposed to tell the difference?
# 3538. How was your weekend?
# 3539. How we doin’?
# 3540. How well acquainted are you with the mythology of the West?
# 3541. How well does he express himself?
# 3542. How would anyone be able to do that?
# 3543. How would you know – you’re never here.
# 3544. How would you know?
# 3545. How would you like it?
# 3546. How?
# 3547. How’s my Chinese?
# 3548. How’s my English?
# 3549. How’s your circulation?
# 3550. Howdy Doodie!
# 3551. Howdy!
# 3552. However, the notation of Leibniz was greatly superior to that of Newton.
# 3553. Human beings have no business drinking that stuff.
# 3554. Human interests grow in constantly specialized directions.
# 3555. Humans are unique among the animals in that they can share their
thoughts.
# 3556. Humans differ from animals in not being afraid of the vacuum cleaner.
# 3557. Humor based on self-deprecation.
# 3558. Hundreds of people drowned in the Chicago River in 1915.
# 3559. Hurry back.
# 3560. Hush!
# 3561. Hydrogen is only an energy-transfer medium.
# 3562. Hyper-correctness fails to recognize linguistic evolution.
# 3563. Hyper-correctness is often purveyed by English teachers.
# 3564. Hyper-correctness is symptomatic of dodging deeper issues.
# 3565. I accidentally took someone else’s umbrella.
# 3566. I admit you’re right.
# 3567. I agree.
# 3568. I almost stepped on her.
# 3569. I already have a full plate.
# 3570. I already know that.
# 3571. I also bought strawberries.
# 3572. I also stopped at the bakery on my way back.
# 3573. I also want it to look nice.
# 3574. I always get a lump in my throat when I tell that story.
# 3575. I always have something to do.
# 3576. I am a civil engineer.
# 3577. I am a little bit sick.
# 3578. I am a prison guard.
# 3579. I am a student.
# 3580. I am a tourist.
# 3581. I am an American.
# 3582. I am at your command.
# 3583. I am expecting a package.
# 3584. I am given to understand Lagrange first published a proof of Wilson’s
Theorem.
# 3585. I am going to a friend’s house.
# 3586. I am her husband.
# 3587. I am here.
# 3588. I am his wife.
# 3589. I am married to a foreigner.
# 3590. I am not feeling very well.
# 3591. I am now preparing for my graduate school entrance exam.
# 3592. I am reading a book.
# 3593. I am the cat who walks alone, and all places are alike to me.
# 3594. I am the one.
# 3595. I am tired.
# 3596. I am to write an essay about the next ten years of my life.
# 3597. I am working at a computer company.
# 3598. I am worried that the word “museum” might put people off.
# 3599. I answer in Esperanto when I want to repel an intruder.
# 3600. I apologize.
# 3601. I appreciate the thought.
# 3602. I appreciate your concern, but I can manage just fine.
# 3603. I asked her point-blank if she received it.
# 3604. I attend yoga class once a week.
# 3605. I beat him to the punch.
# 3606. I beg your pardon.
# 3607. I believe in you.
# 3608. I believe that the law prohibits air traffic controllers from going on strike.
# 3609. I believe you.
# 3610. I best be going.
# 3611. I bet his idea of fun is something like watching paint dry.
# 3612. I bet if she fell out, you wouldn’t even notice it.
# 3613. I bet they punt.
# 3614. I bet they’re pretty rotten.
# 3615. I better run this past him.
# 3616. I borrowed this book from the library.
# 3617. I bought a chicken recipe book.
# 3618. I bought another one of these.
# 3619. I bought myself a new coat.
# 3620. I bought myself another sweater today.
# 3621. I bought some chicken.
# 3622. I bought some kiwi fruit because I know you like it.
# 3623. I bought ten days worth of rice.
# 3624. I bought the pants a little long, so they’ll be just right next year.
# 3625. I bought them today.
# 3626. I bought this for eating on the train.
# 3627. I bought this for you.
# 3628. I bought two.
# 3629. I bought you a sheepskin coat for the winter.
# 3630. I bought you two outfits.
# 3631. I brake for military convoys.
# 3632. I brought a book along: Black Beauty.
# 3633. I brought you along too quickly.
# 3634. I brushed him off.
# 3635. I burn the midnight oil after nine p.m.
# 3636. I call my system of digraphs “Doubleknit”.
# 3637. I campaigned for him.
# 3638. I can barely keep my eyes open.
# 3639. I can believe it.
# 3640. I can breathe easier now.
# 3641. I can buy that at a place very close by.
# 3642. I can come back later if you’re busy right now.
# 3643. I can do that much.
# 3644. I can explain.
# 3645. I can hear it out the window.
# 3646. I can hear you perfectly well back here.
# 3647. I can help you over here.
# 3648. I can never find the clean bath towel when it comes time to change the
towel.
# 3649. I can never tell that story without my voice cracking.
# 3650. I can process about five hundred items per hour.
# 3651. I can run circles around you.
# 3652. I can shift for myself.
# 3653. I can sometimes say the harsh thing, and I said it now: “Oh.”
# 3654. I can take penicillin.
# 3655. I can’t agree with you there.
# 3656. I can’t believe a charisma man is talking to me about social skills.
# 3657. I can’t blame you.
# 3658. I can’t come to the phone right now.
# 3659. I can’t do the laundry until the water comes back on.
# 3660. I can’t eat spicy food.
# 3661. I can’t fathom why he did that.
# 3662. I can’t find any movie on TV right now.
# 3663. I can’t find it in the dictionary.
# 3664. I can’t find my jewelry.
# 3665. I can’t find my keys.
# 3666. I can’t find my suitcase.
# 3667. I can’t find the receipt.
# 3668. I can’t find the remote for the air conditioner.
# 3669. I can’t find the remote for the TV.
# 3670. I can’t hear you.
# 3671. I can’t help it.
# 3672. I can’t make heads or tails out of it.
# 3673. I can’t make out the details.
# 3674. I can’t permit that.
# 3675. I can’t pick it up by myself.
# 3676. I can’t place his face.
# 3677. I can’t pronounce that word correctly, even with intense coaching.
# 3678. I can’t read what you have written.
# 3679. I can’t recall his name.
# 3680. I can’t remember his name.
# 3681. I can’t remember what I was doing.
# 3682. I can’t remember where I put it.
# 3683. I can’t remember your name.
# 3684. I can’t see.
# 3685. I can’t take a breath without pain.
# 3686. I can’t take it anymore.
# 3687. I can’t walk down the street without being accosted.
# 3688. I can’t watch.
# 3689. I can’t win for losing.
# 3690. I cannot convict a man on such slim evidence as that.
# 3691. I cannot decide immediately.
# 3692. I care.
# 3693. I caught the bus going the wrong way just to get out of the cold.
# 3694. I changed my mind.
# 3695. I chipped a tooth on that bit of gravel or whatever it was.
# 3696. I chipped a tooth on that.
# 3697. I chose ten additional pictures for the album.
# 3698. I chose that one, but now I wish I had chosen the other one.
# 3699. I closed the window not because of the rain, but because of the thunder.
# 3700. I consider it to be a sacred trust.
# 3701. I continually make corrections as I see the need for them.
# 3702. I could care less.
# 3703. I could do as well myself.
# 3704. I could get used to this.
# 3705. I could have sworn I heard his voice.
# 3706. I could have used a reminder on that.
# 3707. I could not understand what they were saying.
# 3708. I could refer to the corresponding place in the Esperanto version.
# 3709. I could use another pair of shoes.
# 3710. I could use one of those.
# 3711. I could write like that too, if I had a mind to.
# 3712. I couldn’t agree more.
# 3713. I couldn’t answer the door just then, as I was in the altogether.
# 3714. I couldn’t breathe.
# 3715. I couldn’t care less.
# 3716. I couldn’t guess what it was she was doing.
# 3717. I couldn’t hear what you said.
# 3718. I couldn’t help it.
# 3719. I couldn’t help laughing.
# 3720. I couldn’t help staring.
# 3721. I couldn’t keep from laughing.
# 3722. I couldn’t remember if I had turned off the gas or not.
# 3723. I couldn’t say.
# 3724. I couldn’t wait for the recess bell to ring.
# 3725. I crammed all night for the exam.
# 3726. I cut him off.
# 3727. I deeply regret it.
# 3728. I demand a re-count.
# 3729. I demand a refund.
# 3730. I deny all charges.
# 3731. I deny any wrongdoing.
# 3732. I deny it.
# 3733. I did a save on it.
# 3734. I did it to have peace of mind.
# 3735. I did my best to avoid it.
# 3736. I did not clearly understand what was at stake.
# 3737. I did not go home, so I did not have a chance to freshen up.
# 3738. I didn’t answer.
# 3739. I didn’t ask you what she said.
# 3740. I didn’t ask.
# 3741. I didn’t come here for that.
# 3742. I didn’t expect you back so early.
# 3743. I didn’t expect you here so early.
# 3744. I didn’t go anywhere – I just stayed home and puttered around the house.
# 3745. I didn’t have anything to do with it.
# 3746. I didn’t have breakfast this morning.
# 3747. I didn’t have time to look.
# 3748. I didn’t hear you the first time.
# 3749. I didn’t hear you.
# 3750. I didn’t know I was supposed to schedule another session.
# 3751. I didn’t know I would be arguing about house payments.
# 3752. I didn’t know I would have this problem.
# 3753. I didn’t know if it was deliberate or by accident.
# 3754. I didn’t know it was raining so much.
# 3755. I didn’t know that.
# 3756. I didn’t know what she was doing.
# 3757. I didn’t know what to make of it.
# 3758. I didn’t know you cared.
# 3759. I didn’t lose any sleep over it.
# 3760. I didn’t mean anything by it.
# 3761. I didn’t mean for you to do that.
# 3762. I didn’t mean it.
# 3763. I didn’t mean that one.
# 3764. I didn’t mean to offend you.
# 3765. I didn’t need that.
# 3766. I didn’t quite understand.
# 3767. I didn’t realize I was making so much noise.
# 3768. I didn’t sleep a wink last night.
# 3769. I didn’t start it.
# 3770. I didn’t turn it on for me – I turned it on for her.
# 3771. I didn’t want to get involved.
# 3772. I didn’t want to say anything that might set him off.
# 3773. I didn’t want to take any chances.
# 3774. I died laughing.
# 3775. I direct your attention to this proverb.
# 3776. I discuss my plans only in Esperanto.
# 3777. I dislike being tyrannized by petty economies.
# 3778. I do not indulge in speculation.
# 3779. I do not suffer fools.
# 3780. I do.
# 3781. I don’t agree with ANY of this.
# 3782. I don’t always understand what you mean.
# 3783. I don’t always understand your meaning.
# 3784. I don’t answer for others, only myself.
# 3785. I don’t approve.
# 3786. I don’t ask much of you.
# 3787. I don’t attach much importance to it.
# 3788. I don’t believe anyone except you.
# 3789. I don’t buy from stores that have legs.
# 3790. I don’t care for any right now.
# 3791. I don’t care for any.
# 3792. I don’t care if they do.
# 3793. I don’t care if you do.
# 3794. I don’t care what happens.
# 3795. I don’t care what you think about it.
# 3796. I don’t care where we go for lunch.
# 3797. I don’t care who knows it.
# 3798. I don’t care.
# 3799. I don’t detect any odor.
# 3800. I don’t discuss my plans with anyone, except my wife.
# 3801. I don’t do windows.
# 3802. I don’t feel that that falls within the purview of my responsibilities.
# 3803. I don’t feel well.
# 3804. I don’t follow trends – I set them.
# 3805. I don’t get it.
# 3806. I don’t get the joke.
# 3807. I don’t give a hoot.
# 3808. I don’t give my phone number out to students.
# 3809. I don’t give my secrets away.
# 3810. I don’t go out at night.
# 3811. I don’t go to anything I don’t have to.
# 3812. I don’t have enough money.
# 3813. I don’t have experience, but I’m a fast learner.
# 3814. I don’t have experience, but I’m a quick study.
# 3815. I don’t have to ask, because I know.
# 3816. I don’t have to give a reason.
# 3817. I don’t know about that.
# 3818. I don’t know about you, but I intend to stay the course.
# 3819. I don’t know about you, but I want to go to the zoo.
# 3820. I don’t know about you, but I want to have tea.
# 3821. I don’t know about you, but I’m busy.
# 3822. I don’t know about you, but I’m hungry.
# 3823. I don’t know about you, but I’m ready to throw in the towel.
# 3824. I don’t know about you, but I’m sick and tired of this.
# 3825. I don’t know about you, but I’m sleepy.
# 3826. I don’t know about you, but I’m very happy.
# 3827. I don’t know anyone by that name.
# 3828. I don’t know anything about that.
# 3829. I don’t know exactly what she has planned for lunch.
# 3830. I don’t know for sure.
# 3831. I don’t know him from Adam.
# 3832. I don’t know how many apples are left.
# 3833. I don’t know how she did it, but she did.
# 3834. I don’t know how to say it in English.
# 3835. I don’t know how you will like it.
# 3836. I don’t know if it was an accident.
# 3837. I don’t know if our soldiers scare the enemy, but they sure scare me.
# 3838. I don’t know if she can be bought off so easily.
# 3839. I don’t know if that dish was ordered.
# 3840. I don’t know if that’s a bug or a feature.
# 3841. I don’t know if that’s just a phobia, or a genuine concern.
# 3842. I don’t know what ails him.
# 3843. I don’t know what happened to the other toy.
# 3844. I don’t know what I did with my keys.
# 3845. I don’t know what I want to do.
# 3846. I don’t know what it’s doing, but the blinking lights sure are pretty.
# 3847. I don’t know what kind of life I would have there.
# 3848. I don’t know what may be bothering him.
# 3849. I don’t know what to make of it.
# 3850. I don’t know what you mean.
# 3851. I don’t know where the expression comes from, but I know what it means.
# 3852. I don’t know where they’re hiding.
# 3853. I don’t know which is which.
# 3854. I don’t know who you think you’re talking to.
# 3855. I don’t know why he’s in such a bad mood.
# 3856. I don’t know why I have to be rushed in my own house.
# 3857. I don’t know why of late I’m so hungry.
# 3858. I don’t know why.
# 3859. I don’t know.
# 3860. I don’t leave home without my American Express card.
# 3861. I don’t let her do that.
# 3862. I don’t let her put her hands on dirty things outside.
# 3863. I don’t like being here.
# 3864. I don’t like for you to joke about our relationship.
# 3865. I don’t like it either.
# 3866. I don’t like it, but I have to do it.
# 3867. I don’t like this.
# 3868. I don’t like to have to repeat myself.
# 3869. I don’t mean to pry.
# 3870. I don’t need an echo.
# 3871. I don’t need for you to tell me that.
# 3872. I don’t need prompting from you.
# 3873. I don’t need to be informed about the state of the world by someone whose
diaper I’ve changed.
# 3874. I don’t need to hear about other people from you.
# 3875. I don’t need to shake your hand.
# 3876. I don’t need you to tell me that.
# 3877. I don’t need your help.
# 3878. I don’t quite understand.
# 3879. I don’t regard you as an authority.
# 3880. I don’t remember if I did.
# 3881. I don’t remember.
# 3882. I don’t see any problem with it.
# 3883. I don’t see why not.
# 3884. I don’t shop there anymore.
# 3885. I don’t speak English very well.
# 3886. I don’t think he’s all there.
# 3887. I don’t think he’s playing with a full deck.
# 3888. I don’t think I like you.
# 3889. I don’t think I was overcharged.
# 3890. I don’t think I would be interested in that.
# 3891. I don’t think it was an accident.
# 3892. I don’t think she’s interested.
# 3893. I don’t think so.
# 3894. I don’t think that that relationship will last.
# 3895. I don’t think that water will hurt it any.
# 3896. I don’t think that will be a problem.
# 3897. I don’t think you have anything to worry about in that regard.
# 3898. I don’t think you have this in America.
# 3899. I don’t understand the words, but I like the melody.
# 3900. I don’t understand this charge on my bill.
# 3901. I don’t understand.
# 3902. I don’t want a cup of tea right now, but maybe later.
# 3903. I don’t want any visitors.
# 3904. I don’t want it broken.
# 3905. I don’t want it.
# 3906. I don’t want that next to my name in the Book of Life.
# 3907. I don’t want the rest of this.
# 3908. I don’t want to add to your problems.
# 3909. I don’t want to be always moving.
# 3910. I don’t want to be forgotten.
# 3911. I don’t want to be impacted because of your carelessness.
# 3912. I don’t want to be interviewed.
# 3913. I don’t want to be shortchanged.
# 3914. I don’t want to bother you.
# 3915. I don’t want to change brands.
# 3916. I don’t want to do that anymore.
# 3917. I don’t want to encourage such behavior.
# 3918. I don’t want to get involved.
# 3919. I don’t want to go down in the Book of Life as having opposed Esperanto.
# 3920. I don’t want to hear about it.
# 3921. I don’t want to hear any complaints.
# 3922. I don’t want to hear any more complaints.
# 3923. I don’t want to hear any WHINING about it.
# 3924. I don’t want to mess with it any longer.
# 3925. I don’t want to receive any invitations in the first place.
# 3926. I don’t want to reward bad behavior.
# 3927. I don’t want to say anything that might set him off.
# 3928. I don’t want to shortchange you.
# 3929. I don’t want to touch it.
# 3930. I don’t want to walk around with this in my hand.
# 3931. I don’t want you to make a special trip just for me.
# 3932. I don’t want you to trouble yourself.
# 3933. I dread going into the hospital for surgery.
# 3934. I endeavor to give satisfaction.
# 3935. I enjoyed it very much.
# 3936. I entertain nosey questions only in Esperanto.
# 3937. I exceeded that figure long ago.
# 3938. I expect so.
# 3939. I fear you won’t be able to find a job.
# 3940. I feel better already.
# 3941. I feel better now.
# 3942. I feel better, already!
# 3943. I feel disappointed.
# 3944. I feel dizzy.
# 3945. I feel entitled to a little consideration.
# 3946. I feel faint.
# 3947. I feel I got my money’s worth.
# 3948. I feel like crying.
# 3949. I feel like I’m in the way.
# 3950. I feel like I’m old.
# 3951. I feel like we’re on a wild goose chase.
# 3952. I feel much better now.
# 3953. I feel nauseous.
# 3954. I feel taken for granted.
# 3955. I feel that my pay isn’t much.
# 3956. I feel you’re trying to appease me.
# 3957. I feel your pain.
# 3958. I fell flat on my face.
# 3959. I felt embarrassed by that.
# 3960. I felt like we were on a wild goose chase.
# 3961. I felt slighted.
# 3962. I figured it out by myself.
# 3963. I finally found a job.
# 3964. I finally saw the light.
# 3965. I finished reading the book yesterday.
# 3966. I finished with what I was doing.
# 3967. I first heard of home schooling through the work of John Holt.
# 3968. I first learned of that from the Oxford Dictionary of Geography.
# 3969. I first read the Afanti stories in Esperanto translation.
# 3970. I flat forgot.
# 3971. I followed his advice.
# 3972. I followed proper procedures.
# 3973. I forgive you.
# 3974. I forgot about it.
# 3975. I forgot about the clothes in the washer.
# 3976. I forgot it in my dorm room.
# 3977. I forgot my password.
# 3978. I forgot my umbrella in the classroom.
# 3979. I forgot to add salt.
# 3980. I forgot to add the salt.
# 3981. I forgot to answer my nephew.
# 3982. I forgot to bring it with me.
# 3983. I forgot to bring the bank passbook along with me.
# 3984. I forgot to buy a bottle of water before class.
# 3985. I forgot to close it.
# 3986. I forgot to close my bag.
# 3987. I forgot to give her carfare.
# 3988. I forgot to pack Julia’s bowl.
# 3989. I forgot to take the bank passbook with me.
# 3990. I forgot to tell you.
# 3991. I forgot where I put it.
# 3992. I forgot why I called you.
# 3993. I forgot why I came in here.
# 3994. I forgot.
# 3995. I found a place for it.
# 3996. I found him reading the newspaper.
# 3997. I found it!
# 3998. I found out later she had simply bought it.
# 3999. I found the flaw in the proof.
# 4000. I gave him his chance.
# 4001. I gave him the brush off.
# 4002. I gave in when they made that threat.
# 4003. I gave it away.
# 4004. I gave the baby the price stickers to play with.
# 4005. I get a travel allowance.
# 4006. I get all the exercise I want by dodging bicycles.
# 4007. I get it.
# 4008. I get no privacy around here.
# 4009. I get no respect around here.
# 4010. I get the joke.
# 4011. I get your drift.
# 4012. I get your meaning.
# 4013. I give you my word on that.
# 4014. I give you my word.
# 4015. I go back to work tomorrow.
# 4016. I go to the bathroom as soon as I get home.
# 4017. I got a jolt when I touched that live wire.
# 4018. I got a raw deal.
# 4019. I got all the shuteye I wanted, so I’m getting up.
# 4020. I got cold.
# 4021. I got engrossed with what I was doing on the computer.
# 4022. I got engrossed with what was on the computer.
# 4023. I got home around midnight.
# 4024. I got married so I would NOT have to date anymore.
# 4025. I got mud all over my shoes.
# 4026. I got my knuckles rapped.
# 4027. I got so engrossed on the computer, I forgot what was on the stove.
# 4028. I got soaked.
# 4029. I got splashed on my way here.
# 4030. I got the idea.
# 4031. I got the short end of the stick.
# 4032. I got things ready earlier.
# 4033. I graduated from Dunbar Vocational High School.
# 4034. I grew up speaking Chinese.
# 4035. I grew up speaking English.
# 4036. I grew up speaking French.
# 4037. I grew up speaking German.
# 4038. I grew up speaking Russian.
# 4039. I grew up speaking Spanish.
# 4040. I groped my way in the dark.
# 4041. I guess he wasn’t such a bad guy after all.
# 4042. I guess he’ll be here sometime soon.
# 4043. I guess he’ll be here sometime yet.
# 4044. I guess I felt like it.
# 4045. I guess I’ll finish off the corn.
# 4046. I guess I’ll have to make a believer out of you.
# 4047. I guess I’m done.
# 4048. I guess it’s no use.
# 4049. I guess she’ll do it when she’s good and ready.
# 4050. I guess so.
# 4051. I guess that’s all for now.
# 4052. I guess you know about the Suzuki method.
# 4053. I guess.
# 4054. I had a bad dream.
# 4055. I had a chance to sleep.
# 4056. I had a cramp in my jaw.
# 4057. I had a cramp in my leg last night.
# 4058. I had a cramp in my leg.
# 4059. I had a feeling that there was a problem.
# 4060. I had a fitfull sleep.
# 4061. I had a happy childhood.
# 4062. I had a meeting with him yesterday.
# 4063. I had a miserable night.
# 4064. I had a muscle spasm.
# 4065. I had a nightmare.
# 4066. I had an accident in the kitchen.
# 4067. I had an egg-salad sandwich.
# 4068. I had better adopt a defensive stance.
# 4069. I had better make a pit stop before leaving.
# 4070. I had better not.
# 4071. I had forgotten about that other pair of gloves of mine.
# 4072. I had insufficient funds in my account.
# 4073. I had no hint that there was a problem.
# 4074. I had no idea I would have to use a squat-pot.
# 4075. I had no idea what she was trying to do.
# 4076. I had no idea you would do that.
# 4077. I had nothing to do with that.
# 4078. I had the blue plate special.
# 4079. I had the same experience.
# 4080. I had to declare personal bankruptcy.
# 4081. I had to endure the pain.
# 4082. I had to go by another route.
# 4083. I had to laugh.
# 4084. I had to pay a fine for returning the book late.
# 4085. I had to pay a late fee.
# 4086. I hadn’t had a chance to sleep.
# 4087. I hadn’t really thought about it.
# 4088. I hate being late.
# 4089. I hate being splashed by cars on a rainy day.
# 4090. I hate hominy, and I don’t think I’m alone.
# 4091. I hate intolerant people.
# 4092. I hate it when you start in like that.
# 4093. I hate tailgaters.
# 4094. I hate to be so hard on a fellow Chicagoan.
# 4095. I hate to have to be the one to tell you this.
# 4096. I hate to have to tell you this.
# 4097. I hate to leave, but I must.
# 4098. I hate to see you go.
# 4099. I have a blister on my toe.
# 4100. I have a blog.
# 4101. I have a boyfriend now.
# 4102. I have a cold.
# 4103. I have a complete audit trail.
# 4104. I have a cramp in my leg.
# 4105. I have a flat tire.
# 4106. I have a friend who knows computers very well.
# 4107. I have a good idea.
# 4108. I have a good joke to tell you.
# 4109. I have a hole in my sock.
# 4110. I have a letter for you.
# 4111. I have a life – what I need is a dream.
# 4112. I have a modern wife, who doesn’t hesitate to override my decisions.
# 4113. I have a notion to give them a piece of my mind.
# 4114. I have a package for you.
# 4115. I have a rock in my shoe.
# 4116. I have a runny nose.
# 4117. I have a sore on the inside of my cheek.
# 4118. I have a sore throat.
# 4119. I have a splitting headache.
# 4120. I have a thirty-minute walk in the cold morning air ahead of me.
# 4121. I have a toothache.
# 4122. I have adjusted your schedule.
# 4123. I have an accountant to take care of my taxes.
# 4124. I have an Esperanto magazine subscription.
# 4125. I have an Individual Retirement Account.
# 4126. I have another class, so I’ll be going now.
# 4127. I have become better acquainted, as you say, with the ways of the world.
# 4128. I have been remiss in my duty.
# 4129. I have been waiting for you for an hour.
# 4130. I have both education and experience.
# 4131. I have class tomorrow morning.
# 4132. I have experience.
# 4133. I have good news and bad news.
# 4134. I have heartburn.
# 4135. I have impaired vision in my left eye.
# 4136. I have it on good authority.
# 4137. I have it written down somewhere.
# 4138. I have just come from the bakery, where I bought some bread.
# 4139. I have just quit my job, so I have some loose ends to tie up with the
company.
# 4140. I have lived in this town since birth.
# 4141. I have lost my passport.
# 4142. I have lost my walking stick.
# 4143. I have miles to go before I sleep.
# 4144. I have my methods.
# 4145. I have my reasons.
# 4146. I have no choice.
# 4147. I have no desire to attend the party.
# 4148. I have no fear on that account.
# 4149. I have no heat in my apartment.
# 4150. I have no idea what they’re doing.
# 4151. I have no idea what to do.
# 4152. I have no idea.
# 4153. I have no more time for that.
# 4154. I have no strong preference as to what we do.
# 4155. I have no sympathy for you.
# 4156. I have no water, but I have a large bottle of fruit juice to drink.
# 4157. I have one niece and three nephews.
# 4158. I have only a cursory interest in it.
# 4159. I have only one good piece of chalk.
# 4160. I have other fish to fry.
# 4161. I have promises to keep.
# 4162. I have reservations about his intentions.
# 4163. I have some college, but not a college degree.
# 4164. I have some out-of-town visitors arriving tomorrow.
# 4165. I have something else I need to do.
# 4166. I have something for you.
# 4167. I have something lined up.
# 4168. I have the flu.
# 4169. I have the most seniority of the foreign teachers here.
# 4170. I have their purchasing agent on the phone.
# 4171. I have time to do this?
# 4172. I have to answer the call of Nature.
# 4173. I have to ask my wife.
# 4174. I have to assume you know your job.
# 4175. I have to attend a departmental meeting at four thirty.
# 4176. I have to attend a meeting.
# 4177. I have to cross two busy streets each way.
# 4178. I have to deal with him.
# 4179. I have to do as you say.
# 4180. I have to do it for myself?
# 4181. I have to do it myself?
# 4182. I have to do this?
# 4183. I have to find a deeply-buried bug in the Order Entry system by next
Tuesday.
# 4184. I have to get ready for class.
# 4185. I have to go now.
# 4186. I have to go shopping for a gift for my mother.
# 4187. I have to go to a job interview.
# 4188. I have to go to the bathroom.
# 4189. I have to go to the head.
# 4190. I have to go to work later.
# 4191. I have to go with her.
# 4192. I have to have a little talk with her.
# 4193. I have to laugh.
# 4194. I have to look it up.
# 4195. I have to make a phone call.
# 4196. I have to make my rounds now.
# 4197. I have to miss class next time.
# 4198. I have to pay eighty dollars a month for storage of my things.
# 4199. I have to prepare for class now.
# 4200. I have to put my mouth in English-mode to get this pronunciation right.
# 4201. I have to run out and buy more food, because we have run out of food.
# 4202. I have to shut it off every time.
# 4203. I have to talk to my husband about this.
# 4204. I have two more things I have to do.
# 4205. I have two pieces of luggage.
# 4206. I have wanted a car for a long time, but I can’t afford one.
# 4207. I have work to do.
# 4208. I have your interests at heart.
# 4209. I haven’t been home in a year.
# 4210. I haven’t decided yet.
# 4211. I haven’t eaten in two days.
# 4212. I haven’t finished, but I’ve made good headway.
# 4213. I haven’t got a clue.
# 4214. I haven’t granted you an interview.
# 4215. I haven’t had a bowel movement in two days.
# 4216. I haven’t had a chance to sleep.
# 4217. I haven’t had time to check my email.
# 4218. I haven’t heard from him in ages.
# 4219. I haven’t heard from Jarmila in a long time.
# 4220. I haven’t lost my mind – I know exactly where I put it.
# 4221. I haven’t really thought about it.
# 4222. I haven’t signed-in yet.
# 4223. I haven’t washed my face in a long time.
# 4224. I hear a different drummer.
# 4225. I hear the window rattling.
# 4226. I hear you.
# 4227. I heard it through the grapevine.
# 4228. I heard that!
# 4229. I heard the bell.
# 4230. I helped a little old lady cross the street.
# 4231. I hid it from her because she’s always wanting to play with it.
# 4232. I hid the tea in the money drawer.
# 4233. I hold my cards close to my vest.
# 4234. I hope I can live up to that.
# 4235. I hope it’s not serious.
# 4236. I hope that’s the end of it.
# 4237. I hope the toner holds out.
# 4238. I hope this won’t take too long.
# 4239. I hope to be able to return the favor.
# 4240. I hope to grow old gracefully.
# 4241. I hope you can recognize a joke when you hear it.
# 4242. I hope you don’t think I agree with you.
# 4243. I hope you enjoyed your stay.
# 4244. I hope you finish today.
# 4245. I hope you’re going to clean that up.
# 4246. I hope you’re not going to try to pull that on me.
# 4247. I hope you’re not relying on ignorance for security.
# 4248. I hope you’re not speaking from experience.
# 4249. I hope your hat is not the heaviest burden for your head.
# 4250. I hope your mother doesn’t find out about this.
# 4251. I hurt my back shoveling snow.
# 4252. I insist.
# 4253. I intend to confront him about that.
# 4254. I intend to later provide extensive searchability of this file.
# 4255. I ironed it this afternoon.
# 4256. I just began.
# 4257. I just don’t get it.
# 4258. I just finished.
# 4259. I just have to ride it out.
# 4260. I just now changed her pants.
# 4261. I just threw that in to make it difficult.
# 4262. I just wanted to be sure we had that on the table.
# 4263. I just wanted to see if you would notice.
# 4264. I just wanted you to know.
# 4265. I keep a flashlight in the glove compartment of my car.
# 4266. I keep forgetting to clip my toenails.
# 4267. I keep the candy bars in the refrigerator.
# 4268. I keep thinking of things to add.
# 4269. I kept a copy of the letter for my records.
# 4270. I killed one of the mosquitoes.
# 4271. I kneel only to tend my garden.
# 4272. I knew he would get out of it somehow.
# 4273. I knew I should have separated those two.
# 4274. I knew she wanted something.
# 4275. I knew you would be back.
# 4276. I know a few words of Spanish and French.
# 4277. I know a little.
# 4278. I know all you do about it, and then some.
# 4279. I know Complex Variables – what more do you want?
# 4280. I know English better than you do.
# 4281. I know how it works.
# 4282. I know how to say “please” and “thank you”.
# 4283. I know I have no choice.
# 4284. I know I have to do as you say.
# 4285. I know I sound hoarse.
# 4286. I know I’m going to take some flak for this.
# 4287. I know it sounds corny.
# 4288. I know it was an easy question.
# 4289. I know it’s expensive, but we have no choice.
# 4290. I know it’s just a big joke.
# 4291. I know it’s tricky.
# 4292. I know next to nothing about infinitesimals.
# 4293. I know nothing.
# 4294. I know now what to do.
# 4295. I know of a store that caters to foreigners.
# 4296. I know that was a mean trick to pull on you.
# 4297. I know they can’t come.
# 4298. I know this is simple, but don’t forget about Columbus’s egg.
# 4299. I know what she wants to do.
# 4300. I know what you mean.
# 4301. I know what you want to do.
# 4302. I know what you’re up to.
# 4303. I know where he’s coming from.
# 4304. I know where the bodies are buried.
# 4305. I know where you buried the bodies.
# 4306. I know you disapprove of my mess jacket.
# 4307. I know you know.
# 4308. I laughed out loud.
# 4309. I lead a rich inner life.
# 4310. I lead a sedentary life.
# 4311. I learned the hard way.
# 4312. I leave at the first sign of trouble.
# 4313. I left a lot of money on the table.
# 4314. I left some for you.
# 4315. I lent her some money.
# 4316. I let him down.
# 4317. I let you down.
# 4318. I like classical music.
# 4319. I like for you to be at home with me, drinking tea.
# 4320. I like for you to do that.
# 4321. I like it, but I don’t know what it means.
# 4322. I like ketchup with my french fries.
# 4323. I like mustard on hot dogs, but not on peanuts.
# 4324. I like oatmeal for breakfast – with raisins, of course.
# 4325. I like tea, but I don’t care for any right now.
# 4326. I like the Father Brown mysteries of Chesterton.
# 4327. I like this brand of orange juice.
# 4328. I like this brand.
# 4329. I like Thousand Island salad dressing.
# 4330. I like to do things in a certain order.
# 4331. I like to read murder-mysteries.
# 4332. I like tomato sauce with my spaghetti.
# 4333. I liked to died laughing.
# 4334. I lost a contact lens.
# 4335. I lost it last Wednesday.
# 4336. I lost my keys.
# 4337. I lost my place.
# 4338. I lost my scarf.
# 4339. I lost my voice.
# 4340. I lost the battle of the bulge, and had to buy XXL underwear.
# 4341. I love ’taters.
# 4342. I love anagrams!
# 4343. I love my hometown, but I don’t want to stay there.
# 4344. I love snow peas.
# 4345. I love sour-dough bread.
# 4346. I love this house.
# 4347. I love to read the cartoons in “The New Yorker”.
# 4348. I love watching it take shape under my effort.
# 4349. I love you.
# 4350. I made a mad dash through the rain.
# 4351. I made a mistake.
# 4352. I meant that one over there.
# 4353. I meant the electricity.
# 4354. I meant the other one.
# 4355. I meant well.
# 4356. I might already have one.
# 4357. I might get a better job next year.
# 4358. I might take a trip.
# 4359. I misread the calendar.
# 4360. I miss my mother.
# 4361. I must go now.
# 4362. I must have gotten up on the wrong side of the bed this morning.
# 4363. I must have misheard you.
# 4364. I nearly chipped my tooth on that.
# 4365. I nearly nodded off.
# 4366. I need a bit of sticky tape.
# 4367. I need a clean pair of socks.
# 4368. I need a copy of this.
# 4369. I need a cotton swab.
# 4370. I need a drink of water.
# 4371. I need a foot bath.
# 4372. I need a map.
# 4373. I need a napkin.
# 4374. I need a new notebook for school.
# 4375. I need a new toothbrush.
# 4376. I need a photocopy of this.
# 4377. I need a piece of sticky tape.
# 4378. I need a replacement for this.
# 4379. I need a taxi.
# 4380. I need a vacation to recover from my vacation.
# 4381. I need a xerox of this.
# 4382. I need about forty winks.
# 4383. I need another clothes hanger.
# 4384. I need another one of these.
# 4385. I need another ream of paper.
# 4386. I need another wastebasket.
# 4387. I need batteries for the remote control device.
# 4388. I need exercise.
# 4389. I need five minutes at my desk, first.
# 4390. I need for him to call me.
# 4391. I need for these pajama bottoms to be shortened.
# 4392. I need for these pants to be shortened.
# 4393. I need for you to be here by noon.
# 4394. I need for you to call me when you arrive.
# 4395. I need for you to get this ready for me.
# 4396. I need for you to help me give her her medicine.
# 4397. I need for you to help me with this problem.
# 4398. I need for you to pick up the baby and rock it to sleep in your arms.
# 4399. I need for you to take this back to her.
# 4400. I need for you to watch the stove while I am out.
# 4401. I need fresh air.
# 4402. I need it back by tomorrow.
# 4403. I need my passport back.
# 4404. I need rest.
# 4405. I need some aspirin.
# 4406. I need some towels.
# 4407. I need the big pair of scissors and the roll of duct tape.
# 4408. I need the calculator.
# 4409. I need the exercise.
# 4410. I need the fingernail clippers.
# 4411. I need the fingernail file.
# 4412. I need the glue.
# 4413. I need the hammer.
# 4414. I need the hand lotion.
# 4415. I need the highlighter.
# 4416. I need the long-nose pliers.
# 4417. I need the marks-a-lot.
# 4418. I need the permanent marker.
# 4419. I need the pliers.
# 4420. I need the roll of tape again.
# 4421. I need the scissors.
# 4422. I need the screwdriver.
# 4423. I need the serial number.
# 4424. I need the sticky tape.
# 4425. I need the tweezers.
# 4426. I need the whiteboard marker.
# 4427. I need to add a little sugar to it.
# 4428. I need to ask a big favor from you.
# 4429. I need to ask for leave to go to a job interview.
# 4430. I need to ask for leave.
# 4431. I need to be the LAST one you ask.
# 4432. I need to buy a hundred more storage envelopes.
# 4433. I need to buy chicken, fish – good fish – , and some other things.
# 4434. I need to check and see.
# 4435. I need to clean.
# 4436. I need to do some cleaning.
# 4437. I need to do some ironing.
# 4438. I need to do some shopping.
# 4439. I need to do some things before she wakes up.
# 4440. I need to get a haircut.
# 4441. I need to get back to work.
# 4442. I need to get by.
# 4443. I need to get in here behind you.
# 4444. I need to get these ideas onto paper.
# 4445. I need to give my mother a gift.
# 4446. I need to go apply for a job.
# 4447. I need to go downstairs for a moment.
# 4448. I need to go out again.
# 4449. I need to go out for a while.
# 4450. I need to go to the dentist.
# 4451. I need to go to the hospital.
# 4452. I need to make a pit stop.
# 4453. I need to make room for more coffee.
# 4454. I need to make sure.
# 4455. I need to purge my old messages.
# 4456. I need to put more money on my cell phone.
# 4457. I need to recharge my cell phone.
# 4458. I need to return this book to the library.
# 4459. I need to scare up five dollars.
# 4460. I need to see a doctor.
# 4461. I need to see some results soon.
# 4462. I need to shop around a bit.
# 4463. I need to shop around some more.
# 4464. I need to shut out distractions.
# 4465. I need to stop at the post office to mail some letters.
# 4466. I need to take care of business.
# 4467. I need to take sick leave.
# 4468. I need to take these two with me.
# 4469. I need to take two of these with me.
# 4470. I need your cooperation on this.
# 4471. I need your medical record booklet.
# 4472. I needed that.
# 4473. I never even suggested it.
# 4474. I never get a straight answer out of him.
# 4475. I never go out to dinner anymore.
# 4476. I never guess.
# 4477. I never hated spinach the way some seem to.
# 4478. I never heard from him again.
# 4479. I never lost it.
# 4480. I no longer have to deal with him.
# 4481. I object to these proceedings.
# 4482. I object!
# 4483. I once heard a great sermon on Brotherly Love.
# 4484. I only asked you one question.
# 4485. I only do what I always do.
# 4486. I only have one pair.
# 4487. I only want happy humans here.
# 4488. I only went window shopping.
# 4489. I ordered from the menu.
# 4490. I ordered the full dinner.
# 4491. I owe you an apology.
# 4492. I paid dearly for it.
# 4493. I paid extra for speedy delivery.
# 4494. I paid for my mistakes, and you have to pay for yours.
# 4495. I picked this mess jacket up in France, and I’m very fond of it.
# 4496. I picked this one for you.
# 4497. I picked this one.
# 4498. I picked up a copy of today’s newspaper for you.
# 4499. I plan to visit a friend.
# 4500. I prefer a darker shade of lipstick.
# 4501. I prefer them roasted and salted.
# 4502. I promise, on a stack of Bibles.
# 4503. I pulled an all-night-er.
# 4504. I pulled off to the side of the road.
# 4505. I put all the leftovers together in here.
# 4506. I put it there to hide it from Julia.
# 4507. I put the rice on before you got back.
# 4508. I ran across the book “Power and Society” while browsing in the library.
# 4509. I ran circles around you.
# 4510. I ran into William this morning.
# 4511. I rarely get a good night’s sleep.
# 4512. I read his biography.
# 4513. I read your book on Ferromagnetism.
# 4514. I really blew it.
# 4515. I really like that.
# 4516. I really miss the down-home cooking.
# 4517. I received a call telling me I needn’t go after all.
# 4518. I refuse to be greatly concerned about tomorrow’s garbage.
# 4519. I refuse to watch.
# 4520. I refuse.
# 4521. I remember clearly.
# 4522. I remember it clearly.
# 4523. I remember putting it somewhere with the baby’s picture album.
# 4524. I remember the “Thresher” disaster.
# 4525. I remembered that they were together.
# 4526. I saw it out of the corner of my eye.
# 4527. I saw nothing objectionable about it.
# 4528. I saw stars when I bumped my head.
# 4529. I saw you coming.
# 4530. I second that motion.
# 4531. I see nothing to object to.
# 4532. I see now.
# 4533. I see the potential.
# 4534. I see you.
# 4535. I see you’re having supper.
# 4536. I see.
# 4537. I seem to have won him over.
# 4538. I sent out for pizza.
# 4539. I shielded my eyes from the light.
# 4540. I shop at that store all the time.
# 4541. I should be so lucky.
# 4542. I should have bought an apple for a midnight snack.
# 4543. I should have done this twenty five years ago.
# 4544. I should have known.
# 4545. I should have listened better.
# 4546. I should have pushed myself just a little harder.
# 4547. I should take out the trash now?
# 4548. I shouldn’t have eaten that spicy food.
# 4549. I signed-up with a temp agency.
# 4550. I slept late this morning, so I’m not going to take a nap this afternoon.
# 4551. I sometimes carry a Spanish-language newspaper as a dodge.
# 4552. I sometimes pretend not to know English, by answering in Esperanto.
# 4553. I sometimes stumble on the truth.
# 4554. I soon tired of that.
# 4555. I speak a only a little English.
# 4556. I speak fluent English.
# 4557. I speak only broken English.
# 4558. I speak pretty good English.
# 4559. I spent the time filling-in some gaps.
# 4560. I spilled coffee on it.
# 4561. I spilled some oil on the kitchen floor.
# 4562. I stayed in the building until seven o’clock.
# 4563. I stayed up late last night.
# 4564. I still feel sleepy.
# 4565. I still have a few things to do.
# 4566. I still have a lot of work to do.
# 4567. I still have lots to do.
# 4568. I still have something to do.
# 4569. I still have to be nice to you – my lasers aren’t airborne yet.
# 4570. I stop there about once a week.
# 4571. I stopped at the bank to get change.
# 4572. I stopped here on my way to the Esperanto club.
# 4573. I store my winter clothes in my suitcase.
# 4574. I stubbed my toe on it.
# 4575. I study English half an hour every day.
# 4576. I stumble over the truth now and then.
# 4577. I suffer fools gladly.
# 4578. I supposed that he knew his options.
# 4579. I sure am lucky about that.
# 4580. I sure would like to wrap myself around a cheeseburger about now.
# 4581. I swore off smoking ten years ago.
# 4582. I sympathize with him.
# 4583. I take it back.
# 4584. I take it she’s had breakfast.
# 4585. I take it you are not staying for the party.
# 4586. I take that back.
# 4587. I take the stairs for exercise.
# 4588. I take things just one day at a time.
# 4589. I talked with her for an hour.
# 4590. I talked with my mother.
# 4591. I teach English to unfortunates not brought up with it.
# 4592. I think aviator glasses look cool, don’t you?
# 4593. I think he has something to say about it.
# 4594. I think he joined the Foreign Legion.
# 4595. I think he was actually murdered.
# 4596. I think he’s in denial right now.
# 4597. I think I dropped it somewhere.
# 4598. I think I should do the cooking now.
# 4599. I think I should go ahead and do the cooking.
# 4600. I think I understand.
# 4601. I think I’ll do the cooking now.
# 4602. I think I’ll dye my hair.
# 4603. I think I’ll have a little tea.
# 4604. I think I’ll have one too.
# 4605. I think I’ll make a fresh pot of tea.
# 4606. I think I’m getting better at it.
# 4607. I think it was actually a case of murder.
# 4608. I think it will take about a week for it to run its course.
# 4609. I think it will take another two hours.
# 4610. I think it would be a good idea.
# 4611. I think it’s better now.
# 4612. I think it’s better this way, as opposed to that other way.
# 4613. I think it’s do-able.
# 4614. I think it’s interesting.
# 4615. I think it’s you she’s copying.
# 4616. I think my meaning was clear.
# 4617. I think she could be persuaded.
# 4618. I think she forgot again.
# 4619. I think she might have a fever.
# 4620. I think she wants to sit at the table with us.
# 4621. I think she was reaching for something.
# 4622. I think she would like some privacy.
# 4623. I think she’ll be awake until ten o’clock.
# 4624. I think she’s eating more than before.
# 4625. I think she’s telling the truth.
# 4626. I think someone scarfed my scarf after I dropped it.
# 4627. I think that about does it.
# 4628. I think the air conditioner is on the wrong setting.
# 4629. I think the baby wants to nurse.
# 4630. I think the power supply is shot.
# 4631. I think their English is at about the same level as yours.
# 4632. I think these batteries are bad.
# 4633. I think they’re both thoroughly dry.
# 4634. I think they’re going to have to carry on without me.
# 4635. I think they’re smoking in the hallway.
# 4636. I think we can iron out our differences.
# 4637. I think we’ll have a heavy rain today.
# 4638. I think we’re losing it.
# 4639. I think you are abusing your position even approaching me about that.
# 4640. I think you had your chance.
# 4641. I thought about that all night.
# 4642. I thought he was a reasonable man.
# 4643. I thought I heard something drop.
# 4644. I thought I was done for.
# 4645. I thought I was finished.
# 4646. I thought it was in China.
# 4647. I thought it was much later that it was.
# 4648. I thought it would be noon before you got back.
# 4649. I thought of a good idea.
# 4650. I thought we were friends.
# 4651. I thought we were on the same side.
# 4652. I thought you died and the hogs ate you.
# 4653. I thought you put it there.
# 4654. I thought you said she wanted two of them.
# 4655. I thought you went back to America for the holidays.
# 4656. I thought you were an atheist.
# 4657. I thought you were asking if you should, not telling me that you did.
# 4658. I thought you were my friend.
# 4659. I told her about the cell phone battery being low.
# 4660. I told him off in no uncertain terms.
# 4661. I told him where to get off.
# 4662. I told you so.
# 4663. I took a different route home.
# 4664. I took a pratfall because of a banana peel.
# 4665. I took attendance.
# 4666. I took my daughter to the doctor.
# 4667. I took off my slipper and used it as a flyswatter.
# 4668. I took the liberty of telling your brother about it.
# 4669. I took the shuttle bus.
# 4670. I took the taxi back.
# 4671. I tried to elicit comments about it.
# 4672. I try to do that.
# 4673. I turned it down a bit, and stirred it up.
# 4674. I turned on the heater.
# 4675. I turned the tables on him.
# 4676. I understand only half of what I read.
# 4677. I understand that I am to abstract the grammar from the lexis.
# 4678. I understand.
# 4679. I use “hoisted” instead of “hoist” regarding petards.
# 4680. I use about one a week.
# 4681. I use Esperanto as a metalanguage for English.
# 4682. I use the dining room as a study.
# 4683. I used duct tape to seal the crack in the baby’s plastic bathtub.
# 4684. I used the iron to firmly hold the power strip on the ledge.
# 4685. I used to always confuse those two words.
# 4686. I waited a long time.
# 4687. I want a good-paying job.
# 4688. I want a hardcopy backup.
# 4689. I want a large kitchen.
# 4690. I want an itemized list.
# 4691. I want central heat and air.
# 4692. I want financial security.
# 4693. I want her to have a happy childhood.
# 4694. I want her to have hair like that.
# 4695. I want it to be dry.
# 4696. I want my own house.
# 4697. I want my wife to wear fashionable clothes.
# 4698. I want nothing more to do with it.
# 4699. I want nothing to do with it.
# 4700. I want our house to have a big kitchen.
# 4701. I want the drumstick.
# 4702. I want to achieve native fluency in English.
# 4703. I want to ask her if the things I sent arrived yet.
# 4704. I want to ask her where to buy clothes.
# 4705. I want to ask you a question.
# 4706. I want to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.
# 4707. I want to buy a big one.
# 4708. I want to buy a digital camera.
# 4709. I want to buy a house.
# 4710. I want to buy a pair of knee-high boots.
# 4711. I want to buy a ticket for a sleeper berth.
# 4712. I want to buy a train ticket.
# 4713. I want to buy another one.
# 4714. I want to buy another pair of blue jeans.
# 4715. I want to buy two more reams of paper.
# 4716. I want to change jobs.
# 4717. I want to charge it.
# 4718. I want to check my blog.
# 4719. I want to consider all my options.
# 4720. I want to curl up with a good book.
# 4721. I want to do some cleaning.
# 4722. I want to drink some red sugar.
# 4723. I want to finish reading this story first.
# 4724. I want to get back to work.
# 4725. I want to get it over with.
# 4726. I want to give her a gift.
# 4727. I want to give it some thought.
# 4728. I want to give myself a footbath too.
# 4729. I want to go back sometime and get my master’s.
# 4730. I want to go out to buy the baby some carrots.
# 4731. I want to go out walking for exercise.
# 4732. I want to go shopping for a gift for my mother.
# 4733. I want to go to heaven when I die.
# 4734. I want to go to the airport.
# 4735. I want to go to the bathroom.
# 4736. I want to go too.
# 4737. I want to go visit my mother.
# 4738. I want to have a baby.
# 4739. I want to have an apple.
# 4740. I want to have central heat and air.
# 4741. I want to have it in writing.
# 4742. I want to have some orange juice.
# 4743. I want to have the big picture.
# 4744. I want to have walk-in closets.
# 4745. I want to hear some sweet lies.
# 4746. I want to iron it while it is still damp.
# 4747. I want to know how Americans live.
# 4748. I want to know how much money we have.
# 4749. I want to live in a coastal city, one without typhoons, of course.
# 4750. I want to look at the ocean.
# 4751. I want to make a difference.
# 4752. I want to make a few shekels.
# 4753. I want to make a list of what to buy.
# 4754. I want to place an order.
# 4755. I want to put some anti-itch lotion on it.
# 4756. I want to re-connect with a good friend.
# 4757. I want to see the ocean.
# 4758. I want to speak fluent English.
# 4759. I want to speak radio English.
# 4760. I want to talk to the manager.
# 4761. I want to talk with her.
# 4762. I want to tell you some good news.
# 4763. I want to tell you something.
# 4764. I want to try on my new clothes.
# 4765. I want to visit your club.
# 4766. I want to wait until she’s better before taking her outside again.
# 4767. I want to watch the fireworks.
# 4768. I want to watch the news.
# 4769. I want to wear fashionable clothes.
# 4770. I want you to do that.
# 4771. I want you to form the habit of doing that.
# 4772. I want you to sit here.
# 4773. I wanted it to arrive soon.
# 4774. I wanted to buy four, but they had only one.
# 4775. I wanted to find out which one she likes.
# 4776. I wanted to have the last word.
# 4777. I wanted to know what they were eating.
# 4778. I wanted to laugh.
# 4779. I wanted to pay with a hundred, but they said they didn’t have change.
# 4780. I was a dunce.
# 4781. I was a fan of Flip Wilson.
# 4782. I was a forklift operator.
# 4783. I was a nervous wreck by the time I got there.
# 4784. I was about to ask the same thing.
# 4785. I was about to walk out the door.
# 4786. I was an only child.
# 4787. I was appointed treasurer.
# 4788. I was asking, not telling.
# 4789. I was at the top of my class.
# 4790. I was born in Hawaii in 1949.
# 4791. I was born in Hawaii, but I remember nothing of Hawaii.
# 4792. I was caught in the thunderstorm, and got soaking wet.
# 4793. I was checking to see if you had “genius” written across your forehead.
# 4794. I was desperate for work, so I signed-up with a temp agency.
# 4795. I was doubled-up in pain.
# 4796. I was falsely accused.
# 4797. I was glad to be of assistance.
# 4798. I was going to say the same thing.
# 4799. I was greatly mistaken.
# 4800. I was hanging out with my friends.
# 4801. I was held up by the ice on the streets.
# 4802. I was hoping YOU could tell ME.
# 4803. I was in a world of hurt.
# 4804. I was in lots of pain.
# 4805. I was in the wrong.
# 4806. I was just a scapegoat.
# 4807. I was just pinging you.
# 4808. I was just surfing the web.
# 4809. I was just testing your patience.
# 4810. I was keeping time to the music.
# 4811. I was laughing at that outside.
# 4812. I was left holding the bag.
# 4813. I was looking for an inexpensive pair of shoes to buy.
# 4814. I was looking for that.
# 4815. I was losing sleep over it.
# 4816. I was most impressed by his performance.
# 4817. I was not able to follow you.
# 4818. I was not born in Fort Worth, but I consider it to be my hometown.
# 4819. I was of some small service to them.
# 4820. I was on my way to the Esperanto club meeting, so you’ll have to excuse
me.
# 4821. I was on vacation when that happened.
# 4822. I was only a bystander.
# 4823. I was only a spectator.
# 4824. I was only asking, not suggesting.
# 4825. I was only asking.
# 4826. I was only burping, not wanting to throw up.
# 4827. I was only joking.
# 4828. I was only surfing the web.
# 4829. I was presented with some tea ware as a farewell gift.
# 4830. I was saved by the bell.
# 4831. I was scared to death.
# 4832. I was short with him.
# 4833. I was so low, I had to look up to see down.
# 4834. I was talking to Elizabeth.
# 4835. I was talking to her.
# 4836. I was talking to you earlier about that magazine.
# 4837. I was the worst-dressed in my class.
# 4838. I was thinking only of myself.
# 4839. I was thinking the same thing.
# 4840. I was thinking.
# 4841. I was tied up in traffic.
# 4842. I was told the curfew ended at seven o’clock.
# 4843. I was unaware that there was a problem.
# 4844. I was under a mistaken impression about the bugs.
# 4845. I was under the wrong impression.
# 4846. I was waiting for the word.
# 4847. I was waiting for you to sit down first.
# 4848. I was wondering why.
# 4849. I was worried whether it met with your approval.
# 4850. I wash my hands of this.
# 4851. I wash the dishes in hot water, and rinse them in cold water.
# 4852. I wasn’t a participant, only a spectator.
# 4853. I wasn’t able to get her to go to sleep.
# 4854. I wasn’t asking your opinion about it – I was just telling you that it was so.
# 4855. I wasn’t born yesterday.
# 4856. I wasn’t calling you, I was calling Julia.
# 4857. I wasn’t complaining, I was bragging.
# 4858. I wasn’t going to throw it away.
# 4859. I wasn’t keeping count.
# 4860. I wasn’t laughing at you, I was laughing at the story.
# 4861. I wasn’t needing any money any time soon.
# 4862. I wasn’t talking to you.
# 4863. I wasn’t watching where I was going.
# 4864. I went by bus, and had to make two transfers.
# 4865. I went shopping yesterday.
# 4866. I went there for a visit.
# 4867. I went to the hospital, and they told me to go home and rest.
# 4868. I will be back in a little while.
# 4869. I will be back soon.
# 4870. I will be on vacation for two weeks starting next week.
# 4871. I will do a wash tomorrow.
# 4872. I will do my best, but I can do only a little each time.
# 4873. I will do the dishes.
# 4874. I will make a deposit to my cell phone account tomorrow.
# 4875. I will never pass this way again.
# 4876. I will not fail in my task.
# 4877. I will not fail in the task you have given me.
# 4878. I will own that I have a sweet tooth.
# 4879. I will recant if they threaten me with torture.
# 4880. I will stay for three days.
# 4881. I will stay two weeks.
# 4882. I will try to do that.
# 4883. I will turn on the light for you.
# 4884. I will, in five minutes.
# 4885. I wiped it up, but it left a stain.
# 4886. I wish for my remains to be cremated, and the ashes put into a river.
# 4887. I wish I could say the same.
# 4888. I wish I could write as well as Greg Palast.
# 4889. I wish I could.
# 4890. I wish I had a nickel for ever time you say “you know”.
# 4891. I wish I had a nickel for every panhandler I saw.
# 4892. I wish I had known then what I know now.
# 4893. I wish I had said that.
# 4894. I wish I had that problem.
# 4895. I wish that clock were silent.
# 4896. I wish you both every happiness.
# 4897. I wish you wouldn’t interrupt my work for trivial reason.
# 4898. I wish you wouldn’t probe me like that.
# 4899. I won’t buy her another pair of shoes.
# 4900. I won’t go on the trip tomorrow.
# 4901. I won’t hold you to that.
# 4902. I won’t make that mistake again.
# 4903. I won’t put up with such impertinence.
# 4904. I wore hand-me-downs while growing up, no pun intended.
# 4905. I work at a software house.
# 4906. I worry about her health.
# 4907. I would appreciate that.
# 4908. I would be ironic, but I’m afraid you would take me literally.
# 4909. I would expect greater prudence on the part of a manager.
# 4910. I would feel out of place.
# 4911. I would gladly trade repartee for some harmony.
# 4912. I would hate to contemplate such a catastrophe.
# 4913. I would hate to hear what your mother would say.
# 4914. I would have done the same thing.
# 4915. I would have heard it.
# 4916. I would have remembered such a thing.
# 4917. I would have to pass an entrance exam.
# 4918. I would have to see the script, before I would consent to be in the film.
# 4919. I would have to take your family name in America.
# 4920. I would jump at the chance to go home.
# 4921. I would just be in your way.
# 4922. I would like a bigger apartment.
# 4923. I would like a large picture window for our house.
# 4924. I would like a receipt.
# 4925. I would like to go someplace for coffee.
# 4926. I would like to go to the zoo.
# 4927. I would like to rest.
# 4928. I would like to teach the world to sing in Esperanto.
# 4929. I would like to visit the art museum.
# 4930. I would love to be able to do that.
# 4931. I would love to help you, but I’m busy reading my Esperanto magazine.
# 4932. I would love to, but I just don’t have the bandwidth.
# 4933. I would not have worded it that way.
# 4934. I would only be in your way.
# 4935. I would open the window, but it’s noisy outside.
# 4936. I would prefer sooner, rather than later.
# 4937. I would rather avoid any unpleasantness.
# 4938. I would rather be envied than admired, if you follow my meaning.
# 4939. I would rather wait until Thursday to go.
# 4940. I would starve to death, depending on you.
# 4941. I would take a job like that in a heartbeat.
# 4942. I would take that with a grain of salt.
# 4943. I would welcome a chance to freshen up.
# 4944. I wouldn’t put anything past him.
# 4945. I wouldn’t say that to him, if I were you.
# 4946. I wouldn’t send a dog out on a day like this.
# 4947. I wouldn’t touch you to scratch you.
# 4948. I wouldn’t trust him to help me cross the street.
# 4949. I wouldn’t try that if I were you.
# 4950. I wouldn’t want to have to go through that indignity.
# 4951. I wrote it in the first person for her.
# 4952. I, too, was taken in by his moral posturing.
# 4953. I’d like a bottle of grape soda.
# 4954. I’d like to change to another room.
# 4955. I’d like to make a reservation for Tuesday night.
# 4956. I’d like to put my two cents in.
# 4957. I’d rather be right than be president.
# 4958. I’d rather hear you say that, than hear my dentist say that.
# 4959. I’ll ask my wife what she thinks about it.
# 4960. I’ll be another year older.
# 4961. I’ll be back in a jiffy.
# 4962. I’ll be back in a minute.
# 4963. I’ll be back in about three or four hours.
# 4964. I’ll be back in five minutes.
# 4965. I’ll be back in time for a late tea.
# 4966. I’ll be better in the future.
# 4967. I’ll be happy to answer that, if you’ll ask me in Esperanto.
# 4968. I’ll be here as long as necessary, or until noon, whichever comes first.
# 4969. I’ll be my old self again soon.
# 4970. I’ll be OK by the time we leave.
# 4971. I’ll be pleasantly surprised if it happens.
# 4972. I’ll be right back.
# 4973. I’ll be staying in town for the holidays, since I live here.
# 4974. I’ll be sure to remember that.
# 4975. I’ll be surprised if he wins.
# 4976. I’ll be the judge of that.
# 4977. I’ll be there in a minute.
# 4978. I’ll be using my credit card.
# 4979. I’ll be watching from the sidelines.
# 4980. I’ll be with you in a minute.
# 4981. I’ll believe it when I see it.
# 4982. I’ll bet someone used a permanent marker on the whiteboard.
# 4983. I’ll bet you left a lot of money on the table.
# 4984. I’ll bring the fan into this room for you.
# 4985. I’ll buy it again sometime.
# 4986. I’ll buy some noodles.
# 4987. I’ll call another day.
# 4988. I’ll call my sister and tell her not to worry.
# 4989. I’ll call the airline ticket office.
# 4990. I’ll call them and ask why it hasn’t arrived.
# 4991. I’ll call them now.
# 4992. I’ll check and see.
# 4993. I’ll come around to the other side.
# 4994. I’ll cross it off the list.
# 4995. I’ll cry a lot.
# 4996. I’ll do a wash tomorrow.
# 4997. I’ll do it right away.
# 4998. I’ll do it, but only under protest.
# 4999. I’ll drink dishwater.
# 5000. I’ll finish soon.
# 5001. I’ll fix oatmeal for breakfast.
# 5002. I’ll get a haircut a little later.
# 5003. I’ll get around to it sooner or later.
# 5004. I’ll get back to you on that.
# 5005. I’ll give it wide berth.
# 5006. I’ll give them that much.
# 5007. I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt.
# 5008. I’ll go again tomorrow.
# 5009. I’ll go around and look through the bedroom window.
# 5010. I’ll go as soon as I finish eating.
# 5011. I’ll go do that right now.
# 5012. I’ll have Adam’s ale to drink.
# 5013. I’ll have his head on a platter.
# 5014. I’ll have Sprite to drink.
# 5015. I’ll have the buffet.
# 5016. I’ll have to lie, or be bored.
# 5017. I’ll have to stay there several days.
# 5018. I’ll have your head for that.
# 5019. I’ll help if it’s within my power to do so.
# 5020. I’ll help you look for it.
# 5021. I’ll let you know when.
# 5022. I’ll look at the other one.
# 5023. I’ll look into it.
# 5024. I’ll look up the lyrics later.
# 5025. I’ll make hamburgers for lunch, OK?
# 5026. I’ll manage somehow.
# 5027. I’ll meet you at the west gate.
# 5028. I’ll need a spoon soon.
# 5029. I’ll never do that again.
# 5030. I’ll open the window to air out the room.
# 5031. I’ll pass on that, but thanks anyway.
# 5032. I’ll pass the exam, I’m sure.
# 5033. I’ll pay you back next week.
# 5034. I’ll prepare a nice meal.
# 5035. I’ll prepare some pineapple for a snack.
# 5036. I’ll print this one.
# 5037. I’ll print this.
# 5038. I’ll put it on my calendar.
# 5039. I’ll put it on the list.
# 5040. I’ll put the food on before I leave.
# 5041. I’ll remember that.
# 5042. I’ll scrounge for myself in the kitchen.
# 5043. I’ll see what I can do for you.
# 5044. I’ll see you and raise you ten.
# 5045. I’ll see you out.
# 5046. I’ll send it to my nephew.
# 5047. I’ll sit this one out.
# 5048. I’ll speak to the president about it.
# 5049. I’ll start the food preparation now, so that we can eat earlier.
# 5050. I’ll stay clear of it.
# 5051. I’ll stick with the old brand.
# 5052. I’ll stop to buy bread on the way back.
# 5053. I’ll take a taxi to the hotel from the airport.
# 5054. I’ll take along a hundred to break.
# 5055. I’ll take along a large bill to break.
# 5056. I’ll take care of it.
# 5057. I’ll take care of that later.
# 5058. I’ll take it back and get a refund.
# 5059. I’ll take the plane back, because the train will be crowded with students.
# 5060. I’ll take this to the bathroom.
# 5061. I’ll take up your homework now.
# 5062. I’ll take your word for it.
# 5063. I’ll tell you later.
# 5064. I’ll tell you when it’s time to do that.
# 5065. I’ll think of it again later.
# 5066. I’ll trade you this for that.
# 5067. I’ll try one.
# 5068. I’ll try to forget it as soon as possible.
# 5069. I’ll try to get there before dark.
# 5070. I’ll try to talk him out of it.
# 5071. I’ll turn if off, OK?
# 5072. I’ll turn it on its side.
# 5073. I’ll wait for the rice.
# 5074. I’ll wait for you to come home.
# 5075. I’ll wait my turn.
# 5076. I’ll wait until it’s light out.
# 5077. I’ll wait until you come back.
# 5078. I’ll wait until you get back to have supper.
# 5079. I’ll wait until you get dressed.
# 5080. I’ll wash them for you.
# 5081. I’m a believer.
# 5082. I’m a card-carrying member.
# 5083. I’m a college graduate.
# 5084. I’m a fan of good food.
# 5085. I’m a fan of his.
# 5086. I’m a fan of Jane Austen.
# 5087. I’m a fast learner.
# 5088. I’m a firm believer in exercise.
# 5089. I’m a graduate of that school.
# 5090. I’m a ham radio operator.
# 5091. I’m a heavy sleeper.
# 5092. I’m a high-school dropout.
# 5093. I’m a homebody.
# 5094. I’m a light sleeper.
# 5095. I’m a married man.
# 5096. I’m a meat-and-potatoes man.
# 5097. I’m a member of that club.
# 5098. I’m a morning person.
# 5099. I’m a night person.
# 5100. I’m a patient at that hospital.
# 5101. I’m a professional student.
# 5102. I’m a quick study.
# 5103. I’m a stranger here myself.
# 5104. I’m a stranger here.
# 5105. I’m a stranger in paradise.
# 5106. I’m a teetotaler.
# 5107. I’m a vegetarian.
# 5108. I’m a veteran.
# 5109. I’m about eighty percent recovered.
# 5110. I’m about to begin.
# 5111. I’m afraid a fire might start.
# 5112. I’m afraid I can’t help you.
# 5113. I’m afraid it was all my fault.
# 5114. I’m afraid not.
# 5115. I’m afraid of fire.
# 5116. I’m afraid she might be cold.
# 5117. I’m afraid she might pull this over on herself.
# 5118. I’m afraid to close that door, because the latch sometimes gets stuck.
# 5119. I’m afraid to ride the elevator.
# 5120. I’m afraid you would take irony literally.
# 5121. I’m afraid you’ll get sick if you do that.
# 5122. I’m afraid.
# 5123. I’m agreeable to that.
# 5124. I’m ahead of the game.
# 5125. I’m alarmed at that trend.
# 5126. I’m all ears.
# 5127. I’m all hot and sweaty.
# 5128. I’m allergic to that.
# 5129. I’m almost done.
# 5130. I’m always happy to hear what you have to say.
# 5131. I’m always happy to see you.
# 5132. I’m always having to cough.
# 5133. I’m always the last to know.
# 5134. I’m amazed at that.
# 5135. I’m anxious about my father’s health.
# 5136. I’m appalled at their living conditions.
# 5137. I’m as snug as a bug in a rug.
# 5138. I’m ashamed to have to tell you I haven’t learned Esperanto yet.
# 5139. I’m at home.
# 5140. I’m at lunch.
# 5141. I’m at the point in life where I have to choose between lying or being
bored.
# 5142. I’m at your service.
# 5143. I’m aware of that.
# 5144. I’m back.
# 5145. I’m beginning to believe it.
# 5146. I’m beginning to understand.
# 5147. I’m beginning to wonder.
# 5148. I’m behind you all the way.
# 5149. I’m bored.
# 5150. I’m broke.
# 5151. I’m building a case against him.
# 5152. I’m busy right now.
# 5153. I’m calling to find out the status of my application.
# 5154. I’m catching a cold.
# 5155. I’m catching cold.
# 5156. I’m claiming fair use.
# 5157. I’m clueless.
# 5158. I’m cold.
# 5159. I’m coming down with something.
# 5160. I’m confused.
# 5161. I’m dead tired.
# 5162. I’m delighted to meet you.
# 5163. I’m disappointed at the outcome.
# 5164. I’m doing data-entry.
# 5165. I’m doing it because it needs to be done.
# 5166. I’m editing the document as we speak.
# 5167. I’m excited about the upcoming trip.
# 5168. I’m expecting that my shirt order will be delivered tomorrow.
# 5169. I’m expecting.
# 5170. I’m falling.
# 5171. I’m famished.
# 5172. I’m fasting.
# 5173. I’m feeling a little bit ill.
# 5174. I’m feeling fine.
# 5175. I’m finally finished.
# 5176. I’m fine.
# 5177. I’m finished with this filthy furniture!
# 5178. I’m fixin’ to go to the store.
# 5179. I’m fond of strawberries.
# 5180. I’m from Kalamazoo, Michigan.
# 5181. I’m full.
# 5182. I’m game.
# 5183. I’m getting better at it.
# 5184. I’m getting ready for tomorrow.
# 5185. I’m getting ready to take her out for a walk.
# 5186. I’m getting the hang of it.
# 5187. I’m getting the water ready.
# 5188. I’m getting tomorrow’s food ready.
# 5189. I’m given to understand that you will be leaving with the others.
# 5190. I’m giving her suggestions.
# 5191. I’m glad I’m not over there.
# 5192. I’m glad to hear it.
# 5193. I’m glad we got back together.
# 5194. I’m glad you asked that question.
# 5195. I’m glad you’re on top of things.
# 5196. I’m going downstairs to look at the pictures of that woman’s baby.
# 5197. I’m going out for a minute.
# 5198. I’m going out to buy some bread.
# 5199. I’m going out too, so remember to take your keys.
# 5200. I’m going out.
# 5201. I’m going out; OK?
# 5202. I’m going shopping right now.
# 5203. I’m going to a friend’s house.
# 5204. I’m going to be an engineer.
# 5205. I’m going to bed.
# 5206. I’m going to fix supper.
# 5207. I’m going to fix us a snack.
# 5208. I’m going to go shopping later today.
# 5209. I’m going to have to bite the bullet and apologize to him.
# 5210. I’m going to have to drop that course.
# 5211. I’m going to have to report this.
# 5212. I’m going to hold you to that.
# 5213. I’m going to make you this offer only once.
# 5214. I’m going to re-negotiate my contract.
# 5215. I’m going to sleep late tomorrow morning.
# 5216. I’m going to take a nap.
# 5217. I’m going to take a shower.
# 5218. I’m going to take a stroll in the park.
# 5219. I’m going to take part in the marathon.
# 5220. I’m going to tell my sister that I have sent the money.
# 5221. I’m going to tell on you!
# 5222. I’m going to tell.
# 5223. I’m going to the bathroom.
# 5224. I’m going to the head.
# 5225. I’m going to the movie with them tonight.
# 5226. I’m going to the store.
# 5227. I’m going to tighten it up a bit.
# 5228. I’m going to try on my new shirt.
# 5229. I’m going to turn over a new leaf.
# 5230. I’m going with her.
# 5231. I’m going with you.
# 5232. I’m gonna throw up.
# 5233. I’m good with that.
# 5234. I’m googling for information on her illness.
# 5235. I’m happily married.
# 5236. I’m happy to have been able to help you.
# 5237. I’m happy.
# 5238. I’m her horse.
# 5239. I’m his girlfriend.
# 5240. I’m his son.
# 5241. I’m history.
# 5242. I’m home.
# 5243. I’m hungry.
# 5244. I’m hurt.
# 5245. I’m ill, so I can’t come to class.
# 5246. I’m impressed by the sofa of the brand “Jennifer”.
# 5247. I’m impressed.
# 5248. I’m in a hurry.
# 5249. I’m in a tight spot.
# 5250. I’m in charge.
# 5251. I’m in lots of pain.
# 5252. I’m in love.
# 5253. I’m in the book.
# 5254. I’m in the dark.
# 5255. I’m in the doghouse.
# 5256. I’m in the kitchen doing the dishes.
# 5257. I’m in the market for a jacuzzi.
# 5258. I’m in the middle of my email right now.
# 5259. I’m in the middle of something right now.
# 5260. I’m in the soup again.
# 5261. I’m innocent.
# 5262. I’m insurance-poor.
# 5263. I’m just a village girl.
# 5264. I’m just a wood-mover.
# 5265. I’m just doing my job.
# 5266. I’m just good, that’s all.
# 5267. I’m just letting you know.
# 5268. I’m kind of busy right now.
# 5269. I’m learning Esperanto.
# 5270. I’m leaving now.
# 5271. I’m leaving tomorrow.
# 5272. I’m letting it cool off for her.
# 5273. I’m listening to the radio.
# 5274. I’m looking for a good job.
# 5275. I’m looking for my keys.
# 5276. I’m looking for the security deposit receipt.
# 5277. I’m looking forward to doing that in the not too distant future.
# 5278. I’m looking out for you.
# 5279. I’m lost.
# 5280. I’m making room for more coffee.
# 5281. I’m miserable with this cold.
# 5282. I’m missing one of my gloves.
# 5283. I’m moving the table now.
# 5284. I’m mystified by that.
# 5285. I’m nervous.
# 5286. I’m never bored.
# 5287. I’m new to this game.
# 5288. I’m next.
# 5289. I’m no spring chicken.
# 5290. I’m not a counselor, only a technician.
# 5291. I’m not a delicatessen – I set my own priorities.
# 5292. I’m not a newbie.
# 5293. I’m not a thief.
# 5294. I’m not allowed to tell you.
# 5295. I’m not asking you about Esperantists – I’m asking you about Esperanto.
# 5296. I’m not claiming that all this is original with me.
# 5297. I’m not complaining, only remarking.
# 5298. I’m not crying, my eyes are just watering.
# 5299. I’m not even a high school graduate.
# 5300. I’m not expecting trouble.
# 5301. I’m not expecting you to understand.
# 5302. I’m not getting any younger.
# 5303. I’m not given to mincing words.
# 5304. I’m not going anywhere.
# 5305. I’m not going to dignify such a question with a reply.
# 5306. I’m not going to discuss my schedule with you.
# 5307. I’m not going to discuss that with you.
# 5308. I’m not going to let it happen on my watch.
# 5309. I’m not going to let them get away with that.
# 5310. I’m not going to look a gift-horse in the mouth.
# 5311. I’m not going to lose any sleep over it.
# 5312. I’m not going to rush.
# 5313. I’m not going to tell you.
# 5314. I’m not going to tell.
# 5315. I’m not going to try to second-guess him.
# 5316. I’m not going to worry about it.
# 5317. I’m not in any pain – I just feel blah – in other words, sluggish.
# 5318. I’m not interested in what your brother-in-law has to say about it.
# 5319. I’m not interested, but I appreciate the thought.
# 5320. I’m not interested.
# 5321. I’m not likely to forget about it any time soon.
# 5322. I’m not particular about that.
# 5323. I’m not picky.
# 5324. I’m not prolific, but slothful, having never written anything in Esperanto.
# 5325. I’m not quite sure how to say this.
# 5326. I’m not really crying – I was chopping onions.
# 5327. I’m not responsible for what you may have heard, and I won’t be bound by
it.
# 5328. I’m not rich – my father’s rich.
# 5329. I’m not saying she’s not sick.
# 5330. I’m not saying that I expect them to.
# 5331. I’m not saying.
# 5332. I’m not sick, I was just coughing because I swallowed wrong.
# 5333. I’m not staying for dinner.
# 5334. I’m not sure about anything.
# 5335. I’m not sure how to read the thermometer.
# 5336. I’m not sure what all that job entails.
# 5337. I’m not sure what you’re saying.
# 5338. I’m not telling.
# 5339. I’m not the best person to answer that.
# 5340. I’m not the least bit interested in something like that.
# 5341. I’m not the one who’s calling the shots.
# 5342. I’m not to blame.
# 5343. I’m not unhappy with this.
# 5344. I’m not voting for anyone who doesn’t know Esperanto.
# 5345. I’m not worried.
# 5346. I’m not yet ready to accept my parents as human beings.
# 5347. I’m OK, you’re a pain in the neck.
# 5348. I’m OK, you’re OK.
# 5349. I’m old.
# 5350. I’m on a roll.
# 5351. I’m on my way to the airport.
# 5352. I’m on pins and needles.
# 5353. I’m on salary.
# 5354. I’m on the defensive.
# 5355. I’m on the first string.
# 5356. I’m on the wagon.
# 5357. I’m on your side.
# 5358. I’m one of those going on the trip.
# 5359. I’m only a conduit.
# 5360. I’m only a spectator.
# 5361. I’m only doing data-entry right now.
# 5362. I’m only going to say this once.
# 5363. I’m only human.
# 5364. I’m only the messenger.
# 5365. I’m onto you.
# 5366. I’m open to suggestion.
# 5367. I’m out of bed and dressed for the day.
# 5368. I’m out of paper.
# 5369. I’m outta here.
# 5370. I’m overjoyed at the news.
# 5371. I’m patient.
# 5372. I’m paying as little as I can.
# 5373. I’m practicing my assertiveness techniques.
# 5374. I’m pregnant.
# 5375. I’m preparing for class.
# 5376. I’m pretty sure I’ll get one, but I think I need to shop around some more.
# 5377. I’m pretty sure that’s what she wants.
# 5378. I’m ready as I’m going to be.
# 5379. I’m ready for a little R & R.
# 5380. I’m ready for class.
# 5381. I’m ready for some cooler weather.
# 5382. I’m ready for the rocking chair.
# 5383. I’m ready for them.
# 5384. I’m ready to catch her if she falls.
# 5385. I’m ready to throw in the towel.
# 5386. I’m ready.
# 5387. I’m re-charging the lantern.
# 5388. I’m recovering from the flu.
# 5389. I’m reporting for duty.
# 5390. I’m responsible for those debts.
# 5391. I’m right behind you.
# 5392. I’m running late.
# 5393. I’m sad.
# 5394. I’m scared.
# 5395. I’m seven years old.
# 5396. I’m sick and tired of that.
# 5397. I’m sleepy.
# 5398. I’m so close I can taste it.
# 5399. I’m so confused, I don’t know if I’m coming or going.
# 5400. I’m so far behind on this project, it’s not even funny.
# 5401. I’m so sorry.
# 5402. I’m sore from sitting for so long of a time.
# 5403. I’m sorry I’m such a disappointment to you.
# 5404. I’m sorry you can’t understand that.
# 5405. I’m sorry, I don’t have any candy for you.
# 5406. I’m sorry.
# 5407. I’m starting to wonder.
# 5408. I’m still going strong.
# 5409. I’m still here.
# 5410. I’m still sleepy.
# 5411. I’m still staying, however.
# 5412. I’m striving for operational command of English.
# 5413. I’m stuck with it.
# 5414. I’m studying English.
# 5415. I’m studying for the bar exam.
# 5416. I’m suffering from existential angst.
# 5417. I’m sure glad that’s over.
# 5418. I’m sure his shrink knows he thinks he’s Joseph Epstein.
# 5419. I’m sure his shrink knows he thinks he’s Robert Fulford.
# 5420. I’m sure I’ve forgotten something.
# 5421. I’m sure it will be approved as-is.
# 5422. I’m sure it’s necessary for them to be making noise at 3:20 in the morning.
# 5423. I’m sure it’s not the first time you’ve been wrong.
# 5424. I’m sure it’s true.
# 5425. I’m sure of it.
# 5426. I’m sure she wants something.
# 5427. I’m sure someone’s on their case about that.
# 5428. I’m sure they won’t.
# 5429. I’m sure you’re very sorry.
# 5430. I’m sure.
# 5431. I’m surprised no one called me on it.
# 5432. I’m surprised you quoted it correctly.
# 5433. I’m surprised.
# 5434. I’m taken aback by their lack of professionalism.
# 5435. I’m taking her out to play now.
# 5436. I’m taking her out to play.
# 5437. I’m taking the baby out to play for a while.
# 5438. I’m taking this of yours, OK?
# 5439. I’m teaching a course in statistical process control.
# 5440. I’m telling on you!
# 5441. I’m telling.
# 5442. I’m the class monitor.
# 5443. I’m the one who has to clean up the mess.
# 5444. I’m the only one here.
# 5445. I’m thinking of a career change.
# 5446. I’m thirsty.
# 5447. I’m throwing down the gauntlet.
# 5448. I’m tired of hitting my head against a wall.
# 5449. I’m tired of sitting.
# 5450. I’m tired of standing.
# 5451. I’m tired.
# 5452. I’m told it’s difficult to do.
# 5453. I’m too pooped to pop.
# 5454. I’m touched.
# 5455. I’m traveling with my wife.
# 5456. I’m trying to scare up a clean shirt.
# 5457. I’m trying to stay out of the way.
# 5458. I’m trying to summon the energy to get up and go to bed.
# 5459. I’m trying to think of what you should buy.
# 5460. I’m up to my hips in alligators.
# 5461. I’m usually able to pick myself up and carry on as if nothing had
happened.
# 5462. I’m very grateful to you.
# 5463. I’m very hungry.
# 5464. I’m very sorry to hear that.
# 5465. I’m very sorry.
# 5466. I’m voting for Alfred E. Neuman.
# 5467. I’m waiting for the other shoe to drop.
# 5468. I’m waiting for the verdict.
# 5469. I’m walking on eggshells.
# 5470. I’m watching TV.
# 5471. I’m wide awake.
# 5472. I’m wide open tomorrow afternoon.
# 5473. I’m willing to wait.
# 5474. I’m working on it.
# 5475. I’m working towards my doctorate.
# 5476. I’m worried that my wife will discover my cache of candy.
# 5477. I’m worried you will be cold.
# 5478. I’m worse than I was yesterday.
# 5479. I’m your man.
# 5480. I’m your replacement.
# 5481. I’ve already been interviewed.
# 5482. I’ve already paid.
# 5483. I’ve already sold it to someone else.
# 5484. I’ve already taken care of that.
# 5485. I’ve always depended on the kindness of strangers.
# 5486. I’ve always wanted that.
# 5487. I’ve been around the block a few times.
# 5488. I’ve been called worse.
# 5489. I’ve been here five years.
# 5490. I’ve been on my feet a lot.
# 5491. I’ve been overruled.
# 5492. I’ve been studying English since I was twelve years old.
# 5493. I’ve been to that store a million times.
# 5494. I’ve booked a flight from Frankfurt to Boston.
# 5495. I’ve come to do some cleaning.
# 5496. I’ve done everything you did, and then some.
# 5497. I’ve eaten all I can.
# 5498. I’ve failed as an astro-physicist, but I won’t fail as a human being.
# 5499. I’ve forgotten more about it than you know about it.
# 5500. I’ve gone native.
# 5501. I’ve got dibs on it.
# 5502. I’ve got it on my wish list.
# 5503. I’ve got the picture.
# 5504. I’ve had a headache all day long.
# 5505. I’ve had breakfast already.
# 5506. I’ve had enough.
# 5507. I’ve had my fill of his bellyaching.
# 5508. I’ve had people call me about that.
# 5509. I’ve heard a lot about you.
# 5510. I’ve never gotten a straight answer out of him.
# 5511. I’ve paid my dues.
# 5512. I’ve put on a little weight.
# 5513. I’ve run across that name before.
# 5514. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again.
# 5515. I’ve seen that before.
# 5516. I’ve told you a million times not to exaggerate.
# 5517. I’ve waited a long time for this.
# 5518. I’ve waited a long time.
# 5519. Iceberg!
# 5520. Ideological purity.
# 5521. Idle talk won’t get you a job.
# 5522. If A = B, and B = C, then A = C.
# 5523. If a woman is wealthy, you can tell her age by counting her rings.
# 5524. If anyone else can win her, I don’t want her.
# 5525. If anything can go wrong, it will.
# 5526. If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.
# 5527. If Esperanto did not exist, it would have to be invented.
# 5528. If he was new in the Big Apple, why didn’t he go to the Esperanto club?
# 5529. If he’s our future, we’re history.
# 5530. If I don’t trip and break my neck first.
# 5531. If I had it to do over again, I would certainly be more cautious.
# 5532. If I knew the answer to that, I would have an office upstairs.
# 5533. If I knew those kinds of things, you would need an appointment to see me.
# 5534. If I need it, I’ll ask for it back.
# 5535. If I remember correctly, and I think I do, there are no more apples left.
# 5536. If I say you’re bothering me, you’re bothering me.
# 5537. If I wear fashionable clothes, people won’t think I’m a nanny.
# 5538. If I were in her shoes, I would jump at the chance to go home.
# 5539. If I were you, I would jump at that opportunity.
# 5540. If I’m coughing, at least I’m still alive.
# 5541. If I’m in trouble, you’re in trouble.
# 5542. If I’ve told you once, I’ve told you a thousand times.
# 5543. If it cost twice as much, I wouldn’t care.
# 5544. If it had been a snake, it would have bit me.
# 5545. If it looks like a corpus, it is a corpus.
# 5546. If it looks worse tomorrow, then we’ll go to the doctor.
# 5547. If it please the court…
# 5548. If it’s after ten o’clock at night, I take a taxi home.
# 5549. If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.
# 5550. If it’s too salty, don’t eat it.
# 5551. If nothing else, Esperanto makes a good pinging device.
# 5552. If she doesn’t want to eat, she doesn’t open her mouth.
# 5553. If she had dropped that on that hard floor, it would have broken.
# 5554. If she’s tired, she’ll sit down.
# 5555. If that food is kept more than three months, it should not be consumed.
# 5556. If that’s how you want to think of yourself, I won’t contradict you.
# 5557. If that’s the worst thing that ever happens to me, I’ll be a happy man.
# 5558. If the internet did not exist, it would have to be invented.
# 5559. If the IRS and the FAA would swap jobs, everyone would breathe easier.
# 5560. If the shoe fits, wear it.
# 5561. If there are still bugs tomorrow, we’ll buy poison for them.
# 5562. If there happen to be any apples left, I would like to have one.
# 5563. If there happen to be any.
# 5564. If there’s hard evidence that it’s harmful, let’s have it already!
# 5565. If there’s no God, who makes the next kleenex pop up?
# 5566. If they don’t do something about these bugs, let’s move somewhere else.
# 5567. If they give you any problem, call security on them.
# 5568. If they had seating, it would be perfect.
# 5569. If they sing on TV, she has to sing too.
# 5570. If this is all it comes down to, why should anyone care?
# 5571. If this isn’t an example of making a mountain out of a molehill, what is?
# 5572. If this isn’t the boondocks, what is?
# 5573. If we can’t live there, we’ll leave there.
# 5574. If we don’t hang together, we’ll hang separately.
# 5575. If we win another battle at this cost, we’ll lose the war!
# 5576. If we’re going to go on that trip, I can’t lend my sister that money.
# 5577. If we’re not back by then, come looking for us.
# 5578. If Winter said he had Spring in his heart, who would believe him?
# 5579. If workmanship is lacking, secrecy is pointless.
# 5580. If worse comes to worst, we can always live in a trailer house.
# 5581. If you add some bells and whistles to it, it will sell much better.
# 5582. If you answered any of the above questions, you’re a sap.
# 5583. If you are not familiar with China, you will have no idea where Taiyuan is.
# 5584. If you believe that, I have some Florida real estate I would like to discuss
with you.
# 5585. If you believe that, you’ll believe anything.
# 5586. If you buy in quantity, you get a discount.
# 5587. If you buy low and sell high, you’ll get rich.
# 5588. If you can think of nothing to say, please don’t say it.
# 5589. If you can’t do algebra, you can’t do anything.
# 5590. If you can’t do it naturally, fake it.
# 5591. If you can’t find a mentor, you have to become your own mentor.
# 5592. If you can’t say anything mean, say it in Esperanto.
# 5593. If you can’t say anything nice, say it in Yiddish.
# 5594. If you charge admission, it’s a different audience.
# 5595. If you don’t behave, I won’t take you again.
# 5596. If you don’t clean it, it will get grimy.
# 5597. If you don’t do it, I will.
# 5598. If you don’t give her what she wants, she cries.
# 5599. If you don’t have a fire-extinguisher, get one.
# 5600. If you don’t know calculus, don’t you dare tell me you have nothing to do.
# 5601. If you don’t know Esperanto, you’re really out-of-touch.
# 5602. If you don’t know Esperanto, you’re shooting from the lip.
# 5603. If you don’t know how to type, learn.
# 5604. If you don’t leave, I’ll leave.
# 5605. If you don’t like how I do it, do it yourself.
# 5606. If you don’t mind.
# 5607. If you don’t say anything, maybe they won’t notice it.
# 5608. If you don’t use soap, we also sell deodorant.
# 5609. If you don’t, somebody else will.
# 5610. If you feel so inclined.
# 5611. If you find out, let me know.
# 5612. If you get hungry, have some of this soup.
# 5613. If you get into trouble, you’ll get no help.
# 5614. If you have a problem, see your supervisor.
# 5615. If you have the high moral ground, you can classify truth as falsehood.
# 5616. If you have the high moral ground, you can easily dodge your critics.
# 5617. If you have the right clothes, there’s no such thing as bad weather.
# 5618. If you have to attend something, attend your Esperanto club meetings.
# 5619. If you haven’t accepted Esperanto, you haven’t accepted diversity.
# 5620. If you haven’t learned Esperanto, you haven’t exhausted all means to
peace.
# 5621. If you help, the price is triple.
# 5622. If you need to celebrate something, let it be Zamenhof’s birthday.
# 5623. If you never use the word “get”, your English will be very fractured.
# 5624. If you only judge by popularity, you’ll never get anywhere.
# 5625. If you pass the test, you will get a certificate of completion.
# 5626. If you please.
# 5627. If you pronounce “cook” and “kook” the same, well, don’t.
# 5628. If you put salt on the sparrow’s tail, you can catch the sparrow.
# 5629. If you say so.
# 5630. If you scratch it, it will bleed.
# 5631. If you speak English “too correctly”, you’ll be recognized as a non-native.
# 5632. If you succeed, you’ll get no thanks.
# 5633. If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.
# 5634. If you try to do that, you’ll only wind up looking ridiculous.
# 5635. If you want attributions, you’ll have to look them up yourself.
# 5636. If you want friends, learn Esperanto.
# 5637. If you want money, learn English.
# 5638. If you want peace, work for justice.
# 5639. If you want to advance, you need to avoid the places of pleasure.
# 5640. If you want to collect picture postcards, Esperanto is your ticket.
# 5641. If you want to help, make me a sandwich.
# 5642. If you want to know that, ask the dean.
# 5643. If you want to know that, you’ll have to ask me in Esperanto.
# 5644. If you want to take the ride, you have to buy the ticket.
# 5645. If you wanted to know that, you should have asked me earlier.
# 5646. If you watch, the price is double.
# 5647. If you will give me a couple of minutes, I’m sure I can find it.
# 5648. If you’ll do the cooking, I’ll do the dishes.
# 5649. If you’re good on the ten-key, you’ll always have a job.
# 5650. If you’re happy and want to show it, clap your hands.
# 5651. If you’re in trouble, I’m in trouble.
# 5652. If you’re not into Esperanto, you’re not into the free exchange of ideas.
# 5653. If you’re not using “get”, you’re probably also not using “don’t”.
# 5654. If you’re searching for searching wisdom, search elsewhere.
# 5655. If you’re short on everything except enemy, you’re in battle.
# 5656. If you’re so smart, how come you’re not rich?
# 5657. If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich?
# 5658. If you’re tempted, you’ve already sinned.
# 5659. If you’re too tired to cook, do take out.
# 5660. If your abiding interest is that the process be peaceful, then use Esperanto.
# 5661. If your neighbor is bothering you, we have some extra seats up here.
# 5662. Ignore the care and feeding of the hoi polloi at your peril.
# 5663. Ignoring Esperanto costs money.
# 5664. Ill-gotten gains.
# 5665. Imagine how much money he is making.
# 5666. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.
# 5667. Impertinence.
# 5668. Impolite expressions are included.
# 5669. In a heartbeat.
# 5670. In a long time.
# 5671. In America, coffee has the status that tea has in China.
# 5672. In America, there are still many ethnic enclaves.
# 5673. In American English, we never say “bloke” except as a joke or an
affectation.
# 5674. In an eye blink.
# 5675. In anagrams, spaces and punctuation are ignored.
# 5676. In any case, we have to leave by the end of the month.
# 5677. In any case, we leave tomorrow morning.
# 5678. In Asimov’s story “Profession”, the word “Olympics” is a motif.
# 5679. In baseball “safe” and “out” are antonyms.
# 5680. In basketball, traveling means moving without dribbling, and incurs a
penalty.
# 5681. In broad daylight.
# 5682. In calm waters, everyone is a good captain.
# 5683. In case of fire, break glass.
# 5684. In case you feel carsick, I have some medication for that.
# 5685. In cyberspace, everything is miscellaneous.
# 5686. In cyberspace, only reasons matter.
# 5687. In discussion of logical operations, “and” is sometimes used as a verb.
# 5688. In English we say “friends-and-relations” much more than “kin-folk”.
# 5689. In English we say “holiday” much more than “festival”.
# 5690. In English, the word “holiday” is used much more than the word “festival”.
# 5691. In English, we often use the word “place” to mean “establishment”.
# 5692. In English, we use the dative case extensively.
# 5693. In fact, it means the opposite.
# 5694. In fact, it will make it easier.
# 5695. In God we trust – all others pay cash.
# 5696. In God we trust.
# 5697. In July, it sure is hot.
# 5698. In my book it does.
# 5699. In my dream, I tried on lots of beautiful clothes.
# 5700. In New York, a ship disaster in 1904 claimed about a thousand lives.
# 5701. In one ear and out the other.
# 5702. In one sitting.
# 5703. In order to advance a given heresy, it helps to be orthodox in everything
else.
# 5704. In order to be able to afford a house, you have to get something out the
door.
# 5705. In order to learn Esperanto, you have to turn over a new leaf.
# 5706. In order to reduce the amount of guessing, submit a parallel draft in
Esperanto.
# 5707. In private they quarrel, but in public they hold hands.
# 5708. In sickness and in health.
# 5709. In some cases the English in the original was quite convoluted.
# 5710. In sync.
# 5711. In ten minutes, I’ll take my shower.
# 5712. In that case, I won’t put the food on the table just yet.
# 5713. In the countryside are many villages.
# 5714. In the end, I forgave him.
# 5715. In the first place, you’re not my mother.
# 5716. In the future I won’t buy that.
# 5717. In the heat of battle.
# 5718. In the know.
# 5719. In the morning, I found the cutting board covered with cockroaches.
# 5720. In the news there is a big scandal in Taiwan.
# 5721. In the real world, only results matter.
# 5722. In the wintertime, because of the dry air, we need a humidifier.
# 5723. In the wintertime, we want to have warmth.
# 5724. In the word “comb”, the “b” is silent.
# 5725. In the word “crumb”, the “b” is silent.
# 5726. In the word “receipt”, the “p” is silent.
# 5727. In this town, cars come up behind you on the sidewalk!
# 5728. In this way, you’ll be less of a target.
# 5729. In three more weeks, we’ll move to our new apartment.
# 5730. In twenty minutes, call me.
# 5731. In two days we will take a group picture.
# 5732. In very rare cases, a person can have more than one set of DNA.
# 5733. In what language?
# 5734. In what way?
# 5735. In your dreams.
# 5736. Incidents are what fill the vacuum of missing corpora.
# 5737. Individualized assignments could be based on this file.
# 5738. Infrastructure.
# 5739. In-phase.
# 5740. Inquiry-denial is a crime against humanity.
# 5741. Inquiry-denial.
# 5742. Inquiry-deniers send their victims to Galileo Prison.
# 5743. Insisting on simplicity in a complex world is the only course of survival.
# 5744. Instead of marrying, a man should buy a house for a woman he hates.
# 5745. Interment of corpses is based on superstition.
# 5746. Io is one of the moons of Jupiter.
# 5747. Irony.
# 5748. Is a security deposit required?
# 5749. Is anything wrong?
# 5750. Is foul play suspected?
# 5751. Is he a southerner?
# 5752. Is he an American?
# 5753. Is he being reasonable?
# 5754. Is he from the south?
# 5755. Is he mentally unbalanced perhaps?
# 5756. Is he on lunch?
# 5757. Is he on the take?
# 5758. Is he on the wagon?
# 5759. Is he productive?
# 5760. Is he ready to talk?
# 5761. Is he senile?
# 5762. Is he still active?
# 5763. Is he well-behaved?
# 5764. Is it a closed shop?
# 5765. Is it a confirmed reservation?
# 5766. Is it a deal?
# 5767. Is it a matter of life and death?
# 5768. Is it a scientific experiment?
# 5769. Is it all right with you if me and her go shopping together tomorrow?
# 5770. Is it all right with you?
# 5771. Is it bigger than a breadbox?
# 5772. Is it carved in stone?
# 5773. Is it cold outside?
# 5774. Is it difficult to get a teaching certificate?
# 5775. Is it dry yet?
# 5776. Is it far away?
# 5777. Is it in English?
# 5778. Is it just a feel-good cause for losers and crazies?
# 5779. Is it just me, or did Northrop Frye really take up where Ambrose Bierce
left off?
# 5780. Is it just me, or does Fulford really take up where Epstein leaves off?
# 5781. Is it just my imagination?
# 5782. Is it just us, or is everybody having this problem?
# 5783. Is it legal?
# 5784. Is it negotiable?
# 5785. Is it OK if I put on my socks?
# 5786. Is it OK if we call you “Charlie”?
# 5787. Is it OK if we call you, Charlie?
# 5788. Is it over?
# 5789. Is it possible to do non-destructive testing on this?
# 5790. Is it possible to do that?
# 5791. Is it possible to get an ivy-league education at a state school?
# 5792. Is it safe?
# 5793. Is it that obvious?
# 5794. Is it time for beddy-bye?
# 5795. Is it too warm?
# 5796. Is it toxic?
# 5797. Is it true that you once ran a saloon?
# 5798. Is it within walking distance?
# 5799. Is it worth the effort?
# 5800. Is it written in stone?
# 5801. Is it your place to ask me such questions?
# 5802. Is my mother there?
# 5803. Is not this a good time?
# 5804. Is she in a relationship?
# 5805. Is she worried about it?
# 5806. Is that a new syringe?
# 5807. Is that a threat, or a promise?
# 5808. Is that all right with you?
# 5809. Is that all you wanted to tell me?
# 5810. Is that all?
# 5811. Is that an idiomatic expression?
# 5812. Is that asking so much?
# 5813. Is that asking too much?
# 5814. Is that beautiful, or what.
# 5815. Is that burner still on?
# 5816. Is that kosher?
# 5817. Is that OK with you?
# 5818. Is that productive work?
# 5819. Is that sack empty?
# 5820. Is that so?
# 5821. Is that spider poisonous?
# 5822. Is that the best you can do?
# 5823. Is that the real reason?
# 5824. Is that the truth?
# 5825. Is that what you were asking?
# 5826. Is the bell working today?
# 5827. Is the danger past?
# 5828. Is the doctor in?
# 5829. Is the end of the world coming?
# 5830. Is the harvest over?
# 5831. Is the internet working?
# 5832. Is the money good?
# 5833. Is the time up yet?
# 5834. Is the water service going to be curtailed during the holidays?
# 5835. Is there a catch?
# 5836. Is there a cobra in the house?
# 5837. Is there a doctor in the house?
# 5838. Is there a fee?
# 5839. Is there a ladle for the soup?
# 5840. Is there a lifeguard on duty?
# 5841. Is there a mop anywhere in this house?
# 5842. Is there a non-invasive alternative?
# 5843. Is there a restaurant nearby?
# 5844. Is there a sign on my door that says, “Grand Central Station”?
# 5845. Is there a window open somewhere?
# 5846. Is there an audit trail?
# 5847. Is there an Esperanto club in Siberia?
# 5848. Is there any more?
# 5849. Is there any MSG in this food?
# 5850. Is there any room available?
# 5851. Is there anything else?
# 5852. Is there anything I can do in the meantime?
# 5853. Is there cause for alarm?
# 5854. Is there cause for concern?
# 5855. Is there enough seating for everyone?
# 5856. Is there no public domain corpus for ESL students other than this one?
# 5857. Is there seating enough for everyone?
# 5858. Is there some reason this is here?
# 5859. Is there some reason this is like this?
# 5860. Is this a better location?
# 5861. Is this a bribe?
# 5862. Is this a good setting?
# 5863. Is this a rush order?
# 5864. Is this a serious proposal?
# 5865. Is this a shaggy-dog story?
# 5866. Is this all you wanted to show me?
# 5867. Is this an airtight container?
# 5868. Is this correct usage?
# 5869. Is this Dr. Zamenhof’s walking stick?
# 5870. Is this enough?
# 5871. Is this futile, or what.
# 5872. Is this Grand Central Station?
# 5873. Is this how you take care of the baby?
# 5874. Is this leading somewhere?
# 5875. Is this necessary?
# 5876. Is this not a good time?
# 5877. Is this seat taken?
# 5878. Is this taking care of the baby?
# 5879. Is this the best there is?
# 5880. Is this your property?
# 5881. Is this yours?
# 5882. Is your baby crawling yet?
# 5883. Is your baby nursing?
# 5884. Is your name on the list?
# 5885. Is your reservation confirmed?
# 5886. Isaac Asimov didn’t have the last word, but he had the last question.
# 5887. Isn’t “noble savage” an oxymoron?
# 5888. Isn’t “rush-hour traffic” an oxymoron?
# 5889. Isn’t “they settled awhile” an oxymoron?
# 5890. Isn’t he rather immature?
# 5891. Isn’t it time she started sleeping by herself?
# 5892. Isn’t sweet-scented laundry detergent a poisoning hazard for small
children?
# 5893. Isn’t that kind of risky?
# 5894. Isn’t this a little pre-mature?
# 5895. Isn’t this fun?
# 5896. It adds up.
# 5897. It always takes a long time for them to do it.
# 5898. It appears that King Tut died of gangrene, following a broken leg.
# 5899. It bears repeating.
# 5900. It beats me.
# 5901. It bled only a little.
# 5902. It blew sky-high.
# 5903. It burned to the waterline.
# 5904. It came as no surprise to anyone in the know.
# 5905. It came crashing down around their ears.
# 5906. It came in handy.
# 5907. It can come in handy.
# 5908. It can easily go bad.
# 5909. It caused a stir.
# 5910. It could be anywhere.
# 5911. It could be better, but it’s good enough.
# 5912. It crashed and burned.
# 5913. It didn’t hit me until later.
# 5914. It didn’t make much of a splash.
# 5915. It didn’t start.
# 5916. It disappeared.
# 5917. It disintegrated.
# 5918. It doesn’t belong to me.
# 5919. It doesn’t cost much.
# 5920. It doesn’t fit in my schedule.
# 5921. It doesn’t fit me.
# 5922. It doesn’t have to be done right away.
# 5923. It doesn’t hurt any to do so.
# 5924. It doesn’t hurt, but it feels tender.
# 5925. It doesn’t matter to me.
# 5926. It doesn’t matter.
# 5927. It doesn’t need cooking.
# 5928. It doesn’t really belong to me.
# 5929. It fails to mention bilingualism, let alone Esperanto.
# 5930. It fails to mention bilingualism, to say nothing of Esperanto.
# 5931. It fell out of my back pocket.
# 5932. It fell over.
# 5933. It fell way under there.
# 5934. It fits me to a T.
# 5935. It fits.
# 5936. It gives a lovely light.
# 5937. It goes bad after two days.
# 5938. It goes to the highest bidder.
# 5939. It goes with the territory.
# 5940. It got quite cold, not last night, but the night before last.
# 5941. It had a fateful, and fatal, effect.
# 5942. It had an impact.
# 5943. It happened a long time ago.
# 5944. It happened on his watch.
# 5945. It happened without warning.
# 5946. It hardly matters.
# 5947. It has been translated into English.
# 5948. It has had no effect.
# 5949. It has often happened that one died of gangrene.
# 5950. It has served us well, this morphology of crystals.
# 5951. It has to be used within two days.
# 5952. It hasn’t been cleaned in half a year.
# 5953. It hasn’t been vetted.
# 5954. It hurts here.
# 5955. It is a painful procedure.
# 5956. It is a windowless room.
# 5957. It is apples that are lacking.
# 5958. It is apples that we need to buy more of.
# 5959. It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness.
# 5960. It is British authors that is his specialty.
# 5961. It is engineering formulas that is in this book.
# 5962. It is imperative to finish by today.
# 5963. It is just a little farther.
# 5964. It is modern novels that interests me.
# 5965. It is nearly dark.
# 5966. It is non-toxic.
# 5967. It is not easy to fix this problem.
# 5968. It is not easy to fix this tooth.
# 5969. It is not far away.
# 5970. It is old books that is his passion.
# 5971. It is on the left side of the road.
# 5972. It is pointless to criticize the tendency toward abbreviation.
# 5973. It is right ahead.
# 5974. It is running very slowly.
# 5975. It is saplings that sway, I believe.
# 5976. It is sometimes hard to hear the bell.
# 5977. It is stamps that he collects.
# 5978. It is still a matter of debate what the extent of that connection amounts to.
# 5979. It is the fifth of the month today.
# 5980. It is virtually certain that you’ll outlive me by many years.
# 5981. It just needs a little tweaking.
# 5982. It just takes some getting-used-to, that’s all.
# 5983. It keeps her entertained.
# 5984. It keeps me busy.
# 5985. It keeps me on my toes.
# 5986. It lasts a long time.
# 5987. It lasts only two days.
# 5988. It left a scar.
# 5989. It looked inviting.
# 5990. It looks good enough to eat.
# 5991. It looks just like a mouse has been nibbling on it.
# 5992. It looks like a live dog, but it’s just a toy dog.
# 5993. It looks like a scientific experiment.
# 5994. It looks like she just woke up.
# 5995. It looks like there’s a storm brewing.
# 5996. It looks like we’re winning the war against the cockroaches.
# 5997. It looks so life-like, it’s scary.
# 5998. It looks to have been an excellent career move.
# 5999. It looks unfinished.
# 6000. It makes me feel good, just talking about leaving this place.
# 6001. It makes no difference.
# 6002. It matters immensely.
# 6003. It matters little at this point.
# 6004. It may be due to a change in the weather.
# 6005. It means a lot to me.
# 6006. It means nothing.
# 6007. It might have been an inside job.
# 6008. It might rain, since my leg is in pain.
# 6009. It might rain.
# 6010. It must be difficult to die.
# 6011. It needs a pinch of salt.
# 6012. It needs to be redone.
# 6013. It needs to be second nature with you.
# 6014. It never happened before or since.
# 6015. It never happened, period.
# 6016. It never happened.
# 6017. It never worries the wolf how many the sheep may be.
# 6018. It only hurts when I laugh.
# 6019. It pains me to have to say this.
# 6020. It pops out at an unpredictable angle.
# 6021. It rained last night.
# 6022. It rained so much that the street was impassable.
# 6023. It rains a lot in London.
# 6024. It said on the news that the train will be busy during that time-frame.
# 6025. It scared me, and I’m fearless.
# 6026. It scared the daylights out of me.
# 6027. It scared the daylights out of them.
# 6028. It seems like more than just a coincidence.
# 6029. It seems like there’s a mining accident in the news every month.
# 6030. It seems like whoever honks loudest has the right-of-way.
# 6031. It seems to have something to do with the flavor of the ice-cream.
# 6032. It should be an element of style to include a note in Esperanto.
# 6033. It slipped through my fingers.
# 6034. It slipped through their fingers.
# 6035. It smells good.
# 6036. It snowed continuously at a constant rate.
# 6037. It snowed in Jinan for three days.
# 6038. It so happens that it is.
# 6039. It sounded good up until then.
# 6040. It sounds like she’s choking.
# 6041. It sounds like you’re having difficulty.
# 6042. It stirred up a hornets’ nest.
# 6043. It sunk on its maiden voyage.
# 6044. It sunk without a trace.
# 6045. It sure does look bad.
# 6046. It sure does stink in here.
# 6047. It sure is hot outside.
# 6048. It takes all kinds.
# 6049. It takes great ability for a man to sit quietly in a room.
# 6050. It takes him only a five-minute walk to get to work.
# 6051. It takes time to get over that.
# 6052. It takes twenty years to make an overnight genius.
# 6053. It takes two people?
# 6054. It takes two to tango.
# 6055. It took him a long time to make the trip.
# 6056. It took me a few moments to sum that series.
# 6057. It took Ogden Nash a while to find that unique voice of his.
# 6058. It torqued my jaw.
# 6059. It toughens them up.
# 6060. It turned out for the best.
# 6061. It turns out what she really meant was –
# 6062. It was a bitter fight.
# 6063. It was a bitterly-fought campaign.
# 6064. It was a blessing in disguise.
# 6065. It was a bone-headed idea.
# 6066. It was a brazen attack.
# 6067. It was a brilliant performance.
# 6068. It was a brisk walk, but I made it on time.
# 6069. It was a cartoon movie.
# 6070. It was a case of an irresistible force meeting an immovable object.
# 6071. It was a case of gross negligence.
# 6072. It was a case of lions being led by donkeys.
# 6073. It was a case of mistaken identity.
# 6074. It was a commercial success, but not an artistic success.
# 6075. It was a cookie, I think, that dropped to the floor.
# 6076. It was a delaying action.
# 6077. It was a face-saving maneuver.
# 6078. It was a fair test, and I failed.
# 6079. It was a family outing.
# 6080. It was a fatal injury, as it turned out.
# 6081. It was a feature completely forgotten about by the development staff.
# 6082. It was a flop.
# 6083. It was a fly-by-night outfit.
# 6084. It was a ghastly scene.
# 6085. It was a great humiliation.
# 6086. It was a grizzly scene.
# 6087. It was a hit-and-run accident.
# 6088. It was a home run.
# 6089. It was a joint venture between an American company and a Chinese
company.
# 6090. It was a junk message, not a live person.
# 6091. It was a liberal translation.
# 6092. It was a loveless marriage.
# 6093. It was a marriage of convenience.
# 6094. It was a massive structure.
# 6095. It was a moral victory.
# 6096. It was a painful procedure.
# 6097. It was a question of choosing a suitable solvent.
# 6098. It was a question of courage.
# 6099. It was a question of time.
# 6100. It was a question of timing.
# 6101. It was a scientific experiment.
# 6102. It was a search-and-rescue mission.
# 6103. It was a shotgun marriage.
# 6104. It was a win-win situation.
# 6105. It was a wrong number.
# 6106. It was against my better judgment.
# 6107. It was an artistic success, but not a commercial success.
# 6108. It was an eye-popping windfall.
# 6109. It was as welcome as the first paycheck after the holidays.
# 6110. It was bleeding profusely.
# 6111. It was both a commercial success and an artistic success.
# 6112. It was closed.
# 6113. It was completely needless.
# 6114. It was declined.
# 6115. It was discovered during a routine check.
# 6116. It was done in good faith.
# 6117. It was downhill from there.
# 6118. It was eerily quiet.
# 6119. It was for the best.
# 6120. It was front-page news.
# 6121. It was given out that he committed suicide.
# 6122. It was hard on me to have to walk that far to school every day.
# 6123. It was hard on the company to have to pay such a big fine.
# 6124. It was hard on their mother to raise them alone.
# 6125. It was hard to choose.
# 6126. It was hard to see among the other things.
# 6127. It was hard to see it among the other things.
# 6128. It was her own fault.
# 6129. It was his first time to handle this task, and he forgot to do it.
# 6130. It was impossible to miss.
# 6131. It was in plain sight.
# 6132. It was in the Atlantic Ocean that the Titanic sunk.
# 6133. It was just a flash in the pan.
# 6134. It was just a piece of trash that she was reaching for.
# 6135. It was just a pose.
# 6136. It was just a thought.
# 6137. It was just an idea.
# 6138. It was just another penny-pinching move on the part of the powers that be.
# 6139. It was just for fun.
# 6140. It was justified.
# 6141. It was left running unattended.
# 6142. It was love at first sight.
# 6143. It was my fault.
# 6144. It was neither a commercial success nor an artistic success.
# 6145. It was on the tip of my tongue.
# 6146. It was one of those RSPV invitations.
# 6147. It was only a flesh wound.
# 6148. It was only a warning.
# 6149. It was open.
# 6150. It was right in the first place.
# 6151. It was said in jest.
# 6152. It was smaller then.
# 6153. It was so convoluted that I could only guess at the meaning.
# 6154. It was so good that people were willing to pay that price for it.
# 6155. It was so good that the professor said it could be published.
# 6156. It was so noisy, I couldn’t hear myself think.
# 6157. It was struck by lightening.
# 6158. It was supposed to take three hours, but it actually took seven.
# 6159. It was the calm before the storm.
# 6160. It was the right thing to do.
# 6161. It was worth a try.
# 6162. It was worth it.
# 6163. It wasn’t a big cake.
# 6164. It wasn’t easy.
# 6165. It wasn’t expensive.
# 6166. It wasn’t for lack of trying.
# 6167. It wasn’t hard to replace them.
# 6168. It wasn’t ME!
# 6169. It wasn’t my fault.
# 6170. It wasn’t our intention for that to happen.
# 6171. It went for a hundred dollars.
# 6172. It went south.
# 6173. It went to pieces.
# 6174. It went up in smoke.
# 6175. It will all come out in the wash.
# 6176. It will be good for you.
# 6177. It will last us until next year.
# 6178. It will probably happen again five minutes from now.
# 6179. It will probably not last until the end of the year.
# 6180. It will soon be time to seek a new contract somewhere.
# 6181. It will turn up sooner or later.
# 6182. It won’t be easy.
# 6183. It won’t happen again.
# 6184. It won’t hurt to take some extra water.
# 6185. It would be best for us to start early in the day.
# 6186. It would be crazy for a sheep to love a wolf.
# 6187. It would be nice if it were a little cooler.
# 6188. It would be nice if the downloads didn’t take so long.
# 6189. It would be nice if the store were closer.
# 6190. It would be nice if they had seating.
# 6191. It would be nice if they would install a handrail for the entrance steps.
# 6192. It would be nice if they would install a street light at that intersection.
# 6193. It would be nice if we had a bigger kitchen.
# 6194. It would be nice if we had a heavy rain, to clean the air.
# 6195. It would be nice to have a little rain.
# 6196. It would be perfect, if they had seating.
# 6197. It would have been nice if they had finished the building on time.
# 6198. It wouldn’t hurt any.
# 6199. It wound up taking seven hours instead of three.
# 6200. It’ll never fly, Orville.
# 6201. It’s a beautiful home, but there’s a lot of noise from airplanes.
# 6202. It’s a beautiful world.
# 6203. It’s a big joke.
# 6204. It’s a bittersweet memory.
# 6205. It’s a bonanza.
# 6206. It’s a buyer’s market.
# 6207. It’s a capital mistake to theorize before having data.
# 6208. It’s a case of nepotism.
# 6209. It’s a crying shame.
# 6210. It’s a deal.
# 6211. It’s a debt that has to be paid.
# 6212. It’s a doggone pity.
# 6213. It’s a done deal.
# 6214. It’s a downward spiral.
# 6215. It’s a face-freezing day.
# 6216. It’s a fair game.
# 6217. It’s a farce to study the cause of our grievances any further.
# 6218. It’s a fifteen minute walk from here.
# 6219. It’s a fine feeling.
# 6220. It’s a firing.
# 6221. It’s a fool’s paradise.
# 6222. It’s a free country.
# 6223. It’s a frequently-employed procedure.
# 6224. It’s a gold mine of information.
# 6225. It’s a good idea to keep a working flashlight handy.
# 6226. It’s a good question, and it has a good answer.
# 6227. It’s a great read.
# 6228. It’s a great story.
# 6229. It’s a heartbreaking case, but I can’t spare any manpower to work on it.
# 6230. It’s a jungle out there.
# 6231. It’s a little tight through the shoulders.
# 6232. It’s a long shot.
# 6233. It’s a losing battle, but one that’s lost slowly enough to be useful.
# 6234. It’s a matter of life and death.
# 6235. It’s a mnemonic for the first eight digits of pi.
# 6236. It’s a moot point.
# 6237. It’s a muscle spasm.
# 6238. It’s a mutual-admiration society.
# 6239. It’s a mystery to me.
# 6240. It’s a never-ending battle.
# 6241. It’s a niche company.
# 6242. It’s a novelty item.
# 6243. It’s a pretty light.
# 6244. It’s a put-on.
# 6245. It’s a real uphill battle to get anything done at this place.
# 6246. It’s a self-defining expression.
# 6247. It’s a seller’s market.
# 6248. It’s a shame you can’t stay.
# 6249. It’s a shot in the dark.
# 6250. It’s a simple matter.
# 6251. It’s a small change.
# 6252. It’s a small thing, but it would go over well.
# 6253. It’s a small world.
# 6254. It’s a stalemate.
# 6255. It’s a strong reminder.
# 6256. It’s a sunken cost.
# 6257. It’s a telephone call from my nephew.
# 6258. It’s a twelve-story building.
# 6259. It’s a very beautiful day.
# 6260. It’s a vicious circle.
# 6261. It’s a war out there.
# 6262. It’s against my better judgment.
# 6263. It’s airtight.
# 6264. It’s all completely automated.
# 6265. It’s all for you.
# 6266. It’s all gone.
# 6267. It’s all in your head.
# 6268. It’s all my fault.
# 6269. It’s all over but the shout.
# 6270. It’s all right for the time being.
# 6271. It’s all right if she just sits here.
# 6272. It’s all right with me.
# 6273. It’s all right.
# 6274. It’s all the rage.
# 6275. It’s all the same after a day.
# 6276. It’s all yours.
# 6277. It’s almost warm enough not to need a hat.
# 6278. It’s almost warm enough to not need a hat.
# 6279. It’s already half past the hour.
# 6280. It’s already nine o’clock.
# 6281. It’s already time to go.
# 6282. It’s always the same.
# 6283. It’s an acquired taste.
# 6284. It’s an edible fungus.
# 6285. It’s an integrated whole.
# 6286. It’s an unsolved crime.
# 6287. It’s an unsolved murder.
# 6288. It’s an unsolved mystery.
# 6289. It’s an uphill battle.
# 6290. It’s backwards.
# 6291. It’s bad luck to be superstitious.
# 6292. It’s been a long time since I did that.
# 6293. It’s been a long time since I saw her.
# 6294. It’s been a really pleasant evening.
# 6295. It’s been a year since they cleaned this carpet.
# 6296. It’s been around a long time.
# 6297. It’s been around a while.
# 6298. It’s been nice talking with you.
# 6299. It’s been quite a while since we’ve had sunshine.
# 6300. It’s been two years ago last month since we lost him.
# 6301. It’s beginning to look somewhat clean, comparatively speaking.
# 6302. It’s best to criticize only someone who is safely dead.
# 6303. It’s best to hide during the holidays.
# 6304. It’s both rolled into one.
# 6305. It’s cold enough to wear your hat.
# 6306. It’s cold, so wear your coat.
# 6307. It’s dangerous for her to go there by herself.
# 6308. It’s dangerous to depend on the nobility of another person.
# 6309. It’s definitely a case of the tail wagging the dog.
# 6310. It’s din-din time.
# 6311. It’s dusty in there.
# 6312. It’s easier said than done.
# 6313. It’s easier to face the world with his help.
# 6314. It’s easy to get sidetracked.
# 6315. It’s even later than that.
# 6316. It’s expensive.
# 6317. It’s fair game.
# 6318. It’s filthy.
# 6319. It’s fine by me.
# 6320. It’s for you.
# 6321. It’s for your own good.
# 6322. It’s freezing!
# 6323. It’s fresh, but I had to go a long way for it.
# 6324. It’s frightening to contemplate the frequency of runway incursions.
# 6325. It’s fun to read the personal ads.
# 6326. It’s getting hotter by the day.
# 6327. It’s getting late, so no footbath tonight.
# 6328. It’s getting late.
# 6329. It’s going to be a rainy day.
# 6330. It’s going to be frantic like that until New Year’s.
# 6331. It’s going to get colder, now that the sun is going down.
# 6332. It’s going very slowly.
# 6333. It’s good clean fun.
# 6334. It’s good I went there myself.
# 6335. It’s got a bite to it.
# 6336. It’s got everything in it but the kitchen sink.
# 6337. It’s great that your sister sent us this book.
# 6338. It’s Greek to me.
# 6339. It’s grist for the mill.
# 6340. It’s growing, even as we speak.
# 6341. It’s happened several times.
# 6342. It’s hard on your family.
# 6343. It’s hard to come off.
# 6344. It’s hard to fool her.
# 6345. It’s hard to forgive those whom we’ve wronged.
# 6346. It’s held together with bailing wire and chewing gum.
# 6347. It’s her fault.
# 6348. It’s herbal medicine.
# 6349. It’s high time we defrosted the refrigerator.
# 6350. It’s his fault.
# 6351. It’s impossible to defeat an ignorant man in argument.
# 6352. It’s in God’s hands now.
# 6353. It’s in the dictionary, you know.
# 6354. It’s inside-out.
# 6355. It’s interesting if you’re interested.
# 6356. It’s just a case of vacuum-filling on the part of Nature, I’m afraid.
# 6357. It’s just a coincidence.
# 6358. It’s just a distraction from the deadly business at hand.
# 6359. It’s just a façade.
# 6360. It’s just a feel-good cause for losers and crazies.
# 6361. It’s just a friendly game.
# 6362. It’s just what the doctor ordered.
# 6363. It’s kind of dicey.
# 6364. It’s kind of dorky to forget your door key.
# 6365. It’s later than you think.
# 6366. It’s leaking from the broken package.
# 6367. It’s like pulling hen’s teeth to get anything done at this place.
# 6368. It’s like pulling hen’s teeth to get them to do anything around here.
# 6369. It’s lonely at the top.
# 6370. It’s lovely at the top.
# 6371. It’s massive, by any measure.
# 6372. It’s me!
# 6373. It’s mighty young fun.
# 6374. It’s mine now.
# 6375. It’s my business.
# 6376. It’s my fault.
# 6377. It’s my intention that we’ll have our own house someday.
# 6378. It’s my turn.
# 6379. It’s nice and quiet at this hour of day.
# 6380. It’s nice to have met you.
# 6381. It’s no bother.
# 6382. It’s no trouble.
# 6383. It’s none of your business.
# 6384. It’s not a long way away.
# 6385. It’s not a requirement, only an option.
# 6386. It’s not because of this.
# 6387. It’s not enough for me to succeed – you must fail.
# 6388. It’s not enough to understand it – you have to GROK it.
# 6389. It’s not fair to the students who paid for the course.
# 6390. It’s not fair!
# 6391. It’s not going to happen on my watch.
# 6392. It’s not going to work, so don’t even try it.
# 6393. It’s not good for her to be always gnawing on this, so let’s throw it away.
# 6394. It’s not just dirty, it’s filthy.
# 6395. It’s not made of cotton.
# 6396. It’s not made of good material.
# 6397. It’s not mine.
# 6398. It’s not my cup of tea.
# 6399. It’s not my day to watch him.
# 6400. It’s not my scene.
# 6401. It’s not my turn to watch the baby.
# 6402. It’s not necessary to know Linear Point Set Theory, but it is necessary to
have forgotten it.
# 6403. It’s not only a good idea, it’s the law.
# 6404. It’s not over until it’s over.
# 6405. It’s not safe over there.
# 6406. It’s not safe to live alone.
# 6407. It’s not so much a hobby, really, as an avocation.
# 6408. It’s not the fall that kills you.
# 6409. It’s not the gales, but the set of the sails, that determines the way I go.
# 6410. It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog.
# 6411. It’s not very probable.
# 6412. It’s not what I had in mind.
# 6413. It’s not what you know, but who you know.
# 6414. It’s not what you think it is.
# 6415. It’s not worth a separate trip.
# 6416. It’s nothing personal.
# 6417. It’s obsolete.
# 6418. It’s offered as-is.
# 6419. It’s on its way.
# 6420. It’s on the first floor of the Administration Building.
# 6421. It’s on the house.
# 6422. It’s one of his perks.
# 6423. It’s one of my payroll deductions.
# 6424. It’s one of the benefits of the job.
# 6425. It’s one of the things on my wish list.
# 6426. It’s only a question of “when”, not “whether”.
# 6427. It’s only a question of time.
# 6428. It’s only money.
# 6429. It’s out of commission.
# 6430. It’s out of kilter.
# 6431. It’s part of the test that you should not know its purpose.
# 6432. It’s picture-perfect.
# 6433. It’s pretty light coming from the lantern.
# 6434. It’s pretty light.
# 6435. It’s quite lengthy.
# 6436. It’s quite quiet now.
# 6437. It’s raining a lot.
# 6438. It’s raining cats and dogs.
# 6439. It’s rather selfish of her to take both halves of the orange that I peeled.
# 6440. It’s right side up.
# 6441. It’s risky.
# 6442. It’s safe and healthy.
# 6443. It’s safe over here.
# 6444. It’s selling like hotcakes.
# 6445. It’s show-and-tell time.
# 6446. It’s simplicity itself.
# 6447. It’s sleeting today.
# 6448. It’s slippery.
# 6449. It’s slipping.
# 6450. It’s small change.
# 6451. It’s snowing outside, so wear your boots.
# 6452. It’s something that can be safely ignored.
# 6453. It’s spoiling for a hurricane, if you ask me.
# 6454. It’s taking longer than I thought.
# 6455. It’s ten o’clock.
# 6456. It’s the calm before the storm.
# 6457. It’s the cat’s meow.
# 6458. It’s the cigarette that smokes.
# 6459. It’s the lesser of two evils.
# 6460. It’s the likes of you that give foreigners a bad name.
# 6461. It’s the same as always.
# 6462. It’s the same content, just a different style.
# 6463. It’s the same thing.
# 6464. It’s the second mouse that gets the cheese.
# 6465. It’s the thought that counts.
# 6466. It’s their cash cow.
# 6467. It’s their fault.
# 6468. It’s there for a reason.
# 6469. It’s time for break.
# 6470. It’s time for her bath.
# 6471. It’s time for me to bathe and shave.
# 6472. It’s time for me to shower and shave.
# 6473. It’s time for me to sit down.
# 6474. It’s time for you to stand up.
# 6475. It’s time for your nap.
# 6476. It’s time to close the curtain anyway.
# 6477. It’s time to eat.
# 6478. It’s time to face the music.
# 6479. It’s time to get dressed for the day.
# 6480. It’s time to go home.
# 6481. It’s time to move on that.
# 6482. It’s time to move on.
# 6483. It’s time to push.
# 6484. It’s too bad he couldn’t take a hint.
# 6485. It’s too bad he died young.
# 6486. It’s too bad someone didn’t tell you this twenty years ago.
# 6487. It’s too bad you failed the exam.
# 6488. It’s too bad you had to learn the hard way.
# 6489. It’s too bad you have to go to work in such bad weather.
# 6490. It’s too bad you missed the movie.
# 6491. It’s too early to tell.
# 6492. It’s too expensive.
# 6493. It’s too heavy to carry.
# 6494. It’s too late.
# 6495. It’s too loose on her.
# 6496. It’s too loose.
# 6497. It’s too risky.
# 6498. It’s too salty.
# 6499. It’s too tight.
# 6500. It’s true!
# 6501. It’s up to the individual teacher.
# 6502. It’s upside-down.
# 6503. It’s usually easier to delete than to add, so go ahead and put everything in.
# 6504. It’s vastly more important for you to learn English than for me to learn
Chinese.
# 6505. It’s very cold outside.
# 6506. It’s very convenient.
# 6507. It’s very dirty here.
# 6508. It’s very nice outside.
# 6509. It’s very uncomfortable.
# 6510. It’s warm enough to rain.
# 6511. It’s warmer in here.
# 6512. It’s what I’m used to.
# 6513. It’s worth every penny.
# 6514. It’s your call.
# 6515. It’s your decision.
# 6516. It’s your fault.
# 6517. It’s yummy in the tummy.
# 6518. It’s, like, the best thing that every happened to me.
# 6519. Its batteries have run down.
# 6520. Its lid is over here.
# 6521. Its presence depends greatly on temperature.
# 6522. James drove me home.
# 6523. James Thurber spilled the beans on Walter Mitty.
# 6524. January, February, March, April, May, June.
# 6525. Japanese cameras are very good.
# 6526. Jeeves showed that one can press the envelope even by ironing.
# 6527. Jeeves was renowned for his tact and resourcefulness.
# 6528. Jeeves would not approve of this attire.
# 6529. Jesus is coming – look busy!
# 6530. Jiminy Cricket!
# 6531. John Candy had been slated to play Ignatius Reilly.
# 6532. John Harrison’s watch passed its sea trials, and so will Esperanto.
# 6533. John kissed his wife, and so did Sam.
# 6534. John Wells is the author of the Longman pronunciation dictionary.
# 6535. Jokes.
# 6536. Jonathan Britten has some interesting things to say about linguistic
corpora.
# 6537. Judith Polgar was born with a chessboard in her hands.
# 6538. Julius Laffal devised a revealing way of classifying the words of a passage.
# 6539. July, August, September, October, November, December.
# 6540. Jumping to conclusions.
# 6541. Just a few friends.
# 6542. Just about any time would be all right.
# 6543. Just answer the question.
# 6544. Just as carbon strengthens iron, so does Esperanto strengthen society.
# 6545. Just as good food nourishes the body, so does good reading nourish the
mind.
# 6546. Just because a word is plural in Latin, doesn’t mean it is plural in English.
# 6547. Just because it’s good for me doesn’t mean I’m not going to grumble about
it.
# 6548. Just because something has a name doesn’t mean it exists.
# 6549. Just because.
# 6550. Just do it.
# 6551. Just fix my order like I asked, and I’ll be a happy camper.
# 6552. Just for a minute.
# 6553. Just for fun.
# 6554. Just imagine how much money he rakes in.
# 6555. Just imagine if they were all gathered together!
# 6556. Just proofreading this thing was a monumental task.
# 6557. Just put it right there.
# 6558. Just right.
# 6559. Just take a look, and you’ll see the problem.
# 6560. Just this once.
# 6561. Just what I will do if that happens, I don’t know.
# 6562. Justice has triumphed!
# 6563. Keep a stiff upper lip.
# 6564. Keep an even keel.
# 6565. Keep an eye on them.
# 6566. Keep building your file of notes.
# 6567. Keep in touch.
# 6568. Keep it moving.
# 6569. Keep it out of sight.
# 6570. Keep it simple.
# 6571. Keep moving.
# 6572. Keep the baby away from me when I’m changing clothes.
# 6573. Keep the change.
# 6574. Keep up, or keep quiet.
# 6575. Keep you hands to yourself.
# 6576. Keep your eyes peeled.
# 6577. Keep your hands to yourself.
# 6578. Keep your nose to the grindstone.
# 6579. Keeping a column current with items of substance is very difficult.
# 6580. Keeping up with the Joneses.
# 6581. KFC is open today.
# 6582. Killian and Company seems to be right on the money, no pun intended.
# 6583. Kilroy was here.
# 6584. King George III helped John Harrison get his reward money.
# 6585. Kiss Mommy.
# 6586. Kiss-and-tell.
# 6587. Knock yourself out.
# 6588. Knowing calculus is the new standard of numeracy.
# 6589. Knowing more and more about less and less ends in knowing everything
about nothing.
# 6590. Knowledge comes in the doing.
# 6591. Knowledge is power.
# 6592. Knowledge of Esperanto is a pre-requisite for speaking on any world issue.
# 6593. Kowtowing to English is like choosing a contractor based solely on price.
# 6594. Kurt Godel was one of the greatest minds of the twentieth century.
# 6595. Kurt Vonnegut’s tag line was, “and so it goes.”.
# 6596. Lack of intermediacy is often a problem.
# 6597. Lady Astor was quite a wit.
# 6598. Lady Welby had some significant things to say.
# 6599. Land ho!
# 6600. Land should be filled in between Cuba and Florida.
# 6601. Landau was a lion leading donkeys.
# 6602. Larger than life.
# 6603. Larson was right.
# 6604. Last but not least, please clean your area before you leave.
# 6605. Last but not least, Steve did a great job of reminding all of you to come.
# 6606. Last but not least.
# 6607. Last call!
# 6608. Last night my throat felt sore again.
# 6609. Last night we watched the fireworks.
# 6610. Last one in the pool is a rotten egg!
# 6611. Last one out turns off the light.
# 6612. Last year we had good weather.
# 6613. Lastly, remember to take your umbrellas with you when you leave.
# 6614. Later – I’m busy right now.
# 6615. Later I’ll buy another one of these.
# 6616. Later, she’ll know how to do this.
# 6617. Later, they set off more firecrackers.
# 6618. Laugh, and the world laughs with you.
# 6619. Laughable nonsense.
# 6620. Laughing out loud.
# 6621. Lax discipline.
# 6622. Lay your head on my lap and see if you can sleep.
# 6623. Lay your head on my lap and see if you can’t sleep.
# 6624. Lead simple lives, so that you may do complicated mathematics.
# 6625. Leader of the pack.
# 6626. Lean and mean.
# 6627. Lean back in the chair.
# 6628. Learn from them, but don’t believe them.
# 6629. Learners need a collection of incremental examples.
# 6630. Learning Esperanto brings you instant friends.
# 6631. Learning Esperanto causes you to learn your own language even better.
# 6632. Learning Esperanto is the best way to study your own language.
# 6633. Learning Esperanto is the first step in working for justice.
# 6634. Learning Esperanto is the supreme instance of watching your language.
# 6635. Learning Esperanto shows consideration for others.
# 6636. Leave it alone.
# 6637. Leave it behind.
# 6638. Leave it there.
# 6639. Leave me be.
# 6640. Leave the door cracked.
# 6641. Leave the door open.
# 6642. Leave the lid cracked.
# 6643. Leave the lid off.
# 6644. Leaving so soon?
# 6645. Leftovers.
# 6646. Legal tender.
# 6647. Leggo a’ my cart!
# 6648. Let George do it.
# 6649. Let him do his job.
# 6650. Let it be.
# 6651. Let it pass.
# 6652. Let me ask these people.
# 6653. Let me ask this person.
# 6654. Let me ask you a question.
# 6655. Let me be.
# 6656. Let me borrow your umbrella.
# 6657. Let me check the stats.
# 6658. Let me do it.
# 6659. Let me do that.
# 6660. Let me find a friend to translate for me.
# 6661. Let me finish!
# 6662. Let me get back to you on that.
# 6663. Let me get closer.
# 6664. Let me get dressed first.
# 6665. Let me get to a stopping point.
# 6666. Let me get you a cup of tea.
# 6667. Let me give you a little more.
# 6668. Let me hear you say it.
# 6669. Let me introduce myself.
# 6670. Let me know about that if it happens.
# 6671. Let me know how you like it.
# 6672. Let me know if you feel any pain.
# 6673. Let me know what happens.
# 6674. Let me know what you intend to do.
# 6675. Let me know when thirty minutes is up.
# 6676. Let me make you an offer.
# 6677. Let me put it this way –
# 6678. Let me see it too.
# 6679. Let me see that documentation again concerning your social security
benefits.
# 6680. Let me see your hands.
# 6681. Let me speak to him.
# 6682. Let me take your pulse.
# 6683. Let me take your temperature.
# 6684. Let me tell you a joke.
# 6685. Let me tell you something.
# 6686. Let me try on this shirt.
# 6687. Let me try one of these.
# 6688. Let me try one.
# 6689. Let me turn on the light.
# 6690. Let no one ignorant of mathematics enter herein.
# 6691. Let someone else be the object of your attention for a while.
# 6692. Let that be a lesson to you.
# 6693. Let the buyer beware.
# 6694. Let the record reflect that.
# 6695. Let the tea steep before pouring it into your cup.
# 6696. Let them go ahead and think that.
# 6697. Let today be remembered by tomorrow.
# 6698. Let us know when you receive the package.
# 6699. Let us now praise famous fang bian mian.
# 6700. Let your anger be swift, effective, and short-lived.
# 6701. Let’s agree to disagree.
# 6702. Let’s begin now.
# 6703. Let’s bury the hatchet.
# 6704. Let’s call it a day.
# 6705. Let’s cast a wide net.
# 6706. Let’s choose sides.
# 6707. Let’s cross the street now.
# 6708. Let’s cut off these threads.
# 6709. Let’s cut to the chase.
# 6710. Let’s define a “cockroach” to be an egregious error in English.
# 6711. Let’s define a “rhino” to be someone who has yet to learn calculus.
# 6712. Let’s do it.
# 6713. Let’s do without candles.
# 6714. Let’s eat.
# 6715. Let’s follow protocol in this matter.
# 6716. Let’s get after this.
# 6717. Let’s get our priorities straight here.
# 6718. Let’s get out of the way.
# 6719. Let’s get ready for bed.
# 6720. Let’s get this show on the road.
# 6721. Let’s get with the program and learn Esperanto!
# 6722. Let’s give it a chance.
# 6723. Let’s give Kumbaya a chance.
# 6724. Let’s go back to the beginning.
# 6725. Let’s go dance.
# 6726. Let’s go find your other shoe.
# 6727. Let’s go for a walk.
# 6728. Let’s go get ’em!
# 6729. Let’s go look at it through the bedroom window.
# 6730. Let’s go on.
# 6731. Let’s go see the new building that they’re building.
# 6732. Let’s go take a look.
# 6733. Let’s go to the museum of Science and Industry.
# 6734. Let’s go watch Mama wash the tea ware.
# 6735. Let’s go with what we’ve got.
# 6736. Let’s go.
# 6737. Let’s have dinner together.
# 6738. Let’s have the truth, even if the heavens fall!
# 6739. Let’s hear it for Alfred E. Neuman!
# 6740. Let’s hear it for heresy!
# 6741. Let’s hear it for upward mobility.
# 6742. Let’s hold it up to the light.
# 6743. Let’s ignore that last part.
# 6744. Let’s invite him too.
# 6745. Let’s just say he has not yet finished surrendering the things of youth.
# 6746. Let’s just say his critical faculties are underdeveloped.
# 6747. Let’s just say that his silver is still in the mine.
# 6748. Let’s just say that I haven’t been granted the gift of faith.
# 6749. Let’s keep in step.
# 6750. Let’s keep on the same page.
# 6751. Let’s leave that stuff alone.
# 6752. Let’s let bygones be bygones.
# 6753. Let’s let that be your problem, not my problem.
# 6754. Let’s let the table just stay here.
# 6755. Let’s look at her pictures.
# 6756. Let’s make a deal.
# 6757. Let’s mark our place.
# 6758. Let’s move on this.
# 6759. Let’s move on to other things.
# 6760. Let’s move on to the next item.
# 6761. Let’s move that before she smacks her head against it.
# 6762. Let’s move the sofa away from the wall a bit.
# 6763. Let’s not be coy about it.
# 6764. Let’s not court disaster.
# 6765. Let’s not do that.
# 6766. Let’s not dwell on that.
# 6767. Let’s not dwell on the past.
# 6768. Let’s not mince words here.
# 6769. Let’s not pass up this opportunity.
# 6770. Let’s not spoil a good thing.
# 6771. Let’s not talk about it now.
# 6772. Let’s not tell lies to children.
# 6773. Let’s not throw the baby out with the bath.
# 6774. Let’s not wash our linen in public.
# 6775. Let’s not, and say we did.
# 6776. Let’s open the window to get some fresh air.
# 6777. Let’s play “Pin the tail on the donkey.”
# 6778. Let’s press on.
# 6779. Let’s put her smock on her before she eats.
# 6780. Let’s put it to bed.
# 6781. Let’s put on some music.
# 6782. Let’s put on the music.
# 6783. Let’s put some more ointment on her.
# 6784. Let’s re-boot the computer.
# 6785. Let’s run it up the flagpole and see who salutes it.
# 6786. Let’s see which one is better.
# 6787. Let’s shake on it.
# 6788. Let’s slow down.
# 6789. Let’s speed up.
# 6790. Let’s splice them together.
# 6791. Let’s stay together.
# 6792. Let’s sweep the floor well; otherwise, the bugs will come.
# 6793. Let’s take a shot at it.
# 6794. Let’s take a taxi.
# 6795. Let’s take a vote.
# 6796. Let’s take care of that right now.
# 6797. Let’s take it away.
# 6798. Let’s take the stairs instead of the elevator.
# 6799. Let’s talk about your upcoming trip.
# 6800. Let’s test the waters.
# 6801. Let’s try harder.
# 6802. Let’s try out the new one.
# 6803. Let’s try to stay out of the way.
# 6804. Let’s use duct tape to hold it in place.
# 6805. Let’s worry about that later.
# 6806. Liar, liar, pants on fire!
# 6807. Life goes on.
# 6808. Life is short, and science is vast.
# 6809. Life is what happens while you are making other plans.
# 6810. Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
# 6811. Life-saving surgery.
# 6812. Lights out!
# 6813. Like a bullet.
# 6814. Like Coleridge, I desire to be of permanent utility.
# 6815. Like Flannery O’Connor, I’m always working.
# 6816. Like greased lightening.
# 6817. Like herding cats.
# 6818. Like kicking a dead whale down the beach.
# 6819. Like water off a duck’s back.
# 6820. Like, I care.
# 6821. Lincoln made men free, but it was Sam Colt that made them equal.
# 6822. Linear Point Set Theory is a great portal to mathematical discipline.
# 6823. Linguistic discrimination is sold as a form of pragmatism.
# 6824. Linguistic imperialism consists of not using Esperanto as a metalanguage.
# 6825. Linguistic preparation for teaching must include Esperanto.
# 6826. Lisbon suffered a triple hit in the year 1755: earthquake, fire, and flood.
# 6827. Listen for the baby.
# 6828. Listen to that nonsense!
# 6829. Listen up.
# 6830. Little by little does the trick.
# 6831. Little good that does, with you around.
# 6832. Little pitchers have big ears.
# 6833. Loaded for bear.
# 6834. Local re-initialization.
# 6835. Lock him up and throw away the key!
# 6836. Lock, stock, and barrel.
# 6837. Lock-step.
# 6838. Logrolling.
# 6839. London is legendary for its fog.
# 6840. Longman has a superb pronuciation dictionary.
# 6841. Look at that!
# 6842. Look at the list if you want to know, for crying out loud.
# 6843. Look at the time!
# 6844. Look at what she’s doing.
# 6845. Look for that elsewhere.
# 6846. Look in the mirror.
# 6847. Look it up.
# 6848. Look lively now.
# 6849. Look out – she’s right behind you.
# 6850. Look out!
# 6851. Look up the words you don’t know.
# 6852. Look up this word, and tell me what it means.
# 6853. Look upon it as an adventure.
# 6854. Look what I found for you.
# 6855. Look what I found.
# 6856. Look what she’s doing.
# 6857. Look what they’ve done.
# 6858. Look what you did.
# 6859. Look where you step.
# 6860. Look, but don’t touch.
# 6861. Looks can be deceiving.
# 6862. Looky here.
# 6863. Loose lips sink ships.
# 6864. Lose an hour in the morning and you’ll spend the rest of the day trying to
find it.
# 6865. Lots of dead bugs.
# 6866. Lots of luck.
# 6867. Lots of work, and little pay.
# 6868. Love makes the world go round.
# 6869. Love me, love my dog.
# 6870. Lovely weather we’re having, isn’t it?
# 6871. Lovey-dovey.
# 6872. Low-hanging fruit.
# 6873. Luckily, it came up without a stain.
# 6874. Ludlum is entertainment, entertainingly presented.
# 6875. Ludlum spun great tales.
# 6876. Luncheons fill a needed vacuum.
# 6877. Lydia Chen and Ying Bian wrote the Pocket Interpreter – CHINESE.
# 6878. Made in China, but not available in China!
# 6879. Make a wish.
# 6880. Make hay while the sun shines.
# 6881. Make me a general – then I’ll always be right.
# 6882. Make note of when the container was opened.
# 6883. Make sure it’s air-tight.
# 6884. Make sure it’s water-tight.
# 6885. Make them pay dearly for it.
# 6886. Make yourself useful.
# 6887. Making a friendly amendment is like succumbing to the intentional fallacy.
# 6888. Mama is peeling an apple for you.
# 6889. Mama put a damper on our fun.
# 6890. Mama says it’s cold outside.
# 6891. Mama will put your clothes on, and later we’ll hang them up to dry.
# 6892. Mama’s asking you a question.
# 6893. Mama’s going to take care of that.
# 6894. Mama’s making something good for you.
# 6895. Mamikon was a university student when he made his brilliant observation.
# 6896. Mamikon’s family name is difficult to pronounce.
# 6897. Man and wife.
# 6898. Man overboard!
# 6899. Man the lifeboats!
# 6900. Management feels that the guests use too much water.
# 6901. Mankind’s one crime is that its babes grow dull.
# 6902. Many animals are to be found in the countryside.
# 6903. Many artifacts have been damaged due to souvenir-hunters.
# 6904. Many families found themselves on the brink of foreclosure.
# 6905. Many happy returns of the day.
# 6906. Many have paid tribute to his great contributions to cinema.
# 6907. Many hazards are posed by crumbling infrastructure.
# 6908. Many needed documents simply do not exist.
# 6909. Many of these entries link-up as dialog, or at least repartee.
# 6910. Many of these expressions have a hidden meaning.
# 6911. Many people enjoy the board game known as “Monopoly”.
# 6912. Many people have made lots of money in real estate.
# 6913. Many phenomena are basically logarithmic.
# 6914. Many songs are about lost love.
# 6915. Margaret invited Susan for a visit, and she gave her a good lunch.
# 6916. Margaret invited Susan for a visit, but she told her she had to go to work.
# 6917. Margaret is doing the cooking.
# 6918. Margaret Magnus has made sense out of sound.
# 6919. Marie Antoinette’s mother made the same mistake as Cleopatra.
# 6920. Marjorie Morningstar was a character created by Herman Wouk.
# 6921. Mark Fettes has written about the educational value of Esperanto.
# 6922. Market price is established by arm’s-length transactions.
# 6923. Martial law has been declared.
# 6924. Mascara is stunning until it starts running.
# 6925. Mate in three.
# 6926. Max Planck had the right idea.
# 6927. May I ask you a personal question?
# 6928. May I come in?
# 6929. May I give you a suggestion?
# 6930. May I have a large container of coffee?
# 6931. May I have your telephone number?
# 6932. May I join you?
# 6933. May I see your driver’s license?
# 6934. May I see your ID card?
# 6935. May I take one of these?
# 6936. May the best man win.
# 6937. May you have a happy and prosperous new year!
# 6938. Maybe he looked at him cross-eyed.
# 6939. Maybe I have a good reason.
# 6940. Maybe I’ll think of it again later.
# 6941. Maybe in two months she’ll be able to do that.
# 6942. Maybe it was an inside job.
# 6943. Maybe one of the other babies took it.
# 6944. Maybe she doesn’t mean us.
# 6945. Maybe she wants more.
# 6946. Maybe she wants to go back to sleep again.
# 6947. Maybe she’ll be happy with that.
# 6948. Maybe the baby needs burping.
# 6949. Maybe this movie has a sequel.
# 6950. Maybe tomorrow.
# 6951. Maybe we should buy a light-weight plastic bowl for her.
# 6952. Maybe we should buy one of those water purification systems.
# 6953. Maybe we’ll stay in China for another year.
# 6954. Maybe you’ll find it later.
# 6955. Maybe, maybe not.
# 6956. Mayday.
# 6957. MBA’s are a dime a dozen.
# 6958. Me and her plan to go shopping together.
# 6959. Me and her want to go shopping together tomorrow.
# 6960. Me and her: this is what native speakers actually say.
# 6961. Me getting sleep is more important than him getting sleep.
# 6962. Me Tarzan, you Jane.
# 6963. Me too.
# 6964. Me worry?
# 6965. Meanwhile, back at the ranch, …
# 6966. Meet and greet.
# 6967. Melville had a whale of a time.
# 6968. Men are alike in their physiology, but differ in their pathologies.
# 6969. Men don’t tell women everything.
# 6970. Men seek to improve their circumstances, but not themselves.
# 6971. Merriam-Webster also has a word of the day specifically for ESL students.
# 6972. Metaphor is the primary mode of communication with the hoi polloi.
# 6973. Metatags.
# 6974. Military necessity.
# 6975. Millions for defense, not one cent for tribute!
# 6976. Mind your own business.
# 6977. Mine is not to reason why.
# 6978. Mine, all mine!
# 6979. Minimal sufficiency.
# 6980. Mission accomplished.
# 6981. Misspelling “cat” as “dog” is the archetypal dog-to-cat error.
# 6982. Moby-Dick was grossly underestimated for a long time.
# 6983. Moderation in all things.
# 6984. Modern torpedoes are equipped with anti-circling circuitry.
# 6985. Moi?
# 6986. Mommy, it’s over!
# 6987. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday.
# 6988. Money doesn’t grow on trees, you know.
# 6989. Money talks.
# 6990. Money was given under the table.
# 6991. Monolinguals are all in the same timid zone.
# 6992. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a widely-used spice, but it makes me ill.
# 6993. Month-end is a busy time for the Accounting Department.
# 6994. Moore, do you have apples in that basket?
# 6995. Moral posturing.
# 6996. More and more people are doing that.
# 6997. More people have heard of Esperanto than the Hahn-Banach Theorem.
# 6998. More people ride the bus than drive a Mercedes, it’s true.
# 6999. More speed, less haste!
# 7000. More, and more, and more!
# 7001. Morning, noon, and night.
# 7002. Morons believe that presence implies cause.
# 7003. Morons have always regarded organizational tools as being a waste.
# 7004. Mortifying failure.
# 7005. Moses Hadas taught at Columbia.
# 7006. Most blogs are written by people who have never taken Linear Point Set
Theory.
# 7007. Most garments nowadays are made from synthetic materials.
# 7008. Most men would be happier with a fine meal than their wife speaking
Esperanto.
# 7009. Most people have no idea of the staggering cost of learning another
language.
# 7010. Mother, may I?
# 7011. Motherhood, the Flag, and Apple Pie.
# 7012. Motorists with cell phones to their ears is an illustration of the Law of the
Universe.
# 7013. Movie previews.
# 7014. Moving the table now!
# 7015. Mr. Bell heard Bill.
# 7016. Mr. Hugo wants to see you.
# 7017. Mr. Reilly examined the crowd of people for signs of bad taste in dress.
# 7018. Mr. Smith is on line three.
# 7019. Mr. Wooster was for a time taken for Rosie M. Banks.
# 7020. Much infrastructure is simply lacking.
# 7021. Mud-slinging.
# 7022. Munitions of war.
# 7023. My arthritis is acting up.
# 7024. My baby is never naughty.
# 7025. My bags are packed.
# 7026. My birthday is the same as hers.
# 7027. My brother will stay overnight and leave early in the morning.
# 7028. My brother, he finally found a job.
# 7029. My car broke down.
# 7030. My car won’t start.
# 7031. My career has consisted of one catastrophe after another.
# 7032. My check bounced.
# 7033. My circumstances are better.
# 7034. My clothes finally arrived.
# 7035. My computer has a virus.
# 7036. My cousin Rachel will visit us next week.
# 7037. My cup runneth over.
# 7038. My dear, turn it down, please.
# 7039. My email address is on my personal data sheet that I handed out.
# 7040. My English is much better now.
# 7041. My English is nothing to write home about.
# 7042. My English is very poor.
# 7043. My Esperanto magazine arrived today.
# 7044. My Esperanto magazine hasn’t arrived yet, and you’re asking how I’m
doing?
# 7045. My essay came back with red ink all over it.
# 7046. My eyesight isn’t what it used to be.
# 7047. My family name is Hugo.
# 7048. My family name is Jones.
# 7049. My father has since died.
# 7050. My father taught me English, Esperanto, and calculus.
# 7051. My father was a civil engineer, too.
# 7052. My favorite website is www(dot)thefreedictionary(dot)com.
# 7053. My fellow man.
# 7054. My flight was delayed for an hour.
# 7055. My flight was overbooked.
# 7056. My given name is Michael.
# 7057. My government thinks…
# 7058. My guess is that birth is the surprise of your life.
# 7059. My hair has split ends.
# 7060. My hair keeps falling out.
# 7061. My hat is off to you.
# 7062. My heart hurts.
# 7063. My hobby is Esperanto.
# 7064. My hometown has many tourist attractions.
# 7065. My hometown is not very hot in the summer, because it has many shade
trees.
# 7066. My job interview was a disaster.
# 7067. My keys were in my other purse.
# 7068. My leg feels numb.
# 7069. My leg hurts, so it might rain.
# 7070. My leg hurts.
# 7071. My leg is swollen.
# 7072. My middle name is Kent.
# 7073. My mistake.
# 7074. My mother could help take care of the baby.
# 7075. My mother finally got her college degree.
# 7076. My mother is going to take me to buy a pair of shoes for me.
# 7077. My mother taught me Chinese.
# 7078. My mother told me there would be days like this.
# 7079. My mother was home alone.
# 7080. My mother wired me some money.
# 7081. My name escapes me.
# 7082. My name is David.
# 7083. My name is Victor Hugo.
# 7084. My native language is Chinese.
# 7085. My nephew bought himself a motorcycle.
# 7086. My orbit is pretty much fixed.
# 7087. My own flesh and blood.
# 7088. My paycheck stub looks like a receipt for all my payroll deductions.
# 7089. My pen keeps running out of ink.
# 7090. My phone is low on electricity.
# 7091. My plate is already full.
# 7092. My pleasure.
# 7093. My sinuses are killing me.
# 7094. My sister asked when I’m coming home.
# 7095. My sister bought it, but my mother sent it.
# 7096. My sister had gone out.
# 7097. My specific circumstances.
# 7098. My stomach hurts.
# 7099. My stomach is growling.
# 7100. My throat hurts a lot.
# 7101. My tooth hurts.
# 7102. My turn.
# 7103. My two cents.
# 7104. My uncle went into the military.
# 7105. My watch is set to chime the hour.
# 7106. My website is only a skeleton, to be fleshed-out later.
# 7107. My website is only a stub, to be filled-in later.
# 7108. My wife bought it for me this past weekend.
# 7109. My wife criticizes all my choices, except my choice of wife.
# 7110. My wife doesn’t teach me Chinese – she just practices her English.
# 7111. My wife is always asking me that.
# 7112. My wife is traveling with me.
# 7113. My wife is waiting for me at home.
# 7114. My wife married a foreigner, and so did I.
# 7115. My wife married beneath her; all women do.
# 7116. My wife wants me to take a better-paying job.
# 7117. My wife will do anything for me except stop criticizing me.
# 7118. My wife will know.
# 7119. My word.
# 7120. My, what big teeth she has!
# 7121. Myths embody truth the way that termites embody wood.
# 7122. Naked among wolves.
# 7123. Napoleon told how it was he was able to defeat the Austrians.
# 7124. Nary a one.
# 7125. Nations may fall, but luncheons are forever.
# 7126. Nature hates a vacuum.
# 7127. Negative.
# 7128. Neglecting Esperanto leads to a pathological pre-occupation with French.
# 7129. Neglecting to translate crucial documents into Esperanto is moral
turpitude.
# 7130. Neither hell nor high water will stop me.
# 7131. Neither here nor there.
# 7132. Networking.
# 7133. Never give luck away.
# 7134. Never go into the kitchen empty-handed.
# 7135. Never let it rest, until you’ve made the good better, and the better best!
# 7136. Never mind.
# 7137. Never regret having eaten too little.
# 7138. Never say never.
# 7139. Never travel for food.
# 7140. Nevermore!
# 7141. New clothes should be washed before being worn.
# 7142. New friends are silver – old friends are gold.
# 7143. New students are called freshmen.
# 7144. New York has the nickname of “the Big Apple”.
# 7145. New York is real; everything else is done with mirrors.
# 7146. New York is so tough, even the muggers get mugged.
# 7147. Newton taught himself calculus, and so can you.
# 7148. Next Thursday is the deadline.
# 7149. Next time you go grocery shopping, get some ribs, and a frozen chicken.
# 7150. Next to nothing is left of the rice.
# 7151. Nice catch!
# 7152. Nice day, isn’t it?
# 7153. Nice doggie!
# 7154. Nice to meet you.
# 7155. Nice to see you again.
# 7156. Nice try.
# 7157. Nice work!
# 7158. Nice work, if you can get it.
# 7159. Nine were hurt.
# 7160. Ninety nine percent of foreigners give the rest a bad name.
# 7161. Ninety percent of anything is trash.
# 7162. Ninety percent of science fiction is trash.
# 7163. NLLB stands for No Language Left Behind.
# 7164. No answer was right.
# 7165. No apples are left.
# 7166. No appointment is necessary.
# 7167. No audio playing is allowed in the classroom during break.
# 7168. No battle-ready unit ever passed inspection.
# 7169. No broken bones.
# 7170. No bugs can get in here.
# 7171. No contest.
# 7172. No cooking gas is left.
# 7173. No credit will be given if your name, in pinyin, is missing.
# 7174. No doubt about it.
# 7175. No doubt.
# 7176. No endeavor degenerates into silliness faster than foreign language
instruction.
# 7177. No fingers crossed?
# 7178. No food or drink for thirty minutes after taking that medicine.
# 7179. No footbath tonight.
# 7180. No gas is left in the tank.
# 7181. No go.
# 7182. No good can come of that.
# 7183. No good deed shall go unpunished.
# 7184. No guts, no glory.
# 7185. No I’m not!
# 7186. No if’s, and’s, or but’s!
# 7187. No inspection-ready unit ever passed battle.
# 7188. No matter what they say, that’s what we say.
# 7189. No more excuses.
# 7190. No more Mr. Nice Guy.
# 7191. No MSG is in this food.
# 7192. No news is good news.
# 7193. No nothing.
# 7194. No one called me on it.
# 7195. No one can be a linguist without knowing Esperanto.
# 7196. No one capable of proving Wilson’s Theorem is capable of serious
wrongdoing.
# 7197. No one cares what you like, unless you’re famous.
# 7198. No one could reach them in time.
# 7199. No one expected that.
# 7200. No one failed the test.
# 7201. No one got the answer.
# 7202. No one has told the newcomers where to put their trash.
# 7203. No one in his right mind would do that.
# 7204. No one loves freedom more than someone who writes for the public
domain.
# 7205. No one should be denied due process.
# 7206. No one was at home.
# 7207. No one was looking.
# 7208. No one will be admitted after the lecture has begun.
# 7209. No one’s asking you, Lieutenant Berg.
# 7210. No other reason?
# 7211. No pain, or loss of functionality.
# 7212. No peeking!
# 7213. No pilot would ever commit a runway incursion on purpose.
# 7214. No problem.
# 7215. No progress is possible without audit trails.
# 7216. No pun intended.
# 7217. No radio-playing during break.
# 7218. No rest for the wicked.
# 7219. No rights are reserved for this work.
# 7220. No running!
# 7221. No searching was necessary.
# 7222. No separate checks.
# 7223. No shirt, no shoes – no service.
# 7224. No taxis were available.
# 7225. No time soon.
# 7226. No tipping.
# 7227. No trespassing.
# 7228. No use crying over spilled milk.
# 7229. No use lying about it.
# 7230. No use putting it off.
# 7231. No water is left.
# 7232. No way I’m going to do that.
# 7233. No way I’m going to let you get away with that.
# 7234. No wonder they were so willing to cooperate.
# 7235. No, but my secretary did.
# 7236. No, don’t!
# 7237. No, give until it stops hurting.
# 7238. No, I do not understand.
# 7239. No, I don’t mind.
# 7240. No, I don’t want to call a doctor.
# 7241. No, I don’t.
# 7242. No, I’m not going to call you “doctor”.
# 7243. No, I’m not messing with that.
# 7244. No, I’m positive.
# 7245. No, nothing like that.
# 7246. No, thank you.
# 7247. No, thanks.
# 7248. No, there isn’t.
# 7249. No, they sent the servants ahead on the Mayflower.
# 7250. No, Virginia, “dirt poor” does not mean “filthy rich”.
# 7251. No, Virginia, “ghoti” is not an Esperanto word.
# 7252. No, Virginia, “Taiyuan” and “Taiwan” are not the same.
# 7253. No, Virginia, a parasite does not mean someone living in Paris.
# 7254. No, Virginia, an out-of-town visitor is not one from a rural area.
# 7255. No, Virginia, cutting-edge technology doesn’t mean cutlery.
# 7256. No, Virginia, English was not handed down on Mount Sinai.
# 7257. No, Virginia, Esperanto is not Spanish.
# 7258. No, Virginia, for life to be cheap doesn’t mean the cost of living is low.
# 7259. No, Virginia, getting the third degree does not mean receiving a doctorate.
# 7260. No, Virginia, hotrock does not mean lava.
# 7261. No, Virginia, Io is not the home of Eeyore.
# 7262. No, Virginia, presence does not imply cause.
# 7263. No, Virginia, the everlasting fire is not the eternal flame.
# 7264. No, Virginia, the space pen is not a nickname for the space shuttle.
# 7265. No, Virginia, there is no sand in the closets.
# 7266. No, Virginia, wine tasters and food tasters do not have similar jobs.
# 7267. No, Virginia, you can’t believe everything you read in the newspapers.
# 7268. No, Virginia, you should not use “hoi polloi” to refer to posh people.
# 7269. No, Virginia, you shouldn’t believe everything you read.
# 7270. No, we’re not going to wait.
# 7271. No, you can’t borrow my things to do what you should have done earlier.
# 7272. Nobody cares what you like unless you’re famous.
# 7273. Nobody else knows what you’re trying to say.
# 7274. Nobody is there before nine o’clock.
# 7275. Nobody knows.
# 7276. Nobody was there.
# 7277. None are left.
# 7278. None of the above.
# 7279. None of these dishes contains monosodium glutamate.
# 7280. None of this makes sense.
# 7281. Normally, I would, but I’m going through a selfish phase right now.
# 7282. Northrop Frye held a Guggenheim fellowship.
# 7283. Northrop Frye should have done this.
# 7284. Not a drop spilled in the saucer.
# 7285. Not a drop was spilled in the saucer.
# 7286. Not a single one.
# 7287. Not a toy.
# 7288. Not a word of it is true!
# 7289. Not all that glitters is gold.
# 7290. Not any.
# 7291. Not being talked about is not the negation of being talked about.
# 7292. Not by a long shot.
# 7293. Not by the hair of my chinny chin chin!
# 7294. Not even close.
# 7295. Not everything gets recorded.
# 7296. Not for love nor money.
# 7297. Not if I can help it.
# 7298. Not knowing calculus is as common as dirt.
# 7299. Not ME!
# 7300. Not now.
# 7301. Not one of them knew the answer.
# 7302. Not one stone was left on top of another.
# 7303. Not particularly.
# 7304. Not so fast!
# 7305. Not so much.
# 7306. Not that I need to tell you that.
# 7307. Not to change the subject, but when is the exam?
# 7308. Not to punish the bad it to harm the good.
# 7309. Not too hot, not too cold.
# 7310. Not too sweet.
# 7311. Nothing betrays you more than your speech.
# 7312. Nothing brings people closer together than does Esperanto.
# 7313. Nothing can stop us now.
# 7314. Nothing elaborate.
# 7315. Nothing gives Kumbaya a chance like Esperanto.
# 7316. Nothing has been sent yet.
# 7317. Nothing is easy.
# 7318. Nothing is left of the chicken.
# 7319. Nothing is more inspiring than a feeling of being on the edge of discovery.
# 7320. Nothing lets you reach out and touch someone like Esperanto does.
# 7321. Nothing lost, nothing gained.
# 7322. Nothing personal.
# 7323. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
# 7324. Nothing will be done about it until after the holidays.
# 7325. Nothing will stand in our way.
# 7326. Nothing you could say will convince me otherwise.
# 7327. Nothing, just clearing my throat.
# 7328. Nothing’s going to happen in a day.
# 7329. Now a word from our sponsor.
# 7330. Now and then I get a hankering for a candy bar.
# 7331. Now and then I go to visit my mother.
# 7332. Now and then I stumble over the truth.
# 7333. Now I go on the offensive!
# 7334. Now I have peace of mind.
# 7335. Now I know where I stand.
# 7336. Now I’ve seen everything.
# 7337. Now or never.
# 7338. Now she knows.
# 7339. Now that it’s over, I can tell you what our plan was.
# 7340. Now that we have cooking gas again, shouldn’t we move the rice-cooker
back?
# 7341. Now that you know, what are you going to do?
# 7342. Now you know who loves you.
# 7343. Now you sound like my father.
# 7344. Now you tell me.
# 7345. Now you’re scaring me.
# 7346. Now, what is your question?
# 7347. Now, you can’t get the time of day out of him.
# 7348. Nowadays, college graduates are a dime a dozen.
# 7349. Nowadays, I have to leave earlier for afternoon classes.
# 7350. Nowadays, they get sick easily.
# 7351. Number Theory is good clean fun.
# 7352. Nuts to you!
# 7353. Nuts!
# 7354. Nuts, bolts, screws, gears – rah, rah, engineers!
# 7355. Objection!
# 7356. Objection, Your Honor!
# 7357. Obviously not.
# 7358. Of course not.
# 7359. Of course.
# 7360. Of what importance is this to you?
# 7361. Off the record.
# 7362. Off the top of my head, these are the only two examples I can give of that.
# 7363. Off the wall.
# 7364. Off with their heads!
# 7365. Off-camera.
# 7366. Office personnel came to investigate the cause of the fire alarm.
# 7367. Off-street parking.
# 7368. Ogden Nash was the Esperanto of poets.
# 7369. Oh my darling Clementine.
# 7370. Oh well, it’s raining now.
# 7371. Oh ye of little faith!
# 7372. Oh, hush!
# 7373. Oh, my achin’ back!
# 7374. Oh, my God!
# 7375. Oh, no!
# 7376. Oh, no, you don’t!
# 7377. Oh, the tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive!
# 7378. Oh, yes!
# 7379. OK, here we go.
# 7380. OK, I’ll do it, but it’s against my better judgment.
# 7381. OK, I’m confused.
# 7382. OK, let’s go.
# 7383. OK, so this is an instance of stamp-collecting.
# 7384. OK, what do you want to know?
# 7385. Old Faithful is in Yellowstone National Park.
# 7386. Old Glory.
# 7387. Old men think up wars for young men to die in.
# 7388. Old soldiers never die.
# 7389. Older and wiser.
# 7390. On account of the long power outage, the things in the refrigerator spoiled.
# 7391. On his way to deliver his speech, the senator was injured in a train
accident.
# 7392. On New Year’s…
# 7393. On payday, we went shopping for much-needed supplies.
# 7394. On payday, we’ll go shopping.
# 7395. On record.
# 7396. On the air.
# 7397. On the cheap.
# 7398. On the contrary.
# 7399. On the go.
# 7400. On the line.
# 7401. On the sly.
# 7402. On the verge.
# 7403. On time, within budget, and with the original staff.
# 7404. Once a motion is made, it belongs not to the mover, but to the assembly.
# 7405. Once again, Jeeves pulled me out of the soup.
# 7406. Once burned, twice shy.
# 7407. Once more, with feeling!
# 7408. Once that screw falls out, it’s hard to put back in.
# 7409. Once upon a time, a long time ago, …
# 7410. Once you learn algebra, you’re ready for calculus.
# 7411. Once you learn to fake sincerity, you’ve got it made.
# 7412. One bad apple spoils the whole bunch.
# 7413. One cannot make an omelet without breaking eggs.
# 7414. One definite good is better than two possible goods.
# 7415. One does what one can.
# 7416. One down, one to go.
# 7417. One enemy hurts more than a hundred friends help.
# 7418. One foot in the grave.
# 7419. One for the money, two for the show, three to get ready, and four to go!
# 7420. One for you, and one for me.
# 7421. One good plateful is enough for me.
# 7422. One hour studying Esperanto is like ten hours studying French.
# 7423. One learns mostly by comparison, hence, once again, the value of
Esperanto.
# 7424. One man cannot save a ship.
# 7425. One meaning of “com” is “currently-operative myth”.
# 7426. One more bite like that, and I’ll be done.
# 7427. One more bite like that, and you can leave the table.
# 7428. One moves away from a place like this at the first opportunity.
# 7429. One must take speaker intent into account.
# 7430. One of Herman Wouk’s books is titled Don’t Stop the Carnival.
# 7431. One of my colleagues was kind enough to point that out to me.
# 7432. One of my friends was Steve Rogers at the University of Notre Dame.
# 7433. One of the characters in that movie is similar to you.
# 7434. One of the charges they set didn’t go off.
# 7435. One of the keys is stuck.
# 7436. One of the lights is burned out in my apartment.
# 7437. One of the modern heresies is that there exist languages other than English.
# 7438. One of the movie characters reminds me of you.
# 7439. One of the wheels fell off the baby crib.
# 7440. One of their children died in infancy.
# 7441. One shoe off and one shoe on.
# 7442. One swallow does not make a summer.
# 7443. One technique of ambiguity resolution is syntactic constraints.
# 7444. One way or the other.
# 7445. One world, one dream.
# 7446. One year of Esperanto followed by five years of English equals eight years
of English.
# 7447. One, two, three – testing!
# 7448. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten.
# 7449. One’s day in court.
# 7450. Only a bunch of picked-over items were left.
# 7451. Only a few people know that “ghoti” is a joke spelling of “fish”.
# 7452. Only a few people know the correct pronunciation of “debris”.
# 7453. Only a gentleman could insult me, and a gentleman never would.
# 7454. Only a little bit for her.
# 7455. Only after having the baby has my nose given me trouble.
# 7456. Only foreign learners of English say “How delicious!”.
# 7457. Only hardware can provide security.
# 7458. Only his pride was hurt.
# 7459. Only in the wintertime do you know that the fir tree is an evergreen.
# 7460. Only millionaires and fools live in hotels.
# 7461. Only people who have been to college know what “motif” means.
# 7462. Only public domain contributions to this project will be accepted.
# 7463. Only shareholders get rich.
# 7464. Only slack-jawed troglodytes oppose Esperanto.
# 7465. Only that much?
# 7466. Only the stupid believe that to be truthful is easy.
# 7467. Only this once.
# 7468. Only this?
# 7469. Only those who have done their homework can be any good at public
dipomacy.
# 7470. Only two things exist: reasons and results.
# 7471. Only your baby does this.
# 7472. On-street parking is dangerous.
# 7473. Oops!
# 7474. Open the curtain halfway.
# 7475. Open the curtain, but close the veil.
# 7476. Open the door.
# 7477. Open wide.
# 7478. Open-handed.
# 7479. Or not, as the case may be.
# 7480. Or so the thinking goes.
# 7481. Order in the court!
# 7482. Organization mediates spontaneity.
# 7483. Original publisher of this: Taiyuan University of Technology, P.R. China.
# 7484. Other bridges have collapsed before.
# 7485. Other features will be added later.
# 7486. Other languages are dead ends, but Esperanto leads to wide vistas.
# 7487. Other than having to work for a living, I’m doing fine.
# 7488. Ouch!
# 7489. Our authority is very limited.
# 7490. Our baby is walking already.
# 7491. Our baby stroller was never stolen.
# 7492. Our baby was the center of attention.
# 7493. Our birthdays are the same.
# 7494. Our building has a lovely lobby.
# 7495. Our bus is coming.
# 7496. Our camera is broken.
# 7497. Our coursework is very heavy.
# 7498. Our data has been compromised.
# 7499. Our decision was a costly mistake.
# 7500. Our departure is at eight o’clock Monday morning.
# 7501. Our dinner is ready.
# 7502. Our director is away at a conference.
# 7503. Our dirty tricks are better than your dirty tricks.
# 7504. Our dog doesn’t bite.
# 7505. Our dog loves children.
# 7506. Our dog won’t hurt you.
# 7507. Our English has greatly improved since you began teaching us.
# 7508. Our excursion was dampened by rain, no pun intended.
# 7509. Our firewall was breached.
# 7510. Our floor has a couple fire extinguishers, as does every floor.
# 7511. Our food has gotten cold.
# 7512. Our goal is to unconfuse you.
# 7513. Our hopes were dashed.
# 7514. Our hotel has no battery backup.
# 7515. Our house has only a few bugs.
# 7516. Our house will have a basement.
# 7517. Our indolence is manifest.
# 7518. Our new house will be ready soon.
# 7519. Our number is legion.
# 7520. Our only concern is the physically-correct handling of data.
# 7521. Our parents just don’t understand.
# 7522. Our progress was hampered by rain.
# 7523. Our refrigerator needs defrosting.
# 7524. Our schedule has been changed.
# 7525. Our school is over a hundred years old.
# 7526. Our system was hacked.
# 7527. Our teachers give us too much work.
# 7528. Our time will come.
# 7529. Our train leaves at eight o’clock.
# 7530. Our trip to the zoo was disappointing.
# 7531. Our valuables are in the hotel safe.
# 7532. Our waiter deserves a large tip.
# 7533. Our waiter was rude and careless.
# 7534. Our water is low.
# 7535. Our window is broken.
# 7536. Ours is not to reason why.
# 7537. Out in the boondocks.
# 7538. Out of phase.
# 7539. Out of sight, out of mind.
# 7540. Out of sync.
# 7541. Out the kazoo.
# 7542. Outages occur in America too, but much less often.
# 7543. Outfielder.
# 7544. Outrageous!
# 7545. Out-sized.
# 7546. Outstanding.
# 7547. Over and out.
# 7548. Over here!
# 7549. Over my dead body.
# 7550. Over there!
# 7551. Ow!
# 7552. Pabulum for the hoi polloi.
# 7553. Palace intrigue.
# 7554. Paper tissues are often used as napkins.
# 7555. Parade rest!
# 7556. Part of the resilience of Esperanto is that it has no deadline.
# 7557. Parting is such sweet sorrow.
# 7558. Pascal had the ability to sit quietly in a room.
# 7559. Pass the salt, please.
# 7560. Passers-by came to his assistance.
# 7561. Passing on urban legends is mostly what passes for education.
# 7562. Passion wanes, but the bitter pressure of the world remains.
# 7563. Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel.
# 7564. Patty-cake.
# 7565. Pawn to king-four.
# 7566. Pay is withheld until the project is complete.
# 7567. Payday is a long way away.
# 7568. PC sets the stage for controlling thought in the name of controlling “hate”.
# 7569. PC stands for “political correctness”.
# 7570. Peace of mind.
# 7571. Peaches and cream.
# 7572. Peeky-boo, I see you.
# 7573. Peel an apple for her to eat.
# 7574. Peg noted that the British have solved the problem of overly-warm food.
# 7575. Peking duck is a delicious dish.
# 7576. Penny-pinching.
# 7577. People are curious about our baby.
# 7578. People came in droves to see the triple hanging.
# 7579. People can forget, but paper doesn’t forget.
# 7580. People can say anything, especially if they know Esperanto.
# 7581. People do lots of things, but that doesn’t mean they get away with it.
# 7582. People in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.
# 7583. People in that province like very salty food.
# 7584. People in this business move around a lot.
# 7585. People no longer look at me askance on the members-only elevator.
# 7586. People say her eyes look fake.
# 7587. People think I’m her nanny.
# 7588. People who don’t speak English often pretend to.
# 7589. People who should have known better ignored Moby-Dick.
# 7590. People who speak English often pretend not to.
# 7591. People will talk.
# 7592. People.
# 7593. Perfect harmony begins with Esperanto.
# 7594. Perhaps a word from you could raise their interest-level in this task.
# 7595. Perhaps I didn’t make that clear.
# 7596. Perhaps it’s better this way.
# 7597. Period, end of story.
# 7598. Perish the thought.
# 7599. Permission to teach Esperanto is the best gift you can give a teacher.
# 7600. Perseverance is the largest component of success.
# 7601. Phrase-building can be considered to be a specialized search.
# 7602. Physical fitness.
# 7603. Pick it up off the floor for me.
# 7604. Pick one, any one.
# 7605. Pick up your feet when you walk.
# 7606. Pieces of eight!
# 7607. Pin the tail on the donkey.
# 7608. Pinpoint accuracy.
# 7609. Pizza by the slice – what a concept!
# 7610. Planetary motion was given its first definitive treatment by Isaac Newton.
# 7611. Plastic bags are a suffocation hazard for small children.
# 7612. Play ball!
# 7613. Play it again, Sam.
# 7614. Play something, anything!
# 7615. Playwrights make nice house pets.
# 7616. Please accept my condolences.
# 7617. Please advise.
# 7618. Please be on time.
# 7619. Please buy more bananas.
# 7620. Please clean your area before you leave.
# 7621. Please come back home.
# 7622. Please come in.
# 7623. Please come with me.
# 7624. Please do that at some other time.
# 7625. Please do.
# 7626. Please don’t eat the strawberries.
# 7627. Please don’t let me fall.
# 7628. Please don’t make it too spicy.
# 7629. Please don’t say things like that.
# 7630. Please don’t stick your nose in my business.
# 7631. Please excuse my dear aunt Sally.
# 7632. Please fill in the registration form.
# 7633. Please follow me.
# 7634. Please forgive me.
# 7635. Please give me a bowl of rice.
# 7636. Please give me small change.
# 7637. Please go get me more chalk.
# 7638. Please hammer in that nail that is protruding.
# 7639. Please have a seat.
# 7640. Please hold the baby while I move the table.
# 7641. Please leave out the MSG.
# 7642. Please make a duplicate of this key.
# 7643. Please pass the salt.
# 7644. Please place your trash at the top of the stairs.
# 7645. Please point to it.
# 7646. Please purge your unused files!
# 7647. Please put some more toilet paper in the bathroom.
# 7648. Please read it carefully.
# 7649. Please refill the kleenex holder.
# 7650. Please refresh my memory.
# 7651. Please repeat what you said.
# 7652. Please say it once again.
# 7653. Please see what you can do.
# 7654. Please see yourself out; I have to go to the restroom.
# 7655. Please sign in.
# 7656. Please sit down.
# 7657. Please spare me the obvious jokes.
# 7658. Please speak more slowly.
# 7659. Please speak slowly.
# 7660. Please stop a moment.
# 7661. Please take this away.
# 7662. Please take this back with you.
# 7663. Please toss me a pillow.
# 7664. Please turn down the volume.
# 7665. Please turn off the air conditioner.
# 7666. Please turn on the fan.
# 7667. Please turn on the light at the top of the stairs.
# 7668. Please turn up the volume.
# 7669. Please wait for me here.
# 7670. Please wait for me in the office.
# 7671. Please wrap each separately.
# 7672. Please, a word.
# 7673. Please, let’s not fight about this.
# 7674. Please, no gender-bashing, or ethnic slurs.
# 7675. Pockets of resistance.
# 7676. Poe was particular about poetry, no pun intended.
# 7677. Poetic justice.
# 7678. Point-blank range.
# 7679. Point-of-sale.
# 7680. Point-of-view.
# 7681. Points of interest.
# 7682. Political correctness is simply the default alternative to learning Esperanto.
# 7683. Politically correct.
# 7684. Pollution and contamination are not the same thing.
# 7685. Pompeii was destroyed, and preserved, by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius.
# 7686. Pooh was a silly bear.
# 7687. Poor baby.
# 7688. Poor execution of a good idea.
# 7689. Poor planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part.
# 7690. Poor writing is overshadowed only by an author’s general lack of
knowledge.
# 7691. Popular psychology.
# 7692. Positively no smoking!
# 7693. Post-bellum America saw the ascendancy of the railroad.
# 7694. Pour me more tea.
# 7695. Power to the people!
# 7696. Practice is like putting time into the bank.
# 7697. Practice makes perfect.
# 7698. Practice what you preach.
# 7699. Practice, practice, practice!
# 7700. Praise the Lord, and pass the ammunition.
# 7701. Pray for a good harvest, but keep on hoeing.
# 7702. Pray, continue.
# 7703. Pray, what did the chicken do?
# 7704. Preaching to the choir.
# 7705. Precise weighing was done.
# 7706. Precision-engineered.
# 7707. Pregnant, of course.
# 7708. Press on.
# 7709. Pretentious ignorance.
# 7710. Preternatural gifts.
# 7711. Pretty good!
# 7712. Preventative maintenance.
# 7713. Previews of coming attractions.
# 7714. Prices are going up every day.
# 7715. Prior to coming here, I was at that school.
# 7716. Probably not.
# 7717. Probably.
# 7718. Profanity is the language computer programmers know best.
# 7719. Programming specifications.
# 7720. Projects quickly reach ninety percent completion, and then stay there
forever.
# 7721. Promises, promises!
# 7722. Property development.
# 7723. Property management.
# 7724. Proportional representation.
# 7725. Proportionally, this was a very large explosion.
# 7726. Proud as peaches.
# 7727. PST stands for Point Set Theory.
# 7728. Public diplomacy is based, ironically, on personal relationships
# 7729. Public diplomacy not based on Esperanto is a joke.
# 7730. Publish or perish.
# 7731. Pucker up.
# 7732. Pull hard.
# 7733. Pull your homework out of the stack for me.
# 7734. Puns.
# 7735. Pure high school.
# 7736. Purity of intention.
# 7737. Push hard.
# 7738. Push here.
# 7739. Pushing up daisies.
# 7740. Put away the groceries.
# 7741. Put in just a little.
# 7742. Put in the ingredients, stir, wait five minutes, and then turn off the heat.
# 7743. Put it here.
# 7744. Put it in the freezer.
# 7745. Put it in the wash.
# 7746. Put it on the shopping list.
# 7747. Put it out of her reach.
# 7748. Put it there.
# 7749. Put it to bed.
# 7750. Put me in charge for a week, and I’ll clean house.
# 7751. Put on some more music.
# 7752. Put on your earphones if you want to listen to something.
# 7753. Put some pepper on it too.
# 7754. Put some salt on it.
# 7755. Put the timer on for twenty five minutes.
# 7756. Put this bottle on the ledge of the bathroom sink.
# 7757. Put this in the washing machine.
# 7758. Put this inside the refrigerator.
# 7759. Put this meat in the refrigerator.
# 7760. Put this on top of the refrigerator.
# 7761. Put those clothes in the washer too.
# 7762. Put those clothes into the washing machine too.
# 7763. Put your feet up while I sweep under here.
# 7764. Put your money where your mouth is.
# 7765. Put your mouth in English-mode.
# 7766. Put your shoulder to the wheel.
# 7767. Quantification.
# 7768. Quick fixes.
# 7769. Quite a show.
# 7770. Quite rightly.
# 7771. Quite so.
# 7772. Quite.
# 7773. Rack and ruin.
# 7774. Rags to riches.
# 7775. Railroad crossing, look out for cars.
# 7776. Rainy weather makes my leg hurt.
# 7777. Randori is not in the dictionary.
# 7778. Rate of return.
# 7779. Ratiocination.
# 7780. Rats and snails and puppy-dog tails.
# 7781. Reaching this goal, on-time and within budget, will require hard work.
# 7782. Read her a bedtime story.
# 7783. Read her the book.
# 7784. Read it and weep.
# 7785. Read me a story.
# 7786. Read my lips.
# 7787. Read the book to her.
# 7788. Read to her.
# 7789. Reading about Mithraism was an eye-opener for me.
# 7790. Reading about the world is best done in Esperanto.
# 7791. Ready or not, here I come!
# 7792. Ready, aim, fire!
# 7793. Real estate is a favorite market.
# 7794. Rearin’ to go.
# 7795. Record everything that occurs to you, and then eliminate duplicates.
# 7796. Recorded live.
# 7797. Redo it.
# 7798. Redundancy helps with contrast, which helps with abstraction of pattern.
# 7799. Refill the salt shaker.
# 7800. Refusing to learn Esperanto ought to be classified as a hate-crime.
# 7801. Regarding “data” as the English plural of “datum” is hyper-correctness.
# 7802. Regarding the computer accessory, “mouse” is short for “mouse unit”.
# 7803. Relax.
# 7804. Remember that even Sherlock Holmes failed a few times.
# 7805. Remember that scientific law need not be congruent with appearance.
# 7806. Remember that the airplane was invented although there were no airports.
# 7807. Remember that the windmill never strays in search of the wind.
# 7808. Remember to also check the addendum of the dictionary.
# 7809. Remember to brush your teeth.
# 7810. Remember to check that the rice has enough water.
# 7811. Remember to check the rice for enough water.
# 7812. Remember to empty the lint trap.
# 7813. Remember to feed the cat while I am away.
# 7814. Remember to give yourself a footbath.
# 7815. Remember to keep your rope tight.
# 7816. Remember to run the spell-checker on your document.
# 7817. Remember to take your shopping bag and some money with you.
# 7818. Remember, even Einstein had to beg for a job.
# 7819. Remember, everyone you meet is fighting a big battle.
# 7820. Remember, people can say anything.
# 7821. Remember, the rest of your life will be more like high school than college.
# 7822. Remind me in the morning not to eat anything before going to see the
doctor.
# 7823. Remind me when the time comes.
# 7824. Render unto Caesar.
# 7825. Repartee.
# 7826. Repeat after me: “Wodehouse rocks!”.
# 7827. Repent, and return those library books.
# 7828. Required reading.
# 7829. Rest and relaxation.
# 7830. Restoration will take five years to complete.
# 7831. Retirement often means half the salary and twice the husband.
# 7832. Retreat!
# 7833. Return on investment.
# 7834. Revealing a truth has no effect if it can be classified as falsehood.
# 7835. Rich food isn’t necessarily expensive.
# 7836. Ride ’em cowboy!
# 7837. Riding through the gate, and other crimes against humanity.
# 7838. Riemann left the world a big puzzle to solve.
# 7839. Right as rain.
# 7840. Right now the rice is cooking.
# 7841. Right now, I’m hungry.
# 7842. Right!
# 7843. Right-of-way.
# 7844. Rinse out your mouth.
# 7845. Rise and shine!
# 7846. Robert Read pleads for hackers to learn Esperanto.
# 7847. Robert’s girlfriend will be here at three o’clock.
# 7848. Roger.
# 7849. Roll up the cuffs of her sleeves.
# 7850. Roll up your pants legs.
# 7851. Rome wasn’t built in a day.
# 7852. Room and board.
# 7853. Root and branch.
# 7854. Rooted in a misconception.
# 7855. Rosie M. Banks worked for a while, incognito, at a posh club.
# 7856. Rote learning.
# 7857. Round-robin.
# 7858. Ruby red grapefruit is scrumptious.
# 7859. Run silent, run deep.
# 7860. Run, don’t walk!
# 7861. Running a ship at top speed at night through an ice field is ASKING for
trouble.
# 7862. Running in the corridor is forbidden.
# 7863. Running in-place.
# 7864. Runway incursions are proof of how difficult English is to understand.
# 7865. Saber-rattling.
# 7866. Sad but true.
# 7867. Sadder but wiser.
# 7868. Safe and sound.
# 7869. Safe at first!
# 7870. Safely dead.
# 7871. Safety first.
# 7872. Salary is negotiable.
# 7873. Sale ends today.
# 7874. Same difference.
# 7875. Same ol’ same ol’.
# 7876. Save and exit.
# 7877. Save it for a rainy day.
# 7878. Save some for me.
# 7879. Save the last dance for me.
# 7880. Save the speeches for your bathroom mirror.
# 7881. Save your receipts for reimbursement of your expenses.
# 7882. Saved by the bell.
# 7883. Say again?
# 7884. Say hello to them for me.
# 7885. Say it isn’t so.
# 7886. Say no more.
# 7887. Say not a word, but go straight to your work.
# 7888. Say on.
# 7889. Say what you mean, and mean what you say.
# 7890. Say what you will, I like that song.
# 7891. Say your name slowly and distinctly, please.
# 7892. Saying “How to spell?” for “How do you spell it?” sounds like a child.
# 7893. Says who?
# 7894. Science is just the refinement of common sense.
# 7895. Science is not some kind of popularity contest.
# 7896. Scram, kid.
# 7897. Scuba diving is a new pleasure unknown to the ancients.
# 7898. Sealed bids had to be submitted.
# 7899. Search-and-seizure.
# 7900. Seating is the only thing lacking to make it perfect.
# 7901. Second, let me remind all of you who haven’t paid your dues, to do so.
# 7902. Second-hand clothes.
# 7903. Second-hand goods.
# 7904. Second-language learners are usually treated like children.
# 7905. Secret negotiations.
# 7906. Secularism is what fairy-tale purveyors call enlightenment.
# 7907. See for yourself.
# 7908. See if she has a fever.
# 7909. See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.
# 7910. See what I mean?
# 7911. See who’s at the door.
# 7912. See you back at the lodge.
# 7913. See you in September.
# 7914. See you in ten minutes!
# 7915. See you later!
# 7916. See you later, alligator!
# 7917. See you next time.
# 7918. See you then.
# 7919. Seeing your baby is the primary reason for our visit.
# 7920. Seek and ye shall find.
# 7921. Seize the day.
# 7922. Seize this very minute!
# 7923. Self-deprecation.
# 7924. Self-expression.
# 7925. Self-improvement is the struggle against becoming a feckless moron.
# 7926. Selfish.
# 7927. Send me an email instead.
# 7928. Send me an email.
# 7929. Send this FEDEX, red label.
# 7930. Separate checks, please.
# 7931. Separate checks?
# 7932. Serious investigation involves a certain amount of pinging.
# 7933. Serious mathematics begins with the measurement of angle.
# 7934. Set it down there.
# 7935. Set it there.
# 7936. Set right down.
# 7937. Set the pan off the stove.
# 7938. Set theory, if properly handled, is greatly liberating.
# 7939. Set up an appointment with my secretary.
# 7940. Set yourself down.
# 7941. Settle down.
# 7942. Severe weather.
# 7943. Shall we drink tea together?
# 7944. Shall we rough it, or stay in a nice hotel?
# 7945. Shame on me.
# 7946. Shanxi province is a coal-producing region.
# 7947. Shape up or ship out.
# 7948. She absconded with it.
# 7949. She actually enjoys taking this particular medicine.
# 7950. She almost broke her nose, trying to go through locked swinging doors.
# 7951. She always does like this.
# 7952. She always does this.
# 7953. She always has the last word.
# 7954. She and I plan to go shopping together.
# 7955. She appreciates your help a lot.
# 7956. She asked if the baby is any better now.
# 7957. She asked me when I’m coming home.
# 7958. She ate a lot.
# 7959. She ate it all up.
# 7960. She barely fits in that anymore.
# 7961. She bit me!
# 7962. She bore him five children.
# 7963. She bore me a beautiful baby.
# 7964. She borrowed some money from me.
# 7965. She broke up with her boyfriend.
# 7966. She burned her hand on that hot tea cup.
# 7967. She buys only two at a time.
# 7968. She called to say that she will not be able to make it back in time.
# 7969. She called to tell me her new telephone number.
# 7970. She came to me instead.
# 7971. She can drink her bottle all by herself now.
# 7972. She can hear the birds twittering outside the window.
# 7973. She can say a few things in English.
# 7974. She can see her reflection in the window.
# 7975. She can understand a great deal now.
# 7976. She can walk now without looking at the floor.
# 7977. She can’t wait for treatment.
# 7978. She changed the channel.
# 7979. She cleaned up after the baby.
# 7980. She climbed onto the window sill from her crib when no one was looking.
# 7981. She climbed up on the sofa by herself for the first time today.
# 7982. She cooks for me, but under protest.
# 7983. She copies anything and everything that you do.
# 7984. She copies what you do.
# 7985. She could knock you in the head with that.
# 7986. She could use a playpen.
# 7987. She couldn’t make heads or tails out of it.
# 7988. She crawled on the sofa.
# 7989. She cried for half an hour after we put her in the crib.
# 7990. She crossed right in front of me.
# 7991. She cut me off.
# 7992. She denounced him to the police.
# 7993. She did both at the same time.
# 7994. She did it right the first time.
# 7995. She did not give another point of view, but simply babble.
# 7996. She didn’t earn it – she bought it.
# 7997. She didn’t know about individual retirement accounts.
# 7998. She didn’t know Julia was sick.
# 7999. She didn’t know what to make of it.
# 8000. She didn’t know which one to choose.
# 8001. She doesn’t do it very often.
# 8002. She doesn’t eat things from off the floor anymore.
# 8003. She doesn’t harp at me about it anymore.
# 8004. She doesn’t know it’s hot.
# 8005. She doesn’t know she’s going to the doctor’s office.
# 8006. She doesn’t know what she wants to do.
# 8007. She doesn’t know what to make of it.
# 8008. She doesn’t like this.
# 8009. She doesn’t like to stay in.
# 8010. She doesn’t like to stay indoors.
# 8011. She doesn’t look as busy as the men.
# 8012. She doesn’t look that old at all.
# 8013. She doesn’t need holding.
# 8014. She doesn’t seem to mind.
# 8015. She doesn’t want to sit.
# 8016. She dresses like a city person.
# 8017. She dropped her lawsuit.
# 8018. She dyed her hair.
# 8019. She eats a lot more now than before.
# 8020. She feels unfairly treated.
# 8021. She fell for him.
# 8022. She fell out of the bed.
# 8023. She finally turned loose of it.
# 8024. She finished already.
# 8025. She foresaw this eventuality.
# 8026. She found a good-paying job with a transnational company.
# 8027. She gave you a task to do.
# 8028. She goes for the jugular.
# 8029. She goes wherever I go.
# 8030. She got a hundred dollars for it.
# 8031. She got a saline drip at the clinic.
# 8032. She got burned by touching that hot tea cup.
# 8033. She got loose again.
# 8034. She got you fair and square.
# 8035. She had a big bowel movement this morning.
# 8036. She had a hard life.
# 8037. She had a tantrum over that.
# 8038. She had quintuplets.
# 8039. She had to choose between them.
# 8040. She had to take bereavement leave.
# 8041. She has a hard life.
# 8042. She has a loose tooth.
# 8043. She has a lot of nerve.
# 8044. She has a lot to say.
# 8045. She has a master’s degree.
# 8046. She has a mission for you.
# 8047. She has a new telephone number.
# 8048. She has a phobia about that.
# 8049. She has a political agenda she’s wanting to advance.
# 8050. She has a tumor.
# 8051. She has an August first deadline.
# 8052. She has another tooth coming in.
# 8053. She has class.
# 8054. She has given notice.
# 8055. She has great happiness.
# 8056. She has had breakfast already.
# 8057. She has her agenda, and I don’t think we’re on it.
# 8058. She has her hair in four pigtails.
# 8059. She has her own agenda.
# 8060. She has her own blog.
# 8061. She has her own ideas.
# 8062. She has her own store.
# 8063. She has high expectations of us.
# 8064. She has loftier goals.
# 8065. She has long eyelashes.
# 8066. She has lost a lot of weight.
# 8067. She has money in her own name.
# 8068. She has no authority.
# 8069. She has nothing to do.
# 8070. She has outgrown all these clothes.
# 8071. She has plans for you.
# 8072. She has something wrong with her stomach.
# 8073. She has surprised me in the past.
# 8074. She has the hiccups.
# 8075. She has to go into the hospital for an operation.
# 8076. She has to learn sometime.
# 8077. She hasn’t woken up yet.
# 8078. She heard the dinner bell.
# 8079. She heard the wrong word.
# 8080. She held on to me while sleeping.
# 8081. She hit her head against the edge of the table.
# 8082. She hopes you’ll read her a story.
# 8083. She is a northerner.
# 8084. She is a welfare case-worker.
# 8085. She is all by herself on the sofa.
# 8086. She is beautiful and charming.
# 8087. She is better now than before.
# 8088. She is from the west.
# 8089. She is in no danger.
# 8090. She is married to a foreigner.
# 8091. She is neither my confidant nor my inspiration.
# 8092. She is not in danger.
# 8093. She is outside only a short time.
# 8094. She is singing in Tibetan.
# 8095. She is the one.
# 8096. She is the power behind the throne.
# 8097. She is thinner than before.
# 8098. She is trying to open it with her teeth.
# 8099. She is very happy.
# 8100. She isn’t even working on her application for admission.
# 8101. She isn’t here.
# 8102. She just passes on messages that get ignored.
# 8103. She just played with her dolls the whole time.
# 8104. She just wants to help.
# 8105. She keeps me on a short leash.
# 8106. She knows a good thing when she has it.
# 8107. She knows everything.
# 8108. She knows how to turn on the TV.
# 8109. She knows my personality.
# 8110. She knows to throw her arm up to protect her head.
# 8111. She knows what I’m talking about.
# 8112. She knows what’s good for her.
# 8113. She likes bananas a bunch, no pun intended.
# 8114. She likes bananas a lot.
# 8115. She likes for things to be fast and easy.
# 8116. She likes her new shoes a lot.
# 8117. She likes shrimp, but myself, I don’t care for seafood.
# 8118. She likes sunflower seeds.
# 8119. She likes things to be fast and easy.
# 8120. She likes this a lot.
# 8121. She likes this program a lot.
# 8122. She likes this song.
# 8123. She likes to do somersaults.
# 8124. She likes to go round and around.
# 8125. She likes to sit here and watch you do things.
# 8126. She lives in the Boston area somewhere.
# 8127. She looked at me with a sheepish grin on her face.
# 8128. She looked at me, but I paid her no mind.
# 8129. She looked like she was about to cry.
# 8130. She looked to see if I was looking.
# 8131. She looks like she just woke up.
# 8132. She loves her soaps.
# 8133. She loves pounding on the keyboard.
# 8134. She made some shoes for Julia and wants to send them to her.
# 8135. She makes me do the same thing.
# 8136. She married him for his money.
# 8137. She might fall and hit her head against the corner of the table.
# 8138. She misses the call, that’s all.
# 8139. She must have money in her own name.
# 8140. She must have treatment immediately.
# 8141. She needs a playpen.
# 8142. She needs new clothes.
# 8143. She needs taking care of.
# 8144. She needs to be able to go about freely.
# 8145. She needs to have a bath more often, because of the dry weather.
# 8146. She needs to have her bib on.
# 8147. She needs to have her hands washed.
# 8148. She needs to have some rice soup.
# 8149. She needs to sleep for an hour.
# 8150. She needs to take vitamins.
# 8151. She never sits still.
# 8152. She now knows what is dangerous.
# 8153. She opened it.
# 8154. She opened the syringe in front of me.
# 8155. She ought to be studying for her entrance exam.
# 8156. She picks the raisins out of it to eat.
# 8157. She played her cards right.
# 8158. She plays by herself now.
# 8159. She prefers a darker shade of lipstick.
# 8160. She pulled the stool over on herself.
# 8161. She pulled through.
# 8162. She put it in her mouth and then spat it out.
# 8163. She ran away as soon as I picked it up.
# 8164. She ran into her ex at the party.
# 8165. She ran me ragged.
# 8166. She ran out right in front of me.
# 8167. She really appreciates your help.
# 8168. She really gets a kick out of this.
# 8169. She really likes this program.
# 8170. She really wants to talk.
# 8171. She remembers her mother weeping while clutching a telegram.
# 8172. She returns on that day.
# 8173. She said she knew I would be back.
# 8174. She said she might be having a baby.
# 8175. She said something under her breath.
# 8176. She said that she greatly desires your company.
# 8177. She sang the blues.
# 8178. She saw me pick up her bowl, so she thought it was time to eat.
# 8179. She says her love-life is in shambles.
# 8180. She scratched me very hard.
# 8181. She scratched my neck with her long fingernails.
# 8182. She seemed upset about something.
# 8183. She seems happy.
# 8184. She seems rather nosey to me.
# 8185. She seems to be in a good mood.
# 8186. She seems to be on the verge of talking.
# 8187. She seems to have a phobia about that.
# 8188. She sells sea shells.
# 8189. She shocked the blue rinse set.
# 8190. She shouldn’t be doing that.
# 8191. She shouldn’t play with this.
# 8192. She shouldn’t sit so close to the TV.
# 8193. She shut the door.
# 8194. She slept the whole time through.
# 8195. She slept the whole time.
# 8196. She slept very well last night.
# 8197. She snuck up behind me.
# 8198. She sometimes comes to my rescue.
# 8199. She speaks English better than I do.
# 8200. She speaks English, Chinese, and Esperanto natively.
# 8201. She speaks fluent English.
# 8202. She spoke English haltingly.
# 8203. She squealed with delight.
# 8204. She sticks her nose in my business.
# 8205. She still goes on all-fours.
# 8206. She suffers from asthma.
# 8207. She sulked for days.
# 8208. She sure does.
# 8209. She switched cups with me.
# 8210. She takes her time about such things.
# 8211. She talked me out of it.
# 8212. She taught me to do that.
# 8213. She thinks I still make castles out of my mashed potatoes.
# 8214. She thinks it’s a game.
# 8215. She thinks it’s food.
# 8216. She thinks it’s her property.
# 8217. She thinks she can get away with that.
# 8218. She thinks she’s going to see the dogs.
# 8219. She thought the government pension was the only pension.
# 8220. She threw that trash away.
# 8221. She told me to close the door.
# 8222. She told me to do some cleaning.
# 8223. She told me to sit here.
# 8224. She told me to tell you.
# 8225. She told me, but I didn’t answer.
# 8226. She took one of the light bulbs as a sample.
# 8227. She understands everything.
# 8228. She used to eat just a little bit, but now she eats a full bowl.
# 8229. She wanted me to help her up onto the bed.
# 8230. She wanted to buy a hat as a gift for her father.
# 8231. She wanted to play hide-and-seek.
# 8232. She wants a house.
# 8233. She wants in the refrigerator.
# 8234. She wants me to buy her a pencil box.
# 8235. She wants out, so we have to back up.
# 8236. She wants the remote.
# 8237. She wants to be in charge of the grapes.
# 8238. She wants to be where the action is.
# 8239. She wants to borrow some money from us.
# 8240. She wants to crack some nuts.
# 8241. She wants to do a wash using our washing machine.
# 8242. She wants to drink some red sugar to help fight her cold.
# 8243. She wants to drink tea with us.
# 8244. She wants to enlist your aid.
# 8245. She wants to get married.
# 8246. She wants to get ready to go home today.
# 8247. She wants to help you with your work.
# 8248. She wants to hire-on with a manufacturing company.
# 8249. She wants to know if you’ve received your schedule.
# 8250. She wants to lick the bowl.
# 8251. She wants to marry off her youngest daughter.
# 8252. She wants to move to America.
# 8253. She wants to pick this up.
# 8254. She wants to play a game.
# 8255. She wants to play hide-and-seek.
# 8256. She wants to play with this.
# 8257. She wants to sit and play on my desk.
# 8258. She wants to sit over here, but there’s no seat.
# 8259. She wants to stay longer.
# 8260. She wants to stay with me until it’s finished.
# 8261. She wants to store her computer at our apartment while she’s gone.
# 8262. She wants to talk with me.
# 8263. She wants to watch the fireworks again.
# 8264. She wants you to help me.
# 8265. She wants you to read the book to her.
# 8266. She was a mail-order bride.
# 8267. She was about to fall, but we caught her in time.
# 8268. She was accorded only a footnote.
# 8269. She was behind me in line.
# 8270. She was determined to be the best candidate.
# 8271. She was eavesdropping again.
# 8272. She was friends with the girl next door.
# 8273. She was gathering material for a novel.
# 8274. She was getting restless.
# 8275. She was going to cry, so I gave her something to distract her.
# 8276. She was having a hard life.
# 8277. She was hoping to re-connect with a good friend.
# 8278. She was only hungry.
# 8279. She was playing with it.
# 8280. She was short with me.
# 8281. She was supposed to eat it herself, but she gave it to me instead.
# 8282. She was talking in her sleep, and crying too!
# 8283. She was unaware that a serious pension is available via an IRA.
# 8284. She was under a mistaken impression about the bugs.
# 8285. She was waiting to see if I was going to get angry.
# 8286. She was walking down the street, minding her own business.
# 8287. She wasn’t watching where she was going.
# 8288. She went ballistic.
# 8289. She went on a crying jag for thirty minutes.
# 8290. She went on a shopping spree.
# 8291. She went on a trip, leaving her cat to cry in her apartment.
# 8292. She went out to buy some groceries.
# 8293. She went to sleep only two minutes ago.
# 8294. She went to the clinic for treatment.
# 8295. She wet all over my clothes.
# 8296. She wet her pants again.
# 8297. She wet her pants.
# 8298. She will become an American citizen.
# 8299. She will have a happy childhood to look back on.
# 8300. She will soon be able to sit up all by herself.
# 8301. She woke up about ten minutes ago.
# 8302. She woke up from her nap.
# 8303. She would have to carry me home.
# 8304. She would sink a ship to save ten cents worth of tar.
# 8305. She would tyrannize me with petty economies.
# 8306. She’ trying to pick them all up at the same time.
# 8307. She’ll be coming around the mountain when she comes.
# 8308. She’ll be eleven months old next week.
# 8309. She’ll be ten months old in three days.
# 8310. She’ll be using a spoon soon.
# 8311. She’ll be walking in two months.
# 8312. She’ll be wide awake and playing a long time.
# 8313. She’ll earn it.
# 8314. She’ll get over that.
# 8315. She’ll have a happy childhood to look back on.
# 8316. She’ll learn.
# 8317. She’ll pull through.
# 8318. She’ll spill it on her clothes.
# 8319. She’ll take them all out.
# 8320. She’ll wake up from her nap soon.
# 8321. She’s a cutey-pie.
# 8322. She’s a dingbat.
# 8323. She’s a ferocious fighter.
# 8324. She’s a freshman at TUT.
# 8325. She’s a live wire.
# 8326. She’s a real live wire.
# 8327. She’s a single mother of two.
# 8328. She’s afraid of snakes and spiders.
# 8329. She’s always putting the sea shell to her ear.
# 8330. She’s always running around.
# 8331. She’s always underfoot.
# 8332. She’s always wanting to put it on.
# 8333. She’s as busy as a bee.
# 8334. She’s asthmatic.
# 8335. She’s at the hospital visiting her sister.
# 8336. She’s barefoot.
# 8337. She’s beautiful and charming.
# 8338. She’s becoming acquisitive.
# 8339. She’s been here as long as he has.
# 8340. She’s better off knowing it than not knowing it.
# 8341. She’s breaking out with a rash or something.
# 8342. She’s classy.
# 8343. She’s cooking chicken in the kitchen.
# 8344. She’s digging-in already.
# 8345. She’s doing pretty well.
# 8346. She’s dressed to kill.
# 8347. She’s fighting a cold.
# 8348. She’s following me.
# 8349. She’s following you.
# 8350. She’s getting there.
# 8351. She’s going to town.
# 8352. She’s going to turn on the humidifier.
# 8353. She’s gone back to sleep again.
# 8354. She’s got bumps all over her face.
# 8355. She’s got leathery skin.
# 8356. She’s got nothing to do, and way too much time to do it in.
# 8357. She’s got that technique down flat.
# 8358. She’s got the beat.
# 8359. She’s had breakfast, I take it.
# 8360. She’s handing out the goodies.
# 8361. She’s helping me do the cleaning.
# 8362. She’s her mother’s daughter.
# 8363. She’s hiding, and I don’t blame her.
# 8364. She’s hot to trot.
# 8365. She’s in mourning.
# 8366. She’s in stocking feet.
# 8367. She’s in the hospital for tests.
# 8368. She’s innocent.
# 8369. She’s just like a nanny for me.
# 8370. She’s just like you.
# 8371. She’s laughing?
# 8372. She’s lived in Holland for many years.
# 8373. She’s living dangerously.
# 8374. She’s looking after my interests there.
# 8375. She’s looking for a foothold.
# 8376. She’s looking for the dog.
# 8377. She’s looking for those little magnets.
# 8378. She’s making a fashion statement.
# 8379. She’s making a nice meal for you.
# 8380. She’s more interested in the birds than her mother.
# 8381. She’s my flesh and blood.
# 8382. She’s nine months old.
# 8383. She’s not comfortable.
# 8384. She’s not going to let you do that, and neither am I.
# 8385. She’s not interested in that.
# 8386. She’s not like she was before.
# 8387. She’s not sleepy today, for some reason.
# 8388. She’s not telling.
# 8389. She’s nothing if not busy.
# 8390. She’s of mixed blood.
# 8391. She’s on her high horse.
# 8392. She’s on her own schedule.
# 8393. She’s on the bed, watching TV.
# 8394. She’s on the move.
# 8395. She’s on the phone?
# 8396. She’s only playing.
# 8397. She’s out for the rest of the day.
# 8398. She’s outgrown those toys.
# 8399. She’s playing her cards right.
# 8400. She’s playing with her doll.
# 8401. She’s playing with the doll’s feet.
# 8402. She’s playing with the rice.
# 8403. She’s polite enough, but she doesn’t know which end is up.
# 8404. She’s pouting.
# 8405. She’s pregnant.
# 8406. She’s pulling the wind-up cord with her teeth.
# 8407. She’s rather selfish.
# 8408. She’s ready to chow down.
# 8409. She’s right behind you.
# 8410. She’s shifting the blame.
# 8411. She’s sitting on the bed, watching TV.
# 8412. She’s so cute!
# 8413. She’s standing here waiting for you.
# 8414. She’s still dry.
# 8415. She’s studying for her master’s.
# 8416. She’s such a big girl already.
# 8417. She’s taking a course in statistical process control.
# 8418. She’s the boss.
# 8419. She’s the same age as my mother.
# 8420. She’s the supervisor.
# 8421. She’s thirty something.
# 8422. She’s trying to act independently.
# 8423. She’s trying to feed herself.
# 8424. She’s trying to find out what she can get away with.
# 8425. She’s trying to pick up all four at one time.
# 8426. She’s trying to spoil our fun.
# 8427. She’s trying to talk.
# 8428. She’s trying to use my toothbrush like she sees in the TV commercial.
# 8429. She’s tugging at my heartstrings.
# 8430. She’s very busy.
# 8431. She’s very happy, but very dirty.
# 8432. She’s very helpful.
# 8433. She’s very interested in this.
# 8434. She’s very smart.
# 8435. She’s wearing a diaper.
# 8436. She’s worried she won’t get to go outside.
# 8437. She’s your daughter.
# 8438. Sheesh!
# 8439. Shere Khan laid low for a month, to put Mowgli off his guard.
# 8440. Sherlock Holmes was a consulting detective.
# 8441. Sherlock Holmes was at first unaware of his powers.
# 8442. Ships passing in the night.
# 8443. Shocking news.
# 8444. Short-stop was my favorite position when playing softball during recess.
# 8445. Should I ask the hotel to fix it?
# 8446. Should I buy more apples?
# 8447. Should I do what you say, or do what you mean?
# 8448. Should I get them from the store, or make them from scratch?
# 8449. Should I go now, or wait for you?
# 8450. Should I leave now?
# 8451. Should I print this?
# 8452. Should I start the cooking now?
# 8453. Should I throw this thing away?
# 8454. Should I wait a minute?
# 8455. Should that package arrive, notify me immediately.
# 8456. Should we bring the rice-cooker back in here now?
# 8457. Should we buy a gift for your mother?
# 8458. Should we do it before I go, or after I come back?
# 8459. Should we give her a bath tonight?
# 8460. Should we go ahead and eat, or wait for the rice?
# 8461. Should we move to a different city?
# 8462. Should we wait for Julia, or go ahead and eat.
# 8463. Should you learn Esperanto, you will then have many brothers and sisters.
# 8464. Shouldn’t Northrop Frye, or perhaps I.A. Richards, have done this?
# 8465. Shouldn’t you be wearing a lab coat while doing that?
# 8466. Shouldn’t you go now?
# 8467. Show me where I’m wrong.
# 8468. Show me your hands.
# 8469. Sic ’em!
# 8470. Sideburns were once in vogue.
# 8471. Silence is golden.
# 8472. Silly putty is an intriguing substance.
# 8473. Simmer down.
# 8474. Simon says.
# 8475. Simplicity itself.
# 8476. Since the weather has gotten warmer, I stored your winter hat away in the
chest.
# 8477. Since we’re all here, we must not be all there.
# 8478. Since when are you an expert on English?
# 8479. Since when did I become your secretary?
# 8480. Since when do you give the orders around here?
# 8481. Since when?
# 8482. Since you put it that way –
# 8483. Since you’re in good with her, would you ask her to lend us her volleyball?
# 8484. Six feet under.
# 8485. Six of one, a half dozen of the other.
# 8486. Skills pay the bills.
# 8487. Slapstick is the lowest form of humor.
# 8488. Slight differences appeared.
# 8489. Slower than molasses in January.
# 8490. Small falsehoods are sacrificed in order to maintain big ones.
# 8491. Smarter than your average bear.
# 8492. Smoke is dust with an attitude.
# 8493. Smooth as silk.
# 8494. Snow on the roof.
# 8495. So close, yet so far.
# 8496. So far, so good.
# 8497. So far, so good?
# 8498. So far, you’ve done everything wrong.
# 8499. So good, so far!
# 8500. So help me God.
# 8501. So let’s go there together, you and I.
# 8502. So long.
# 8503. So many steps!
# 8504. So much for that.
# 8505. So much is correct, and so little is right.
# 8506. So slow the dawning.
# 8507. So so.
# 8508. So sue me.
# 8509. So that makes it OK?
# 8510. So what?
# 8511. So why bother?
# 8512. So why the plaintive tone?
# 8513. So, what did they say?
# 8514. So, what do you want to know?
# 8515. So, what’s your favorite example of a recursively-defined function?
# 8516. So, you know.
# 8517. So?
# 8518. Soak the handkerchief in warm water and give it to me.
# 8519. So-called “handyman” skills means the same thing as “DIY” skills.
# 8520. So-called misquotation is often the evolution of the quotation.
# 8521. Solemn sermons scold sinners.
# 8522. Somatic reflexes.
# 8523. Some adjustment and correction is called for.
# 8524. Some are, some aren’t.
# 8525. Some canned goods come with a wind-up key, you know.
# 8526. Some deep cleaning is needed.
# 8527. Some dietary restrictions date from antiquity.
# 8528. Some do, some don’t.
# 8529. Some folks say a man’s made out of mud.
# 8530. Some form of controlled English is often highly desirable.
# 8531. Some inquiry-deniers are ditzier than others.
# 8532. Some like it hot.
# 8533. Some of the students in the class want you to give them English names.
# 8534. Some of the things in the fridge are turning into scientific experiments.
# 8535. Some of these expressions are confrontational.
# 8536. Some people are surprised that I’m nursing.
# 8537. Some people are using that room already.
# 8538. Some people ask me if I’m a student here.
# 8539. Some people at the zoo were having a picnic.
# 8540. Some people believe the eleventh commandment is: Thou shalt kowtow to
English.
# 8541. Some people confuse a poor memory with a clear conscience.
# 8542. Some people don’t have sense enough to come in out of the rain.
# 8543. Some people expect you to look after their things for them.
# 8544. Some people just don’t know how to tell a joke.
# 8545. Some people mistake a poor memory for a clear conscience.
# 8546. Some people say I’m too thin.
# 8547. Some people say I’m too young.
# 8548. Some people say our baby is too thin.
# 8549. Some people say we should feed our baby more.
# 8550. Some people say you shouldn’t eat anything that has a face.
# 8551. Some people stopped to look at her.
# 8552. Some rarely-used words, such as “elbow”, have to be thoroughly mastered.
# 8553. Some scholars contend that the truth is complicated.
# 8554. Some sentences change meaning based solely on punctuation.
# 8555. Some signals are hard to decipher.
# 8556. Some solutions seem simple.
# 8557. Some students still straggle in long after the bell has rung.
# 8558. Some things are used correctly, but explained incorrectly.
# 8559. Some words, like “cabinet”, have an internal silent vowel.
# 8560. Some words, like “laser”, were originally an acronym.
# 8561. Some worry, some don’t.
# 8562. Somebody pottied their kid on the supermarket floor.
# 8563. Someday he’ll get the credit he deserves.
# 8564. Someday, all this will be yours.
# 8565. Someone from America is called an American.
# 8566. Someone in good health is said to be “well”.
# 8567. Someone must have told you.
# 8568. Someone stole his cell phone and his girlfriend’s purse.
# 8569. Someone suggested I do that, but I didn’t.
# 8570. Someone who doesn’t know Esperanto is talking to me about social skills?
# 8571. Someone’s always watching.
# 8572. Someone’s at the door.
# 8573. Someone’s been eating my food.
# 8574. Someone’s been leaving the door open.
# 8575. Someone’s been leaving their trash in the wrong place.
# 8576. Someone’s been sitting in my chair.
# 8577. Something about it didn’t feel right.
# 8578. Something caught his attention.
# 8579. Something is missing.
# 8580. Something’s not quite right.
# 8581. Sometime during the next few days.
# 8582. Sometimes an idiot says something useful.
# 8583. Sometimes one, sometimes the other.
# 8584. Sooner or later a man realizes he’s going to be working for the rest of his
life.
# 8585. Sooner or later you’ll make a mistake that looks intentional.
# 8586. Sooner or later, I’ll get around to it.
# 8587. Sooner or later, the baby will stop crying.
# 8588. Sooner or later, you’ll see the light.
# 8589. Sorry about that.
# 8590. Sorry it’s late.
# 8591. Sorry to disappoint you.
# 8592. Sort the retrieval set into reverse chronological order.
# 8593. Sort them into two groups.
# 8594. Sounds good to me.
# 8595. Sounds like a good idea.
# 8596. Sounds like a winner.
# 8597. Spare me the sad story.
# 8598. Specialization consists of knowing more and more about less and less.
# 8599. Spectacular achievement.
# 8600. Sponges are useful in the hospital, as well as in the home.
# 8601. Spread out that cover.
# 8602. Spring has sprung, as they say.
# 8603. Spring is still a month away, my dear.
# 8604. Spring, and all that.
# 8605. Sprite is my favorite soft drink.
# 8606. Squalor is all that truly exists.
# 8607. Squeals of delight.
# 8608. Stand on the floor.
# 8609. Stand right there.
# 8610. Stand up so she can get by.
# 8611. Stand up.
# 8612. State your name, slowly and distinctly, please.
# 8613. State your purpose for going there.
# 8614. Statistics can be regarded as the study of variation.
# 8615. Stay away while I’m using the scissors.
# 8616. Stay clear of my desk.
# 8617. Stay with us, or stay quiet.
# 8618. Staying here is better than going there.
# 8619. Steady as she goes!
# 8620. Steer clear of that.
# 8621. Step on it.
# 8622. Step right up!
# 8623. Stephen is the one.
# 8624. Steve Rogers made a wry comment about Sunday supplement physics.
# 8625. Stick to the subjects you know something about.
# 8626. Stoicism contains an implicit recognition of sunken cost.
# 8627. Stolen goods.
# 8628. Stop and listen, if you like.
# 8629. Stop being so humble – you’re not that great.
# 8630. Stop bumping my chair.
# 8631. Stop pestering me.
# 8632. Stop saying that!
# 8633. Stop smelling the roses, and get to work.
# 8634. Stop talking about my face.
# 8635. Stop to smell the roses.
# 8636. Stop your ears.
# 8637. Stop, look, and listen.
# 8638. Story of my life.
# 8639. Straight up?
# 8640. Strategy is for amateurs – logistics is for professionals.
# 8641. Stream of consciousness.
# 8642. Street vendors sometimes block the pedestrian path.
# 8643. Strict discipline.
# 8644. Strike while the iron is hot.
# 8645. Strong coffee.
# 8646. Strut your stuff.
# 8647. Students are urged to speak English by those who themselves don’t speak
it.
# 8648. Success comes before work only in the dictionary.
# 8649. Such a possibility had not been considered.
# 8650. Such as it is.
# 8651. Such beliefs are part of the things of youth.
# 8652. Such laws as that need to be taken off the books.
# 8653. Such things as that should be discussed only in Esperanto.
# 8654. Suck in that gut!
# 8655. Sudden death.
# 8656. Sugar and spice and everything nice.
# 8657. Summary judgment.
# 8658. Sunbathing dovetails nicely with my plans to go swimming at the beach.
# 8659. Sunken cost.
# 8660. Supreme headquarters.
# 8661. Sure thing.
# 8662. Sure.
# 8663. Surface negation and semantic negation sometimes diverge.
# 8664. Suspension of judgment.
# 8665. Swab the deck.
# 8666. Sweet dreams!
# 8667. Sweetness and light.
# 8668. Swept under the rug.
# 8669. T minus five minutes, and counting.
# 8670. T minus three minutes fourteen seconds, and holding.
# 8671. Taiyuan is in Shanxi province, PRC.
# 8672. Taiyuan University of Technology is, not surprisingly, in Taiyuan.
# 8673. Take a close look.
# 8674. Take a look at Dr. Spock’s baby care book.
# 8675. Take a look at the Internet Picture Dictionary.
# 8676. Take a look at www(dot)esperanto(dot)net.
# 8677. Take a look at www(dot)fullbooks(dot)com.
# 8678. Take a look at www(dot)m-w(dot)com.
# 8679. Take a look at www(dot)thefreedictionary(dot)com.
# 8680. Take a look so you’ll know what to buy next time.
# 8681. Take a number.
# 8682. Take a right at the light.
# 8683. Take a whiff of this and tell me what you think.
# 8684. Take care of the baby while I take a shower.
# 8685. Take care of your health.
# 8686. Take care of yourself.
# 8687. Take care.
# 8688. Take five.
# 8689. Take her away.
# 8690. Take her out for a walk, so maybe she’ll stop crying.
# 8691. Take it all.
# 8692. Take it as a lesson.
# 8693. Take it as a warning.
# 8694. Take it easy.
# 8695. Take it one step at a time.
# 8696. Take it or leave it.
# 8697. Take it to Tim.
# 8698. Take me to the south gate.
# 8699. Take me to your leader.
# 8700. Take no prisoners.
# 8701. Take one a day, for thirty days.
# 8702. Take that back.
# 8703. Take that with a grain of salt.
# 8704. Take them out and hang them up.
# 8705. Take this to the bathroom.
# 8706. Take two aspirin and call me in the morning.
# 8707. Take your feet off of the table.
# 8708. Take your feet off the table.
# 8709. Take your seats.
# 8710. Take your time.
# 8711. Taking a blood sample is part of the medical exam.
# 8712. Taking care of the baby is very tiring.
# 8713. Taking this course is better than taking that course.
# 8714. Talk for two minutes on the topic “apples”.
# 8715. Talk for two minutes on the topic “apricots”.
# 8716. Talk for two minutes on the topic “baking soda”.
# 8717. Talk for two minutes on the topic “bananas”.
# 8718. Talk for two minutes on the topic “bean curd”.
# 8719. Talk for two minutes on the topic “bean sprouts”.
# 8720. Talk for two minutes on the topic “beans”.
# 8721. Talk for two minutes on the topic “broccoli”.
# 8722. Talk for two minutes on the topic “brussel sprouts”.
# 8723. Talk for two minutes on the topic “cabbage”.
# 8724. Talk for two minutes on the topic “carrots”.
# 8725. Talk for two minutes on the topic “cauliflower”.
# 8726. Talk for two minutes on the topic “celery”.
# 8727. Talk for two minutes on the topic “chives”.
# 8728. Talk for two minutes on the topic “corn meal”.
# 8729. Talk for two minutes on the topic “corn”.
# 8730. Talk for two minutes on the topic “dates”.
# 8731. Talk for two minutes on the topic “eggplant”.
# 8732. Talk for two minutes on the topic “flour”.
# 8733. Talk for two minutes on the topic “garlic”.
# 8734. Talk for two minutes on the topic “grapes”.
# 8735. Talk for two minutes on the topic “kiwi fruit”.
# 8736. Talk for two minutes on the topic “lettuce”.
# 8737. Talk for two minutes on the topic “millet”.
# 8738. Talk for two minutes on the topic “mushrooms”.
# 8739. Talk for two minutes on the topic “my hometown”.
# 8740. Talk for two minutes on the topic “noodles”.
# 8741. Talk for two minutes on the topic “onions”.
# 8742. Talk for two minutes on the topic “pears”.
# 8743. Talk for two minutes on the topic “peas”.
# 8744. Talk for two minutes on the topic “plums”.
# 8745. Talk for two minutes on the topic “potatoes”.
# 8746. Talk for two minutes on the topic “radishes”.
# 8747. Talk for two minutes on the topic “tofu”.
# 8748. Talk for two minutes on the topic “tomatoes”.
# 8749. Talk for two minutes on the topic “yams”.
# 8750. Talk of the town.
# 8751. Talk to the hand.
# 8752. Talk well, which means not too wisely.
# 8753. Talking to my shoe is the only thing that keeps me sane.
# 8754. Talking turkey.
# 8755. Tally ho!
# 8756. TC stands for “Till complete”.
# 8757. Tea time is over for today.
# 8758. Teacher let the mules out.
# 8759. Teaching English without using Esperanto is malpractice.
# 8760. Teaching is a class act.
# 8761. Tease it out.
# 8762. Tell her I’m sorry.
# 8763. Tell her the truth.
# 8764. Tell her who’s boss.
# 8765. Tell it like it is.
# 8766. Tell me about it later.
# 8767. Tell me about it.
# 8768. Tell me all.
# 8769. Tell me everything.
# 8770. Tell me something I don’t know already.
# 8771. Tell me something I don’t know.
# 8772. Tell me something new.
# 8773. Tell me the truth.
# 8774. Tell that oaf off.
# 8775. Tell the jury what happened to you.
# 8776. Tell us a little about yourself.
# 8777. Tell us some new ones.
# 8778. Telling the truth can land you in Galileo Prison.
# 8779. Ten Four.
# 8780. Ten milliliters, three times a day.
# 8781. Tender loving care.
# 8782. Ten-hut!
# 8783. Terms of endearment.
# 8784. Terms of surrender.
# 8785. Thank Heaven for small favors.
# 8786. Thank Julia for that.
# 8787. Thank you for bringing your concerns to our attention.
# 8788. Thank you for not making a pun on the expression “time flies”.
# 8789. Thank you for not saying that “glitters” should be “glisters”.
# 8790. Thank you for sharing that with me.
# 8791. Thank you, my dear.
# 8792. Thank you.
# 8793. Thanks a lot.
# 8794. Thanks anyway.
# 8795. Thanks for letting me know.
# 8796. Thanks for letting me put my two cents in.
# 8797. Thanks for telling me.
# 8798. Thanks for the info.
# 8799. Thanks for the memories.
# 8800. Thanks just the same, but I’ll pass on that.
# 8801. Thanks to you, we missed the train.
# 8802. Thanks, I needed that.
# 8803. That accident cost him a leg.
# 8804. That also has another meaning.
# 8805. That apartment has walk-in closets.
# 8806. That area is sparsely populated.
# 8807. That bad, huh?
# 8808. That book of poems was compiled by Hazel Felleman.
# 8809. That brand is famous throughout China.
# 8810. That building has a helipad.
# 8811. That business is rooted is a misconception.
# 8812. That can easily become a version-control nightmare.
# 8813. That can wait.
# 8814. That change applied across the board.
# 8815. That coat really becomes you.
# 8816. That company makes high-quality baby products.
# 8817. That company specializes in floor coverings.
# 8818. That confirms the suspicion I had about you.
# 8819. That could be disturbing.
# 8820. That country has to import that item.
# 8821. That disruptive behavior has to stop.
# 8822. That document is almost two hundred kilobytes in size.
# 8823. That does it.
# 8824. That doesn’t help me any.
# 8825. That doesn’t make it a bad product.
# 8826. That doesn’t make you look cool; it makes you look like a moron.
# 8827. That doesn’t meet our standards.
# 8828. That dog had to be put down.
# 8829. That dress is to die for.
# 8830. That evens up the score somewhat.
# 8831. That experiment should be done under the hood.
# 8832. That exploit gave him bragging rights.
# 8833. That exposé names names.
# 8834. That flies in the face of the facts.
# 8835. That food is fattening.
# 8836. That food is too rich for me.
# 8837. That fried perch was scrumptious.
# 8838. That goes for me too.
# 8839. That goes to show you.
# 8840. That happened off-camera.
# 8841. That has been debunked.
# 8842. That has no bearing on the matter.
# 8843. That has no effect on it.
# 8844. That hit the spot.
# 8845. That incident should have ended his career.
# 8846. That instigated a state-wide manhunt.
# 8847. That is a currently-operative myth.
# 8848. That is a famous book.
# 8849. That is a long-distance call.
# 8850. That is a nationally-known brand.
# 8851. That is an urban legend.
# 8852. That is confusing.
# 8853. That is good.
# 8854. That is irrelevant.
# 8855. That is no big deal.
# 8856. That is no business of yours.
# 8857. That is no easy thing to do.
# 8858. That is no lie.
# 8859. That is no longer necessary.
# 8860. That is no longer sufficient.
# 8861. That is no problem.
# 8862. That is no skin off my back.
# 8863. That is not an immediate concern.
# 8864. That is not in my interest.
# 8865. That is not one of my interests.
# 8866. That is not something I am interested in.
# 8867. That is one for the record books.
# 8868. That is one of his pet peeves.
# 8869. That is one of my favorite things.
# 8870. That is the conclusion pointed to by the evidence.
# 8871. THAT is the sequence of events.
# 8872. That is very good real estate.
# 8873. That job offers very good pay and benefits.
# 8874. That just means I need a drink of water.
# 8875. That law ought to be repealed.
# 8876. That Learner’s Dictionary is for English-Chinese.
# 8877. That looks childish.
# 8878. That looks familiar.
# 8879. That makes her cry.
# 8880. That makes it all the sweeter.
# 8881. That makes two of us.
# 8882. That makeshift whiteboard needs to be cleaned of the old markings.
# 8883. That may come to pass.
# 8884. That may have a lot to do with it.
# 8885. That means it might rain.
# 8886. That microwave oven is kaput.
# 8887. That midnight snack hit the spot.
# 8888. That might be a good idea.
# 8889. That movie was a laugh a minute.
# 8890. That one.
# 8891. That only causes confusion.
# 8892. That ought to be done entirely robotically.
# 8893. That parrot cost him a lot of money.
# 8894. That phenomenon can be modeled using the logarithm.
# 8895. That picture doesn’t do her justice.
# 8896. That picture is way out.
# 8897. That piece of information was carefully excized from the report.
# 8898. That place is dangerous.
# 8899. That policy dates from the previous administration.
# 8900. That possibility needs to be investigated.
# 8901. That program was recorded live.
# 8902. That put him into an irreversible decline.
# 8903. That school is taking up perfectly good farm land.
# 8904. That set him off on a long story.
# 8905. That set their tongues awaggin’!
# 8906. That shopping center has a free shuttle bus for its customers.
# 8907. That should not be allowed in here.
# 8908. That song is from a movie.
# 8909. That song was a big hit.
# 8910. That song was a hit.
# 8911. That song was a smash hit.
# 8912. That sounds like gospel that some garbage was turned into.
# 8913. That stinks.
# 8914. That store has considerable goodwill.
# 8915. That story was probably ghost-written.
# 8916. That street is badly in need of repair.
# 8917. That stuff is poison.
# 8918. That surgery was life-saving.
# 8919. That surgery was only for cosmetic purposes.
# 8920. That takes a load off my mind.
# 8921. That takes care of the immediate concern.
# 8922. That takes great will-power.
# 8923. That tea went through me.
# 8924. That terrible collision occurred while one of the planes was “taxiing back”.
# 8925. That there are languages other than English is left out of the discussion.
# 8926. That tickles me.
# 8927. That tickles.
# 8928. That toy dog looks very life-like.
# 8929. That tub has a crack in it.
# 8930. That type of shirt would have made you look ridiculous.
# 8931. That was a brilliant riposte to the insult.
# 8932. That was a close call.
# 8933. That was a complete waste of time.
# 8934. That was a good choice.
# 8935. That was a great jump-shot!
# 8936. That was a mean trick to play on you.
# 8937. That was a pivotal event in my intellectual development.
# 8938. That was a stupid thing to say.
# 8939. That was a tactless remark.
# 8940. That was a wild ride.
# 8941. That was an isolated instance.
# 8942. That was an under-handed thing to do.
# 8943. That was fun.
# 8944. That was futile.
# 8945. That was informative.
# 8946. That was insulting.
# 8947. That was just a warm-up question, for harder ones yet to come.
# 8948. That was just an appetizer.
# 8949. That was MY fault.
# 8950. That was my first time to set foot on that campus.
# 8951. That was my way of being friendly.
# 8952. That was not meant for broadcast.
# 8953. That was one tough test!
# 8954. That was rather selfish.
# 8955. That was rather sloppy of me.
# 8956. That was the decisive moment.
# 8957. That was the easiest one of all.
# 8958. That was the idea.
# 8959. That was too close for comfort.
# 8960. That was your decision.
# 8961. That wasn’t a movie; it was just a home-video.
# 8962. That wasn’t hard.
# 8963. That wasn’t part of the deal.
# 8964. That wasn’t so bad, was it?
# 8965. That wasn’t so smart, was it?
# 8966. That way!
# 8967. That went over like a lead balloon.
# 8968. That will be all.
# 8969. That will do.
# 8970. That will get old.
# 8971. That will give you a tummy-ache for sure.
# 8972. That will help you get thin.
# 8973. That will wake me up.
# 8974. That wind will cut right through you.
# 8975. That wisdom was born of bitter experience.
# 8976. That worked out pretty well.
# 8977. That would be a great chance to speak Esperanto to a lot of people.
# 8978. That would be a welcome development.
# 8979. That would be like having the fox guard the chicken house.
# 8980. That would be like putting Eeyore in charge of the cheer-leading team.
# 8981. That wouldn’t be safe.
# 8982. That, and much more.
# 8983. That, plus a buck seventy five, will get you on the bus.
# 8984. That’ll be the day.
# 8985. That’s “d”, as in “dog”.
# 8986. That’s a big Ten Four.
# 8987. That’s a bitter pill to have to swallow.
# 8988. That’s a bunch of baloney.
# 8989. That’s a bunch of bunk.
# 8990. That’s a bunch of nonsense.
# 8991. That’s a childish joke.
# 8992. That’s a choice cut of meat.
# 8993. That’s a clear sign.
# 8994. That’s a cute excuse.
# 8995. That’s a deal.
# 8996. That’s a fair trade.
# 8997. That’s a far cry from being acceptable.
# 8998. That’s a far cry from being ready.
# 8999. That’s a far cry from what I actually said.
# 9000. That’s a far cry from what I had in mind.
# 9001. That’s a good idea.
# 9002. That’s a good joke.
# 9003. That’s a great song.
# 9004. That’s a hard one to answer.
# 9005. That’s a high-quality humidifier.
# 9006. That’s a horse of another color.
# 9007. That’s a knife that cuts both ways.
# 9008. That’s a lie – it is not.
# 9009. That’s a little TOO comfortable.
# 9010. That’s a one-way street.
# 9011. That’s a pet peeve of mine.
# 9012. That’s a pitfall for the unwary.
# 9013. That’s a silly question.
# 9014. That’s a swell idea.
# 9015. That’s a tall tale.
# 9016. That’s a thorn in my side.
# 9017. That’s a thought.
# 9018. That’s a well-known logical fallacy.
# 9019. That’s a well-known open question.
# 9020. That’s a wonderful thing.
# 9021. That’s about the size of it.
# 9022. That’s absolutely eloquent.
# 9023. That’s actually a pretty good strategy.
# 9024. That’s all I can stand of it.
# 9025. That’s all I have to say about it.
# 9026. That’s all right.
# 9027. That’s all there is to it.
# 9028. That’s all you ever say.
# 9029. That’s all you know how to do.
# 9030. That’s all, folks!
# 9031. That’s always the case.
# 9032. That’s an accident waiting to happen.
# 9033. That’s an eloquent expression.
# 9034. That’s an enlightened employer.
# 9035. That’s an execrable excuse.
# 9036. That’s an idiomatic expression.
# 9037. That’s an idiotic expression.
# 9038. That’s an inane expression.
# 9039. That’s an understatement, if there ever was one.
# 9040. That’s an urban legend.
# 9041. That’s apparently what people want.
# 9042. That’s as good a place as any to stop.
# 9043. That’s awful-tasting stuff, I know.
# 9044. That’s because you leave the kitchen dirty.
# 9045. That’s better.
# 9046. That’s classy.
# 9047. That’s close enough.
# 9048. That’s cold.
# 9049. That’s correct, by coincidence.
# 9050. That’s eloquent.
# 9051. That’s enough for me.
# 9052. That’s enough for you to carry.
# 9053. That’s exactly right.
# 9054. That’s exactly what I had in mind.
# 9055. That’s exactly what I’m doing.
# 9056. That’s for me to know, and you to wonder about.
# 9057. That’s for the birds.
# 9058. That’s for you to decide.
# 9059. That’s good.
# 9060. That’s gross.
# 9061. That’s her department.
# 9062. That’s her job.
# 9063. That’s her latest boyfriend.
# 9064. That’s her rule.
# 9065. That’s highway robbery!
# 9066. That’s his pet theory.
# 9067. That’s his tagline.
# 9068. That’s how it is in China.
# 9069. That’s how the cookie crumbles.
# 9070. That’s illegal.
# 9071. That’s in God’s hands.
# 9072. That’s incredible!
# 9073. That’s inexorable logic.
# 9074. That’s just a burden we’ll have to live with.
# 9075. That’s just icing on the cake.
# 9076. That’s just idle talk.
# 9077. That’s just my guess.
# 9078. That’s just my point.
# 9079. That’s just pillow-talk.
# 9080. That’s mighty young fun.
# 9081. That’s more like it.
# 9082. That’s music to my ears.
# 9083. That’s my favorite sitcom.
# 9084. That’s my little Margie!
# 9085. That’s my toothbrush.
# 9086. That’s no joke.
# 9087. That’s no lie.
# 9088. That’s nonsense.
# 9089. That’s not a consideration.
# 9090. That’s not a toy.
# 9091. That’s not for you to say.
# 9092. That’s not good enough for you?
# 9093. That’s not just a silly question – it’s a stupid question.
# 9094. That’s not my job.
# 9095. That’s not my official name.
# 9096. That’s not my problem.
# 9097. That’s not nearly as good.
# 9098. That’s not original.
# 9099. That’s not something you need to know.
# 9100. That’s not the first bridge to collapse.
# 9101. That’s not the true cost.
# 9102. That’s not water, it’s urine.
# 9103. That’s not what he wants to hear.
# 9104. That’s not what I’m used to.
# 9105. That’s of no use to me.
# 9106. That’s off-topic.
# 9107. That’s one of her friends from downstairs.
# 9108. That’s one of her rules.
# 9109. That’s one of his hangups.
# 9110. That’s one of my favorite proverbs.
# 9111. That’s one way of looking at it.
# 9112. That’s only circumstantial evidence.
# 9113. That’s only hearsay.
# 9114. That’s only six days away.
# 9115. That’s only the reflection from the window.
# 9116. That’s par for the course.
# 9117. That’s part of her artwork.
# 9118. That’s perfect English.
# 9119. That’s rather off-topic, isn’t it?
# 9120. That’s right on the money.
# 9121. That’s right up your alley.
# 9122. That’s something to clap about.
# 9123. That’s tellin’ ’em.
# 9124. That’s telling her!
# 9125. That’s terrible.
# 9126. That’s the dirty clothes pile.
# 9127. That’s the easy way.
# 9128. That’s the gist of it.
# 9129. That’s the kind of joke a ten-year-old tells.
# 9130. That’s the long and short of it.
# 9131. That’s the naïve way of looking at it.
# 9132. That’s the old Julia we know and love.
# 9133. That’s the oldest scam in the book.
# 9134. That’s the oldest trick in the book.
# 9135. That’s the raw, unvarnished truth.
# 9136. That’s the result of the populace not knowing calculus and Esperanto.
# 9137. That’s the silliest excuse I’ve heard yet.
# 9138. That’s the sort of excuse they were looking for.
# 9139. That’s the sort of joke a ten-year-old tells.
# 9140. That’s the stuff to give the troops.
# 9141. That’s the truth.
# 9142. That’s the way the cookie crumbled.
# 9143. That’s the way the cookie crumbles.
# 9144. That’s the whole idea.
# 9145. That’s true, and frightening.
# 9146. That’s true, but you haven’t hit the nail on the head.
# 9147. That’s true.
# 9148. That’s usually the case.
# 9149. That’s very hot.
# 9150. That’s way past my bedtime.
# 9151. That’s what becomes of you on a conventional diet.
# 9152. That’s what gives us a bad name.
# 9153. That’s what I had in mind.
# 9154. That’s what I want to know.
# 9155. That’s what I want you to do.
# 9156. That’s what I’m afraid of.
# 9157. That’s what I’m used to.
# 9158. That’s what this is.
# 9159. That’s why I am late.
# 9160. That’s why she does that.
# 9161. That’s why we’re spending some time discussing it.
# 9162. That’s why you have to go today.
# 9163. That’s your department.
# 9164. That’s your job.
# 9165. That’s your last chance, I guess you know.
# 9166. That’s your opinion.
# 9167. That’s your problem.
# 9168. That’s your vocabulary word for today.
# 9169. The “ee” in “been” is pronounced as a short “i”.
# 9170. The “outfielder” fooled the teacher.
# 9171. The 158-method is “1 year Esperanto + 5 years English = 8 years English”.
# 9172. The acronym ICU stands for Intensive Care Unit.
# 9173. The addendum of a dictionary is sometimes called “New Words
Supplement”.
# 9174. The air conditioner is on another circuit.
# 9175. The air seems to be a little bit bad.
# 9176. The airport is crowded.
# 9177. The alarm went off.
# 9178. The alternative to Esperanto is cockroaches.
# 9179. The amount decreased gradually with increasing temperature.
# 9180. The answer is “no”.
# 9181. The answer to that has to come from you.
# 9182. The answers were not computed, but simply plugged.
# 9183. The ante-bellum South was down-in-the-mouth.
# 9184. The apartments are being renovated.
# 9185. The argument at least cleared the air.
# 9186. The argument of kings.
# 9187. The artifacts have been despoiled by souvenir hunters.
# 9188. The baby has eaten already.
# 9189. The baby is always grabbing my hair.
# 9190. The baby is crying.
# 9191. The baby needs a diaper change.
# 9192. The baby put the comb in this drawer.
# 9193. The baby stroller folds up to be easy to store.
# 9194. The baby wants you to pick it up and rock it to sleep in your arms.
# 9195. The baby wants you to talk with her.
# 9196. The baby’s first words may be “Attention K-Mart shoppers!”.
# 9197. The baby-care book fails to mention anything about bilingualism.
# 9198. The banality of evil.
# 9199. The bank is beside the store.
# 9200. The banker is a friend of the president.
# 9201. The barber nicked me pretty bad.
# 9202. The barometer is falling.
# 9203. The bathroom heater is still not working, after all this time.
# 9204. The battery being dead, his car wouldn’t start.
# 9205. The bedroom’s far wall is exposed to the cold.
# 9206. The bell isn’t working today.
# 9207. The bellboy kept two dollars as his tip.
# 9208. The benefit of the doubt.
# 9209. The best campfire songs are Esperanto folk songs.
# 9210. The best computers money can buy.
# 9211. The best example of sediment is the mud at the bottom of a river.
# 9212. The best is yet to come.
# 9213. The best linen money can buy.
# 9214. The best songs are about lost love.
# 9215. The best things in life are free.
# 9216. The best way to meet locals is to go to their Esperanto club.
# 9217. The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.
# 9218. The Bible as literature.
# 9219. The Bible is a source of literary references.
# 9220. The big money is in the private sector.
# 9221. The big news is yet to come.
# 9222. The big picture.
# 9223. The biggest calculus reform would be for people to learn it.
# 9224. The Birmingham jail served for a while as part of Galileo Prison.
# 9225. The blood needs to circulate.
# 9226. The blue rinse set.
# 9227. The blues.
# 9228. The boondocks.
# 9229. The boss wants to see you.
# 9230. The bottom line.
# 9231. The bottom of the rice pot needs to be dry before being used in the cooker.
# 9232. The bottom rung of the ladder is loose.
# 9233. The break-even point.
# 9234. The bridge collapsed.
# 9235. The brilliance of Mamikon’s observation is like that of Foucault.
# 9236. The British think that a hundred miles is a long distance.
# 9237. The British use the word “flat” for “apartment”.
# 9238. The broken English on product packaging is amusing.
# 9239. The buck stops here.
# 9240. The bugs are back.
# 9241. The bugs are everywhere.
# 9242. The building is almost finished.
# 9243. The building tends to be drafty.
# 9244. The bunch of old women jogged around the mall, fanny-packs flapping.
# 9245. The burden of learning syntax falls on the users.
# 9246. The bus runs a somewhat altered route after nine p.m.
# 9247. The bus stopped to pick up some passengers.
# 9248. The buzzards are circling overhead.
# 9249. The call of Nature.
# 9250. The calls of the referee were hotly disputed.
# 9251. The canonical rhyme for “orange” is “door hinge”.
# 9252. The captain gave the order to abandon ship.
# 9253. The captain was not drunk last night.
# 9254. The captain was so culpable that they sent him to prison.
# 9255. The car careened into a tree, killing them both.
# 9256. The case is pending.
# 9257. The case was one of in-laid gold.
# 9258. The cat got out.
# 9259. The cat says, “They treat me so well, I must be a god.”.
# 9260. The categorical imperative.
# 9261. The cause of death has not yet been determined.
# 9262. The cause of death has yet to be determined.
# 9263. The chain of command.
# 9264. The chalk supply is here.
# 9265. The check bounced.
# 9266. The check is in the mail.
# 9267. The check-out line is kind of long right now.
# 9268. The child is father to the man.
# 9269. The children played hide-and-seek.
# 9270. The Chinese believe, erroneously, that babies have to be fat to be healthy.
# 9271. The Chinese pilot’s last words were, “What does ‘pull up’ mean?”
# 9272. The Chinese restaurant is on the first floor.
# 9273. The choice is quite simple: Esperanto or chaos.
# 9274. The choice is yours.
# 9275. The church key has become obsolete, but its spirit lives on.
# 9276. The circuits were overloaded.
# 9277. The class monitor will make copies for distribution.
# 9278. The classroom was comfortable.
# 9279. The clinical lab results are now available on-line.
# 9280. The coach made me captain of the team.
# 9281. The coast is clear.
# 9282. The coin of the realm.
# 9283. The cold shoulder.
# 9284. The college president was never any the wiser.
# 9285. The comb is in this drawer.
# 9286. The company has filed for Chapter 11 protection.
# 9287. The company wants to hire more salesreps.
# 9288. The company wants to test its job applicants for English proficiency.
# 9289. The computer needs rebooting.
# 9290. The construction workers haven’t been paid.
# 9291. The continued domination of English is due to the FUD factor.
# 9292. The contract expires at the end of this year.
# 9293. The convergence is quite rapid.
# 9294. The cookies absorbed moisture from the air.
# 9295. The cooking gas cylinder has gone empty.
# 9296. The corpse was identified from dental records.
# 9297. The cost of living is much higher there.
# 9298. The course was cancelled.
# 9299. The crime scene was thoroughly examined.
# 9300. The crowd went wild.
# 9301. The cupboard was bare.
# 9302. The dancing flea fetched a good price at the auction.
# 9303. The danger associated with moonlighting is falling asleep at the wheel.
# 9304. The danger has passed.
# 9305. The dangers and drawbacks of uncontrolled adventure.
# 9306. The date of receipt was not recorded.
# 9307. The dating scene.
# 9308. The day begins at four a.m., as far as I’m concerned.
# 9309. The day begins at noon for astronomers.
# 9310. The days are getting longer.
# 9311. The death toll was staggering.
# 9312. The deeper the snow, the slower I go.
# 9313. The demands and contingencies of life.
# 9314. The depositions became a paper blizzard.
# 9315. The devil made me do it.
# 9316. The difference between a necessary condition and a sufficient condition.
# 9317. The difference between an urgent matter and an important matter.
# 9318. The difference between specification and implementation.
# 9319. The dirt was swept under the rug.
# 9320. The dirty air gives me sinus problems.
# 9321. The dirty clothes go here.
# 9322. The disbursement of funds devolved into dispute.
# 9323. The discipline at that school is strict.
# 9324. The disinterested pursuit of knowledge always leads to Esperanto.
# 9325. The diversion that you’re ignoring is the main attack.
# 9326. The doctor gave him six months to live.
# 9327. The doctor is in.
# 9328. The doctor said it would take two weeks for her to regain her appetite.
# 9329. The doctor said to gather the family.
# 9330. The doctor wrote a prescription for her.
# 9331. The doctor’s walking stick has been found.
# 9332. The documentation of English.
# 9333. The dog got loose.
# 9334. The dog says, “They treat me so well, they must be gods.”.
# 9335. The door doesn’t lock.
# 9336. The door hinges need lubricating.
# 9337. The door latch is missing.
# 9338. The dot product of two vectors is not a vector.
# 9339. The dove dove after a tasty morsel.
# 9340. The drain is clogged.
# 9341. The driver went to fill up the gas tank.
# 9342. The dunces of the world are in confederacy against Esperanto.
# 9343. The early bird gets the worm.
# 9344. The electrical power is off in my apartment.
# 9345. The elevator is gone, but the concrete mixer is still there.
# 9346. The eminent surgeons welcomed Walter Mitty’s assistance.
# 9347. The enemy is whoever gets you killed, not matter what side they’re on.
# 9348. The engine is of an advanced and novel design.
# 9349. The English on packaging in China is often wrong.
# 9350. The Esperanto club meets on Saturdays.
# 9351. The Esperanto dictionary of John Wells is a classic.
# 9352. The essay was empty of enlightenment.
# 9353. The essential contribution is always made by an outsider.
# 9354. The event will not only be aired, but also webcast.
# 9355. The exhaust fan of the stove is noisy.
# 9356. The exhibits are all in place.
# 9357. The exigencies of empire.
# 9358. The existence of that bug was kept a secret.
# 9359. The experiment confirmed our suspicion about the lack of correlation.
# 9360. The experiments will be carried out as soon as funding is confirmed.
# 9361. The expression “rat pack” is an example of assonance.
# 9362. The expression “set off” has antonymous meanings.
# 9363. The expression “the public mind” is almost an oxymoron, no pun intended.
# 9364. The expression “with knobs on” is actually British, but I like to use it.
# 9365. The expression, “It’s your call.” is not a reference to the telephone.
# 9366. The family gathered at his bedside.
# 9367. The farmers feared a killing frost.
# 9368. The fate of Loomis seems similar to that of Goodyear.
# 9369. The faucet is leaking.
# 9370. The feeble-minded.
# 9371. The feral child named Mowgli was a character invented by Rudyard
Kipling.
# 9372. The field of Artificial Intelligence was initiated by the creation of
Esperanto.
# 9373. The fingernail clippers are in that drawer.
# 9374. The fire extinguishers are missing.
# 9375. The fire is so delightful.
# 9376. The Fire Marshall would have a fit if he saw that.
# 9377. The fire raged for almost a week.
# 9378. The first book of Esperanto was published in the year 1887.
# 9379. The first bus I caught had a problem, and so I had to transfer to another
bus.
# 9380. The first mate was drunk last night.
# 9381. The first one to complain about the food has to take over the job of
cooking.
# 9382. The first rule of public life is to never pass up a chance to use the restroom.
# 9383. The first train is a local, but the second train is an express.
# 9384. The first translation of this file will be into Esperanto.
# 9385. The five-pointed green star is the symbol of Esperanto.
# 9386. The flags file needs some kind of index or search mechanism.
# 9387. The floors are caked with grime, hardened with the wear of time.
# 9388. The food was left out where the bugs could get it.
# 9389. The fool says, “This is much too important to tackle before lunch.”
# 9390. The forecast is that tomorrow will be much colder.
# 9391. The freezer compartment of the refrigerator is filled with popsicles.
# 9392. The fun has just started.
# 9393. The future’s not ours to see.
# 9394. The game is over.
# 9395. The game is up.
# 9396. The gamma knife is an item of cutting-edge technology, no pun intended.
# 9397. The good life.
# 9398. The grammar-checker is so poor that it will seriously mislead ESL
students.
# 9399. The grass is always greener on the other side.
# 9400. The Great Chicago Fire was in 1871.
# 9401. The greatest of faults is to be conscious of none.
# 9402. The greatest test of living fame is to participate in, and lose, one of your
impersonization contests.
# 9403. The Grim Reaper.
# 9404. The hash totals matched, so the transmission was accepted.
# 9405. The head of the house.
# 9406. The heartbreak of psoriasis.
# 9407. The heat doesn’t work.
# 9408. The heat is not working today.
# 9409. The heat should have been turned on four days ago.
# 9410. The heater in the bathroom doesn’t work.
# 9411. The heavy perfume she wears makes me nauseous.
# 9412. The highest levels of command.
# 9413. The highway is closed because of snow.
# 9414. The highways are all closed because of snow.
# 9415. The historical tethers of Anglo-centric expansionism.
# 9416. The hoi polloi consists of those who don’t know calculus and Esperanto.
# 9417. The hoi polloi take liberties during the holidays.
# 9418. The home-schooled miss being robbed of their lunch money.
# 9419. The honeymoon is over.
# 9420. The horns of dilemma.
# 9421. The horrors of war.
# 9422. The hose is pinched at the handle.
# 9423. The hot water runs cold at first, so turn it on now.
# 9424. The hurricane took its toll of human life.
# 9425. The idea that I might know what I’m doing is still somewhat alien to her.
# 9426. The identities of the victims have not been released yet.
# 9427. The important thing is to get something on paper.
# 9428. The inanity of foreign language instruction is well known.
# 9429. The incumbent is stepping down, for reasons of health.
# 9430. The initial public offering will be next week.
# 9431. The injury proved fatal.
# 9432. The injury was not service-related.
# 9433. The inmates have taken over the insane asylum.
# 9434. The innocent are fired, and the guilty are promoted.
# 9435. The inside of my lip has a sore or something that hurts a lot.
# 9436. The instinct to scrutinize and appraise the value of all that exists or
happens.
# 9437. The Intensive Care Unit is abbreviated ICU.
# 9438. The intentional fallacy is a special case of the sunken-cost fallacy.
# 9439. The internet is down for the whole campus.
# 9440. The internet is not working.
# 9441. The invisible pink unicorn is marked by a condition of extreme ontological
shyness.
# 9442. The iron was left too long on the mess jacket.
# 9443. The IRS will drive a Sherman tank through a pinhole.
# 9444. The Italian navigator has discovered the new land.
# 9445. The jaws of death.
# 9446. The jaws of life.
# 9447. The jaws that bite, the claws that catch.
# 9448. The joke is on you.
# 9449. The joys of Yiddish ought to be more widely known.
# 9450. The jurors are still in deliberation.
# 9451. The jury is still out on that question.
# 9452. The jury is still out.
# 9453. The key to learning a language is repetition.
# 9454. The kind of garbage that gets turned into gospel.
# 9455. The kind of vitriol usually reserved for those who tell the truth.
# 9456. The kindness of strangers.
# 9457. The king isn’t wearing any clothes!
# 9458. The kitchen closes at ten o’clock.
# 9459. The kitchen is a mess.
# 9460. The lady doth protest too much, methinks.
# 9461. The largest percentage of victims were of Czech descent.
# 9462. The last hurrah.
# 9463. The last question threw me for a loop.
# 9464. The last to leave has to lock the door.
# 9465. The latest and greatest.
# 9466. The latest outrage.
# 9467. The Law of the Universe: Things are always getting globally better, but
locally worse.
# 9468. The law requires interpretation.
# 9469. The law’s delay.
# 9470. The lecture was well-attended.
# 9471. The left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing.
# 9472. The legislature is the ultimate destination of an unchecked fallacy.
# 9473. The less said about it, the better.
# 9474. The letter of the law.
# 9475. The light is better over here.
# 9476. The light is lasting longer.
# 9477. The linen closet.
# 9478. The listener goes from expression to idea.
# 9479. The location for the trash storage has been changed.
# 9480. The lock doesn’t work.
# 9481. The long and the short of it.
# 9482. The long and winding road.
# 9483. The longest journey begins with a single step.
# 9484. The Longman pronunciation dictionary was written by John Wells.
# 9485. The look in his blue eyes was intense.
# 9486. The Lord must have been carrying you in His arms.
# 9487. The Lord must have been holding my hand.
# 9488. The lower temperature is due to adiabatic expansion.
# 9489. The man who knows how will always have a job.
# 9490. The man who knows why will always be boss.
# 9491. The management was a bunch of self-serving jackals.
# 9492. The manager must be gone for the day.
# 9493. The market has been saturated.
# 9494. The market here has only the iced version, not the fresh version.
# 9495. The masses will be liberated by the liberation of the miscellaneous.
# 9496. The meal could have used some gravy.
# 9497. The meat was smothered in sauce.
# 9498. The meeting was cancelled due to bad weather.
# 9499. The Merriam-Webster learners website gives pronunciation practice.
# 9500. The message was relayed to me.
# 9501. The message was relayed to us by the coordinating office.
# 9502. The mills of the Lord grind slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine.
# 9503. The mist has cleared.
# 9504. The misters came on while I was picking out some vegetables.
# 9505. The modern term for “heresy” is “hate”.
# 9506. The monetary value of time grows exponentially until interruption.
# 9507. The money is good.
# 9508. The moon gives us light at night, when we need it.
# 9509. The more things change, the more they stay the same.
# 9510. The more you stir it, the more it stinks.
# 9511. The mortgage company foreclosed on their house.
# 9512. The mother lode.
# 9513. The motion died for lack of a second.
# 9514. The motto of Fort Worth is “Where the West begins”.
# 9515. The national Esperanto organization for the U.S. is called Esperanto-USA.
# 9516. The neighborhood toughs let the doctor pass through their midst.
# 9517. The new teachers were introduced to us at the luncheon.
# 9518. The news reported that, in the mining accident, nine were hurt.
# 9519. The next time you pass me, I’ll appreciate it.
# 9520. The next time you pass my desk, I’ll appreciate it.
# 9521. The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.
# 9522. The nickname of Dallas is “Big D”.
# 9523. The nickname of Fort Worth is “Cowtown”.
# 9524. The nickname of New York City is “The Big Apple”.
# 9525. The nitty-gritty.
# 9526. The note in Esperanto should state what language the document is in.
# 9527. The ocean space between Cuba and Florida ought to be reclaimed.
# 9528. The old exam papers have been discarded.
# 9529. The one in the crow’s nest is the first to know.
# 9530. The only deniers to be wary of are those who would deny inquiry.
# 9531. The only guarantee that she knows about it is if the request comes from
her.
# 9532. The only other language I have any real command over is Esperanto.
# 9533. The only thing I rage against is the dying of the light.
# 9534. The only two certainties in life are death and taxes.
# 9535. The operation was a success.
# 9536. The opinions expressed herein are only those of the author, not the
publisher.
# 9537. The opportunity to respond.
# 9538. The optimist was treed by a lion, but enjoyed the view.
# 9539. The other one is the same.
# 9540. The other shoe was in the potty horse.
# 9541. The outlook was grim.
# 9542. The overhead light needs to be repaired.
# 9543. The Pacific Ocean.
# 9544. The package is broken.
# 9545. The pain has subsided.
# 9546. The pain robbed me of my sleep.
# 9547. The painting was discovered to be a forgery.
# 9548. The party is over.
# 9549. The party starts at seven.
# 9550. The party starts at six o’clock.
# 9551. The past is economically irrelevant except as a tool of education.
# 9552. The patient is a famous banker.
# 9553. The patterns are original.
# 9554. The pediatrics nurse told me your daughter’s name.
# 9555. The pen is mightier than the sword.
# 9556. The pending cases are listed there.
# 9557. The pendulum has swung in the other direction.
# 9558. The phone is for you.
# 9559. The phrase “In business” may be a dog-to-cat error for “Open for
business”.
# 9560. The phrase “to be continued” is not equal to “continued on other side”.
# 9561. The pictures will be ready next Wednesday.
# 9562. The pieces of the puzzle are coming together.
# 9563. The pillow was one of the softest down.
# 9564. The pillowcase is being washed.
# 9565. The pitter-patter of little feet.
# 9566. The place is beside the hospital.
# 9567. The place looks clean, doesn’t it?
# 9568. The place looks clean.
# 9569. The place was silent, except for echoes.
# 9570. The place where I usually shop at is closed today.
# 9571. The plague took a terrible toll.
# 9572. The plan was one of great cunning.
# 9573. The plane crashed and burned.
# 9574. The plane crashed because ice had accumulated on the wings.
# 9575. The plants need to be watered.
# 9576. The plate-breaking scene of John Candy was very funny.
# 9577. The plural of “mouse unit” is, of course, “mouse units”.
# 9578. The plural, in English, of “datum” is “items of data”.
# 9579. The poem “Victory in Defeat” was written by Edwin Markham.
# 9580. The point of no return.
# 9581. The poison is working.
# 9582. The police are investigating the burglary.
# 9583. The police believe that robbery was the motive.
# 9584. The politically-correct term for “blind” is “sightless”.
# 9585. The politically-correct term for “to attack” is “to target”.
# 9586. The politically-correct term for “to die” is “to make final transition”.
# 9587. The pony express was replaced by the telegraph.
# 9588. The potential is there.
# 9589. The potholes retain rainwater, which breeds mosquitoes.
# 9590. The power of packaging.
# 9591. The power of the telephone.
# 9592. The power outage lasted until 8:25 A.M.
# 9593. The power strip fell from the window ledge to the floor.
# 9594. The power strip is plugged in, but turned off.
# 9595. The powers that be.
# 9596. The practice of one-upmanship is nowhere keener than in academia.
# 9597. The presumption of innocence.
# 9598. The price goes up every day.
# 9599. The price is reasonable.
# 9600. The price of everything is going up.
# 9601. The price of homes usually appreciates.
# 9602. The price of meat is going up.
# 9603. The price of rice in China.
# 9604. The price of tomatoes has gone through the roof.
# 9605. The problem with doing someone a favor is that then they think they’re
your friend.
# 9606. The progress of something like Esperanto is slow, but certain.
# 9607. The proof is in the pudding.
# 9608. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
# 9609. The pros and cons of each.
# 9610. The protection of privilege.
# 9611. The public mind.
# 9612. The purpose of dreams is to keep you asleep.
# 9613. The purpose of oversight is to prevent oversights.
# 9614. The purpose of propaganda is to deny inquiry.
# 9615. The purpose of the letter names is to communicate over a noisy channel.
# 9616. The purpose of this project is to give information about English.
# 9617. The pursuit of happiness.
# 9618. The putative status is being aggressively touted as a fait accompli.
# 9619. The quality is the best.
# 9620. The quarterback was sacked.
# 9621. The questions will get harder.
# 9622. The rain brought cooler temperatures.
# 9623. The rat pack.
# 9624. The real battle is over how the lines are drawn.
# 9625. The real fight is over who has the burden of proof.
# 9626. The real reason is because they enjoy doing it.
# 9627. The reason that relationships are difficult is that men are involved.
# 9628. The reason this looks strange is because it’s correct.
# 9629. The red, white, and blue.
# 9630. The redundancy is deliberate, so don’t criticize it.
# 9631. The redundancy, and semi-redundancy, is deliberate.
# 9632. The referee penalized them for that.
# 9633. The regulation of temperature.
# 9634. The report is due Monday morning.
# 9635. The report was right – you were just reading it incorrectly.
# 9636. The rest is for Julia.
# 9637. The rest is history.
# 9638. The restroom on a ship is called “the head”.
# 9639. The restrooms stink to high heaven.
# 9640. The result is often independent of the path.
# 9641. The result would be the same.
# 9642. The results would be equal.
# 9643. The rice is cooking now.
# 9644. The ride with you was worth the fall.
# 9645. The rocket blew up on the launch pad.
# 9646. The room needs to be cleaned.
# 9647. The root of all evil.
# 9648. The root of the tooth by itself serves no purpose, and should be extracted.
# 9649. The roots of unity.
# 9650. The round-trip air fare is amazingly low.
# 9651. The rules of engagement.
# 9652. The runners were staggered for the track race.
# 9653. The runway was too short.
# 9654. The rush to war consists of the failure to implement Esperanto.
# 9655. The same old song.
# 9656. The scary thing is, he’s still practicing.
# 9657. The school is, frankly speaking, strapped for cash.
# 9658. The school’s prestige would be increased.
# 9659. The scissors are in that drawer.
# 9660. The seat of power.
# 9661. The secretary is out sick today.
# 9662. The Securities and Exchange Commission was set up to prevent such
abuses.
# 9663. The sentence, “I’m not telling.” is not simply the negation of “I’m
telling.”.
# 9664. The shades of night were falling fast.
# 9665. The ship burned to the water line.
# 9666. The ship capsized.
# 9667. The ship proceeded under radio silence.
# 9668. The shop was closed.
# 9669. The shopping list is right here.
# 9670. The shortest distance between two points is off the wall.
# 9671. The show must go on.
# 9672. The show starts at eight o’clock.
# 9673. The shower hose is defective.
# 9674. The sidewalk is often blocked by a delivery truck.
# 9675. The simple expedient of repetition often suffices.
# 9676. The sky is dark with rain clouds.
# 9677. The sky is grey.
# 9678. The slices are still cohering.
# 9679. The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.
# 9680. The snow is melting quickly.
# 9681. The snow plow started some time before noon.
# 9682. The so-called “French J” sound is quite common in English.
# 9683. The solution to the problem of multiple languages is to add one more
language.
# 9684. The sooner I go, the sooner I’ll get back.
# 9685. The sooner the better.
# 9686. The sooner you go, the sooner you’ll get back.
# 9687. The soup is simmering.
# 9688. The speaker goes from idea to expression.
# 9689. The speech won’t last long.
# 9690. The spider and the fly.
# 9691. The spider offered enticements, but the fly demurred.
# 9692. The spirit of the law.
# 9693. The square of 11 is 121.
# 9694. The square root of 121 is 11.
# 9695. The stakes are very high.
# 9696. The stakes were very high.
# 9697. The stampede was caused by some dishes falling off the mess wagon.
# 9698. The standard procedure in such cases.
# 9699. The status (“formal”, “informal”, etc.) of each entry will be noted in the
link.
# 9700. The status quo.
# 9701. The stems of artificial flowers are eye-poking hazards.
# 9702. The stock market was down a bit due to profit-taking.
# 9703. The stockbrokers do not think this commodity has a future.
# 9704. The store is open until midnight, but its pharmacy closes at ten.
# 9705. The storm will break at any time.
# 9706. The story had a happy ending.
# 9707. The straight self versus the wayward self.
# 9708. The stroke of midnight.
# 9709. The sun gives us light during the day, when we don’t need it.
# 9710. The surgeon’s knife.
# 9711. The system is down.
# 9712. The system is highly configurable.
# 9713. The system is one of immense technical sophistication.
# 9714. The system is plagued with non-standard routines.
# 9715. The system is powerful, but a little rough around the edges.
# 9716. The system is running out of space.
# 9717. The system was overbuilt and too costly to operate.
# 9718. The table has not been washed yet.
# 9719. The tea has gone through me already.
# 9720. The tea is ready already.
# 9721. The tea went through me.
# 9722. The teacher took attendance.
# 9723. The teachers come back to work on this day.
# 9724. The teachers’ lounge was locked.
# 9725. The teapot is chipped.
# 9726. The telephone is beeping because it is low on electricity.
# 9727. The teller’s window is one of bullet-proof glass.
# 9728. The term “natural language” is actually an oxymoron.
# 9729. The term “politically-correct” is itself intentionally politically-incorrect.
# 9730. The test tube broke in the centrifuge.
# 9731. The textbook is full of mistakes.
# 9732. The thermos bottle is filled with very hot water.
# 9733. The thermos bottled was stoppered with a cork.
# 9734. The thieves entered the building through a window in the courtyard.
# 9735. The thought crossed my mind.
# 9736. The three-dimensionality of time.
# 9737. The thrill of being chased.
# 9738. The tickets are all sold out.
# 9739. The tines of this fork are uneven.
# 9740. The tip of the iceberg.
# 9741. The tip of the sword.
# 9742. The Titanic sank in 1912, with huge loss of life.
# 9743. The Titanic sank in the Atlantic Ocean.
# 9744. The Titanic was a luxury liner.
# 9745. The toilet doesn’t work.
# 9746. The towel is right there.
# 9747. The traffic was bad.
# 9748. The train has to stop at every town to let people on and off.
# 9749. The train is one of a mile in length.
# 9750. The train lost its brakes and derailed.
# 9751. The train will be crowded with students returning home.
# 9752. The trap has been set.
# 9753. The trapped miners ran out of air.
# 9754. The trash is to be placed at the top of the stairs.
# 9755. The trash sometimes obstructs access to the fire extinguishers.
# 9756. The trees are turning green.
# 9757. The trees need trimming.
# 9758. The trouble with the world is the inability of a man to sit quietly in a room.
# 9759. The true motive is finally revealed.
# 9760. The true, the good, and the beautiful.
# 9761. The truth hasn’t got its boots on yet.
# 9762. The truth is out there.
# 9763. The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.
# 9764. The tub of water.
# 9765. The turning point.
# 9766. The turnip will turn up sooner or later.
# 9767. The two candidates faced off in a televised debate.
# 9768. The two quantities are out of phase.
# 9769. The two sides feared the cannibals more than they feared each other.
# 9770. The two technologies may be seen as highly complementary.
# 9771. The two usually go together.
# 9772. The ump dusted off home plate.
# 9773. The UN should turn off the earphones, and turn on Esperanto.
# 9774. The user documentation is pretty good, but the programming
documentation is abysmal.
# 9775. The variation was small.
# 9776. The very picture of incompetence.
# 9777. The video contains blood and gore sequences.
# 9778. The village was wiped out by a mud slide.
# 9779. The wastebasket.
# 9780. The water has been cut off to my apartment.
# 9781. The water has run out.
# 9782. The water was off earlier this morning.
# 9783. The way to make progress is by the accumulation of many small
advantages.
# 9784. The way was blocked, so I had to go around.
# 9785. The ways of the world.
# 9786. The weather is beautiful.
# 9787. The weather outside is frightful.
# 9788. The Western restaurant is on the second floor.
# 9789. The whiter the bread, the sooner dead.
# 9790. The whole ball of wax.
# 9791. The whole nine yards.
# 9792. The Wild West.
# 9793. The wind is rattling the window.
# 9794. The wolf at the door.
# 9795. The wolf is at the door.
# 9796. The wolf was injured by a gunshot.
# 9797. The woman who sold mantos went home, because her son got married.
# 9798. The word “cabinet” looks like it has three syllables, but actually has only
two.
# 9799. The word “data” is actually a collective noun, like the word “water”.
# 9800. The word “nothing” is not pronounced like the two words “no thing”.
# 9801. The word “oxymoron” is a high-brow word for “a contradiction in terms”.
# 9802. The word “pantry” is synonymous with “cupboard”.
# 9803. The word “set” is used as an informal form of “sit”.
# 9804. The workers haven’t been paid.
# 9805. The world Esperanto organization is called UEA.
# 9806. The world is awash in disinformation.
# 9807. The worst men give the best advice.
# 9808. The worst mistake is to do nothing because you can do only a little.
# 9809. The worst-case scenario.
# 9810. The wound festered without proper attention.
# 9811. The yuan is getting stronger against the dollar.
# 9812. Their baby stroller was stolen.
# 9813. Their baby was stillborn.
# 9814. Their basement is flooded.
# 9815. Their cause is just.
# 9816. Their conduct was wanton, wicked, and lewd.
# 9817. Their dog likes for you to pet it.
# 9818. Their homes are far apart.
# 9819. Their lot has greatly improved.
# 9820. Their parents don’t let them do that.
# 9821. Their relationship has ended.
# 9822. Then why did you ask for it?
# 9823. Theorizing takes practice.
# 9824. There are a lot of mosquitoes around here.
# 9825. There are a number of chatterbots on the web.
# 9826. There are a number of words like that.
# 9827. There are abundant coal reserves in the western part of China.
# 9828. There are always too many days before Saturday.
# 9829. There are certain allusions you have to know in order to be fluent.
# 9830. There are crumbs all over the sofa.
# 9831. There are dirty dishes in the sink.
# 9832. There are four provinces without power, due to the severe winter weather.
# 9833. There are many ancient Latin expressions routinely used in English.
# 9834. There are many Chinese communities abroad.
# 9835. There are many curious things to see when you are there.
# 9836. There are many possibilities.
# 9837. There are never enough hours in the day.
# 9838. There are no illegitimate children – only illegitimate parents.
# 9839. There are no old bold truck drivers.
# 9840. There are no problematical ones in that group.
# 9841. There are no restrictions on the use of this file.
# 9842. There are no shortcuts.
# 9843. There are no unattractive women, only lazy ones.
# 9844. There are old truck drivers, and there are bold truck drivers.
# 9845. There are other things I could be doing.
# 9846. There are some CD’s in the bookcase.
# 9847. There are some laws that ought to be repealed.
# 9848. There are some things you should have only second-hand knowledge of.
# 9849. There are still some unanswered questions about the Fibonacci sequence.
# 9850. There are toys all over the floor.
# 9851. There are two items of medicine for her to take.
# 9852. There are two pieces of cake left.
# 9853. There are two pieces of chicken left.
# 9854. There can be no legitimate difference of opinion on this matter.
# 9855. There can be no valid difference of opinion on the importance of
Esperanto.
# 9856. There has got to be an easier way of doing this.
# 9857. There is 500 yuan left in the account.
# 9858. There is a bitter struggle over control of the definition of “hate”.
# 9859. There is a God!
# 9860. There is a heavy frost this morning.
# 9861. There is a pizza parlor at that shopping center.
# 9862. There is a problem with it.
# 9863. There is a sales clerk behind the counter.
# 9864. There is a staff meeting at two o’clock.
# 9865. There is a strange sound coming from there.
# 9866. There is a supplement to the contract.
# 9867. There is an old ditty that starts off, “Five foot two / Eyes of blue…”.
# 9868. There is ice on the inside of the window.
# 9869. There is more.
# 9870. There is need to insist on the rectification of mentality.
# 9871. There is no “stimulus idea” greater than Esperanto.
# 9872. There is no chalk in this room.
# 9873. There is no connection in the public mind between the two uses of the
name.
# 9874. There is no excuse for not taking your cell phone.
# 9875. There is no greater presumption than that of seizing the high moral ground.
# 9876. There is no linguistic difference between fact and idea.
# 9877. There is no linguistic difference between truth and falsehood.
# 9878. There is no mistake.
# 9879. There is no news in truth, and no truth in news.
# 9880. There is no room available at present.
# 9881. There is no scholarly consensus on its precise placing.
# 9882. There is no water in the bottle.
# 9883. There is simply no excuse for not learning Esperanto.
# 9884. There is still money left in the account.
# 9885. There is water seeping in from under the door.
# 9886. There is, as yet, insufficient data to give a meaningful answer to that
question.
# 9887. There IS?
# 9888. There isn’t any water.
# 9889. There may be something to that.
# 9890. There might be lots of people there.
# 9891. There ought to be a law against making such laws.
# 9892. There ought to be a law against that.
# 9893. There seems to be a little bit of an odor in the air.
# 9894. There seems to be a mistake here.
# 9895. There should be a note in Esperanto stating what language it is in.
# 9896. There was a breakdown in communication.
# 9897. There was a death in the family.
# 9898. There was a delay in the detection of the defect.
# 9899. There was a failure to communicate.
# 9900. There was a pop-quiz today.
# 9901. There was a power outage during the night.
# 9902. There was a power outage in the middle of the night.
# 9903. There was another earthquake in Japan today.
# 9904. There was no letup in the rain, so we had to stay overnight.
# 9905. There was some kind of commotion in the lobby.
# 9906. There wasn’t any water left.
# 9907. There were a few things I wanted to say to him.
# 9908. There were no fatalities.
# 9909. There were no students in the classroom.
# 9910. There were obvious differences.
# 9911. There were two of them in there.
# 9912. There weren’t any apples left.
# 9913. There weren’t any people in the room
# 9914. There weren’t any shopping carts, or even hand baskets, available.
# 9915. There will also be translations into other languages, as well, in due course.
# 9916. There will be a Chinese translation of this lexis.
# 9917. There will be a pop quiz later.
# 9918. There will be a quiz on this.
# 9919. There will be a test tomorrow of the civil defense system.
# 9920. There will be no break today.
# 9921. There, but for the grace of God, go I.
# 9922. There’s a bathroom on the right.
# 9923. There’s a bunch of trash piled in the corner.
# 9924. There’s a crying need for this.
# 9925. There’s a curfew in effect.
# 9926. There’s a fly in my soup.
# 9927. There’s a fly in the ointment.
# 9928. There’s a fungus among us.
# 9929. There’s a gas leak somewhere.
# 9930. There’s a girl downstairs who would appreciate these.
# 9931. There’s a great age-difference between them.
# 9932. There’s a lesson there for you.
# 9933. There’s a little left.
# 9934. There’s a lot about English you don’t understand.
# 9935. There’s a lot left.
# 9936. There’s a mess on the floor.
# 9937. There’s a sale today.
# 9938. There’s a storm brewing.
# 9939. There’s a storm warning in effect.
# 9940. There’s a strong wind today.
# 9941. There’s a time-in-grade requirement.
# 9942. There’s a train every ten minutes or so.
# 9943. There’s a work-around.
# 9944. There’s always something you can do.
# 9945. There’s an easier way to do this.
# 9946. There’s an on-going investigation about it.
# 9947. There’s an on-going lawsuit about it.
# 9948. There’s food on the floor.
# 9949. There’s little left.
# 9950. There’s more of this.
# 9951. There’s more than one possibility.
# 9952. There’s more to life than that.
# 9953. There’s more where that came from.
# 9954. There’s next to nothing left of the water.
# 9955. There’s no accounting for taste.
# 9956. There’s no behavioral difference between believers and non-believers.
# 9957. There’s no better example of an outreach program than Esperanto.
# 9958. There’s no better way to be on the same wave-length than to use
Esperanto.
# 9959. There’s no business like show business.
# 9960. There’s no dial tone.
# 9961. There’s no difference between them.
# 9962. There’s no disputing that.
# 9963. There’s no electricity or water.
# 9964. There’s no greater impediment to progress than a tourist mentality.
# 9965. There’s no moon tonight.
# 9966. There’s no need even to acknowledge source.
# 9967. There’s no need for us to shake hands.
# 9968. There’s no nice way to say this.
# 9969. There’s no one here by that name.
# 9970. There’s no one left to call me “Charlie”.
# 9971. There’s no place like home.
# 9972. There’s no real competition between vendors at that marketplace.
# 9973. There’s no time to explain right now.
# 9974. There’s no turning back once you’ve passed that point.
# 9975. There’s no use complaining about it.
# 9976. There’s no use dithering about it.
# 9977. There’s no use in us wasting each other’s time.
# 9978. There’s no use quibbling about it.
# 9979. There’s nobody here to take care of that problem.
# 9980. There’s nobody in the office except him.
# 9981. There’s not a grain of truth in it.
# 9982. There’s nothing back there.
# 9983. There’s nothing cool about that.
# 9984. There’s nothing in it.
# 9985. There’s nothing more harmful than a sense of entitlement.
# 9986. There’s nothing unusual about that.
# 9987. There’s nothing wrong with your hearing.
# 9988. There’s one more left.
# 9989. There’s precious little that can be done now.
# 9990. There’s rice on the floor.
# 9991. There’s something fishy about it.
# 9992. There’s something I haven’t told you.
# 9993. There’s too much noise at night.
# 9994. There’s trash all over the floor.
# 9995. There’s usually no refund on sale items.
# 9996. There’s water on the floor here.
# 9997. Thermos bottles are very popular in China.
# 9998. These are better than those.
# 9999. These are instances not of “controlled” English, but of unrestrained
English.
# 10000. These are instances of English.
# 10001. These are on sale.
# 10002. These are raw sunflower seeds.
# 10003. These are seedless grapes.
# 10004. These are short utterances for study and practice by ESL students.
# 10005. These bananas are a little under-ripe.
# 10006. These boxes go in the back.
# 10007. These clothes are for export.
# 10008. These clothes are still a little damp.
# 10009. These clothes aren’t dry.
# 10010. These documents need to be shredded.
# 10011. These doors are a firewall, and are supposed to be kept closed.
# 10012. These examples are not necessarily to be taken as exemplary, Jane.
# 10013. These items first need to soak in water.
# 10014. These look better than your other shoes.
# 10015. These pants are too tight.
# 10016. These papers need to be distributed.
# 10017. These premises are under electronic surveillance.
# 10018. These shoes are too small on her.
# 10019. These walls are dangerous, because they’re so hard.
# 10020. They accept cash only – no bank cards.
# 10021. They also serve who only stand and wait.
# 10022. They always ask about Julia first.
# 10023. They always ask Julia first.
# 10024. They approved my research proposal.
# 10025. They are Americans.
# 10026. They are at your command.
# 10027. They are constant companions.
# 10028. They are dressed alike.
# 10029. They are inquiry-deniers.
# 10030. They are investigating the relationship between structure and reactivity.
# 10031. They are members of a mutual-admiration society.
# 10032. They are not working today.
# 10033. They are only vitamin C tablets.
# 10034. They are professionals.
# 10035. They are waiting for us downstairs.
# 10036. They are working on it to get it back up again.
# 10037. They at least have to observe the forms.
# 10038. They attempted to save him.
# 10039. They became unable to pay their mortgage.
# 10040. They began by cutting off the prisoner’s Esperanto magazine
subscription.
# 10041. They believe that kind of stuff only in the hinterland.
# 10042. They call him this behind his back.
# 10043. They called a truce to bury the dead.
# 10044. They called him a dumb ox.
# 10045. They came running.
# 10046. They came to blows.
# 10047. They can breathe easier now.
# 10048. They can fix that with surgery, you know.
# 10049. They can, but they don’t.
# 10050. They can’t tell friend from foe.
# 10051. They cast a wide net.
# 10052. They cook their food on a grill over an open fire.
# 10053. They couldn’t meet my salary requirement.
# 10054. They danced the night away.
# 10055. They declined.
# 10056. They did a lab test on a sample of her hair.
# 10057. They did a study focused on this question.
# 10058. They did it in broad daylight.
# 10059. They did it without any enthusiasm.
# 10060. They did not notify us beforehand about the curtailment of service.
# 10061. They did not seem overjoyed to see me.
# 10062. They did well with the primitive tools that they had.
# 10063. They didn’t clean their area before they left.
# 10064. They didn’t know it was yours.
# 10065. They didn’t tell me about the cancellation of the classes.
# 10066. They died in an automobile accident.
# 10067. They died like flies.
# 10068. They do brain surgery while you wait, you know.
# 10069. They don’t answer the phone before nine o’clock.
# 10070. They don’t call this feat “the widow-maker” for nothing.
# 10071. They don’t do any real teaching.
# 10072. They don’t have any of that.
# 10073. They don’t know you like I do.
# 10074. They don’t let us out much.
# 10075. They don’t seem to think anything of it.
# 10076. They don’t tell you beforehand about the amount of lock-step that is
imposed.
# 10077. They don’t want to be cornered by probing questions.
# 10078. They donated their old things to charity.
# 10079. They drowned thirty feet from shore.
# 10080. They failed to distinguish themselves with a superior product.
# 10081. They finally gave in.
# 10082. They first need to soak in water.
# 10083. They followed the method described in the literature.
# 10084. They gained five yards on that play.
# 10085. They gave him a necktie party.
# 10086. They gave him a rough time.
# 10087. They gave him an Esperanto magazine subscription.
# 10088. They gave him enough rope to hang himself.
# 10089. They gave him the cold shoulder.
# 10090. They gave him the third degree.
# 10091. They gave it up for lost.
# 10092. They gave me the wrong item.
# 10093. They gave us the red-carpet treatment.
# 10094. They got married and had a baby.
# 10095. They had big ideas, and small talent.
# 10096. They had enjoyed the good life.
# 10097. They had heavy wind and rain and hail.
# 10098. They had me over a barrel.
# 10099. They had some nefarious purpose for doing that, I’m sure.
# 10100. They had to burn the bodies.
# 10101. They had to carry on in spite of severe shortages.
# 10102. They had to improvise.
# 10103. They had to make their way across treacherous terrain.
# 10104. They had to put their dog to sleep.
# 10105. They had to solve the problem of keyboard bounce.
# 10106. They had to special-order the book.
# 10107. They had to stop only three times along the way to ask directions.
# 10108. They hadn’t seen each other in six years.
# 10109. They have a guard dog.
# 10110. They have a toll-free number.
# 10111. They have blood on their hands.
# 10112. They have embarked on a modernization program.
# 10113. They have finished putting in all the windows.
# 10114. They have learned nothing, and they have forgotten nothing.
# 10115. They have nothing to do, and way too much time to do it in.
# 10116. They have nothing to do.
# 10117. They have obviously done their homework.
# 10118. They have put their house up for sale.
# 10119. They haven’t cleaned this carpet in a year.
# 10120. They haven’t cleaned this carpet in seven months.
# 10121. They haven’t done anything about it yet.
# 10122. They haven’t turned on the heat yet.
# 10123. They heard my laughter.
# 10124. They heard the news.
# 10125. They heard you were leaving.
# 10126. They hold each other in high esteem.
# 10127. They hold themselves up as the defenders of all things good and decent.
# 10128. They hoped to increase the extraction yield.
# 10129. They jumped through hoops to provide us good accommodations.
# 10130. They jumped up and down for joy.
# 10131. They keep reducing the water pressure at night.
# 10132. They know perfectly well what our grievances are.
# 10133. They know that I know that they’re watching.
# 10134. They know that perfectly well.
# 10135. They landed on their feet.
# 10136. They left me holding the bag.
# 10137. They let me exchange it.
# 10138. They let me go.
# 10139. They live in a mountainous region.
# 10140. They live to the limit of their income.
# 10141. They lived happily ever after.
# 10142. They lost at their own game.
# 10143. They marched in step.
# 10144. They mined the road.
# 10145. They mugged for the camera.
# 10146. They mumble something about culture, and then change the topic.
# 10147. They must have deep pockets.
# 10148. They need a helping hand.
# 10149. They need a long time to get better.
# 10150. They need for us to finish by today.
# 10151. They need something on paper, in front of them, in their hands.
# 10152. They need something to do.
# 10153. They need to be fed.
# 10154. They need to be kept happy.
# 10155. They need to let the building stand for a while before letting people move
into it.
# 10156. They offer an attractive compensation package.
# 10157. They open the doors at eight thirty.
# 10158. They own that land.
# 10159. They parted friends.
# 10160. They pay scant attention to their duties.
# 10161. They pinned it on me.
# 10162. They plan to party hardy.
# 10163. They played “Pin the tail on the donkey.”
# 10164. They probably think I’ve forgotten about them.
# 10165. They pulled no punches.
# 10166. They pulled the plug on it.
# 10167. They pulled the rug out from under him.
# 10168. They put a satellite into orbit.
# 10169. They put out the welcome mat for us.
# 10170. They put their money in the bank.
# 10171. They ran out of air, for crying out loud.
# 10172. They ran out of gas.
# 10173. They really buffaloed you.
# 10174. They really cleaned up.
# 10175. They replaced the monkey’s heart with a pig’s heart.
# 10176. They resigned themselves to their fate.
# 10177. They said they would come today, but they didn’t.
# 10178. They sang in unison.
# 10179. They sang out of tune.
# 10180. They sat around the campfire and sang songs.
# 10181. They save their noisy work for night.
# 10182. They say it will be fixed in three or four days.
# 10183. They say it’s going to rain again tomorrow.
# 10184. They say it’s going to rain today.
# 10185. They say that electrical power may be restored by the fourth of next
month.
# 10186. They say that Widder could teach calculus to a rhinoceros.
# 10187. They seemed confused about what to do.
# 10188. They seized the high moral ground.
# 10189. They served together in the Peninsular War.
# 10190. They set off the charges, and the building came down.
# 10191. They set out at first light on their journey.
# 10192. They shoot first and ask questions later.
# 10193. They short-changed me.
# 10194. They speak broken English.
# 10195. They speak Bulgarian in Bulgaria.
# 10196. They speak Chinese in China.
# 10197. They speak French in France.
# 10198. They speak German in Germany.
# 10199. They speak Hungarian in Hungary.
# 10200. They speak Japanese in Japan.
# 10201. They speak Russian in Russia.
# 10202. They speak Spanish in Spain.
# 10203. They sprayed the building for bugs.
# 10204. They stopped making music in 1970.
# 10205. They sustained staggering losses.
# 10206. They talked about it for weeks.
# 10207. They threatened to cut off my Esperanto magazine subscription.
# 10208. They threw the book at him.
# 10209. They took him to the cleaners.
# 10210. They took no prisoners.
# 10211. They took refuge in the cellar during the storm.
# 10212. They tried to force my hand by presenting me with a fait accompli.
# 10213. They use a forklift truck to move that stuff.
# 10214. They want proof.
# 10215. They want to get on the bandwagon.
# 10216. They want to know if you’re willing to try a new brand.
# 10217. They want to pump me about my plans.
# 10218. They want to pump me for information.
# 10219. They wanted to impeach him.
# 10220. They welcomed his advice and assistance.
# 10221. They welcomed me with open arms.
# 10222. They went all-out to show us a good time.
# 10223. They went for a spin.
# 10224. They went for a test drive.
# 10225. They went hand-in-hand.
# 10226. They went out of business.
# 10227. They went thata way!
# 10228. They went to town in mufti.
# 10229. They were accused of fraud.
# 10230. They were always together.
# 10231. They were beaten at their own game.
# 10232. They were blown away.
# 10233. They were blown out of the water.
# 10234. They were booed and hissed.
# 10235. They were caught in the act.
# 10236. They were caught in the open.
# 10237. They were comrades in arms.
# 10238. They were defeated because they did not know the value of five minutes.
# 10239. They were dismembered on impact.
# 10240. They were easily replaced.
# 10241. They were evicted by the sheriff’s department.
# 10242. They were given up for dead.
# 10243. They were hamming it up.
# 10244. They were happy to escape with their lives.
# 10245. They were hit while backing up to their missed exit on the freeway.
# 10246. They were in plain sight.
# 10247. They were inseparable friends.
# 10248. They were killed when their stopped car was rear-ended by a truck.
# 10249. They were left holding the bag.
# 10250. They were mugging for the camera.
# 10251. They were next to each other, so I got them mixed up.
# 10252. They were none the wiser.
# 10253. They were not willing to cooperate.
# 10254. They were ordered to hold their position at all costs.
# 10255. They were out of their depth.
# 10256. They were outfitted in denim.
# 10257. They were playing for high stakes.
# 10258. They were playing hide-and-seek.
# 10259. They were read the riot act.
# 10260. They were separated at birth.
# 10261. They were thrown to the lions.
# 10262. They were told about the plan in advance.
# 10263. They will be here next week.
# 10264. They will be overjoyed to see you.
# 10265. They will have dinner and watch TV.
# 10266. They will let you earn your teaching certificate while teaching.
# 10267. They will meet me at the train station.
# 10268. They will run in-place.
# 10269. They won the battle, but lost the war.
# 10270. They would kill you for your shoes.
# 10271. They would kill you to save ten minutes.
# 10272. They would look down on you for that.
# 10273. They wouldn’t even have known if I hadn’t have told them.
# 10274. They wrote a position paper.
# 10275. They’d kill you with kindness.
# 10276. They’ll be coming later.
# 10277. They’ll be here this afternoon.
# 10278. They’ll be leaving soon.
# 10279. They’ll come at three o’clock.
# 10280. They’ll do what you do.
# 10281. They’ll find their way.
# 10282. They’ll make a movie about it sooner or later.
# 10283. They’re about to leave.
# 10284. They’re all at lunch.
# 10285. They’re all the same.
# 10286. They’re as scarce as hen’s teeth.
# 10287. They’re at it again.
# 10288. They’re back.
# 10289. They’re blocking the line of sight.
# 10290. They’re dredging the river.
# 10291. They’re evacuating the people.
# 10292. They’re everywhere.
# 10293. They’re getting along.
# 10294. They’re going on another trip.
# 10295. They’re going to hell in a hand basket.
# 10296. They’re going to make a crown for my tooth.
# 10297. They’re having a close-out sale tomorrow.
# 10298. They’re having the same kind of weather in my hometown.
# 10299. They’re here to fix the bathroom heater.
# 10300. They’re in a big rush for this.
# 10301. They’re in Chapter 11.
# 10302. They’re in conference right now.
# 10303. They’re in the crosshairs.
# 10304. They’re in trouble.
# 10305. They’re inviting me to lunch to pump me for information.
# 10306. They’re just running out the clock.
# 10307. They’re just testing the waters.
# 10308. They’re living hand-to-mouth.
# 10309. They’re living high off the hog.
# 10310. They’re living payday-to-payday.
# 10311. They’re looking for the thieves.
# 10312. They’re making a virtue out of a necessity.
# 10313. They’re old enough to marry without parental consent.
# 10314. They’re piping hot.
# 10315. They’re playing hide-and-seek.
# 10316. They’re playing our song.
# 10317. They’re playing tag.
# 10318. They’re practicing for the parade.
# 10319. They’re putting the finishing touches on it as we speak.
# 10320. They’re selling like hot cakes!
# 10321. They’re sitting around waiting for an accident to happen.
# 10322. They’re supposed to come in costume.
# 10323. They’re tossing trash out the window.
# 10324. They’re trying to buffalo you.
# 10325. They’re trying to confuse you.
# 10326. They’re trying to do an end-run around the rules.
# 10327. They’re up the creek without a paddle.
# 10328. They’re up to something.
# 10329. They’re used to it.
# 10330. They’re very different.
# 10331. They’re waiting for me to return with the rest of the stuff to send.
# 10332. They’ve been married a long time.
# 10333. They’ve come back home.
# 10334. They’ve come back to the apartment.
# 10335. They’ve gone bankrupt.
# 10336. They’ve gone green.
# 10337. They’ve got everything at this restaurant, from soup to nuts.
# 10338. They’ve got your number.
# 10339. They’ve just mopped the floor, so be careful about slipping and falling.
# 10340. They’ve obviously done their homework.
# 10341. Thick ice formed on the inside of the window during the night.
# 10342. Things are always getting globally better, but locally worse.
# 10343. Things aren’t always what they seem.
# 10344. Think globally; act locally.
# 10345. Thirty feet underwater was out of reach in the time before scuba diving.
# 10346. This and that.
# 10347. This apple has a rotten spot on it.
# 10348. This book was a discard from the library.
# 10349. This bottle is empty.
# 10350. This box of cookies is almost empty.
# 10351. This button is a little loose.
# 10352. This can’t last.
# 10353. This carpet gets dirty easily, and is difficult to clean.
# 10354. This carpet needs cleaning.
# 10355. This clock is two minutes fast.
# 10356. This clothing is too bulky.
# 10357. This comes out like this.
# 10358. This cost four hundred yuan.
# 10359. This costs at least fifty dollars.
# 10360. This could have been done a hundred years ago.
# 10361. This coupon expires in two days.
# 10362. This cream needs to go on her whole face.
# 10363. This cutlery hasn’t been sharpened in ages.
# 10364. This doesn’t tell me anything.
# 10365. This eraser is no good anymore.
# 10366. This file could be used as test data.
# 10367. This file could be used as the basis of a phrase-builder system.
# 10368. This file is meant to help ESL teachers and students, worldwide.
# 10369. This file is the fruit of public diplomacy.
# 10370. This food is delicious!
# 10371. This garment is suitable for cold weather.
# 10372. This gift card has to be redeemed by the end of this month.
# 10373. This goes back to the bathroom, right?
# 10374. This happens a lot.
# 10375. This has been a public service announcement.
# 10376. This has gone too far.
# 10377. This has never happened before.
# 10378. This has priority over that.
# 10379. This hinge is missing a screw.
# 10380. This I can do.
# 10381. This is a better location.
# 10382. This is a bottom-up approach to language mastery.
# 10383. This is a case of applied linguistics.
# 10384. This is a chance for you to redeem yourself.
# 10385. This is a class act.
# 10386. This is a coal-producing region.
# 10387. This is a difficult problem to fix.
# 10388. This is a dues-paying position.
# 10389. This is a file of utterances.
# 10390. This is a good introduction to the subject.
# 10391. This is a one hundred percent cotton garment.
# 10392. This is a private clinic, owned by a retired doctor.
# 10393. This is a really fun toy.
# 10394. This is a scientific experiment.
# 10395. This is a serious proposal.
# 10396. This is a state-of-the-art system.
# 10397. This is a step towards the documentation of English.
# 10398. This is a test.
# 10399. This is a treasure trove of tropes.
# 10400. This is a unique opportunity.
# 10401. This is a very good item of clothing.
# 10402. This is a very perishable item.
# 10403. This is a work in-progress.
# 10404. This is about the nitty-gritty of English.
# 10405. This is acceptable.
# 10406. This is all I have left of that.
# 10407. This is an airtight container.
# 10408. This is an ESL corpus.
# 10409. This is an ESL exercise corpus.
# 10410. This is an ESL lexis.
# 10411. This is an ESL reservoir.
# 10412. This is an important item.
# 10413. This is an imported item.
# 10414. This is as good as it gets.
# 10415. This is awaiting your approval.
# 10416. This is bath night.
# 10417. This is breaking news.
# 10418. This is cutting-edge technology.
# 10419. This is dirty pool.
# 10420. This is do-able.
# 10421. This is dry now, so I’ll put it back in the crib.
# 10422. This is enough to last us half a year.
# 10423. This is for fun.
# 10424. This is for future reference.
# 10425. This is for the celebrated man in the street.
# 10426. This is for you.
# 10427. This is for your own good.
# 10428. This is futile.
# 10429. This is getting out of control.
# 10430. This is going to be a long day.
# 10431. This is good for you.
# 10432. This is grassroots support for Esperanto.
# 10433. This is great food!
# 10434. This is hard work.
# 10435. This is help with the nitty-gritty of English.
# 10436. This is her bath night.
# 10437. This is her biography.
# 10438. This is her third day without a bowel movement.
# 10439. This is how accidents happen.
# 10440. This is how you talk to your husband?
# 10441. This is intended to be a basic resource for ESL.
# 10442. This is intended to be a significant upgrade to the worldwide ESL effort.
# 10443. This is it.
# 10444. This is its natural habitat.
# 10445. This is just a cash cow for them.
# 10446. This is just for fun.
# 10447. This is mine.
# 10448. This is monotonous.
# 10449. This is much better.
# 10450. This is my baggage claim check.
# 10451. This is my business.
# 10452. This is my dad’s old leather jacket.
# 10453. This is my desk.
# 10454. This is my favorite restaurant.
# 10455. This is my first trip to China.
# 10456. This is my good deed for today.
# 10457. This is my rest time.
# 10458. This is news to me.
# 10459. This is no place for amateurs.
# 10460. This is not a basket-weaving course.
# 10461. This is not a matter that can be handled by fax messages.
# 10462. This is not a phrase list, but a collection of utterances.
# 10463. This is not a toy.
# 10464. This is not acceptable.
# 10465. This is not mine.
# 10466. This is not my idea of a good time.
# 10467. This is not the place for that.
# 10468. This is nutritious liquid, not to drink, but to drip.
# 10469. This is one hundred percent silk.
# 10470. This is one of those situations.
# 10471. This is only a test.
# 10472. This is our family picture.
# 10473. This is our final offer.
# 10474. This is our life.
# 10475. This is outrageous!
# 10476. This is painful.
# 10477. This is something widely believed.
# 10478. This is the first of the month.
# 10479. This is the highest grade of olive oil.
# 10480. This is the last batch.
# 10481. This is the last one.
# 10482. This is the last time you’re getting away with this.
# 10483. This is the one most frequently needed.
# 10484. This is the perfect time to be doing that.
# 10485. This is the perfect time.
# 10486. This is the place to be.
# 10487. This is the second time today that that has happened.
# 10488. This is the start of something big.
# 10489. This is the third rock from the sun.
# 10490. This is the third time this week it’s rained.
# 10491. This is the wrong way.
# 10492. This is to pay for the water.
# 10493. This is useless.
# 10494. This is very good.
# 10495. This is what passes for searching wisdom?
# 10496. This is what they expect.
# 10497. This is where I keep the supplies.
# 10498. This is where what’s-his-name used to live.
# 10499. This is worse than before.
# 10500. This is your lucky day.
# 10501. This is your pen.
# 10502. This is your wake-up call.
# 10503. This isn’t a safe place for a baby.
# 10504. This isn’t brain surgery.
# 10505. This isn’t fair!
# 10506. This isn’t rocket science.
# 10507. This isn’t sworn testimony.
# 10508. This isn’t what I had in mind.
# 10509. This item goes bad quickly.
# 10510. This keeps getting worse and worse.
# 10511. This lace is loose.
# 10512. This latch is loose.
# 10513. This listing was compiled, from various sources, by Mike Jones.
# 10514. This little piggy stayed home.
# 10515. This little piggy went to market.
# 10516. This made them nervous, and eventually led to disaster.
# 10517. This magic is made possible by sufficiently-advanced technology.
# 10518. This market here doesn’t have this item.
# 10519. This may be the start of something big.
# 10520. This may be your big break.
# 10521. This may help in creating an accurate description.
# 10522. This medical procedure is quite invasive.
# 10523. This meeting is over.
# 10524. This might be one of the reasons why different results were obtained.
# 10525. This movie is a parody of that other movie.
# 10526. This needs some more sticky tape to hold it in place.
# 10527. This never happened before.
# 10528. This newscast is talking about the drought.
# 10529. This one best suits our needs and budget.
# 10530. This one.
# 10531. This one’s hers.
# 10532. This one’s his.
# 10533. This one’s mine.
# 10534. This one’s ours.
# 10535. This one’s theirs.
# 10536. This one’s yours.
# 10537. This outfit is for wearing around the house.
# 10538. This picture postcard shows the Chicago skyline at night from the lake.
# 10539. This place gives me the creeps.
# 10540. This place is a dumping ground for those who have not kept up
technically.
# 10541. This place is always like that.
# 10542. This place is infested with cockroaches.
# 10543. This place looks clean.
# 10544. This plug doesn’t fit.
# 10545. This reeks of rum.
# 10546. This register is closed.
# 10547. This rock is a million and one years old.
# 10548. This room feels warm.
# 10549. This room hasn’t been mopped in twenty years, I bet.
# 10550. This ruler is made of metal.
# 10551. This should be in a bowl, not on a plate.
# 10552. This should be interesting.
# 10553. This should be old hat to you by now.
# 10554. This should have been done ages ago.
# 10555. This should have been done at least fifty years ago.
# 10556. This should have been done earlier.
# 10557. This should not be handled this way.
# 10558. This side doesn’t hurt so much anymore.
# 10559. This side of the building gets lots of sunshine.
# 10560. This side up.
# 10561. This sofa needs re-upholstering.
# 10562. This sounds gross.
# 10563. This sponge cake is great!
# 10564. This tea has gone cold.
# 10565. This tea is really great.
# 10566. This tells me nothing.
# 10567. This text file is also intended for awk practice.
# 10568. This toast is burnt!
# 10569. This too shall pass.
# 10570. This was a great thing to buy.
# 10571. This was easy enough to do, but it was a step that could not be skipped.
# 10572. This was forgotten on the table.
# 10573. This was one of my childhood games.
# 10574. This was the first magic square known to the human race.
# 10575. This water is only lukewarm.
# 10576. This whole thing could be automated.
# 10577. This will be interesting.
# 10578. This will put us on the map.
# 10579. This won’t hurt a bit.
# 10580. This work is in the Public Domain.
# 10581. This work is meant to help in oral proficiency development for ESL
students.
# 10582. This work is slow-going and needs great persistence.
# 10583. This would be a good time to not be among those present.
# 10584. This would cost double in where we used to live.
# 10585. This would take Sherlock Holmes to figure out.
# 10586. Those apartments are being renovated.
# 10587. Those are better than these.
# 10588. Those are fragile.
# 10589. Those are my old stomping grounds.
# 10590. Those are your marching orders.
# 10591. Those clothes need to be washed.
# 10592. Those days around the end of April and the beginning of May are my
favorite.
# 10593. Those files are stored off-site.
# 10594. Those guilty of telling the truth are sent to Galileo Prison.
# 10595. Those hoses strung across the floor are a tripping hazard.
# 10596. Those laws should have been repealed long ago.
# 10597. Those laws should never have been enacted.
# 10598. Those meeting these requirements will be invited to the meeting.
# 10599. Those not familiar with China have no idea where Taiyuan is.
# 10600. Those pants were sent by your sister.
# 10601. Those plums have gone bad.
# 10602. Those records are sealed for seventy five years.
# 10603. Those ruins are a great tourist attraction.
# 10604. Those shirts are very good, but they have faded somewhat over time.
# 10605. Those steps are slippery.
# 10606. Those strawberries are for somebody else.
# 10607. Those units are in transfer.
# 10608. Those who froth at the mouth are the least likely to learn Esperanto.
# 10609. Those who get hoisted by their own petards are held up to us as martyrs.
# 10610. Those who go to law school suffer loss cool.
# 10611. Those who wait for inspiration become waiters.
# 10612. Thou shalt not presume.
# 10613. Thought-crime supporters are inquiry-deniers.
# 10614. Thought-crimes are legislated on behalf of people who can’t handle the
truth.
# 10615. Three cheers for Zamenhof!
# 10616. Three days.
# 10617. Three moves is like a fire – you lose about as many things.
# 10618. Three of them are missing.
# 10619. Three strikes and you’re out.
# 10620. Three times four is twelve.
# 10621. Through clenched teeth.
# 10622. Through thick and thin.
# 10623. Throughout history, the law has required interpretation.
# 10624. Throughout history, various fallacies have received legislative support.
# 10625. Tickets at the door cost double.
# 10626. Tickets for the sixteenth are all sold out.
# 10627. Tick-tock went the clock.
# 10628. Tie your shoe laces.
# 10629. Tie your shoes.
# 10630. Till complete.
# 10631. Time and again.
# 10632. Time flies when you’re having fun.
# 10633. Time heals all wounds.
# 10634. Time is hanging heavy on his hands.
# 10635. Time is money.
# 10636. Time is on my side.
# 10637. Time is up.
# 10638. Time out!
# 10639. Time spent studying languages is time not spent studying science.
# 10640. Time wounds all heels.
# 10641. Time’s awastin’!
# 10642. Timing is everything.
# 10643. TLC stands for Tender Loving Care.
# 10644. To a fault.
# 10645. To challenge a currently-operative myth is to ignore the warning of
Machiavelli.
# 10646. To die for.
# 10647. To each his own.
# 10648. To err is human.
# 10649. To get anywhere, a man has to chain himself to his desk.
# 10650. To lead men, you must turn your back on them.
# 10651. To learn English before learning Esperanto is to put the cart before the
horse.
# 10652. To lie like a newspaper.
# 10653. To make-up any exam, you need a note from the dean.
# 10654. To parry-down your search results, and the search string with
“Esperanto”.
# 10655. To protect myself against intruders, I pretend not to know English.
# 10656. To round, add half the next unit, and truncate.
# 10657. To save money, they had meat only once a month.
# 10658. To say something really nice, say it in Esperanto.
# 10659. To speak English fluently, you have to know a bit of French
pronunciation.
# 10660. To speak English fluently, you have to know some French pronunciation.
# 10661. To the best of my recollection.
# 10662. To YOU, I am an atheist – to God, I am the loyal opposition.
# 10663. To your health!
# 10664. Today is the first of the month.
# 10665. Today is the sixteenth.
# 10666. Today is your lucky day.
# 10667. Today is Zamenhof day – Zamenhof’s birthday!
# 10668. Today it will be cold outside.
# 10669. Today she’s sixteen months old.
# 10670. Today, because of the party, I have no time to fill it out.
# 10671. Today’s my lucky day.
# 10672. Today’s your lucky day.
# 10673. Together, we can do anything.
# 10674. Tom tells Brian every little thing.
# 10675. Tomorrow is another day.
# 10676. Tomorrow is the first of the month.
# 10677. Tongue-in-cheek.
# 10678. Tonight is bath night for her.
# 10679. Tonight it’s going to rain, they say.
# 10680. Tonight there’s a great American movie on.
# 10681. Too close for comfort.
# 10682. Too close.
# 10683. Too much of a good thing.
# 10684. Tooth and claw.
# 10685. Topsy-turvy.
# 10686. Top-to-toe wash.
# 10687. Torture begins with having your Esperanto magazine subscription cut off.
# 10688. Torture should begin with cutting off the prisoner’s Esperanto
subscription.
# 10689. Totally incompetent.
# 10690. Touché!
# 10691. Touching that live wire gave me a jolt.
# 10692. Touch-typing is an immensely valuable skill.
# 10693. Tough toenails.
# 10694. Toy, or trash?
# 10695. Trace amounts of toxic compounds are released in the process.
# 10696. Trade is based on specialization-and-exchange.
# 10697. Traditionally, few Americans have taken an interest in Esperanto.
# 10698. Transient subspaces are the basis of income.
# 10699. Travel is tremendously costly.
# 10700. Treacherous terrain.
# 10701. Trespassers will be prosecuted.
# 10702. Trial and error.
# 10703. Trial by fire.
# 10704. Trial by jury.
# 10705. Tried and true.
# 10706. Trigger-happy.
# 10707. Trouble often comes disguised as fun.
# 10708. Truck drivers get good money.
# 10709. True blue.
# 10710. True cost.
# 10711. Trust me.
# 10712. Truth and falsehood cannot be distinguished solely on the basis of
language.
# 10713. Truth is any public statement that goes unchallenged.
# 10714. Truth is the first victim of war.
# 10715. Try on this shirt, for size, not for looks.
# 10716. Try some of this cake.
# 10717. Try the broccoli.
# 10718. Try this new dish.
# 10719. Try this on again.
# 10720. Trying to ignore Esperanto will imperil your career.
# 10721. Trying to make a finished product match your blueprints teaches you
humility.
# 10722. Turn back, before it’s too late!
# 10723. Turn it down a little.
# 10724. Turn it down please, my dear.
# 10725. Turn it loose.
# 10726. Turn it off.
# 10727. Turn it over.
# 10728. Turn it sideways.
# 10729. Turn it upside-down.
# 10730. Turn loose of it.
# 10731. Turn off the stove if the rice is done.
# 10732. Turn on the exhaust fan, so that you don’t have to breathe those fumes.
# 10733. Turn on the hot water and let it run.
# 10734. Turn on the wall-heater so that the bedding will dry faster.
# 10735. Turn on your meter.
# 10736. Turn over.
# 10737. Turn the table over, so the baby can’t climb onto it from the chair.
# 10738. Turn to the back.
# 10739. Turn to the right.
# 10740. Turning around a losing situation.
# 10741. Turning on the Do-Not-Disturb sign disables the doorbell.
# 10742. Tut-tut, a very nasty fall!
# 10743. Two against one isn’t fair!
# 10744. Two can live as cheaply as one.
# 10745. Two can play this game.
# 10746. Two grains of rice.
# 10747. Two hands for beginners.
# 10748. Two mice fell into a pitcher of cream.
# 10749. Two of the dollars wound up in the bellboy’s pocket.
# 10750. Two sentences are sometimes welded together to form a hybrid.
# 10751. Two’s company; three’s a crowd.
# 10752. Two’s company; three’s a society.
# 10753. Uh, oh, here we go again.
# 10754. Ultimately, he discovered and studied the few books then available on the
subject.
# 10755. Ultimately, software alone cannot provide security.
# 10756. Unattended farmland usually goes fallow.
# 10757. Unavailable until recently.
# 10758. Unbelievable!
# 10759. Unconditional surrender.
# 10760. Under contract.
# 10761. Under duress.
# 10762. Under false colors.
# 10763. Under the same conditions.
# 10764. Under the table.
# 10765. Underground railroad.
# 10766. Under-handed.
# 10767. Undisclosed terms.
# 10768. Unearned income sounds like ill-gotten gains, but it’s not.
# 10769. Unfortunately, he acted on those false assumptions.
# 10770. Unfortunately, Mamikon’s observation was ignored for a long time.
# 10771. Unfortunately, nobody was watching at the time.
# 10772. Unfortunately, there was a patch of ice in his path.
# 10773. Unfortunately, we were not able to find the bug.
# 10774. Unjust laws have been with us since antiquity.
# 10775. Unless you are an Olympic athlete, giving the baby a bath takes two
people.
# 10776. Unlikely, I think.
# 10777. Until complete.
# 10778. Until death do us part.
# 10779. Until recently unavailable.
# 10780. Until the cows come home.
# 10781. Until the world speaks Esperanto, there isn’t much else worth reporting.
# 10782. Up and at ’em!
# 10783. Up close and personal.
# 10784. Up the down staircase.
# 10785. Upon entering the teachers’ lounge, I saw them talking to each other.
# 10786. Upward mobility.
# 10787. Use Esperanto as the backboard for making your baskets.
# 10788. Use it or lose it.
# 10789. Use that sparingly.
# 10790. Use these corrections at your own risk.
# 10791. Use this work for commercial purposes if you wish.
# 10792. Used to be, my English was so poor, I didn’t know lint from toner.
# 10793. Useful information is mostly locked away, in proprietary systems.
# 10794. Using “an history” instead of “a history” is an example of
hyper-correctness.
# 10795. Using Esperanto you can easily collect picture postcards from around the
world.
# 10796. Usually some letter I forget.
# 10797. Vans block line-of-sight like all get-out.
# 10798. Variety is the spice of life.
# 10799. Various things.
# 10800. Various varieties of cockroach exist, it’s true.
# 10801. Vegetables are expensive when it snows.
# 10802. Velikovsky ventured Venus volatile.
# 10803. Velikovsky vetoed Venus’s venue.
# 10804. Velikovsky’s victory vindicates voluminous verification.
# 10805. Verbatim.
# 10806. Very good pay and benefits.
# 10807. Very good, sir.
# 10808. Very much.
# 10809. Vested interests.
# 10810. Victor’s justice.
# 10811. Villagers are unfamiliar with the idea of using an exhaust fan while
cooking.
# 10812. Vim and vigor.
# 10813. Virtue is its own reward.
# 10814. Visitors are not allowed.
# 10815. Vital statistics.
# 10816. Volatile computer memory is an example of a transient subspace.
# 10817. Wait a minute – not so fast.
# 10818. Wait five minutes after I come home before bothering me about anything.
# 10819. Wait five more minutes, and then turn it off.
# 10820. Wait for me – I’m going with you.
# 10821. Wait just a minute – I want to put on a wash.
# 10822. Wait just a moment.
# 10823. Wait till my father hears about this.
# 10824. Wait until I get dressed.
# 10825. Wait until I go.
# 10826. Wait until I start the mantos to take her out on her stroll.
# 10827. Wait until Julia has eaten.
# 10828. Wait your turn.
# 10829. Waiter!
# 10830. Waiters live on tips.
# 10831. Wake me up at seven o’clock.
# 10832. Wake up and smell the coffee.
# 10833. Walk between the raindrops.
# 10834. Walk right in.
# 10835. Walk softly, and carry a big stick.
# 10836. Walk, don’t run!
# 10837. Walk-ins are welcome.
# 10838. Walt Disney Pictures presents …
# 10839. Wanna bet?
# 10840. Want to dance?
# 10841. Want to go halves on a pizza?
# 10842. Want to go shoot some baskets?
# 10843. Want to hear something funny?
# 10844. Want to trade?
# 10845. Wanted Dead or Alive.
# 10846. War broke out between Japan and China.
# 10847. War broke out.
# 10848. War might break out.
# 10849. Warts and all.
# 10850. Was he watching where he was going?
# 10851. Was I wrong about that?
# 10852. Was it a face card that he played?
# 10853. Was it a moving violation?
# 10854. Was it an accident?
# 10855. Was it insured?
# 10856. Was it just an oversight?
# 10857. Was it skill, or just dumb luck?
# 10858. Was it vetoed?
# 10859. Was it you that ate those strawberries that I was saving for later?
# 10860. Was it your fault?
# 10861. Was Larson an astro-physicist, or what.
# 10862. Was she crying while I was away?
# 10863. Was that necessary?
# 10864. Was that true, or not.
# 10865. Was the course cancelled?
# 10866. Was the food left out where the bugs could get it?
# 10867. Was the invention of the airplane useless, since there were no airports?
# 10868. Was there an Esperanto club in Baghdad?
# 10869. Was there an Esperanto club in Dresden?
# 10870. Was there an Esperanto club in Hiroshima?
# 10871. Was there an Esperanto club in Nagasaki?
# 10872. Was there bleeding?
# 10873. Was this stated under oath?
# 10874. Washing tea provides an example of decanting.
# 10875. Wasn’t that a ghastly scene?
# 10876. Wasn’t that a great pun about infinitesimals?
# 10877. Wasn’t that rather extravagant?
# 10878. Wasn’t that rather selfish?
# 10879. Watch out for the electrical cord.
# 10880. Watch the baby a minute while I make a pit stop.
# 10881. Watch the baby for a minute.
# 10882. Watch the baby so I can eat.
# 10883. Watch the baby while I go to the bathroom.
# 10884. Watch the baby while I make a pit stop.
# 10885. Watch the baby while I’m eating.
# 10886. Watch this, everybody!
# 10887. Watch this, everyone!
# 10888. Watch where you’re going!
# 10889. Watch your back.
# 10890. Watch your health.
# 10891. Watch your language.
# 10892. Watch your shins!
# 10893. Watch your step.
# 10894. Watching paint dry would be more fun than this.
# 10895. Water has high thermal inertia.
# 10896. Way leads on to way.
# 10897. Way to go!
# 10898. We all have our burden to bear.
# 10899. We all have our hangups.
# 10900. We all have our work to do.
# 10901. We are adjourned.
# 10902. We are creatures of habit.
# 10903. We are in session.
# 10904. We are in want of basic resources.
# 10905. We are making some rice soup for her.
# 10906. We are making too many mistakes.
# 10907. We are only concerned with what native speakers actually say.
# 10908. We are out of bread.
# 10909. We are ready to chow down.
# 10910. We are ready.
# 10911. We are recessed until two p.m.
# 10912. We arrived home safe and sound.
# 10913. We both saw it.
# 10914. We both want to know.
# 10915. We bought two days worth of medicine.
# 10916. We came to an understanding.
# 10917. We can complete the work by mid-November.
# 10918. We can learn a lot from Esperanto.
# 10919. We can leave whenever you like.
# 10920. We can see the light at the end of the tunnel.
# 10921. We can still be friends, right?
# 10922. We can use it for padding.
# 10923. We can’t afford it.
# 10924. We can’t afford one another.
# 10925. We can’t let her play with that.
# 10926. We can’t live in the past.
# 10927. We cannot turn back.
# 10928. We could do without that.
# 10929. We could use it in a pinch.
# 10930. We couldn’t stop to help him.
# 10931. We did it on the cheap.
# 10932. We didn’t buy anything – we just went window shopping.
# 10933. We didn’t want to take any chances.
# 10934. We do a physical inventory every six months.
# 10935. We do all the work, but he gets all the glory.
# 10936. We do not rely on ignorance for security.
# 10937. We do things right around here.
# 10938. We don’t have any money.
# 10939. We don’t have time for such niceties.
# 10940. We don’t have to be always moving it.
# 10941. We don’t know where they’re hiding.
# 10942. We don’t need anyone on this project who is “merely a conduit”.
# 10943. We don’t see eye-to-eye on that.
# 10944. We don’t talk like that around here.
# 10945. We don’t want to be breathing all that dust.
# 10946. We don’t want to be late for the concert.
# 10947. We don’t want to hear about it.
# 10948. We don’t want to hear what your wrong guess was.
# 10949. We don’t want to take any chances.
# 10950. We donated them to the Salvation Army Thrift Store.
# 10951. We enjoyed it.
# 10952. We established a good working relationship.
# 10953. We finished reading that already.
# 10954. We followed your advice.
# 10955. We found Jesus – he was behind the sofa all the time.
# 10956. We gave you up for dead.
# 10957. We get an hour for lunch.
# 10958. We get comp time.
# 10959. We get to take a long lunch today.
# 10960. We go through these like wildfire.
# 10961. We got a message, relayed by the coordinating office, saying it had
arrived.
# 10962. We got into trouble.
# 10963. We got one.
# 10964. We got out of there just in time.
# 10965. We got rid of the troublemakers.
# 10966. We got separated for a while in the crowd at the zoo.
# 10967. We had a discussion about what appropriate costumes would be.
# 10968. We had a fender-bender on our way here.
# 10969. We had a heavy snow last night.
# 10970. We had a long, hot, noisy wait for the train.
# 10971. We had an argument this morning.
# 10972. We had apple pie à la mode.
# 10973. We had better get going if we’re going to get there on time.
# 10974. We had better not do that.
# 10975. We had better punt.
# 10976. We had good times together.
# 10977. We had to let him go.
# 10978. We had to make do with bailing wire and bubble gum.
# 10979. We had to retreat.
# 10980. We had turkey, with all the trimmings.
# 10981. We hammed it up for them.
# 10982. We hate to say goodbye.
# 10983. We have a checklist we go through.
# 10984. We have a common ancestor.
# 10985. We have a common enemy.
# 10986. We have a common friend.
# 10987. We have a friend in common.
# 10988. We have a little money.
# 10989. We have a reliable contact in that company.
# 10990. We have a thirty-year mortgage.
# 10991. We have a window of opportunity.
# 10992. We have been friends since childhood.
# 10993. We have been here three months.
# 10994. We have come to an understanding.
# 10995. We have crossed the Rubicon.
# 10996. We have everything in America.
# 10997. We have higher standards than that.
# 10998. We have little money.
# 10999. We have made meager progress.
# 11000. We have made measurable progress.
# 11001. We have made significant progress.
# 11002. We have no money.
# 11003. We have not lost our faith – we have transferred it to the medical
profession.
# 11004. We have not seen each other for half a year.
# 11005. We have nothing to discuss.
# 11006. We have only twenty dollars in our apartment.
# 11007. We have our priorities.
# 11008. We have our work cut out for us.
# 11009. We have run out of bananas.
# 11010. We have snow flurries today.
# 11011. We have to be on our guard.
# 11012. We have to consider all our options.
# 11013. We have to do something about all this clutter.
# 11014. We have to do what she says.
# 11015. We have to keep it out of the baby’s reach.
# 11016. We have to let you go.
# 11017. We have to observe a minimum of decorum during class.
# 11018. We have to wait for it to cool down.
# 11019. We have to wait until nine o’clock to call.
# 11020. We have to work overtime today.
# 11021. We have to work through lunch today.
# 11022. We have unlimited local calls.
# 11023. We have zero tolerance for that here.
# 11024. We haven’t been able to isolate the problem.
# 11025. We haven’t been introduced.
# 11026. We haven’t had dumplings for a long time.
# 11027. We heard the dinner bell.
# 11028. We held out as long as we could.
# 11029. We hold these truths to be self-evident.
# 11030. We hoofed it.
# 11031. We just don’t get along.
# 11032. We knew it all the time.
# 11033. We knew this day would come.
# 11034. We know what to do about that.
# 11035. We like to go hiking together, especially in the mountains.
# 11036. We locked horns over that.
# 11037. We made meager progress.
# 11038. We made measurable progress.
# 11039. We made significant progress.
# 11040. We may as well buy a new one.
# 11041. We may as well.
# 11042. We may leave later that same day.
# 11043. We might become landlords.
# 11044. We might start our own company.
# 11045. We must tend our garden.
# 11046. We need a ladle for the soup.
# 11047. We need a nanny.
# 11048. We need a new eraser for the board.
# 11049. We need a refill of hot water for the tea.
# 11050. We need a refill of the two printer toner cartridges.
# 11051. We need a space heater during the winter.
# 11052. We need a third party to mediate.
# 11053. We need a wastebasket in the bathroom.
# 11054. We need another bottle of water.
# 11055. We need another tray.
# 11056. We need basic resources.
# 11057. We need coasters for the glasses.
# 11058. We need more toothpaste.
# 11059. We need some napkins.
# 11060. We need this done asap.
# 11061. We need to apply the medication to her face.
# 11062. We need to assemble more kits.
# 11063. We need to buy another bedspread.
# 11064. We need to clean out this closet.
# 11065. We need to cultivate the capability for abstract thought.
# 11066. We need to do fumigation.
# 11067. We need to follow protocol in this matter.
# 11068. We need to fumigate some more.
# 11069. We need to get organized.
# 11070. We need to get this out the door.
# 11071. We need to get this prescription filled.
# 11072. We need to get with the program.
# 11073. We need to get you started.
# 11074. We need to give her her bath.
# 11075. We need to give her her food on a separate plate.
# 11076. We need to give her her medicine.
# 11077. We need to go faster.
# 11078. We need to have a little talk.
# 11079. We need to have the bathroom overhead light fixed.
# 11080. We need to have the door hinges tightened.
# 11081. We need to keep and eye on the time.
# 11082. We need to make a small adjustment.
# 11083. We need to put her bib on her.
# 11084. We need to refill the salt shaker.
# 11085. We need to run the anti-virus software.
# 11086. We need to run the vacuum cleaner.
# 11087. We need to set out some poison for the bugs.
# 11088. We need to start earlier.
# 11089. We need to take the baby to the doctor again this month.
# 11090. We need to wait a bit.
# 11091. We need to work as a team.
# 11092. We never make pizza from scratch anymore.
# 11093. We ordered à la carte.
# 11094. We park on the driveway, and drive on the parkway.
# 11095. We performed close monitoring of their maritime military maneuvers.
# 11096. We periodically pinged them to probe their defenses.
# 11097. We plotted this quantity against temperature.
# 11098. We postponed it for a week.
# 11099. We proved them wrong.
# 11100. We put all her stuff in the big bag.
# 11101. We put everything in the big bag.
# 11102. We ran it up the flagpole.
# 11103. We ran out of water.
# 11104. We ran several laps.
# 11105. We ran the program with test data.
# 11106. We saw only one panda, and it kept its back turned.
# 11107. We saw that one already.
# 11108. We saw you coming.
# 11109. We say “a lot” a lot in English.
# 11110. We sit in a very privileged position.
# 11111. We specifically put this here to prevent that.
# 11112. We still have mosquitoes.
# 11113. We still need that.
# 11114. We swapped stories.
# 11115. We think gas may be leaking somewhere.
# 11116. We took the whole sofa apart looking for it.
# 11117. We tried to warn him, but to no avail.
# 11118. We understand.
# 11119. We use facts and figures to support our position.
# 11120. We use the baby bath tub as our hamper.
# 11121. We used duct tape to hold it in place.
# 11122. We want to arrive in time for the show.
# 11123. We want to keep on good terms with the hardware department.
# 11124. We want to recognize speech, but we don’t want to wreck a nice beach.
# 11125. We went all-out.
# 11126. We went our separate ways.
# 11127. We were always together.
# 11128. We were childhood friends, but our lives are now very different.
# 11129. We were comrades in arms.
# 11130. We were denied the benefit of his mature thought.
# 11131. We were disappointed with the zoo.
# 11132. We were inseparable friends.
# 11133. We were murdered.
# 11134. We were only talking.
# 11135. We were there on a tour.
# 11136. We who are about to die salute you.
# 11137. We will eagerly await your return.
# 11138. We will go.
# 11139. We will soon run out of water.
# 11140. We will take our artwork with us.
# 11141. We wish him the best!
# 11142. We wish you the best!
# 11143. We won’t be back for two days.
# 11144. We won’t hold that against you.
# 11145. We work for different companies.
# 11146. We would be up the creek without that.
# 11147. We would have had to wait a long time.
# 11148. We’ll all see each other on that day.
# 11149. We’ll be back at work on that day.
# 11150. We’ll be moving to another city.
# 11151. We’ll be off on that day.
# 11152. We’ll be on our way now.
# 11153. We’ll clean up the mess later.
# 11154. We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.
# 11155. We’ll do it later.
# 11156. We’ll do so as soon as he gets back.
# 11157. We’ll fight fire with fire.
# 11158. We’ll give them to my brother next time he comes to visit.
# 11159. We’ll have another go at it next time.
# 11160. We’ll have to live with it.
# 11161. We’ll miss you.
# 11162. We’ll pay her a salary to manage the properties.
# 11163. We’ll play it by ear.
# 11164. We’ll probably stay in China for at least another year.
# 11165. We’ll pull through somehow.
# 11166. We’ll remember you.
# 11167. We’ll see.
# 11168. We’ll take care of all that.
# 11169. We’ll take that to mean we’re ready to print the payroll.
# 11170. We’ll talk about it later.
# 11171. We’ll think about it.
# 11172. We’ll try and see.
# 11173. We’ll try harder.
# 11174. We’ll wait for you.
# 11175. We’ll wing it.
# 11176. We’re a group of five.
# 11177. We’re all God’s children.
# 11178. We’re all on the same page.
# 11179. We’re almost finished.
# 11180. We’re always together.
# 11181. We’re back in business.
# 11182. We’re back in session.
# 11183. We’re being watched.
# 11184. We’re better thieves than you are.
# 11185. We’re content-providers.
# 11186. We’re cookin’ with gas.
# 11187. We’re doing all right.
# 11188. We’re done for.
# 11189. We’re due back on the bus in fifteen minutes.
# 11190. We’re evidently expected to accept these passages at face value.
# 11191. We’re fixin’ to have tea.
# 11192. We’re friends, right?
# 11193. We’re going full-throttle.
# 11194. We’re going to dip the apples in caramel.
# 11195. We’re going to go look out the window over there.
# 11196. We’re going to have a pop-quiz now.
# 11197. We’re going to the dojo to do some randori.
# 11198. We’re good for another five hundred miles.
# 11199. We’re having butterscotch pudding for dessert.
# 11200. We’re having leftovers today.
# 11201. We’re in a mad rush to get this out the door.
# 11202. We’re in clover.
# 11203. We’re in damage-control mode.
# 11204. We’re in for stormy weather.
# 11205. We’re in no hurry.
# 11206. We’re in the middle of a coal-producing region.
# 11207. We’re in the middle of wintertime, so of course it’s cold outside.
# 11208. We’re in trouble.
# 11209. We’re just mopping up.
# 11210. We’re just playing with the TV.
# 11211. We’re living hand-to-mouth.
# 11212. We’re living payday-to-payday.
# 11213. We’re never surprised, but are sometimes amused.
# 11214. We’re not finished yet.
# 11215. We’re not obliged to believe his blog.
# 11216. We’re on the same page.
# 11217. We’re on velvet.
# 11218. We’re out of cooking gas.
# 11219. We’re out of eggs.
# 11220. We’re out of money.
# 11221. We’re ready for bed.
# 11222. We’re ready for the exhibition.
# 11223. We’re running ahead of schedule today.
# 11224. We’re running behind schedule today.
# 11225. We’re running low on paper.
# 11226. We’re sitting pretty.
# 11227. We’re supposed to meet at 11:30 to go to the luncheon.
# 11228. We’re talking about you.
# 11229. We’re trying to avoid further loss of functionality.
# 11230. We’re trying to figure it out.
# 11231. We’re trying to re-construct what happened.
# 11232. We’re up the creek without a paddle.
# 11233. We’re waiting for an opportune moment.
# 11234. We’re waiting for Mama.
# 11235. We’re waiting for you.
# 11236. We’re waiting on her to bring the steamed bread.
# 11237. We’re winning the war against the cockroaches.
# 11238. We’re with Esperanto Enterprises.
# 11239. We’re within hollering distance of being done.
# 11240. We’ve already heard those fairy tales.
# 11241. We’ve been starting later and later.
# 11242. We’ve been through thick and thin together.
# 11243. We’ve got a big day tomorrow.
# 11244. We’ve got double coverage on her.
# 11245. We’ve got plenty of toilet paper.
# 11246. We’ve got plenty to do.
# 11247. We’ve got to be careful what we say.
# 11248. We’ve got to do something about these critters.
# 11249. We’ve got to do something about this.
# 11250. We’ve got you surrounded.
# 11251. Wear the other one.
# 11252. Wear your new pants.
# 11253. Welcome aboard.
# 11254. Welcome back.
# 11255. Welcome to my abode.
# 11256. Welcome to my home.
# 11257. Welcome to our home!
# 11258. Welcome to the party!
# 11259. Welcome to the real world.
# 11260. Welcome what you cannot avoid.
# 11261. Well begun is half done.
# 11262. Well that, I suppose, is that.
# 11263. Well, well, if it isn’t Peg Halsey, after all these years!
# 11264. Were the forms observed?
# 11265. Were there lots of people at the store?
# 11266. Were they playing for money?
# 11267. Were you a participant?
# 11268. Were you an only child?
# 11269. Were you eavesdropping?
# 11270. Were you falsely accused?
# 11271. Were you invited?
# 11272. Were you taken in by that ruse?
# 11273. Were you taken in by that urban legend?
# 11274. Were you wrongly accused?
# 11275. Wet your whistle.
# 11276. What a big girl she is!
# 11277. What a bummer!
# 11278. What a coincidence!
# 11279. What a concept!
# 11280. What a disgrace!
# 11281. What a joke!
# 11282. What a waste of good infantry!
# 11283. What about it?
# 11284. What agreement do you expect from people who can’t agree on
Esperanto?
# 11285. What ails him?
# 11286. What am I supposed to do, sitting here?
# 11287. What are his intentions?
# 11288. What are little boys made of?
# 11289. What are little girls made of?
# 11290. What are my options?
# 11291. What are the hidden costs?
# 11292. What are the magic words?
# 11293. What are the odds?
# 11294. What are the side-effects?
# 11295. What are we going to eat tonight?
# 11296. What are you doing back in that corner?
# 11297. What are you doing back there?
# 11298. What are you doing following me?
# 11299. What are you doing here?
# 11300. What are you doing in here?
# 11301. What are you doing in my chair?
# 11302. What are you doing smoking at the gas pump, for crying out loud?
# 11303. What are you doing there?
# 11304. What are you doing this weekend?
# 11305. What are you doing watching me?
# 11306. What are you doing, following me?
# 11307. What are you doing, watching me?
# 11308. What are you going to do about it?
# 11309. What are you going to do this summer?
# 11310. What are you going to get?
# 11311. What are you holding behind your back?
# 11312. What are you making a study of?
# 11313. What are you thinking?
# 11314. What are you trying to prove?
# 11315. What are you wanting to do?
# 11316. What are your New Year’s resolutions?
# 11317. What are your plans for the summer?
# 11318. What authorization code do you want me to use for the package?
# 11319. What beverage would you like?
# 11320. What can be done, with care perform today.
# 11321. What can I do for you?
# 11322. What can you do in a year?
# 11323. What chutzpah!
# 11324. What city did they move to?
# 11325. What company are you with?
# 11326. What country are you from?
# 11327. What country is he from?
# 11328. What cut of meat do you prefer?
# 11329. What defines morons is their belief that presence implies cause.
# 11330. What did he promise you?
# 11331. What did he promise?
# 11332. What did he say when he saw the broken vase?
# 11333. What did he say when he saw the vase you bought?
# 11334. What did I come in here to do?
# 11335. What did I do wrong?
# 11336. What did I do?
# 11337. What did I tell you about that?
# 11338. What did I tell you earlier?
# 11339. What did Mary Poppins have to say about measuring one’s height?
# 11340. What did the art graduate say to the engineering graduate?
# 11341. What did they do to get her to smile?
# 11342. What did you do in the war, Daddy?
# 11343. What did you do this summer?
# 11344. What did you do this weekend?
# 11345. What did you expect?
# 11346. What did you hope to gain from that?
# 11347. What did you say?
# 11348. What did you think it meant?
# 11349. What dinglepuss doesn’t want to migrate to metric?
# 11350. What do I need to study?
# 11351. What do they have in common?
# 11352. What do you care?
# 11353. What do you do about hecklers?
# 11354. What do you do for a living?
# 11355. What do you do for kicks?
# 11356. What do you do here?
# 11357. What do you do there?
# 11358. What do you do?
# 11359. What do you have behind your back?
# 11360. What do you have in there?
# 11361. What do you have to say for yourself?
# 11362. What do you mean by that?
# 11363. What do you plan to do on Sunday?
# 11364. What do you say we call it a day?
# 11365. What do you say we have some tea?
# 11366. What do you think about buying a computer?
# 11367. What do you think about that?
# 11368. What do you think of Jung’s theory of archetypes?
# 11369. What do you think of my new coat?
# 11370. What do you think of the concept of collective guilt?
# 11371. What do you think of Western Civilization?
# 11372. What do you think runway incursions say about the difficulty of English?
# 11373. What do you think would help?
# 11374. What do you think?
# 11375. What do you use for a tie-breaker?
# 11376. What do you want to buy?
# 11377. What do you want to know?
# 11378. What do you want to talk about?
# 11379. What do you want?
# 11380. What does he do for a living?
# 11381. What does he have to say about it?
# 11382. What does it involve?
# 11383. What does she think I am – a yo-yo?
# 11384. What does she want to do?
# 11385. What does that mean?
# 11386. What does this mean?
# 11387. What don’t I understand?
# 11388. What else is on the list?
# 11389. What exactly does that mean in operational terms?
# 11390. What floor am I on?
# 11391. What foolish talk!
# 11392. What gives?
# 11393. What goes around, comes around.
# 11394. What good is it?
# 11395. What happened to it?
# 11396. What happened to the music?
# 11397. What happened to you?
# 11398. What happened?
# 11399. What have I done?
# 11400. What have you been up to these days?
# 11401. What he knows is worth money.
# 11402. What he said was hardly original.
# 11403. What I call “Doubleknit” is a phonetic transcription system.
# 11404. What idiot was smoking in here?
# 11405. What information can you give me?
# 11406. What information do you have?
# 11407. What interest rate do you have to pay?
# 11408. What is at stake?
# 11409. What is happiness?
# 11410. What is his background?
# 11411. What is his occupation?
# 11412. What is it to you?
# 11413. What is it?
# 11414. What is needed is simply more elbow grease.
# 11415. What is she hiding?
# 11416. What is that awful racket?
# 11417. What is that doing in her mouth?
# 11418. What is that outside?
# 11419. What is that that she put in her mouth?
# 11420. What is the address?
# 11421. What is the cosine of ninety degrees?
# 11422. What is the difference between a good haircut and a bad haircut?
# 11423. What is the expiration date?
# 11424. What is the itinerary?
# 11425. What is the magic word?
# 11426. What is the meaning of this?
# 11427. What is the service charge?
# 11428. What is the severity level of the threat?
# 11429. What is the state of the art of robotics?
# 11430. What is the time frame?
# 11431. What is the verdict?
# 11432. What is today’s date?
# 11433. What is two to the tenth power?
# 11434. What is your arrangement?
# 11435. What is your email address?
# 11436. What is your favorite anagram?
# 11437. What is your name?
# 11438. What is your native language?
# 11439. What is your point?
# 11440. What kept you?
# 11441. What kind of dressing would you like for your salad?
# 11442. What kind of fabric is this?
# 11443. What kind of medical coverage do you have?
# 11444. What language do you expect your guests to speak?
# 11445. What language do you propose that visitors use?
# 11446. What language is this document in?
# 11447. What languages has it been translated into?
# 11448. What makes them tick?
# 11449. What makes you think I’m lying?
# 11450. What makes you think you can come to my door any time you feel like it?
# 11451. What more do you want?
# 11452. What new fairy tale are you going to tell us?
# 11453. What part of “cyclotomic polynomial” don’t you understand?
# 11454. What part of “no” don’t you understand?
# 11455. What part of “the line integral of the tangential component” don’t you
understand?
# 11456. What part of “third floor” don’t you understand?
# 11457. What part of “torsion-free monoid” don’t you understand?
# 11458. What part of the Hahn-Banach Theorem don’t you understand?
# 11459. What people want is big benefit for small effort.
# 11460. What people were using this apartment?
# 11461. What plans are there for you to convert to compact fluorescent lights?
# 11462. What precaution did you take against that?
# 11463. What repartee!
# 11464. What sanctions were imposed?
# 11465. What security clearance level do you have?
# 11466. What seems to be the problem?
# 11467. What should be done about it?
# 11468. What should I do?
# 11469. What should we do about it?
# 11470. What size do you take?
# 11471. What some call “the high cost of living”, others call “poverty”.
# 11472. What time did he arrive?
# 11473. What time did you get up this morning?
# 11474. What time do we have to be back on board?
# 11475. What time do you have?
# 11476. What time does the train leave?
# 11477. What time does your class start?
# 11478. What time is it?
# 11479. What time will they be finished?
# 11480. What time will we go?
# 11481. What time will you be back?
# 11482. What time would be best for you?
# 11483. What version of English does he speak?
# 11484. What version of the operating system do you have?
# 11485. What was ascertained?
# 11486. What was his reaction?
# 11487. What was I doing?
# 11488. What was it you wanted to talk to me about?
# 11489. What was THAT about?
# 11490. What was THAT all about?
# 11491. What was that?
# 11492. What was the attorney’s fee?
# 11493. What was the point?
# 11494. What was the setting of the story?
# 11495. What was the verdict?
# 11496. What was their reaction?
# 11497. What was your name?
# 11498. What was your purpose for going there?
# 11499. What we have here is a failure to communicate.
# 11500. What weapons we wield!
# 11501. What were the results of the autopsy?
# 11502. What were their names?
# 11503. What were you looking for?
# 11504. What will the Goyim say?
# 11505. What will they say?
# 11506. What would Alfred E. Neuman say about that?
# 11507. What would be the environmental impact?
# 11508. What would happen in that case?
# 11509. What would Mary Poppins say about that?
# 11510. What would you do if one of your reporters got close to the truth?
# 11511. What would you do if you won the lottery?
# 11512. What would you like to drink?
# 11513. What would you say to some tea?
# 11514. What would your mother say if she saw that?
# 11515. What year are you in?
# 11516. What you do with this capability is completely up to you.
# 11517. What you said wasn’t clear.
# 11518. What you thought is irrelevant.
# 11519. What you thought is neither here nor there.
# 11520. What, and leave show business?
# 11521. What, me worry?
# 11522. What?
# 11523. What’s going on?
# 11524. What’s happening?
# 11525. What’s he done recently?
# 11526. What’s his batting average?
# 11527. What’s hot, and what’s snot.
# 11528. What’s in a name?
# 11529. What’s in that bag?
# 11530. What’s it to you?
# 11531. What’s keeping them?
# 11532. What’s needed is a work that is of high-quality, voluminous, and free.
# 11533. What’s new?
# 11534. What’s next on the agenda?
# 11535. What’s next?
# 11536. What’s scary is that they’re singing that, and they’re over twenty.
# 11537. What’s she doing in there?
# 11538. What’s so funny?
# 11539. What’s that all about?
# 11540. What’s that got to do with it?
# 11541. What’s that got to do with the price of rice in China?
# 11542. What’s that sound?
# 11543. What’s that?
# 11544. What’s the best way to get there?
# 11545. What’s the big deal?
# 11546. What’s the big idea?
# 11547. What’s the catch?
# 11548. What’s the difference between American girls and Chinese girls?
# 11549. What’s the exchange rate?
# 11550. What’s the game plan?
# 11551. What’s the going rate for a nanny in this neck of the woods?
# 11552. What’s the good word?
# 11553. What’s the hold-up?
# 11554. What’s the matter?
# 11555. What’s the rest of it?
# 11556. What’s the rush?
# 11557. What’s the scuttlebutt?
# 11558. What’s the special?
# 11559. What’s the use?
# 11560. What’s the world coming to?
# 11561. What’s their rating?
# 11562. What’s this fly doing in my soup?
# 11563. What’s this thing doing still plugged-in?
# 11564. What’s this worth to you?
# 11565. What’s this?
# 11566. What’s up?
# 11567. What’s with him?
# 11568. What’s wrong with this picture?
# 11569. What’s your angle?
# 11570. What’s your excuse this time?
# 11571. What’s your handle?
# 11572. What’s your hobby?
# 11573. What’s your hurry?
# 11574. What’s your major?
# 11575. What’s your problem?
# 11576. What’s your secret?
# 11577. Whatever happened to so-and-so?
# 11578. Whatever I do, she does.
# 11579. Whatever is, is right.
# 11580. Whatever she wants to do, you let her do?
# 11581. Whatever that means.
# 11582. Whatever the traffic will bear.
# 11583. Whatever the truth is.
# 11584. Whatever will be, will be.
# 11585. Whatever you do this summer, take care of yourself.
# 11586. Whatever.
# 11587. When all else fails, follow instructions.
# 11588. When an actor has to cry, he should think of his love life.
# 11589. When an actor has to laugh, he should think of his love life.
# 11590. When are they going to fix it?
# 11591. When are they going to start using Esperanto as a metalanguage for
English?
# 11592. When are we going to convert to metric?
# 11593. When are we going to give Esperanto a fair test?
# 11594. When are you free?
# 11595. When are you going on your vacation?
# 11596. When are you going to get your high school diploma?
# 11597. When are you going to learn Esperanto?
# 11598. When are you going to start?
# 11599. When are you not in pain?
# 11600. When can I expect delivery?
# 11601. When did you first notice it?
# 11602. When did you get the notice?
# 11603. When did you get your Ph.D.?
# 11604. When did you give notice?
# 11605. When did you notice it?
# 11606. When do we eat?
# 11607. When do you get your Ph.D.?
# 11608. When does the bank open?
# 11609. When does the concert begin?
# 11610. When he got married, he got kicked out of the bachelor’s club.
# 11611. When he heard that, he finished his lunch in a New York minute and left.
# 11612. When he repays me, I can lend you some money.
# 11613. When he returned my book, it had coffee stains on it.
# 11614. When I get back, I’ll help you.
# 11615. When I got older, I developed a liking for black tea.
# 11616. When I leave home, I don’t sleep well.
# 11617. When I say “stop!”, stop!
# 11618. When I say repeat, repeat – otherwise, keep quiet.
# 11619. When I sit up, the pain goes away.
# 11620. When I think of all the opportunities I’ve wasted, my hair falls out.
# 11621. When I try to leave, she grabs my sleeve.
# 11622. When I want your opinion, I’ll give it to you.
# 11623. When I was in college, they didn’t allow that.
# 11624. When I was young I liked flower tea.
# 11625. When I’m asleep, you could sell me and I wouldn’t know it.
# 11626. When in doubt, be anecdotal.
# 11627. When in doubt, mumble.
# 11628. When in Rome, do as the Romans.
# 11629. When is breakfast going to be ready?
# 11630. When is dinner going to be ready?
# 11631. When is his birthday?
# 11632. When is it going to be ready?
# 11633. When is lunch going to be ready?
# 11634. When is our next rest stop?
# 11635. When is supper going to be ready?
# 11636. When is the baby due?
# 11637. When is the last time she had a bowel movement?
# 11638. When is the last time they cleaned this carpet?
# 11639. When is the next symposium?
# 11640. When is the tea going to be ready?
# 11641. When is Unesco going to get its act together and start using Esperanto?
# 11642. When is your birthday?
# 11643. When it comes time to leave, I’ll tell the driver to come pick you up.
# 11644. When it comes to adult education, nothing quite beats contradicting the
boss.
# 11645. When it comes to clothes, I prefer comfort to looks.
# 11646. When it comes to food, home-made is usually better than store-bought.
# 11647. When it gets dark enough, you can see the stars.
# 11648. When it rains, it pours.
# 11649. When it rains, it’s hard to get a taxi.
# 11650. When Mozart was my age, he had been dead for twenty six years.
# 11651. When my leg hurts, there’s a good chance it will rain.
# 11652. When no one was looking.
# 11653. When she comes, I’ll go.
# 11654. When she gets rambunctious, I take her away.
# 11655. When she rummages through her toy box, toys get strewn all over the
floor.
# 11656. When someone is sleeping soundly, we say that they are “dead to the
world”.
# 11657. When that is the case, there will be peace on Earth.
# 11658. When the alarm goes off, these doors close automatically.
# 11659. When the cat is away, the mice will play.
# 11660. When the clerk can’t give you change, it’s a lose-lose situation.
# 11661. When the clip falls out of her hair, I put it here.
# 11662. When the count reaches zero, the rocket is supposed to lift off.
# 11663. When the electricity is off, so is the water.
# 11664. When the fly lights, I will swat it.
# 11665. When the harvest is over, there’ll be a lot of socializing.
# 11666. When the washing machine is finished, it beeps.
# 11667. When the world adopts Esperanto, will the Dow go over one million?
# 11668. When there’s a storm in the teapot, keep the lid on it.
# 11669. When they passed out brains, you thought they said “trains”, and you
missed yours.
# 11670. When was your last physical?
# 11671. When we buy a house for ourselves, we’ll get a really nice sofa.
# 11672. When we move, we’ll take only the hard drive with us.
# 11673. When will he be back?
# 11674. When will it be fixed?
# 11675. When will it be translated into Esperanto?
# 11676. When will she be well again?
# 11677. When will the hotel turn on the heating system for the winter?
# 11678. When will the repair be done?
# 11679. When will the replacement be made?
# 11680. When will you give it back to me?
# 11681. When you can ask me that question in Esperanto, maybe then I will
answer it.
# 11682. When you find out, tell ’em.
# 11683. When you find out, tell me.
# 11684. When you get a chance, I need to talk to you.
# 11685. When you have learned Esperanto, we’ll have dinner together.
# 11686. When you have more experience, my words will have meaning for you.
# 11687. When you leave New York, you’re camping out.
# 11688. When you open the refrigerator, the baby runs to it.
# 11689. When you write to the editor, you discover what “barrier to publication”
means.
# 11690. When?
# 11691. Where am I supposed to go?
# 11692. Where am I?
# 11693. Where are my slippers?
# 11694. Where are the breaker switches?
# 11695. Where are we going?
# 11696. Where are we now?
# 11697. Where are you going shopping, Safeway?
# 11698. Where are you going with that?
# 11699. Where are you going?
# 11700. Where are you taking me?
# 11701. Where are your gloves?
# 11702. Where can I download one of those from?
# 11703. Where did he wind up?
# 11704. Where did that come from?
# 11705. Where did the time go?
# 11706. Where did we leave off?
# 11707. Where did we meet?
# 11708. Where did you come from?
# 11709. Where did you drop it?
# 11710. Where did you get such a notion?
# 11711. Where did you go on your vacation?
# 11712. Where did you put her clothes?
# 11713. Where do I know you from?
# 11714. Where do you work?
# 11715. Where does that leave me?
# 11716. Where does the time go?
# 11717. Where does this go?
# 11718. Where is everybody?
# 11719. Where is he?
# 11720. Where is her other shoe?
# 11721. Where is her other sock?
# 11722. Where is my jewelry?
# 11723. Where is she hiding?
# 11724. Where is she?
# 11725. Where is the baby’s spoon?
# 11726. Where is the baby’s water bottle?
# 11727. Where is the bank?
# 11728. Where is the cap for this pen?
# 11729. Where is the exit?
# 11730. Where is the fuse box?
# 11731. Where is the jewelry that I put here?
# 11732. Where is the lid to this jar?
# 11733. Where is the mirror?
# 11734. Where is the post office?
# 11735. Where is the restroom?
# 11736. Where is the safe?
# 11737. Where is the tape measure?
# 11738. Where is the thermometer?
# 11739. Where is your handkerchief?
# 11740. Where is your mother?
# 11741. Where is your other shoe?
# 11742. Where is your sense of values?
# 11743. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire.
# 11744. Where to?
# 11745. Where will we go next year?
# 11746. Where would you like to go next year?
# 11747. Where’s my rubber ducky?
# 11748. Where’s my violin?
# 11749. Wherever I go, Esperanto also goes.
# 11750. Wherever I go, she follows.
# 11751. Wherever I go, she goes.
# 11752. Which bus goes to Bloomingdale’s?
# 11753. Which button should I press?
# 11754. Which do you prefer?
# 11755. Which do you want first, the good news or the bad news?
# 11756. Which Esperanto magazine did you subscribe to?
# 11757. Which evens up the score somewhat.
# 11758. Which is which?
# 11759. Which one of us is the lucky object of her attention?
# 11760. Which one?
# 11761. Which way?
# 11762. While in New York, Bertram enjoyed himself, but longed for London.
# 11763. While they’re at it, why don’t they legislate the value of pi?
# 11764. Whisper it to me.
# 11765. Whistling in the dark.
# 11766. Who am I to judge?
# 11767. Who are you talking to?
# 11768. Who are you to judge?
# 11769. Who are you with?
# 11770. Who are you, and what do you want?
# 11771. Who are you?
# 11772. Who controls thought, controls politics.
# 11773. Who destroyed it?
# 11774. Who destroyed that imperial park?
# 11775. Who did that?
# 11776. Who died and made you God?
# 11777. Who died?
# 11778. Who do you think you are - King Tut?
# 11779. Who does this belong to?
# 11780. Who doesn’t?
# 11781. Who invited you?
# 11782. Who is Cary Grant?
# 11783. Who is handling arrangements?
# 11784. Who is that man?
# 11785. Who is that?
# 11786. Who is the class monitor?
# 11787. Who is to blame for that?
# 11788. Who is to say?
# 11789. Who is your thesis adviser?
# 11790. Who killed Bambi’s mother?
# 11791. Who made this mess?
# 11792. Who needs to know?
# 11793. Who ordered this weather?
# 11794. Who said that?
#11795. Who said this?
# 11796. Who scarfed the strawberries I was saving for dessert?
# 11797. Who sent you here?
# 11798. Who were you talking to just then?
# 11799. Who will help me?
# 11800. Who will take care of me when I’m old?
# 11801. Who would pay for it?
# 11802. Who would want to buy this?
# 11803. Who wouldn’t?
# 11804. Who, other than people who talk in theaters, would oppose Esperanto?
# 11805. Who?
# 11806. Who’d’ve thought?
# 11807. Who’s counting?
# 11808. Who’s going to bell the cat?
# 11809. Who’s in charge of the key?
# 11810. Who’s in charge?
# 11811. Who’s keeping them?
# 11812. Who’s minding the store?
# 11813. Who’s on first?
# 11814. Who’s paying you to do this?
# 11815. Who’s the one responsible for doing this update?
# 11816. Who’s there?
# 11817. Who’s who.
# 11818. Who’s your contact at that company?
# 11819. Who’s your friend?
# 11820. Whoa!
# 11821. Whole wheat bread.
# 11822. Wholesale versus retail.
# 11823. Whose coat is this?
# 11824. Whose fault was it?
# 11825. Whose is this, anyway?
# 11826. Whose side are you on?
# 11827. Why always me?
# 11828. Why am I me, and not somebody else?
# 11829. Why am I not surprised?
# 11830. Why are you asking me all these questions?
# 11831. Why are you asking me nosey questions about my employer?
# 11832. Why are you asking me this question?
# 11833. Why are you asking me this?
# 11834. Why are you asking me?
# 11835. Why are you asking?
# 11836. Why are you back again?
# 11837. Why are you blocking my way?
# 11838. Why are you finding out about it only now?
# 11839. Why are you going so slow?
# 11840. Why are you going way off-topic?
# 11841. Why are you so far behind on this project?
# 11842. Why can’t we all just learn Esperanto?
# 11843. Why did we pick this place?
# 11844. Why did you let her come in here?
# 11845. Why did you let her pick up that sharp object?
# 11846. Why did you let that happen?
# 11847. Why did you turn on the stove fan?
# 11848. Why did you wait until now?
# 11849. Why didn’t anyone do this before?
# 11850. Why didn’t I think of that?
# 11851. Why didn’t you do as I told you?
# 11852. Why didn’t you just say so?
# 11853. Why didn’t you say so?
# 11854. Why didn’t you tell me about this?
# 11855. Why do grandparents and grandchildren get along so well?
# 11856. Why do they do what they do?
# 11857. Why do they tolerate such racket?
# 11858. Why do you always spoil it by saying something stupid?
# 11859. Why do you feel free to interrogate me?
# 11860. Why do you have to repeat such nonsense?
# 11861. Why do you keep telling me what she says?
# 11862. Why do your clothes get dirty so soon?
# 11863. Why don’t I get a receipt?
# 11864. Why don’t you check first before asking?
# 11865. Why don’t you do it yourself?
# 11866. Why don’t you donate them to Goodwill?
# 11867. Why don’t you eat the rest of that rice?
# 11868. Why don’t you grow up?
# 11869. Why don’t you just be quiet if you don’t have anything intelligent to say?
# 11870. Why don’t you put some lotion on it?
# 11871. Why don’t you put your money where your mouth is?
# 11872. Why don’t you use a hand-truck to move that stuff?
# 11873. Why don’t you watch where you’re going?
# 11874. Why gild the lily?
# 11875. Why haven’t they turned on the heat yet?
# 11876. Why is he so cross?
# 11877. Why is she crying?
# 11878. Why is she so cranky of late?
# 11879. Why is the internet so slow of late?
# 11880. Why is this charge on my bill?
# 11881. Why isn’t “randori” in the dictionary?
# 11882. Why it was she was crying was because she wanted to go to sleep.
# 11883. Why kick a dead elephant?
# 11884. Why me?
# 11885. Why not?
# 11886. Why should I answer that?
# 11887. Why should it take several days?
# 11888. Why should that matter to me?
# 11889. Why so many?
# 11890. Why so slow?
# 11891. Why tell children something they will have to unlearn?
# 11892. Why the long face?
# 11893. Why wasn’t this done earlier?
# 11894. Why were you coughing so much last night?
# 11895. Why would a gentleman want to shake hands with you?
# 11896. Why would you think such a thing?
# 11897. Why?
# 11898. Wide as a church door.
# 11899. Wide-eyed and bushy-tailed.
# 11900. Wild horses couldn’t keep me away.
# 11901. Wilderness survival skills.
# 11902. Will all the fans of C.S. Lewis please raise their hands?
# 11903. Will I be able to pay by credit card?
# 11904. Will it hold water?
# 11905. Will our house have a basement?
# 11906. Will that affect it any?
# 11907. Will that be all?
# 11908. Will that be enough for you?
# 11909. Will the conference be in Esperanto?
# 11910. Will the money reach those for whom it is intended?
# 11911. Will they want to take a blood sample?
# 11912. Will we always have to be moving?
# 11913. Will we arrive in time for the show?
# 11914. Will you accompany us to the airport?
# 11915. Will you be able to come to the luncheon?
# 11916. Will you be able to fix it?
# 11917. Will you be attending the meeting?
# 11918. Will you be coming to the table, or do you want to eat in bed?
# 11919. Will you be given relocation assistance?
# 11920. Will you be staying in town for the holidays?
# 11921. Will you go with me to the airport?
# 11922. Will you have to be looking for a new position every two or three years?
# 11923. Will you have to take an exam to get that job?
# 11924. Will you host the event?
# 11925. Will you keep your promise to me?
# 11926. Will you settle out of court?
# 11927. Willa Cather wrote My Antonia.
# 11928. William Saroyan wrote about the human comedy.
# 11929. Willy-nilly.
# 11930. Wink-wink, nudge-nudge.
# 11931. Winter came early this year.
# 11932. Winter sees a coal dash, and cold ash.
# 11933. Wisdom comes from an anthill.
# 11934. With all that extra cash, you could build a great mathematics library.
# 11935. With any luck, you’ll be able to do it.
# 11936. With English and Chinese, there are still billions of people you can’t talk
to.
# 11937. With Esperanto, no language commands kowtow.
# 11938. With Esperanto, No Language Left Behind.
# 11939. With Esperanto, the dream of a common language is fulfilled.
# 11940. With Esperanto, you don’t need those silly earphones.
# 11941. With malice aforethought.
# 11942. With malice toward none.
# 11943. With pleasure.
# 11944. With practice, your English will improve.
# 11945. With this heater working, it won’t be so cold for us anymore.
# 11946. Without a background project, you’ll be wasting precious time.
# 11947. Without Esperanto, there is a failure to communicate.
# 11948. Without Esperanto, you can’t dodge an ignorant man.
# 11949. Without Esperanto, you have to argue with an ignorant man.
# 11950. Without Esperanto, you’re up the creek without a paddle.
# 11951. Without fear or favor.
# 11952. Without follow-up, there can’t be much in the way of progress.
# 11953. Without follow-up, there is seldom any result.
# 11954. Without warning.
# 11955. Witticisms.
# 11956. Wodehouse was a master of farce.
# 11957. Woe is me.
# 11958. Women don’t like to tell their age, and men don’t like to act their age.
# 11959. Won’t you let me help you?
# 11960. Won’t you listen to reason?
# 11961. Won’t you please come share my feast?
# 11962. Woody Allen’s movie “Bananas” is very funny.
# 11963. Word-for-word.
# 11964. Words in Esperanto are the most likely to make all the difference in the
world.
# 11965. Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.
# 11966. Worst-case scenario.
# 11967. Worth every penny.
# 11968. Would I kid you about such a thing?
# 11969. Would that be a fun thing to do?
# 11970. Would that be OK with you?
# 11971. Would you also like a reminder about the software piracy you committed?
# 11972. Would you be found intelligent enough to be convicted of a
thought-crime?
# 11973. Would you excuse me a minute?
# 11974. Would you like a bite of this?
# 11975. Would you like a foot bath?
# 11976. Would you like an apple?
# 11977. Would you like another forkful?
# 11978. Would you like for me to give you the recipe?
# 11979. Would you like fries with your order, sir?
# 11980. Would you like onion on your hamburger?
# 11981. Would you like some tea?
# 11982. Would you like to dance?
# 11983. Would you like to donate a dollar to bury a critic?
# 11984. Would you like to drink some water?
# 11985. Would you like to have duck or chicken for lunch today?
# 11986. Would you like to have tea?
# 11987. Would you like to join us?
# 11988. Would you like to open an account with us?
# 11989. Would you like to visit the Grand Canyon?
# 11990. Would you please get your foot off my chair?
# 11991. Would you please repeat that?
# 11992. Would you take a picture of us, please?
# 11993. Would you wear part of a dead elephant?
# 11994. Wouldn’t you like to go to the party?
# 11995. Wouldn’t you like to know.
# 11996. Wow, did I say that?
# 11997. Write a review of a website, between 300 and 500 words in length.
# 11998. Write an essay on the topic “My Next Ten Years”.
# 11999. Write your report while it’s still fresh in your mind.
# 12000. Writing was the great invention.
# 12001. Wrong again.
# 12002. Wrong way.
# 12003. Wrong!
# 12004. Yabadabadoo!
# 12005. Yeah, right.
# 12006. Yeah, yeah.
# 12007. Yes or no.
# 12008. Yes you are!
# 12009. Yes, a house is expensive – that’s what financing is for.
# 12010. Yes, and I’ve also read Aesop’s Fables.
# 12011. Yes, and so’s the King.
# 12012. Yes, he did.
# 12013. Yes, I am gripped by the need to exhort my fellow man.
# 12014. Yes, I contradict myself, I know.
# 12015. Yes, I do.
# 12016. Yes, I had to say it.
# 12017. Yes, I know.
# 12018. Yes, I lied to you, but it was a matter of military necessity.
# 12019. Yes, I mind.
# 12020. Yes, I will.
# 12021. Yes, I’m aware of that.
# 12022. Yes, I’m feeling a little bit better.
# 12023. Yes, I’m one of the English teachers here.
# 12024. Yes, I’ve read the Bible, and I’ve also Aesop’s Fables.
# 12025. Yes, if it’s good, we’ll buy more.
# 12026. Yes, it came loose.
# 12027. Yes, it is.
# 12028. Yes, it looks clean – very clean – to me.
# 12029. Yes, ma’am.
# 12030. Yes, many times.
# 12031. Yes, sir.
# 12032. Yes, so repent and return those library books.
# 12033. Yes, that was a bad slip.
# 12034. Yes, Virginia, English is everywhere, and so are cockroaches.
# 12035. Yes, Virginia, Esperanto holds a mirror up to your soul.
# 12036. Yes, Virginia, Esperanto is a real language.
# 12037. Yes, Virginia, Esperanto will be of benefit to the underclass of China and
India.
# 12038. Yes, Virginia, even Ogden Nash would have pulled your leg.
# 12039. Yes, Virginia, God plays dice with the Universe – and sometimes He even
hides the dice!
# 12040. Yes, Virginia, I know that Sam never played it again.
# 12041. Yes, Virginia, Taiyuan is in mainland China.
# 12042. Yes, Virginia, there exist languages other than English.
# 12043. Yes, Virginia, they lied to you.
# 12044. Yes, Virginia, this is grassroots support for Esperanto.
# 12045. Yes, Virginia, you should learn Esperanto.
# 12046. Yes, Virginia, your elders lied to you.
# 12047. Yes, Virginia, your little friends are right.
# 12048. Yes, we use facts and figures to support our position.
# 12049. Yes, you yahoos, yield!
# 12050. Yes, you, and a million other people.
# 12051. Yesterday was my birthday.
# 12052. You abrogated my explicitly-stated wishes.
# 12053. You always do whatever you want to do.
# 12054. You always have something to do.
# 12055. You always have to spoil it, don’t you.
# 12056. You always shoot first, and ask questions later.
# 12057. You always take a long time to do it.
# 12058. You and her need to have a little talk.
# 12059. You and me both.
# 12060. You are a gentleman and a scholar.
# 12061. You ARE a soul – you HAVE a body.
# 12062. You are a very curious person.
# 12063. You are an American.
# 12064. You are evidently unfamiliar with the shape of the exponential growth
curve.
# 12065. You are generous, kind, thoughtful.
# 12066. You are greatly mistaken.
# 12067. You are my sunshine.
# 12068. You are perhaps unaware of the intended irony of that expression.
# 12069. You are right.
# 12070. You are so indecisive, you make Hamlet look like Hannibal!
# 12071. You are talking foolishly.
# 12072. You are the one.
# 12073. You are to re-write your essays, incorporating my corrections.
# 12074. You are very kind.
# 12075. You are wonderful.
# 12076. You aren’t the first to say that.
# 12077. You best leave well enough alone.
# 12078. You bet your bottom dollar.
# 12079. You bet.
# 12080. You blew it.
# 12081. You bought only one?
# 12082. You came at the perfect time.
# 12083. You came out of nowhere.
# 12084. You can bank on that.
# 12085. You can bet the farm on that.
# 12086. You can breathe easier now.
# 12087. You can count on me.
# 12088. You can do that much.
# 12089. You can easily do it yourself.
# 12090. You can find a clean towel in the linen closet.
# 12091. You can get the key from Stephen.
# 12092. You can go back to sleep now.
# 12093. You can go now.
# 12094. You can have all of it.
# 12095. You can have it all.
# 12096. You can ignore anything of this you object to.
# 12097. You can look at it during break.
# 12098. You can look at these things now.
# 12099. You can pay me when your circumstances are better.
# 12100. You can pick up the key from Stephen.
# 12101. You can put your worries aside now.
# 12102. You can save two years on learning English learning Esperanto first.
# 12103. You can say anything you want, as long as it doesn’t have any effect.
# 12104. You can say that again.
# 12105. You can see for yourself.
# 12106. You can see our family pictures at my wife’s blog.
# 12107. You can speak Esperanto with me if you wish.
# 12108. You can stop worrying now.
# 12109. You can study Esperanto at www(dot)esperanto(dot)net.
# 12110. You can take my word for it.
# 12111. You can thank Julia for that.
# 12112. You can use Esperanto to repel intruders.
# 12113. You can use this work in any way, including for commercial purposes.
# 12114. You can’t be serious about PC if you haven’t learned Esperanto.
# 12115. You can’t come directly to me about that.
# 12116. You can’t cut class and expect to pass.
# 12117. You can’t expect a charisma man to know Esperanto.
# 12118. You can’t fool me.
# 12119. You can’t have your cake and eat it too.
# 12120. You can’t just sit there talking to yourself.
# 12121. You can’t just sit there.
# 12122. You can’t just walk around talking to yourself like that.
# 12123. You can’t let them define the terms of the debate.
# 12124. You can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs.
# 12125. You can’t make things too quiet for me.
# 12126. You can’t press the envelope without resorting to Esperanto.
# 12127. You can’t see the forest for the trees.
# 12128. You can’t stand there talking to yourself.
# 12129. You can’t take that literally.
# 12130. You can’t tell a joke when you hear it.
# 12131. You can’t tell which way the train went by looking at the tracks.
# 12132. You cannot seriously philosophize without coming to Esperanto.
# 12133. You come back here!
# 12134. You committed software piracy, and I demand your immediate
resignation.
# 12135. You convinced me.
# 12136. You could be a private tutor.
# 12137. You could call English “the cockroach language”, because it’s
everywhere.
# 12138. You could have knocked me over with a feather.
# 12139. You could look it up, you know.
# 12140. You could lose your shirt doing that.
# 12141. You decide the best time for that, based on your schedule.
# 12142. You decide.
# 12143. You deserve the best.
# 12144. You did a great job of supervising.
# 12145. You did both at the same time?
# 12146. You did the same thing.
# 12147. You didn’t feel out of place?
# 12148. You didn’t give him a chance to cooperate.
# 12149. You didn’t hear that.
# 12150. You didn’t know that?
# 12151. You didn’t miss anything.
# 12152. You didn’t?
# 12153. You do me great honor.
# 12154. You do need a keeper.
# 12155. You do us honor.
# 12156. You don’t approve?
# 12157. You don’t dress for where you are; you dress for where you’re going.
# 12158. You don’t get an opportunity like this every day.
# 12159. You don’t give me enough credit.
# 12160. You don’t have any say in the matter.
# 12161. You don’t have to make a federal case out of it.
# 12162. You don’t know how good you have it.
# 12163. You don’t know what I had to go through to do that.
# 12164. You don’t know what I have to do.
# 12165. You don’t know what I have to go through to get there.
# 12166. You don’t know what you’re asking.
# 12167. You don’t know when to quit.
# 12168. You don’t look that old.
# 12169. You don’t need classroom instruction to learn Esperanto.
# 12170. You don’t say.
# 12171. You don’t seem to have a coherent idea what to do.
# 12172. You don’t seem to have a coherent plan.
# 12173. You don’t seem to realize that you’re breaking my concentration.
# 12174. You don’t seem to understand.
# 12175. You don’t set tasks for me.
# 12176. You don’t speak to me directly.
# 12177. You don’t understand.
# 12178. You don’t want to waste your time talking to me.
# 12179. You done good.
# 12180. You earned it.
# 12181. You explain that to her, not me.
# 12182. You finally got it right.
# 12183. You first need to get your GED.
# 12184. You forgot the salt again.
# 12185. You gave me quite a start.
# 12186. You get no sympathy from me.
# 12187. You get the tea ready, all right?
# 12188. You get three wishes.
# 12189. You get two more wishes.
# 12190. You get what you pay for.
# 12191. You gimme that!
# 12192. You give me the creeps.
# 12193. You go now.
# 12194. You go on ahead.
# 12195. You got her attention.
# 12196. You got hold of a good one.
# 12197. You got it.
# 12198. You got me in trouble with her.
# 12199. You got the idea.
# 12200. You got the very best one.
# 12201. You had better be here on time.
# 12202. You had better get to bed – we’ve got a big day tomorrow.
# 12203. You had better have a good reason for this.
# 12204. You had better listen to your parents.
# 12205. You had better put on your long underwear today.
# 12206. You had better start doing your homework.
# 12207. You had better take care of that before it causes permanent damage.
# 12208. You had to impugn his integrity?
# 12209. You HAD to say that?
# 12210. You had your chance.
# 12211. You handled that well.
# 12212. You have a bright future.
# 12213. You have a lot of exploring still to do.
# 12214. You have a piece of food or something on your tie.
# 12215. You have a problem with that?
# 12216. You have a rebellion on your hands.
# 12217. You have a strange way of showing it.
# 12218. You have a text message on your cell phone.
# 12219. You have a window of opportunity.
# 12220. You have bags under your eyes.
# 12221. You have just offended a very wealthy man.
# 12222. You have my permission.
# 12223. You have never traveled this road.
# 12224. You have no choice.
# 12225. You have no idea how much that hurt.
# 12226. You have no idea how slothful I really am.
# 12227. You have staff to handle that.
# 12228. You have the option of speaking Esperanto to me, if you wish.
# 12229. You have to be here at least six months before asking me that.
# 12230. You have to be present to win.
# 12231. You have to be well-coordinated to be a competitive pole-vaulter.
# 12232. You have to come back for a number of times.
# 12233. You have to discuss our family affairs in front of other people?
# 12234. You have to do what your mother says.
# 12235. You have to go after inspiration with a club, such as the Esperanto club.
# 12236. You have to go through me to get to him.
# 12237. You have to go through proper channels.
# 12238. You have to go through the chain of command.
# 12239. You have to go to your supervisor about that.
# 12240. You have to have a strong stomach to watch sausage, or law, being made.
# 12241. You have to have faith.
# 12242. You have to keep her in sight at all times.
# 12243. You have to pay the first two months’ rent in advance.
# 12244. You have to reach the decision-maker.
# 12245. You have to read between the lines.
# 12246. You have to take a hand in your education to amount to anything.
# 12247. You have to take the medication at certain times.
# 12248. You have to tell me this in front of another person?
# 12249. You have to turn your cell phone off and then back on to see the new
balance.
# 12250. You have to wait until this day.
# 12251. You have to watch where you are stepping.
# 12252. You have two wishes left.
# 12253. You haven’t answered the question.
# 12254. You heard me.
# 12255. You help Mama put away the groceries.
# 12256. You hit the nail on the head.
# 12257. You hurt his feelings.
# 12258. You keep this.
# 12259. You know English better than I do.
# 12260. You know I know.
# 12261. You know very well.
# 12262. You know we can’t take that risk.
# 12263. You let me down.
# 12264. You listened to your stupid ignorant friends instead of me.
# 12265. You look fat in that dress.
# 12266. You look like a nervous wreck.
# 12267. You look swell.
# 12268. You look thinner than before.
# 12269. You look thinner.
# 12270. You look young for your age.
# 12271. You lose your appetite when you get sick.
# 12272. You lost your place.
# 12273. You lucked out.
# 12274. You make me answer for everything, don’t you.
# 12275. You may be misinterpreting it.
# 12276. You may forget the singer, but you shan’t forget the song.
# 12277. You may go now.
# 12278. You may have forgotten, but I haven’t.
# 12279. You may need it yourself.
# 12280. You might not know her, but she knows you.
# 12281. You might want to bring that up to them, if you happen to talk to them
again.
# 12282. You mother should have told you there would be days like this.
# 12283. You must activate your card within six months of your purchase.
# 12284. You must be crazy.
# 12285. You must be present to win.
# 12286. You must think I suffer fools gladly.
# 12287. You nearly stepped on my foot.
# 12288. You need a parachute for skydiving only if you want to live to tell about
it.
# 12289. You need an access-control system.
# 12290. You need an appointment to see me.
# 12291. You need experience for this job.
# 12292. You need not be present to win.
# 12293. You need professional help.
# 12294. You need three letters of recommendation.
# 12295. You need to add more money to your account to continue using your
phone.
# 12296. You need to be careful with it.
# 12297. You need to be careful.
# 12298. You need to be more salesy.
# 12299. You need to be very quiet.
# 12300. You need to bone up on your English.
# 12301. You need to check and see.
# 12302. You need to drink water.
# 12303. You need to establish re-order points, and abide by them.
# 12304. You need to get out more.
# 12305. You need to get rid of these cockroaches.
# 12306. You need to get with the program.
# 12307. You need to get your act together.
# 12308. You need to go back and get it.
# 12309. You need to have that leak in the kitchen fixed.
# 12310. You need to have your head examined.
# 12311. You need to keep him on a short leash.
# 12312. You need to press the envelope.
# 12313. You need to spend more time with him.
# 12314. You need to start updating your resume.
# 12315. You need to stop assuming you know everything.
# 12316. You need to take money.
# 12317. You need to wait for a minute.
# 12318. You never know.
# 12319. You not making any sense.
# 12320. You only get hired to do what you’re already doing.
# 12321. You only love yourself.
# 12322. You only think about yourself.
# 12323. You opened a can of worms.
# 12324. You opposed me every step of the way.
# 12325. You ought not to say such things.
# 12326. You paid too much for this.
# 12327. You play too rough.
# 12328. You rang?
# 12329. You really got your money’s worth that time.
# 12330. You said it yourself.
# 12331. You said it.
# 12332. You said that already.
# 12333. You say that only because you can’t think of an answer.
# 12334. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.
# 12335. You see what kind of help I get around here?
# 12336. You seem bent on doing that.
# 12337. You seem bent on proving that.
# 12338. You seem mighty sure of yourself.
# 12339. You seem to think I just hopped off the turnip truck.
# 12340. You should already know this.
# 12341. You should also wear your sweater.
# 12342. You should apologize to him.
# 12343. You should ask yourself “How do you say that in Esperanto?”.
# 12344. You should avail yourself of this opportunity.
# 12345. You should be at home, studying calculus and Esperanto.
# 12346. You should be careful what you say.
# 12347. You should be more careful.
# 12348. You should be paying rapt attention to what I am saying.
# 12349. You should cut him some slack.
# 12350. You should eat more vegetables.
# 12351. You should go to the hospital.
# 12352. You should have been here at nine o’clock.
# 12353. You should have come to see me much earlier.
# 12354. You should have left earlier, if you knew the traffic was bad.
# 12355. You should keep a journal.
# 12356. You should learn how to count in binary.
# 12357. You should never stick anything smaller than your elbow into your ear.
# 12358. You should pay a little attention.
# 12359. You should put your valuables in the hotel’s safe.
# 12360. You should read to her.
# 12361. You should show this to your students.
# 12362. You should spell out at least one time what that acronym stands for.
# 12363. You should take a look at my blog.
# 12364. You should take your umbrella.
# 12365. You should talk about the weather instead.
# 12366. You should thank your lucky stars.
# 12367. You should try harder to get along with him.
# 12368. You should use a dolly to move that stuff.
# 12369. You should watch your weight.
# 12370. You shouldn’t cry over spilled milk.
# 12371. You shouldn’t do that.
# 12372. You shouldn’t waste your valuable time talking to me.
# 12373. You spoke too soon.
# 12374. You started it, so you finish it.
# 12375. You started without me?
# 12376. You stay here and guard our things.
# 12377. You take care of the baby for a while.
# 12378. You take over watching the baby.
# 12379. You take the baby and go.
# 12380. You talked me into it.
# 12381. You tickle me.
# 12382. You tire me with your stupid questions.
# 12383. You took me by surprise.
# 12384. You took the words right out of my mouth.
# 12385. You turned your back at just the right time.
# 12386. You two are in cahoots.
# 12387. You wait here.
# 12388. You wait right here.
# 12389. You want me to give you a hand?
# 12390. You want to clean me out.
# 12391. You went against my explicitly-stated wishes.
# 12392. You were doing 30 in a 20-mile-per-hour zone.
# 12393. You were going out later, weren’t you?
# 12394. You were infected with hyper-correctness, and this-here is the antidote.
# 12395. You were just waiting for a chance to say that.
# 12396. You were just waiting to say that, weren’t you.
# 12397. You were saying…?
# 12398. You were talking to yourself.
# 12399. You were taught wrong.
# 12400. You were under the wrong impression.
# 12401. You will do very well on your exam.
# 12402. You will forever remain ignorant if you understand things too quickly.
# 12403. You WILL have a safe trip!
# 12404. You won’t find “ghoti” in the dictionary, but can you tell what it means?
# 12405. You would be better off getting a good night’s sleep.
# 12406. You would be better off getting rid of one of those cars.
# 12407. You would be welcome at my sister’s house, I’m sure.
# 12408. You would be welcome there at any time.
# 12409. You would have to pass an entrance exam.
# 12410. You would have to take my family name in America.
# 12411. You would have us believe that?
# 12412. You wouldn’t speak to me like that if I had my writers with me!
# 12413. You, of all people, should know that.
# 12414. You’d be a lot happier if you learned Esperanto.
# 12415. You’ll advance beyond that point.
# 12416. You’ll be glad to leave this dirty place, I’m sure.
# 12417. You’ll be notified by email when it is finished.
# 12418. You’ll do this yourself someday.
# 12419. You’ll get fed up with doing that.
# 12420. You’ll get run over even if you’re on the right track, if you just sit there.
# 12421. You’ll get used to him.
# 12422. You’ll get used to it.
# 12423. You’ll have to excuse me.
# 12424. You’ll need the receipt to get a refund.
# 12425. You’ll read her a story, won’t you?
# 12426. You’ll thank me later.
# 12427. You’re a better man than I am, Gunga Din!
# 12428. You’re a big disappointment.
# 12429. You’re a dunce.
# 12430. You’re a gentleman and a scholar.
# 12431. You’re a human “gimmie” pig.
# 12432. You’re a pain in the neck.
# 12433. You’re a pest.
# 12434. You’re a popular person.
# 12435. You’re a real charisma man.
# 12436. You’re a very curious fellow.
# 12437. You’re always assuming I’m in the wrong.
# 12438. You’re always in a rush.
# 12439. You’re asking a lot.
# 12440. You’re asking me?
# 12441. You’re asking my plans?
# 12442. You’re bad news.
# 12443. You’re batting a thousand.
# 12444. You’re beautiful and charming.
# 12445. You’re being watched.
# 12446. You’re blocking my way.
# 12447. You’re bluffing.
# 12448. You’re bumping my chair.
# 12449. You’re Canadian, aren’t you?
# 12450. You’re confusing me.
# 12451. You’re crazy.
# 12452. You’re doing that, and I’m doing this.
# 12453. You’re exaggerating.
# 12454. You’re family.
# 12455. You’re fired!
# 12456. You’re forgetting your umbrella.
# 12457. You’re getting them confused.
# 12458. You’re going to hear more about it.
# 12459. You’re here again.
# 12460. You’re hiding, and I don’t blame you.
# 12461. You’re hired!
# 12462. You’re imagining things.
# 12463. You’re in no position to say what I can do.
# 12464. You’re in the right ballpark.
# 12465. You’re in the way.
# 12466. You’re interrupting.
# 12467. You’re it!
# 12468. You’re just deceiving yourself.
# 12469. You’re just like him.
# 12470. You’re just repeating a long-standing calumny.
# 12471. You’re just spitting into the wind.
# 12472. You’re just the sucker.
# 12473. You’re kidding, right?
# 12474. You’re making a mountain out of a molehill.
# 12475. You’re mean.
# 12476. You’re most welcome.
# 12477. You’re my witness.
# 12478. You’re never going to lose weight like that.
# 12479. You’re no fun.
# 12480. You’re not being coherent.
# 12481. You’re not entitled to that.
# 12482. You’re not following proper procedures.
# 12483. You’re not getting older, you’re getting better.
# 12484. You’re not getting ready?
# 12485. You’re not going to get very far with that.
# 12486. You’re not going to interview me.
# 12487. You’re not making any sense.
# 12488. You’re not much help.
# 12489. You’re not supposed to drink tea quickly.
# 12490. You’re not using all your resources.
# 12491. You’re not using common sense.
# 12492. You’re nothing if not busy.
# 12493. You’re older than her, but look younger than her.
# 12494. You’re on the air.
# 12495. You’re on the right track, but on the wrong train.
# 12496. You’re on your own with that.
# 12497. You’re on your own, kid.
# 12498. You’re on your own.
# 12499. You’re out of control.
# 12500. You’re out of line.
# 12501. You’re out of your depth.
# 12502. You’re preaching to the choir.
# 12503. You’re pulling my leg.
# 12504. You’re putting me on.
# 12505. You’re right, as usual.
# 12506. You’re rushing in where angels fear to tread.
# 12507. You’re scraping the bottom of the barrel.
# 12508. You’re setting your sights rather high, aren’t you?
# 12509. You’re so careless.
# 12510. You’re staking a lot on that.
# 12511. You’re still alive, aren’t you?
# 12512. You’re such an inspiration.
# 12513. You’re supposed to be setting an example, for crying out loud.
# 12514. You’re supposed to know things like this.
# 12515. You’re swallowing a camel while straining out a gnat.
# 12516. You’re talking through your hat.
# 12517. You’re telling me way more than I want to know.
# 12518. You’re the only one I believe.
# 12519. You’re the two-hundredth person to visit this location.
# 12520. You’re too far behind on this project.
# 12521. You’re trespassing.
# 12522. You’re trying to trick me.
# 12523. You’re up the creek without a paddle.
# 12524. You’re very brave.
# 12525. You’re welcome here any time.
# 12526. You’re welcome.
# 12527. You’re worrying about the wrong things.
# 12528. You’re your own worst enemy.
# 12529. You’ve bothered me enough, already.
# 12530. You’ve come a long way, baby.
# 12531. You’ve fallen down on the job again.
# 12532. You’ve got a lot of nerve.
# 12533. You’ve got it made.
# 12534. You’ve got it on backwards.
# 12535. You’ve got it right.
# 12536. You’ve got me over a barrel.
# 12537. You’ve got the words, but not the melody.
# 12538. You’ve got them confused.
# 12539. You’ve got to watch out not to step on things.
# 12540. You’ve got to watch your step around here.
# 12541. You’ve got your hands full.
# 12542. You’ve had your fun.
# 12543. You’ve made a believer out of me.
# 12544. You’ve made me a nervous wreck.
# 12545. You’ve made my day!
# 12546. You’ve made your point.
# 12547. You’ve never investigated anything for yourself.
# 12548. You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.
# 12549. You’ve seen them all, you’ve seen one.
# 12550. You’ve stumped me.
# 12551. Young ones do.
# 12552. Your application is being processed.
# 12553. Your baby has the best features of both of you.
# 12554. Your baby is calling you.
# 12555. Your calculations were completely erroneous.
# 12556. Your cell phone credit is all used up.
# 12557. Your checking account received an interest credit of $25.00.
# 12558. Your comb is in that drawer.
# 12559. Your condition is painful, but not serious.
# 12560. Your English has greatly improved.
# 12561. Your English is gradually getting better.
# 12562. Your English is very good.
# 12563. Your English isn’t good enough to discuss something this complicated.
# 12564. Your feet look better.
# 12565. Your fifteen minutes are up.
# 12566. Your food.
# 12567. Your friends are ignorant ninnies.
# 12568. Your grandchildren won’t be able to tell the difference.
# 12569. Your husband can’t ask you this?
# 12570. Your ignorance is exceeded only by your presumption.
# 12571. Your job is in jeopardy.
# 12572. Your lawyer will plead your case for you.
# 12573. Your leg looks better.
# 12574. Your lips are moving.
# 12575. Your logic is flawed.
# 12576. Your methods are a bit rough.
# 12577. Your mother had it with the bugs.
# 12578. Your mother has great faith in the medical profession.
# 12579. Your mother has had it with the bugs.
# 12580. Your mother has picked something out for you already.
# 12581. Your mother has plans for you.
# 12582. Your mother is calling you.
# 12583. Your mother told you not to do that.
# 12584. Your pants are over there, on the floor.
# 12585. Your premise is flawed.
# 12586. Your presence is required.
# 12587. Your proof is flawed.
# 12588. Your recent letter sent to Mr. Hector Holder was forwarded to my
attention.
# 12589. Your shoe laces need tying.
# 12590. Your sister sent those pants.
# 12591. Your son is alive and well.
# 12592. Your specific circumstances.
# 12593. Your time is up.
# 12594. Your turn.
# 12595. Your wish is my command.
# 12596. Your worries are over.
# 12597. Yours will not be the first.
# 12598. Yo-yos are always spitting on the sidewalk.
# 12599. Yummy in the tummy.
# 12600. Zamenhof donated his language to the world.
# 12601. Zamenhof is my hero.
# 12602. Zamenhof published the first book of Esperanto in the year 1887.
# 12603. Zamenhof was smarter than your average bear.
# 12604. Zamenhof’s birthday is December 15th.
# 12605. Zamenhof’s life paralleled that of Thomas Richard Allinson.
# 12606. Zikes!
# 12607. Zip up your pants.
# 12608. Zippadeedoodah.
# 12609. Zoom in on that.
# 12610. Zounds!

                               (end of document)

								
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