2007_FULL_500 - The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.doc by suchufp

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                                                1 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                              December 31, 2007 Monday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

To Mark 100 New Years, A Much Brighter Ball
BYLINE: By ROBERT D. McFADDEN; Trymaine Lee, Toby Lyles and Michael Wilson contributed reporting.

SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; Pg. 3

LENGTH: 772 words

     It was not always a midnight kaleidoscope of roaring multitudes and a 1,200-pound sphere clad in Waterford crys-
tal, with 30,000 watts of light-emitting diodes to dazzle America. A century ago Monday, the first New Year's ball de-
scended in Times Square and a tradition was born, with modest crowds cheering a five-foot iron globe studded with 216
electric lamps.
      There were years when the occasion and its globular star had to be subdued. In 1917, the square was blacked out
for a wartime coal shortage, and while the ball was dropped, The New York Times reported: ''The New Year slunk in
with rubber shoes on, coming upon a lightless, noiseless and frigid Broadway.''
      In 1943 and 1944, World War II laid a melancholy hand on the celebrations. There were no glowing balls. Instead,
plane-spotter beams crisscrossed the sky, and the crowds, after midnight cheers, silently remembered Americans over-
seas. In 2001 the specter of Sept. 11 hovered over the proceedings.
      But for millions of New Yorkers and visitors to the city, and in the television age for most Americans and audi-
ences abroad, the ball-dropping has been a euphoric occasion in nearly all of the 100 years since the first globe was cre-
ated by Walter F. Palmer, the chief electrician for The Times, at the behest of the publisher, Adolph S. Ochs, who want-
ed a spectacular midnight show in the square.
       There were antecedents of a sort. Since the early 1800s, mariners could set ships' clocks by the lowering of iron
balls in ports at noon daily. But in 1907, three years after Longacre Square had been renamed, the idea was celebratory
and promotional, with crowds eddying around the 26-story Times Tower to watch the ball descend on its 70-foot flag-
pole at midnight to mark the new year.
     While The Times occupied the trapezoidal tower from 1905 to 1913, when it moved to a larger ''annex'' on West
43rd Street, the ball-dropping tradition continued, even after the building was sold years later.
      The balls were made of iron and then wood until 1955, when aluminum was used for a third version. For several
years in the 1980s, the aluminum was shaped like an apple. In 1995, it was given a flashier look with rhinestones. Until
then, the ball had been lowered by a half-dozen men, but in recent years cables controlled by computers have been used.
       The ball that will descend Monday atop 1 Times Square is a new, $1.1 million high-tech creation, with a skeleton
of aluminum and a skin composed of 672 Waterford crystal panels and additional pyramid-shaped mirrors to best reflect
the light of 9,576 diodes generating 625,033 lumens. That is more than double the dazzle-power of last year's ball,
which looked like a porcupine with 600 halogen-quill bulbs.
      Security, a major concern in the age of terrorism, was taking shape on Sunday. For blocks around the square, met-
al barriers were in place to funnel crowds, and blue wooden sawhorses were stacked on their sides, in reserve, along the
curbs of Broadway. Undercover officers in plain clothes will be in the crowds, along with thousands of uniformed offic-
ers. Others will be posted atop buildings overlooking the scene.
                                                                                                                   Page 2
          To Mark 100 New Years, A Much Brighter Ball The New York Times December 31, 2007 Monday


     Alcohol and backpacks are forbidden in the area. Traffic will be blocked off Monday afternoon and parking is
banned on most streets. Video surveillance cameras will be used to monitor the activity. Devices to detect airborne
chemical or radiological elements are set up, and a helicopter with sophisticated communications equipment will hover
overhead.
      Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly said on Sunday that security for the celebration has been increased, even
as crowds have become better behaved. ''The nature of the crowd is more of a tourist crowd than 10 years ago,'' he said
in an interview. ''It is an entertainment event from 8 o'clock on, as opposed to years ago, when it was a lot of waiting
and a lot of drinking.''
      By midafternoon on Sunday, Times Square was already swelling with people in a celebratory mood, watched over
by officers and cajoled by entrepreneurs hawking tours and souvenirs, knockoff perfumes and New Year's Eve glasses
with the big zeros in ''2008'' for eye holes. Crews were setting up spotlights, speakers on lampposts and sound stages for
a lengthy roster of entertainers.
     The ball was not yet visible from the street.
     But a little boy perched on a man's shoulder glimpsed something. ''I think I see it, Daddy,'' he said.
       Other people pointed toward the sky -- was it a bird? a plane? Superman? -- and gestured with circled fingertips,
as if guiding the great ball in its agonizingly slow descent: 77 feet in 60 seconds, starting at 11:59 p.m.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: POWER FAILURES (76%); WORLD WAR II (75%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (93%)

LOAD-DATE: December 31, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Tests of the New Year's ball, loaded with Waterford crystal, were conducted on Sunday. (PHO-
TOGRAPH BY JAMES ESTRIN/THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                2 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                     The New York Times

                                              December 30, 2007 Sunday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

Whither the Game? Just Asking
BYLINE: By MURRAY CHASS

SECTION: Section 8; Column 0; Sports Desk; ON BASEBALL; Pg. 11

LENGTH: 1405 words
                                                                                                                        Page 3
                     Whither the Game? Just Asking The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday




      Questions seeking answers in the coming months and the coming season:
        Will the Twins trade Johan Santana, and if so, to whom?
        Will Commissioner Bud Selig discipline any players named in the Mitchell report, and if so, who?
     Will the commissioner's office and the players union negotiate an acceptance of the recommendations of the
Mitchell report?
    Will one or both of the Congressional committees that have scheduled hearings for next month subpoena Roger
Clemens to testify under oath?
        If he testifies under oath, will Clemens continue to deny the Mitchell report findings that he used steroids?
        Will Barry Bonds get a job for next season so that he can add to his record total of 762 home runs?
      Will Bonds go on trial on perjury and obstruction of justice charges? And if he is tried, will he be convicted? And
if convicted, will he watch the World Series on a prison television?
      How much of an inroad will Alex Rodriguez (518) make in his attempt to supplant Bonds as the career home run
leader?
        Will Goose Gossage be elected to the Hall of Fame next week after falling short a year ago by 21 votes of 545
cast?
    Will the disgraced Mark McGwire improve on the 23.5 percent he received in his first appearance on the Hall of
Fame ballot last year?
      Will the steroids zealots, those sanctimonious self-appointed judges of baseball's steroids program, who in some
cases have conflicts of interest in their commercial positions, accept baseball's testing and discipline guidelines?
      Will the Mets acquire a front-line starting pitcher, pacifying their critics who don't believe they have enough
pitching to win their division?
     Will Pedro Martinez make a solid return to the Mets' rotation and ease the criticism that the Mets don't have
enough starting pitching?
        Will the Mets get so desperate for an established starting pitcher that they will trade Jose Reyes?
        Will Reyes make Mets fans forget his collapse in the final month last season?
        Will the Mets make their fans forget their September swoon and re-establish their credibility as contenders?
        Will Joba Chamberlain start the season as a Yankees starter or remain in the bullpen, setting up for Mariano Rive-
ra?
      Will Chamberlain, Phil Hughes and Ian Kennedy be in the Yankees' starting rotation, and will they perform as ad-
vertised?
        Will the Yankees trade one or more of those three pitchers for an established starter?
     Will Brian Cashman, the Yankees' general manager, who liberated himself from George Steinbrenner's iron
thumb, clash with Hank Steinbrenner, his new boss, over player personnel decisions?
        Will Joe Girardi manage the Yankees to the postseason for the 14th successive season?
    Will Joe Torre, relocated in Los Angeles, continue his string of postseason appearances, or will he revert to the
managerial status he held before he became the beneficiary of George Steinbrenner's money?
        Will Lastings Milledge mature and blossom among the cherry blossoms in Washington?
      With Dontrelle Willis and Dan Haren having been traded this off-season, will any other front-line starting pitchers
be traded?
        Will Willis's new environment in Detroit inspire him to rebound from the worst season of his five-year career?
                                                                                                                         Page 4
                    Whither the Game? Just Asking The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


      Having added Miguel Cabrera and Edgar Renteria to their lineup and Willis to their pitching rotation, will the Ti-
gers let any other American League team near the World Series?
      Will the Red Sox win their third World Series in five years after having won none in 86 years?
      Will the Marlins and the Rays get new parks, or will Florida continue to be a baseball wasteland?
      Will the National League have its first 20-game winner in three years?
     Will the N.L. win the All-Star Game for the first time in 12 years and gain home-field advantage for the pennant
winner for the first time under the six-year-old format that links the game to the World Series?
      Will the newly anointed Tampa Bay Rays, having exorcised the Devil from their name, win more than 70 games
for the first time in their 11-year history?
      Will the Baltimore Orioles end their streak of losing seasons at 10, which makes them one of four teams in history
to have 10 consecutive losing seasons after a first-place finish?
     Will the Pirates suffer their 16th consecutive losing season and tie the 1933-48 Phillies for the record for incompe-
tence?
      Parlez-Vous Baseball?
     By his own description, Bill Smith was a ''bad backup catcher'' on the Hamilton College baseball team. ''I knew I
was in trouble when we had a doubleheader at Union College and it was a cold blustery April day and the other guy
caught both games,'' said Smith, the general manager of the Minnesota Twins.
    All right, Smith didn't become a baseball player, but he did become a baseball executive and a unique one at that.
He may be the only general manager who majored in French in college.
      ''Hamilton was a great liberal arts school,'' said Smith, class of '80. ''I decided I wanted to learn a language. I also
realized the only way I'd succeed at that was to major in it.''
      Smith also wanted to spend a semester abroad, and the language education would help him do that. He spent the
spring semester of his junior year in the Loire Valley of France.
      ''It was a great experience,'' he said. ''I was with a great group of people.''
      The next group Smith spent time with worked in baseball.
      ''The winter meetings were in Toronto in 1979, and I took a bus from Clinton, N.Y.,'' he said. ''I spent five days
there. It was reading period before final exams, and I tried to explain to my professors that it was job related. They
weren't buying it.''
      Honest, Professor, it was job related. The commissioner's office had started an executive development program,
hiring two college graduates a year, and Smith received one of the internships in the second year.
      ''I spent a year in the commissioner's office and then moved to the White Sox organization,'' Smith said. That
started him on his way to the general manager's job with the Twins.
      Smith, who said he was a ''big believer'' in a liberal arts education, has only one regret about majoring in French.
      ''If I had known what I was going to do, I would have taken Spanish,'' he said. ''It would have helped me a great
deal more. I've spent the last 12 years going to Latin America quite a bit. But French has helped me learn Spanish.''
      Seeking Common Ground
      It's an old Jewish joke told by Jews among Jews: Put three Jews on a committee, and they'll have four different
opinions.
     That's where baseball in Israel seems to be right now. There's last summer's league, there's a new league that has
been announced, there's an independent businessman who isn't thrilled with either one and there's a group of former
advisers to the original league who want to resolve the mess and emerge with one strong, viable league.
                                                                                                                        Page 5
                    Whither the Game? Just Asking The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


     The mediators include Dan Kurtzer, a former United States ambassador to Israel and commissioner of the Israel
Baseball League; Marvin Goldklang, a limited Yankees partner and owner of several minor league teams; and Andrew
Zimbalist, a Smith College economics professor.
      They hope to get everyone together for a meeting in New York next month.
      ''Everybody thought the league was a wonderful concept, but serious divisions developed,'' Goldklang said. ''We
have tried to develop an approach under which those who are interested in continuing the league can come together and
support a common approach based on a much sounder business plan.''
        The Israel Baseball League is about $1 million in debt. Its founder, Larry Baras, the Boston bagel entrepreneur,
isn't likely to be able to operate the league next summer. Jeffrey Rosen, who was Baras's first investor, has announced
the creation of the Israel Professional Baseball League.
      That's exactly what the Goldklang group wants to avoid, starting a new league without settling the chaos left by
the original.
      Further muddying matters is the relationship between Rosen and Jeffrey Royer, a Canadian investor in the original
league and a general partner of the Arizona Diamondbacks. Royer and Rosen are reluctant to meet for their own rea-
sons.
     Along with the Goldklang group, Buddy Lewis, whose Nokona Athletics Goods contributed the league's equip-
ment last summer, wants to see the problems resolved.
    ''Everybody believes that the notion of baseball in Israel is fantastic and it can be a reality,'' Lewis said. ''It only
means everybody pulling on one rope.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: SUBPOENAS (90%); CONFLICTS OF INTEREST (90%); WITNESSES (90%); STEROIDS (90%);
BASEBALL (89%); TESTIMONY (76%); JUDGES (71%); SPORTS & RECREATION EVENTS (77%); BASE-
BALL TOURNAMENTS (73%); CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS (90%)

PERSON: ALEX RODRIGUEZ (56%); MICHAEL MCMAHON (52%)

GEOGRAPHIC: CALIFORNIA, USA (69%) UNITED STATES (69%)

LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                      Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                  3 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                    The New York Times

                                                December 30, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Anxious? You Should Be. It's Good for Business.
                                                                                                                        Page 6
          Anxious? You Should Be. It's Good for Business. The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


BYLINE: By ROBERT H. ROSEN.
     Robert H. Rosen is a psychologist and chief executive of Healthy Companies International, a consulting firm in Ar-
lington, Va. His book ''Just Enough Anxiety'' will be published by Portfolio in March.

SECTION: Section 3; Column 0; Money and Business/Financial Desk; PREOCCUPATIONS; Pg. 15

LENGTH: 841 words

     ANXIETY is usually something people want to avoid. The dictionary defines it as ''a state of being uneasy, appre-
hensive or worried about what may happen.'' People who experience too much anxiety may find themselves on a thera-
pist's couch, and doctors prescribe pills to keep this feeling away.
      And yet, in my work as an adviser to executives, I have found that in corporate life there is a place for anxiety, as
long as it is understood and managed the right way. I have interviewed or advised 250 top executives at companies that
include Procter & Gamble, Toyota, PepsiCo, Four Seasons Hotels, Ericsson, Samsung and Novartis. I have seen the
positive effect that anxiety has had on their organizations -- whether intentional or not.
      The success of great leaders is all about creating just enough anxiety -- within themselves and their organizations -
- to unleash the energy that drives powerful leadership, accelerates growth and helps companies succeed.
      I have come to realize that both personality and culture influence the way leaders handle change and uncertainty,
and the anxiety that comes with them. Just enough anxiety enables the best leaders to embrace uncertainty and to turn
challenges into opportunities. It prods them to make meaningful and necessary changes within themselves and their
organizations.
      What is just enough anxiety? It is the exact amount we need to respond to change, tackle a tough problem or take
a leap of faith. It is the right level of energy combined with the right attitude that enables us to perform at our best. Just
enough anxiety is a catalyst for individual and organizational growth.
       Contrast this with too much anxiety, which is mired in negative thinking and characterized by the desire to attack
change. This can lead to arrogance, fear, mistakes and low morale. Or contrast it with too little anxiety, which is
grounded in complacency and the belief that everything will turn out O.K., without intervention. This can result in a
failure to confront hard issues, mediocre performance and untapped potential. Both too much and too little anxiety in-
hibit top performance and lead to deterioration and decline.
      Having just enough anxiety has led me to become a better teacher and motivator. It propelled me to stretch myself
to get my Ph.D. It enabled me to step outside my comfort zone and start my own business. It continually challenges me
to grow. And it helps me coach senior executives as they deal with ever-changing issues in an ever-changing world.
      Like all leaders, I am constantly moving back and forth between too much, too little and just enough anxiety.
      Not long ago my company was working hard to keep up with a growth spurt. I was being pulled in many direc-
tions, traveling a lot, and was tired and overly impatient. Even though I am committed to healthy leadership, I was un-
knowingly taking out my anxiety on my team.
      Fortunately, we were testing a new 360-degree performance evaluation at the time. People described me as ''bold,
honest and a strong leader.'' But they also told me I was being ''unpredictable and moody'' at times. They helped me
realize that I wasn't listening to them very well and was jumping to conclusions. To be honest, I was surprised and em-
barrassed by the feedback but grateful for the chance to examine my actions. After a candid conversation, we got our
team back on track.
      I recognized that it was my resistance to my discomfort with the stresses of the business that had created too much
anxiety within me. This led to increasing levels of tension and conflict between me and my team. At the same time, it
was my acceptance of my discomfort in hearing people's feedback that allowed me to have an honest conversation with
them about my performance. The experience helped me make positive changes in how I look at and handle the pres-
sures of a growing business.
     IF you've ever taught a child to ride a bike, you know all about managing anxiety in yourself and the people
around you. You know it's up to you to help the child conquer fears. After all, you're the adult. But you've got fears of
                                                                                                                     Page 7
          Anxious? You Should Be. It's Good for Business. The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


your own. You want to help him become more independent, to build his self-confidence. But what if he falls? What if
he gets hurt? You see the hesitation, fear, and excitement on the child's face. But he says that he wants to do it, so you
let go of the bike. That's my idea of leadership.
     Your relationship with uncertainty and anxiety has a profound effect on your life and your ability to lead people
through change. It shapes how you see yourself and others, and how others see you. It influences how you think about
problems and make decisions. And it's a crucial factor in how you manage performance and interact with people.
      When you manage this powerful force correctly, you create just enough anxiety inside and outside yourself. You
are better able to learn, change and navigate in a complex world. You unleash vast amounts of human energy. And you
lead people and companies to levels of success they've never reached before.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: ENTREPRENEURSHIP (70%)

COMPANY: PEPSICO INC (57%); NOVARTIS AG (57%); PROCTER & GAMBLE CO (57%); FOUR SEASONS
HOTELS INC (57%)

TICKER: PEP (NYSE) (57%); NVS (NYSE) (57%); NOV (LSE) (57%); PGP (PAR) (57%); PGM (LSE) (57%); PG
(NYSE) (57%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS312111 SOFT DRINK MANUFACTURING (57%); NAICS311919 OTHER SNACK FOOD
MANUFACTURING (57%); SIC2096 POTATO CHIPS, CORN CHIPS, & SIMILAR SNACKS (57%); SIC2086
BOTTLED & CANNED SOFT DRINKS & CARBONATED WATER (57%); NAICS339115 OPHTHALMIC
GOODS MANUFACTURING (57%); NAICS325412 PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATION MANUFACTURING
(57%); SIC3851 OPHTHALMIC GOODS (57%); SIC2834 PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS (57%);
NAICS325620 TOILET PREPARATION MANUFACTURING (57%); NAICS325611 SOAP & OTHER DETER-
GENT MANUFACTURING (57%); NAICS322291 SANITARY PAPER PRODUCT MANUFACTURING (57%);
SIC2844 PERFUMES, COSMETICS, & OTHER TOILET PREPARATIONS (57%); SIC2841 SOAPS & OTHER
DETERGENTS, EXCEPT SPECIALTY CLEANERS (57%); SIC2676 SANITARY PAPER PRODUCTS (57%)

LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: ILLUSTRATION (ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN HOWARD)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 4 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 30, 2007 Sunday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

The Blush Of the New
BYLINE: By LEE SIEGEL.
                                                                                                                         Page 8
                         The Blush Of the New The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


    Lee Siegel's ''Against the Machine: Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob'' will be published next month.

SECTION: Section 7; Column 0; Book Review Desk; Pg. 8

LENGTH: 3082 words

    MODERNISM
      The Lure of Heresy From Baudelaire to Beckett and Beyond.
      By Peter Gay.
      Illustrated. 610 pp. W. W. Norton & Company. $35.
      Thomas Mann was an archmodernist, and this was his favorite story: One day, Gustave Flaubert was out walking
with his sister. Ferociously antibourgeois, Flaubert lived alone, unconsoled and unencumbered by marriage or family.
His novels mocked and maligned the French middle class, ironizing it into oblivion. He was a great frequenter of broth-
els and had fornicated his way through Paris and Cairo. And yet here he was out for a stroll, suddenly stopping in his
tracks before a small house surrounded by a white picket fence.
      In the yard, a solid middle-class father played with his typical middle-class children while wife and mother looked
lovingly on. The enemy! Yet instead of holding his nose, Flaubert gestured toward the house and exclaimed, without
irony: ''Ils sont dans le vrai!'' (''They are in the truth!'') For Mann, the delightful incident illustrated the tension between
the outrage at conventional life and the yearning to be part of it that tore at modernist psyches. There is more to aesthet-
ic rebellion than offends the eye.
      Surprisingly, the anecdote doesn't appear in Peter Gay's ''Modernism: The Lure of Heresy,'' a massive history of
the movement in all its artistic forms -- painting, sculpture, fiction, poetry, music, architecture, design, film (though,
bafflingly, not photography, one of the chief catalysts of the modernist revolution). It's all the more surprising because I
once heard Gay cite Flaubert's droll little stroll in a lecture, after which he brilliantly analyzed the episode's every para-
doxical nuance.
        If anyone is aware of the complexity of modernist attitudes, it is Peter Gay. He is the country's pre-eminent cultur-
al historian and the author of masterpieces of social and intellectual reimagining including ''The Enlightenment,''
''Weimar Culture,'' ''Freud'' and the towering multi-volume study ''The Bourgeois Experience.'' Such achievements make
it all the more dismaying to find that in this rich, learned, briskly written, maddening yet necessary study, Gay's formi-
dable syntheses often run aground on lapses of knowledge and judgment.
       Gay's new book is the only one I'm aware of that tries to make sense of modernism in all its incarnations. Gay
takes up his subject from the outset of the movement in the late 19th century to what he considers its continued vitality
after World War II and its eventual death and possible resurrection in our own time. This comprehensiveness makes
''Modernism'' essential, especially for the general reader who wants to get a handle on Western culture's most enigmatic
phase. (A gift of this book and ''The Rest Is Noise,'' Alex Ross's magisterial history of modern music, would equal about
three years of college.) But unlike Henry Moore's giant sculptures, in which negative space plays a positive role, Gay's
omissions and miscomprehensions cry out to be filled in and corrected. And yet, at times, the book is so nimbly erudite
that its stubborn flaws make it all the more richly challenging.
       For example, Gay knows that the image of the modernist as committed subverter of custom and convention is
hackneyed. He writes in his introductory chapter that the idea of modernists as ''scofflaws or mavericks massed against
the solid verities of time-honored high culture and, usually, Christian faith'' is one of the avant-garde's ''cherished fairy
tales.'' The Impressionists, for instance, didn't care a whit about outraging official culture, or Christianity. But because
Gay needs the ''lure of heresy'' to thematically structure his book, he often ends up not just reinforcing the caricature of
modernists as unhappy outsiders and elitist malcontents, but inflating it.
       It is almost as if Gay were perversely determined to undermine his own profound awareness of modernism's mul-
tifaceted and contradictory nature. On the one hand he astutely writes, ''The sources of the modernist rebellion in the
arts rose from all quarters of the political, intellectual and emotional world.'' On the other he speaks of ''two essentially
distinct areas of art, high art and low, which modernists had thought it crucial to keep apart.'' But it was the modernists
who brought the energy of everyday life into high art! Think of the scraps of newspapers and advertisements in the col-
                                                                                                                       Page 9
                        The Blush Of the New The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


lages of Picasso and Braque; of the parodic newspaper headlines and the music hall ditties in Joyce's ''Ulysses''; of Leo-
pold Bloom wiping himself with a newspaper in the notorious book that appalled Virginia Woolf (and delighted T. S.
Eliot); or of the Dadaists' total collapse of serious art into the quotidian, or Mahler's quotations of nursery rhymes or
Stravinsky's saxophones -- the list of the modernists' elitist democratizations is interminable.
       What a relief it is to read Gay debunking the myth of Kafka the grim depressive with a description of friends who
''laughed heartily'' when Kafka read drafts to them. Kafka's fiction is about the comedy of sexual frustration and the
humor of competitive paranoia, among other things. What really broke up Kafka's friends was the first sentence of ''The
Trial'': ''Someone must have slandered Josef K., for one morning, without having done anything truly wrong, he was
arrested.'' Neurotic guilt was their collective metier.
      Yet although Gay writes beautifully about Kafka, about Proust on grief, about authentic middle-class hunger for
modernist liberations and about the final scene of recognition and unspeakable shame in Chaplin's ''City Lights'' -- to
take just four examples among many -- he seems to find it more useful to traffic in cardboard simplicities. There are a
disconcerting number of these.
      Gauguin did not, for example, abruptly quit his job as a stockbroker in Paris, as both popular legend and Gay
would have it. He was fired by his firm, which had just gone under. You might say it was respectable society that had
sacrificed Gauguin to the bottom line running just underneath bourgeois rhetoric about compassion and decency. No
wonder the artist took off for what seemed to be the primitive explicitness of Tahiti.
      Nor did the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch pay, as Gay writes, ''the usual price'' for his unsettling innovations.
Munch was not doomed to ''being misunderstood, neglected, rejected,'' or to enjoying only ''occasional appreciation.'' He
sold his first paintings at age 18 and three years later was invited to exhibit in the Norwegian section of the World's Fair
in Antwerp. At 26 he had his first one-man show, hailed by prominent art critics; two years later, Norway's National
Gallery, the country's most prestigious art museum, purchased one of Munch's works. By the time he was 40, Munch
enjoyed international renown and the largesse of several wealthy patrons.
      And it's right for Gay to refer to Munch's countryman, the odd, fierce peasant novelist Knut Hamsun, as a public
admirer of the Nazis who wrote enthusiastically about them even as the Germans were occupying Norway. But it is
wrong for Gay not to add that during his one meeting with Hitler, Hamsun so aggressively pressed the Fuhrer to stop
executing Norwegian resistance fighters and to loosen his repressive hold on the country that Hitler loathed Hamsun for
his insolent disrespect.
       As for Gay's Parisian modernist ''outsiders,'' if the French provided the most extreme assaults on Western ration-
ality -- Rimbaud's ''disorientation of the senses,'' Andre Breton's celebration of primal instincts stored in the uncon-
scious, Andre Gide's enthusiasm for the ''motiveless'' crime, Antonin Artaud's ''Theater of Cruelty,'' Maurice Blanchot's
declaration of the death of the author -- the reason was simple. It was not that French conditions kept creating figures
resembling Baudelaire, about whom Gay histrionically writes that he was ''an outcast aware of his loneliness'' -- though,
as Gay admits, Baudelaire lived at the center of Parisian cultural energy. In France, civilization is invincible and eternal.
Its immutable stability makes opposition to it all the more cheerfully ferocious. You can hurl the most incredible rhetor-
ical and intellectual violence against French custom and convention and still have time for some conversation in the
cafe, un peu de vin, a delicious dinner and, of course, l'amour. And in the morning, you extricate yourself from such
sophisticated coddling -- the result of centuries of art and artifice -- and rush back to the theoretical barricades.
      But Gay, in thrall to Freud, prefers to root the modernists' adventures in family trauma. Baudelaire, he writes, suf-
fered a ''revolution at home'' after his father died and his mother married a ''dashing'' military officer. The poet and es-
sayist, Gay simplistically tells us, ''never quite worked through his expulsion from paradise.'' Yet you would think that
the author of the culture-shifting ''Fleurs du Mal,'' and of the equally seminal essay ''The Painter of Modern Life,'' had
worked his way through everything that required working through.
      In Charles Dickens's ''Little Dorrit,'' a shrewd entrepreneur constantly condescends to his inventor friend by
stressing what it pleases him to see as his friend's pathetically impractical maladaptation to life. In fact, the inventor is
fundamentally nothing of the kind. In a similar way, Gay falsely stresses the ''cherished fairy tale'' of modernist dark-
ness, depression and miserable discontent. But Dada, for instance, was not ''wholly negative,'' as Gay describes it, any
more than Munch or Kafka was wholly negative. Hannah Hoch's and Sophie Tauber's dolls and puppets, Duchamp's
optical illusions in the form of whimsical machines and especially the cool, broken harmonies of Kurt Schwitters's col-
lages and fantastical life-size constructions were all imbued with the positive spirit of humor and play.
                                                                                                                          Page 10
                         The Blush Of the New The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


       Even more radical are Gay's misperceptions of modernism's fundamental nature. It is not accurate to say, as Gay
does, that in modernist fiction, ''modernist mirrors reflected mainly the author.'' Joyce, Proust, Mann, Lawrence, Woolf,
Gide all wrote great realist novels that were as concerned with minutely noting the external world as with projecting
intensely personal visions of the world. Elsewhere, Gay seems to acknowledge this, too. About Baudelaire, he writes,
''Like the modernists who came after him, he was a realist with a difference.'' Perhaps Gay simply wants to say that
Baudelaire is a symbolist poet, and that surreal or highly subjective images coexist in his poetry alongside ''realist'' evo-
cations of mental states and physical reality. In any case, it would have been helpful for Gay to explain his nice phrase
''realist with a difference'' and then go on to apply it to his other modernists. But he never elaborates on the distinction
and never returns to it.
       On the disheartening conundrum of modernists and politics, Gay is at his most bewildering. He writes of
''liberalism, that fundamental principle of modernism.'' He seems to have momentarily forgotten that Yeats, Eliot,
Pound, Lawrence and Celine on the right, and Picasso, Gide, Breton and the Russian modernists (barely alluded to by
Gay) on the left, were about as far from liberalism as a Cubist painting is from an iPod -- not to mention the toxically
snobbish Woolf, who was neither right nor too much left. For Gay, reactionaries like Eliot and Hamsun were ''anti-
modern modernists.'' But he does not try to account for the fact that reactionaries like the Italian Futurists worshipped
modernity's speed and power. Nor does he grapple with what you might call hypermodernists: the utopian Russian
avant-garde, who, far from being political reactionaries, threw in their lot with the Bolsheviks.
       The question of why so many modernists were drawn to regimes that were sick parodies of the modernist quest for
transcendence and absolutes is unanswerable. But perhaps here is where some psychologizing could be useful. Perhaps
beleaguered by the mental burden of their intensely personal visions, the modernists looked at a totalitarian regime's
real-life version of their fanaticism and perfectionism and wearily exclaimed, ''They are in the truth!'' Thus they con-
trived the delusion that actual power made a home somewhere in the world for their solitary ideals. It could have been a
mental trick that protected their egos from mortal wounds.
      Gay traces the modernist impulse through the post-World War II period to our own time, where he finds it in the
work of Frank Gehry and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Yet he doesn't have much admiration for the postwar epoch. ''There
was much talent and little genius,'' he writes about the decades after 1945. Is it so, however, that T. S. Eliot and Wallace
Stevens ''produced no creditable heirs''? Not even W. H. Auden, who is not discussed by Gay? (''Lay your sleeping
head, my love / Human on my faithless arm'' -- in one stroke, Auden could invoke modernist despair and affirm human
hope.) But then, Gay never discusses Brecht's dramas, either, though those quintessentially modernist works changed
theater forever, especially in the '60s. Conversely, Gay's survey of postwar American art almost exclusively refers to the
intensely biased and partisan -- toward his own dubious theories, that is -- Clement Greenberg, which is like quoting a
Jesuit on the character and history of Protestantism.
      Indeed, Gay's inclusion of postwar art in a history of modernism makes little sense. Modernism was modernism
only when the rising foundations, beams and struts of modernity were still visible. Once modernity became an envelop-
ing condition, artists who were part of that condition -- from Pollock to Warhol, from Robbe-Grillet to Grass, from
Artaud to Pinter -- rebelled as much against modernist Prometheanism as against the modern inadequacies that pro-
voked it.
      The Abstract Expressionists' pure formalism was the end of the road for painting, not the exciting beginning of a
new frontier. Malevich, Kandinsky and Mondrian all thought they had embodied a universal spiritual language in aes-
thetic form. Rothko wanted only that his canvases make people cry. DeKooning painted his scary women to make
viewers laugh when they recalled Western art's idealizations of women. And Pollock wanted nothing specific at all --
Greenberg stuffed his theories into Pollock's mouth. After modernity's catastrophic climaxes -- the Holocaust, Stalin's
gulags, Hiroshima and Nagasaki -- postwar art aimed both to lower the boom on modernist euphoria and to ridicule
modernism's earnest despondency. Mann may not have been right when he wrote in his novel ''Doctor Faustus'' that
modernism could only produce works of art that parodied earlier epochs. But in our own time, we seem mostly to be
surrounded by art that parodies the various strains of modernism.
      For all that, it's painful to list the inadequacies in ''Modernism.'' Despite its failings, Gay's book touches on so
many relevant ideas and issues, subjects and themes, that it rouses us to a keen awareness of our own condition. Consid-
er the second part of his thesis. Gay argues that along with the ''lure of heresy,'' what characterized the modernist rebel-
lion was its ''celebration of subjectivity.'' If there's anything that speaks to us now, it is the question of the ''I,'' that bar-
bell of a pronoun that is so hard to lift in just the right expressive way. It is often provocative to watch Gay pursue mod-
ernist representations of the self.
                                                                                                                   Page 11
                        The Blush Of the New The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


      Yet you wish that in Gay's countless references to what he regards as the modernists' cultivation of inwardness, he
had made an important distinction between the modernists and the Romantics. It was the Romantics who stressed sub-
jectivity. By contrast, the modernists emphasized the idiosyncrasy of personal vision as a way to flee from subjectivity.
Knut Hamsun called this an ''unselfish inwardness.'' Gay means the same thing when he writes of ''disinterested
subjectivity'' in his discussion of ''Ulysses.'' But he never returns to the idea.
      The single reference Gay does make to Romantic inwardness occurs in the chapter on Baudelaire. It's anybody's
guess as to what Gay means when he writes that the most sophisticated Romantics rejected ''unchecked subjectivity.''
Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Goethe in ''Werther'' -- all these ''sophisticated'' Romantic au-
thors were, by the standards of their age, ''unchecked'' in their subjective outpourings. But Gay seems to think it was the
Romantics, not the modernists, who restrained their introspections.
       On the contrary. Every modern revolution finds its point of resistance in the personal experience of those in revolt
-- that is, in a heightened subjectivity. The Romantics substituted genius and unique personality for aristocratic birth-
right and class, thus giving birth to the bourgeoisie. As Rousseau famously wrote, ''I feel my heart, and therefore I know
humankind.'' But by the time the modernists came along, the bourgeoisie had conventionalized Romantic individualism
into the petty assertions of ego.
      And so the modernists sought to replace personality. They dissolved it in an impersonal creative vision that was
nevertheless uniquely individual. Unselfish inwardness. When Eliot wrote that poetry was ''not the expression of per-
sonality, but an escape from personality,'' he was thinking along Hamsun's lines. ''The Wasteland'' doesn't tell us any-
thing specific about Eliot's personality, but it could have been produced only by Eliot's personality. To put it another
way, the Romantics exalted the self, but the modernists exalted the idiosyncratic -- the intensely individualistic -- escape
from self.
      Perhaps the bourgeoisie's origins as the revolutionary class account for its facile assimilations of cultural subver-
sions. Throughout his book, Gay marvels at the middle class's capacity to absorb its adversaries. It's an old story. But
there is a difference between Artaud and HBO. We have exhausted Romantic individualism, and we have twisted the
uniquely individual, modernist escape from the self into ''self-expression.'' Expression is everywhere nowadays, but true
art has grown indistinct and indefinable. We seem now to be living in a world where everyone has an artistic tempera-
ment -- emotive and touchy, cold and self-obsessed -- yet few people have the artistic gift. We are all outsiders, and we
are all living in our own truth.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: BOOK REVIEWS (90%); NOVELS & SHORT STORIES (77%); MARRIAGE (76%); WRITERS &
WRITING (76%); HISTORY (70%); SCULPTURE (69%); PHOTOGRAPHY (69%); POETRY (64%); PAINTING
(64%); WORLD WAR II (50%)

COMPANY: W W NORTON & CO INC (91%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS511130 BOOK PUBLISHERS (91%); SIC5192 BOOKS, PERIODICALS, & NEWSPAPERS
(91%); SIC2732 BOOK PRINTING (91%); SIC2731 BOOKS: PUBLISHING, OR PUBLISHING & PRINTING
(91%)

GEOGRAPHIC: PARIS, FRANCE (57%) FRANCE (57%)

LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Clockwise from above: Le Corbusier brought a modernist sensibility to architecture, Flaubert to
the novel and Baudelaire to poetry. (PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: KEYSTONE/CORBIS
HULTON-DEUTSCH COLLECTION/CORBIS
 STAPLETON COLLECTION/CORBIS)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Review
                                                                                                                      Page 12
                        The Blush Of the New The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday




PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 5 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 30, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

BYLINE: By CATHLEEN SHINE

SECTION: Section 6; Column 0; Magazine; MADELEINE STERN B. 1912; Pg. 36

LENGTH: 917 words

    Madeleine Stern was a renowned antiquarian book dealer, but her most important discovery was not a book at all. It
was a series of lurid stories, all published in gaudy popular journals, all written under a pseudonym, all by New Eng-
land's fresh and hearty Louisa May Alcott.
      During her lifetime, the last vestiges of Victorianism gave way to modernism, to pop, to postmodernism. Cars re-
placed horses. Television, computers, cellphones, the Internet all came to conquer the world she grew up in. She trav-
eled to Europe just before World War II and after. Revolutions came, and revolutions went. But Stern barely registered
these changes, for she was creating her own revolution.
     Stern invented herself. She was the Gatsby of pedants. A fervent but utterly apolitical feminist in a world where
feminists were bluestockings and then bra burners; a devoted scholar with a thriving business in a world where scholars
were either academics or independently wealthy gentlemen; an innovative and revered entrepreneur in the leather-
armchair world of gentlemen antiquarian book dealers; unmarried in a world where women were wives, Stern lived in a
universe in which it was not possible to live the way she wanted to. She simply ignored that impossibility, created her
own universe and, in a small but exquisite way, changed the world.
       Stern saw herself quite explicitly as a ''pioneer,'' and perhaps that gentler, old-fashioned word better describes the
tenor of her life and her achievements than ''revolutionary'' does. Raised as the pampered daughter of well-off German
Jews long established in America, she attended Barnard and met Leona Rostenberg, the person who was to become her
partner in the rare-books business and in life. After reading Stern's two books of memoirs, it is difficult to think of her
without Rostenberg -- perhaps because even in this most individual of all genres, the autobiography, the two women
were together. They wrote ''Bookends'' and ''Old Books, Rare Friends'' as joint ventures. They were firm and emphatic
that what they shared was love, and that their love was platonic, but as the titles suggest, they saw their lives as one.
''Our lives are our legacy, and it is a legacy dominated by the first-person plural.''
       Stern and Rostenberg wrote biographies, scholarly studies and histories -- both together and separately -- but their
greatest art was not writing. (The style, both stiff and florid, has the static, decorative quality of good wallpaper rather
than of literature.) They worshiped books, and both had an encyclopedic knowledge that allowed them to discover rare
volumes others had overlooked. But their art was not reading, or even ''sleuthing,'' as they sometimes called their literary
digging. The two ladies, living and working out of Rostenberg's childhood house in the Bronx, were like great hip-hop
D.J.'s, energetic, imaginative artists of sampling. The most personal and inspired art they created were catalogs -- bril-
liant, fascinating, scholarly, witty, inspiring, utterly original catalogs of old and rare books. They saw connections that
others missed.
                                                                                                                   Page 13
                                   The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


      Instead of just listing the books they were selling, they had the vision to see the patterns their stock formed. When
the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth was celebrated and they had no rare Shakespeare volumes, they designed a
catalog of books published in each year of Shakespeare's life. Every book was captioned with a quotation from a Shake-
speare play. ''Under the date 1566, and under the caption 'O brave new world,' we offered Sir Thomas More's Latin
works, including the ''Utopia''; under the date 1587, we described an oration on the death of Francesco de Medici, head-
ed with the quotation 'Good-night, sweet prince,' '' they wrote in ''Old Books, Rare Friends.''
       What brought these remarkable women to the attention of the world outside rare-book collectors -- there has even
been a musical based on their lives -- was their joint discovery regarding Louisa May Alcott. Scholars had long suspect-
ed that the potboiler blood-and-thunder stories written by Jo March in ''Little Women'' reflected real-life sensational
stories written by Alcott in her constant early attempts to earn money for her bankrupt family. But no one had ever iden-
tified these stories. Until Stern and Rostenberg got on the case. It was Rostenberg who discovered Alcott's pseudonym
(A. M. Barnard), giving a war whoop in a silent Harvard library where the two sat doing their research side by side. And
it was Stern who uncovered many of the stories after an exhaustive search through the trashy periodicals of the day like
The Flag of Our Union and Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. Stern eventually edited three editions of these stories
of murder, adultery and incest written by pink-cheeked America's most beloved 19th-century authoress.
      In one of their memoirs, they wrote: ''We still end each other's sentences. Together we look to the future -- to our
next find, to our next book, to our next adventure.'' The authors were 84 and 87. Leona Rostenberg, the elder, died in
2005 at 96. And now her faithful friend is gone, too. But they have left a legacy, and it is more than their discoveries
and innovations in their antiquarian book dealings. It is more even than their important discoveries and scholarship re-
garding printing, early American literature and Louisa May Alcott. They have, as they predicted, left behind perhaps the
rarest legacy of all: that of the first-person plural.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: BOOKSTORES (90%); BIOGRAPHICAL LITERATURE (89%); PROFILES & BIOGRAPHIES (89%);
ANTIQUE DEALERS (78%); LITERATURE (78%); WRITERS & WRITING (78%); JOINT VENTURES (63%);
WORLD WAR II (55%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (50%) NORTHEAST USA (88%); NEW YORK, USA (50%) UNITED
STATES (88%); EUROPE (57%); GERMANY (57%)

LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                6 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                               December 30, 2007 Sunday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

SECTION: Section 11; Column 0; Real Estate Desk; CORRECTION; Pg. 2

LENGTH: 33 words
                                                                                                                     Page 14
                                    The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


   The Streetscapes column on Dec. 23, about 78th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues, misspelled the given
name of the advertising entrepreneur who built 6 East 78th. He was Artemas Ward, not Artemus.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Correction

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 7 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 30, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

BYLINE: By REBECCA JOHNSON

SECTION: Section 6; Column 0; Magazine; LIZ CLAIBORNE B. 1929; Pg. 22

LENGTH: 913 words

     Pants, shirt, jacket. No big deal -- now. But back in the early 1970s, before Liz Claiborne became a household
name, that outfit was not much of an option for women. Out in the world, you wore a dress or a skirt with a matching
jacket. At home, you wore slacks or a housedress. You could be dressed up or dressed down, in other words, but
''separates,'' as the fashion industry calls the way women now dress, had yet to become a phenomenon. Until Liz.
       As with many figures at the center of a paradigm shift, Claiborne was in the right place at the right time. ''I can't
tell you we were smart enough back then to say, 'American women are about to join the work force in record numbers,
and they're going to need something to wear,' '' admits Jerry Chazen, one of Claiborne's original partners. ''But there was
a busy lady who needed something to wear. We saw a niche.''
      Claiborne understood that niche because she was a busy lady needing something to wear. A Belgian-born high-
school dropout who spoke with a kind of accent Americans usually identify as ''grand'' -- ''turquoise'' was ter-kwaz --
Claiborne began her career as a sketcher and a dress model on Seventh Avenue and worked her way up to designer. Her
parents were so opposed to her career choice that her father, a banker, dropped her off on a corner in New York City,
handed her $50 and did not speak to her for 20 years. On an interview for a job, Claiborne met the fashion executive Art
Ortenberg, and although they were both married to other people at the time, they ended up married to each other shortly
thereafter, beginning a lifelong collaboration. Within seven months of starting (along with a handful of investors) Liz
Claiborne Inc., they were in the black, an unheard-of feat on Seventh Avenue.
       ''We started out in the same building,'' says the designer Stan Herman, who was president of the Council of Fash-
ion Designers of America for 16 years. ''I watched her take the fifth floor, then the sixth floor, then the seventh. Finally,
they had to move to a new building.'' The company went public in 1981. Five years later it made the Fortune 500, the
first company founded by a woman to do so.
                                                                                                                     Page 15
                                    The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


       It's not that other companies weren't making clothes for working women. But the clothes they were making looked
remarkably similar to the clothes men were wearing -- conservative blue or camel's-hair jackets, blouses with bow ties.
The message was clear: I may be a woman, but don't worry, I'm not that different from you. Claiborne's clothes were
actually quite ordinary -- high-waisted pants that flared at the bottom, long-sleeved button-down shirts. The revolution
was in the details. A talented seamstress herself, she cared a great deal about fit and comfort. ''She was a pear-shaped
woman,'' says Chazen, ''who knew how to design for women, most of whom are also pear-shaped.'' She was also one of
the first to design in color -- bright red, yellow and royal blue, the colors female politicians still wear when they want to
be taken seriously. Nor did she focus on the East Coast sophisticate. ''She also designed for the woman in Dallas, where
the light was different,'' says her design protegee Dana Buchman.
       Claiborne also revolutionized the way clothes were sold. Back then, department stores displayed pants with pants,
shirts with shirts. She introduced the concept of ''outfits.'' Liz Claiborne pants were sold next to Liz Claiborne shirts
with all the dye lots coordinated to match. The innovations made Claiborne a star with a certain generation. ''Traveling
with her in those days was like traveling with a rock star,'' Buchman says. ''Women were so grateful to her for these
clothes.''
     As it happened, Claiborne did not have the personality of a rock star. Sensing the beginning of what is now the
global business of branding, her partners pushed her to become more of a public persona. ''We didn't need to spend
money on advertising,'' Chazen says, ''because all the magazines wanted to write about Liz or have her clothes in their
magazine.'' But in a business of big egos and flashy personalities, Claiborne was a shy person who preferred staying at
home to going out at night. ''You never saw Liz at the parties,'' Stan Herman says. ''She was like Garbo.''
      As the business got bigger and bigger -- today Liz Claiborne Inc. is a $5-billion-a-year company and owns the
brands Juicy Couture, Lucky Brand Jeans, Dana Buchman, Kate Spade and Ellen Tracy, among others -- she grew more
and more miserable. ''I found myself spending my whole day in elevators,'' she once lamented in an interview. ''Liz was
a lovely person,'' Chazen says. ''That was one of the problems with her being a manager. She didn't know how to say
something was terrible, because she knew how hard those designers had worked.''
       In 1989, Claiborne and her husband resigned from the company they started, liquidated their stock and began
making grants to wildlife-preservation groups. To date, their foundation has given $40 million away. In this, she was
also ahead of her time. ''The fashion industry hadn't always been good at giving back,'' Herman says. ''She was among
the first.'' In 2000, the C.F.D.A. recognized that generosity with their Humanitarian Award. Even though the cancer that
would eventually kill her was diagnosed three years earlier, Claiborne showed up to accept the award. That night, the
woman who built a multibillion-dollar industry on clothes made of bright, happy colors wore black.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: WOMEN (90%); FASHION DESIGNERS (90%); FASHION & APPAREL (89%); WOMEN WORKERS
(77%); FASHION ACCESSORIES (76%); INTERVIEWS (69%); EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS (68%); ENTRE-
PRENEURSHIP (65%)

COMPANY: LIZ CLAIBORNE INC (64%)

TICKER: LIZ (NYSE) (64%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS448120 WOMEN'S CLOTHING STORES (85%); NAICS424320 MEN'S & BOYS' CLOTHING
& FURNISHINGS MERCHANT WHOLESALERS (85%); NAICS315234 WOMEN'S & GIRLS' CUT & SEW SUIT,
COAT, TAILORED JACKET & SKIRT MANUFACTURING (85%); NAICS315233 WOMEN'S & GIRLS' CUT &
SEW DRESS MANUFACTURING (85%); NAICS315232 WOMEN'S & GIRLS' CUT & SEW BLOUSE & SHIRT
MANUFACTURING (85%); NAICS315224 MEN'S & BOYS' CUT & SEW TROUSER, SLACK & JEAN MANU-
FACTURING (85%); NAICS315223 MEN'S & BOYS' CUT & SEW SHIRT (EXCEPT WORK SHIRT) MANUFAC-
TURING (85%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (56%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (79%) NEW YORK, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (91%)
                                                                                                                     Page 16
                                    The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Claiborne: champion of the busy lady. (PHOTOGRAPH FROM LIZ CLAIBORNE INC.)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 8 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 30, 2007 Sunday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

The Free Market: A False Idol After All?
BYLINE: By PETER S. GOODMAN

SECTION: Section 4; Column 0; Week in Review Desk; IDEAS & TRENDS; Pg. 4

LENGTH: 1414 words

     FOR more than a quarter-century, the dominant idea guiding economic policy in the United States and much of the
globe has been that the market is unfailingly wise. So wise that the proper role for government is to steer clear and not
mess with the gusher of wealth that will flow, trickling down to the every level of society, if only the market is left to do
its magic.
      That notion has carried the day as industries have been unshackled from regulation, and as taxes have been rolled
back, along with the oversight powers of government. Faith in markets has held sway as insurance companies have
fended off calls for more government-financed health care, and as banks have engineered webs of finance that have
turned houses from mere abodes into assets traded like dot-com stocks.
     But lately, a striking unease with market forces has entered the conversation. The world confronts problems of
staggering complexity and consequence, from a shortage of credit following the mortgage meltdown, to the threat of
global warming. Regulation -- nasty talk in some quarters, synonymous with pointy-headed bureaucrats choking the
market -- is suddenly being demanded from unexpected places.
      The Bush administration and the Federal Reserve have in recent weeks put aside laissez-faire rhetoric to wade into
real estate, wielding new rules and deals they say are necessary to protect Americans from predatory bankers -- the
same bankers who, only a year ago, were being lauded for creativity. Were the market left to its own devices, millions
could lose their homes, the administration now says.
       Central banks on both sides of the Atlantic are coordinating campaigns to flush cash through the global economy,
lest frightened lenders hoard capital and suffocate growth. In Bali this month, world leaders gathered in the name of
striking agreement to slow climate change.
      Adam Smith used the metaphor of the invisible hand to describe how markets should function: With everyone at
liberty to pursue self-interest, the market omnisciently distributes goods and capital to maximize the benefits for all.
                                                                                                                     Page 17
              The Free Market: A False Idol After All? The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


Since the Reagan administration, that idea has weighed in as a veritable holy commandment, with the economist Milton
Friedman cast as Moses.
      As the cold war ended and Communism retreated, the invisible hand seemed to monopolize economic thinking.
Even China, controlled by a nominally Communist party, has blessed private entrepreneurs and foreign investment. In
Latin America, the International Monetary Fund financed governments that embraced market forces while shunning
those that were resistant.
      But now the invisible hand is being asked to account for what it has wrought. In this country, many economic
complaints -- from the widening gap between rich and poor to the expense of higher education -- are being dusted for its
fingerprints.
       After two decades of disappointing economic growth, several Latin American countries have spurned the I.M.F.
while embracing the finance and thinking of Venezuela's avowedly Socialist leader, Hugo Chavez. China's leaders,
though still devoted to ''reform and opening,'' are keeping tight control on the value of the currency while steering capi-
tal to powerful state-owned companies, concerned that freer markets could throw millions of peasants out of work.
      Throughout history, regulation has tended to gain favor on the heels of free enterprise run amok. The monopolistic
excesses of the Robber Barons led to antitrust laws. Not by accident did strict new accounting rules follow the unmask-
ing of fraud at Enron and WorldCom. Now, the subprime fiasco and a still unfolding wave of home foreclosures are
prompting many to call for new rules.
      ''We're revisiting the question of market flows with a deservedly wary eye,'' said Jared Bernstein, senior economist
at the liberal Economic Policy Institute in Washington. ''For decades, economists and political elites have argued that
any time you regulate any aspect of the economy, you're slipping the handcuffs on the invisible hand. That's demonstra-
bly wrong in lots of ways.''
      But if markets can inflict pain, the harm from trying to tame them is often worse, argue those who would let the
invisible hand carry on. The new regulatory tilt threatens to tie up innovation in a straitjacket of bureaucratic nannying
while slowing the global economy, they say.
      ''Every regulation reduces people's freedom,'' said David R. Henderson, a libertarian economist at Stanford Uni-
versity's Hoover Institution. ''The more regulation we get, the worse we do.''
      Mr. Henderson is critical of the Bush administration's effort to freeze mortgage rates, and the new rules proposed
by the Fed intended to curb nefarious lending. They undermine the sanctity of contracts, he said, while making mort-
gages harder to gain for everyone.
       ''The way they justify it is that you've got to protect the stupid people who can't read a contract,'' Mr. Henderson
said. ''But they're treating everyone as stupid.''
      But in Washington, and under the roofs of many homes now worth less than a year ago, there appears to be a shift
in the nation's often-ambivalent attitude about regulation.
      Back in the boom, banks made loans to homeowners who did not have to prove their ability to pay, then quickly
sold the loans to other companies. By the time it emerged that a lot of homeowners could not pay, these loans had been
pooled with other loans and chopped into strange new paper assets that were sold to unsuspecting buyers around the
globe. The subsequent reckoning has forced major banks to write off vast sums of money.
        ''Here you had all these people who were supposed to be sophisticated investors, and it turns out they were buying
billions of dollars worth of debt where they didn't even understand what they owned,'' said Dean Baker, co-director of
the liberal Center for Economic and Policy Research. ''There is going to be a willingness to re-regulate financial mar-
kets.''
      Liberal critics have long asserted that dogmatic devotion to market forces has skewed American society toward
those of greatest means. More wealth is being concentrated in fewer hands, with rich people capturing the best housing,
private education and health care services, and, as the argument goes, only crumbs left for everyone else.
      That critique informs proposals from Democrats vying for the presidency, as they debate how best to expand ac-
cess to health care and ways to shift the tax burden to the rich. They are in essence calling for market intervention to
redress imbalances. With the gap between the richest and poorest now greater than it has been since the 1920s, these
pitches have emerged as central components of their campaigns
                                                                                                                   Page 18
                The Free Market: A False Idol After All? The New York Times December 30, 2007 Sunday


        More notable, though, is how fervent proponents of unfettered market forces have lately come to embrace regula-
tion.
     The Bush administration, in seeking to freeze mortgage rates for some homeowners, put Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson Jr. in charge of the campaign. Mr. Paulson not long ago ran the Wall Street giant Goldman Sachs. Now, he is
demanding that banks accept smaller payments than promised, while describing the market as a fallible thing in need of
supervision.
      ''The government acted to prevent a market failure and to try to avoid unnecessary harm,'' he said at a public meet-
ing in California.
     More than a decade ago, when Bill Clinton occupied the White House, he pushed through the landmark North
American Free Trade Agreement, which linked the fortunes of Mexico and the United States. But if his wife or one of
her Democratic rivals captures the White House next year, they promise a more skeptical look at trade deals.
      Some argue that the push back against market forces is a momentary pause in a steady march toward unfettered
capitalism. The libertarian Cato Institute recently issued a report in which it found that economic freedom -- shorthand
for smaller government and fewer regulations -- has never been greater.
     ''Global economic growth significantly increases with the growth of the world's economic freedom,'' said Ian
Vasquez, director of Cato's center for global liberty and prosperity.
     Few policymakers have a beef with that characterization as a generality. But when things go wrong, demands
grow for the government to step in and make them right.
       ''Untethered market forces lead to bad things,'' said Mr. Bernstein of the Economic Policy Institute. ''You simply
can't run an economy as complicated as ours on ideology alone.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: BANKING & FINANCE (90%); US FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (90%); PUBLIC POLICY (90%);
ECONOMIC POLICY (89%); ECONOMIC NEWS (89%); SOCIAL JUSTICE (89%); AGENCY RULEMAKING
(78%); ECONOMIC GROWTH (78%); CENTRAL BANKS (74%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (74%); INSURANCE
(73%); INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (73%); FOREIGN INVESTMENT (73%); ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
(73%); GLOBALIZATION (72%); POLITICAL PARTIES (72%); EMERGING MARKETS (72%); GLOBAL
WARMING (67%); REAL ESTATE (67%); COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES (50%); CREDIT CRISIS (73%); COLD
WAR (78%)

COMPANY: CNINSURE INC (83%)

TICKER: CISG (NASDAQ) (83%)

PERSON: ADAM SMITH (53%)

GEOGRAPHIC: UNITED STATES (94%); LATIN AMERICA (92%); SOUTH AMERICA (79%); VENEZUELA
(79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: DRAWING (DRAWING BY STEPHEN SAVAGE)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                                     Page 19
              Instant Fortunes, and Sudden Headaches The New York Times December 29, 2007 Saturday




                                                 9 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 29, 2007 Saturday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Instant Fortunes, and Sudden Headaches
BYLINE: By CAITLIN KELLY

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; YOUR MONEY; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1082 words

    So what would you do if you got your wish and suddenly came into a lot of money -- by winning the lottery, per-
haps, or getting a six-figure insurance settlement or a long-awaited inheritance? Financial freedom, right?
      Ken Jennings, a 33-year-old former software engineer who earned more than $2.5 million by winning 74 consecu-
tive games on ''Jeopardy'' in 2004, says it is not that simple.
      ''For a long time, I was paralyzed,'' he said. ''I didn't know what to do. I was depositing a $1.5 million check into
an account that had never had more than $5,000 in it.'' What he did was quit his job. Eighteen months later, he moved
his family from Salt Lake City to a larger home in the more expensive city of Seattle, bought a widescreen television
and has become an author and developer of board games. Initially, he said, ''it was a very lonely feeling. I was getting
junk mail from all over the world and begging letters.''
      He added: ''For a lot of people, the money is the end. But that's just the beginning. You need to decide what your
goal is and stick to it.''
      Laurel Touby, 44, an entrepreneur based in New York City, made her money last summer by selling
mediabistro.com, a Web site for job-seeking media and creative professionals that she had founded in 1996. She sold it
for $23 million -- leaving $9 million to $11 million, she said, in her bank account after taxes. One of her concerns, she
said, was losing friendships. ''I've tried to be really direct, and I try to be really sensitive to their needs,'' she said.
''Otherwise you do have a separation and scare people off.''
     Like Mr. Jennings, Ms. Touby and her husband, Jon Fine, a journalist, are feeling their way in an unfamiliar new
world of money with little guidance.
      ''I had all kinds of illusions about how far the money would go and what I would enjoy, but they're not true,'' Ms.
Touby said. ''I thought, 'O.K., a car and driver and a new apartment and a whole new life.' In fact, I can only afford two
out of three.''
      She said she interviewed 20 wealthy people for advice and quickly found out about the deep divide between the
truly wealthy -- for whom private jets are the norm -- and people in her new station.
     Robert Frank, a columnist for The Wall Street Journal who wrote the book ''Richistan: A Journey Through the
American Wealth Boom and the Lives of the New Rich'' (Crown, 2007), drew the same dividing line as Ms. Touby.
From 1995 to 2003, the number of millionaire households more than doubled to more than eight million, he wrote in
his book, with many of those households worth far more than $10 million.
     For people who did not grow up wealthy, suddenly having to figure out how to conserve and build on a seven- or
even eight-figure windfall is not easy. Nor is it easy to find smart, solid advice for handling it.
     ''If you have list of 10 things you think you'll be able to do with all your money, you'll only be able to do two,''
Ms. Touby said. ''There's a knockdown period when the accountants tell you what's really possible.'' She remains de-
                                                                                                                   Page 20
              Instant Fortunes, and Sudden Headaches The New York Times December 29, 2007 Saturday


termined to buy a Manhattan loft apartment, which will consume half her money, and must still earn $100,000 a year to
maintain it, she said.
      Elwood Bartlett, a 41-year-old accountant in Westminster, Md., won $84 million in a lottery last summer -- $33
million after taxes. He gave away $200,000 to the Special Olympics while fending off hundreds of strangers pleading
for his aid or investment.
      ''I went from being 'Elwood Bartlett the individual' to 'the corporation''' he said. He incorporated himself to gain
protection from a frivolous lawsuit. ''Someone could see my face on TV and walk in front of my car,'' he said.
      Mr. Bartlett's wealth has allowed him access to investments available only to those with $2 million to $5 million,
like certain hedge funds. ''I've bought a number of properties and I've made some opportunities for people,'' he said. He
has hired a full-time personal trainer, property manager and personal assistant, paying each an annual salary, with health
benefits, of $30,000 to $60,000.
      Mary Sue Donohue, a lawyer in Boca Raton, Fla., who has specialized in wills, trusts and estates for 25 years,
advises caution. Many of the newly wealthy immediately want a larger house, she said. ''It's a pattern we regularly see,
and it's not a wise choice. It's not necessary -- they already have a place to live.''
     Ms. Donohue advises clients to spend 5 to 10 percent at once, to have a little fun. ''For anyone with a net worth of
$250,000 or less, a windfall can be a real shock,'' she said.
       Patricia MacGregor, of Wellington, Fla., who has written 26 thrillers as T. J. MacGregor, used a $100,000 inher-
itance to pay down credit card debt and buy her daughter a used car. She put the rest into certificates of deposit earning
5 percent. Ms. MacGregor, whose husband, Rob MacGregor, is also an author, said the money ''basically made life easi-
er,'' adding, ''We have no steady income so if we have a slow year,'' interest income on what is left can help pay the
bills.
      A windfall need not be six figures to make a difference. Janice Moore, for instance, ended up with $8,000 by sell-
ing a rare Beatles album. Her copy of ''Yesterday and Today,'' which she bought in 1966 at a Sears store, bore the
''butcher'' cover that had been recalled by the record company. She had not paid it much attention until a relative men-
tioned a couple years ago that the album might be worth a lot of money.
     Experts on ''Antiques Roadshow'' on PBS confirmed that the record was valuable. She spent half the proceeds
from the sale on repairing her roof and the rest on her first trip to Europe, including a walk on Abbey Road, made fa-
mous by another Beatles album.
     Initially, conceded Ms. Moore, an administrative assistant in Schaumburg, Ill., ''I didn't know what to do with it.''
     For those who had gotten much more money, investing in C.D.'s, mutual funds and real estate was attractive, but
making the bigger choices remained daunting, sometimes for months.
     Mr. Jennings said, ''The fun part for me was seeing my face with some seven-figure number below it,'' when he
was on ''Jeopardy.'' ''It was like playing Pac-Man. It never felt real, but when Alex Trebek pulled a seven-figure check
from his pocket, I almost fainted. It wasn't a video game score. I was now 'the millionaire guy.'''
     His advice now? ''Put your money somewhere not idiotic and leave it alone as much as possible.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: LOTTERIES (90%); WEALTHY PEOPLE (89%); JOURNALISM (73%); EMPLOYMENT (68%); EM-
PLOYMENT SEARCH (69%); COMPUTER SOFTWARE (77%)

COMPANY: WALL STREET JOURNAL (50%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (52%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (79%); SEATTLE, WA, USA (79%); SALT LAKE CITY, UT, USA (76%)
WASHINGTON, USA (79%); NEW YORK, USA (79%); UTAH, USA (76%) UNITED STATES (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2007
                                                                                                                      Page 21
              Instant Fortunes, and Sudden Headaches The New York Times December 29, 2007 Saturday




LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Elwood Bartlett in Mystickal Voyage, a shop in Nottingham, Md., in which he invested after
winning the lottery. (PHOTOGRAPH BY STEVE RUARK FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)
Ken Jennings, right, with the host of 'Jeopardy,' Alex Trebek. Mr. Jennings won more than $2.5 million on the game
show in 2004. (PHOTOGRAPH BY SONY PICTURES TELEVISION)(pg. C6)
 Janice Moore with a replica of a rare Beatles album that brought her $8,000. (PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER WYNN
THOMPSON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)(pg. C1)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 10 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 29, 2007 Saturday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

On the Streets and in the Police Stations, the Mayor of Newark Is on Patrol
BYLINE: By ANDREW JACOBS

SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1328 words

DATELINE: NEWARK

    Mayor Cory A. Booker bounded through the back door of a police station in the early-morning hours of Christmas
Eve. He did not come bearing holiday gifts.
       A desk sergeant stage-shouted ''Good evening, Mayor,'' and the half dozen officers who were preparing gear for
the lobster shift looked up with a start. After a round of greetings, Mr. Booker got down to work. He grilled command-
ing officers about a string of car thefts and armed robberies, asked why drug dealers were brazenly hawking their wares
at a nearby housing project, and then flipped through a ream of log sheets to see which patrol units were lagging in ar-
rests and summonses.
      As the officers lined up for roll call, Mr. Booker, dressed in a gray hooded sweat shirt, stood behind the front desk
and delivered a pep talk subtly laced with admonition. He praised them for their hard work and bravery -- and gave
thanks for an 11 percent drop in overall crime -- but suggested that some officers were less than industrious. ''We are on
the foothills of greatness, but there is still a big mountain to climb,'' he said, his voice filled with urgency. ''We need to
show the country what Newark can do. When you are between service calls, I need you to challenge the bad guys and
show them that they don't own the streets. Be aggressive, be hungry, make me proud.''
      It is a speech that Mr. Booker has been giving often in recent weeks as he roams the city in the middle of the night
to prod a department that, depending on the point of view, is either overworked and understaffed, or hamstrung by apa-
thy and complacency. With 2007 nearing its end, Mr. Booker has both eyes on the crime statistics that he knows will be
used to judge him and his 17-month-old mayoralty.
                                                                                                           Page 22
 On the Streets and in the Police Stations, the Mayor of Newark Is on Patrol The New York Times December 29, 2007
                                                        Saturday

      By most measures it has been a good year: There were 110 fewer shootings than in 2006, and a 12 percent in-
crease in arrests. But the figure that the public, the media and especially his enemies will latch onto, is the number of
homicides, which has been nearing the 106 of last year -- the most in the city since 1990. As of early Monday morning,
as Mr. Booker gave his speech, 96 people had been killed in Newark this year, a 9.4 percent decrease. Not bad, but still
tantalizingly short of the ''double-digit drop'' that public officials know sounds so compelling in a press release or a
stump speech.
      Mr. Booker has long understood that his efforts to heal this afflicted city will hinge on public safety, real or per-
ceived. He knows that the entrepreneurs, developers and middle-class taxpayers needed to revitalize the state's biggest
city will stay away as long as Newark remains a synonym for urban disorder.
      Soon after his election, he bucked the tradition of his predecessor by going outside Newark to hire Garry McCar-
thy, a veteran of the New York City Police Department, as his chief anticrime strategist. He also backed the aggressive
style of policing that many experts said led to the momentous drops in crime in cities like New York and Los Angeles.
But the mayor and his aides have been frustrated at times by the department they inherited from Sharpe James. Over the
years, a string of police chiefs and scores of the rank and file were tainted by corruption, which fed public mistrust.
      Fred Siegel, an urban historian at The Cooper Union, said Newark's crime-fighting prowess is limited by a lack of
professionalism and what he calls a deep provincialism that is suspicious of change, especially when it is wrought by
outsiders like Mr. McCarthy and Mr. Booker, who was raised in the suburbs. ''I suspect the continuous gains will de-
pend on the mayor's ability to not just implement these new policies but to upgrade the quality of the officers,'' said Mr.
Siegel, who frequently writes about big-city crime and the police.
      For the moment, Mr. Booker is also limited by budget constraints, which have forced him to pare about 270 peo-
ple from the municipal payroll. With another multimillion dollar shortfall looming, he has warned of more pain in 2008.
     In the past decade, manpower in the police department has fallen by about 700, to about 1,000 officers, although
Mr. Booker has promised to increase that number by about 200 next year, including a class of 84 that entered the acad-
emy last week.
      Not surprisingly, Mr. McCarthy, who often accompanies the mayor on his late-night rounds, is sanguine about the
future. He has spent much of the year trying to depoliticize the department while implementing Compstat, a system cre-
ated by the New York Police Department that focuses on quality-of-life infractions and quickly shifts resources to crime
hot spots. There have been other notable triumphs: the installation of a network of public cameras, the purchase of a
police helicopter and the creation of muscular narcotics units in each of the city's four precincts.
     ''Early on, we were reactionary; we weren't ready to fight crime the way we are now,'' Mr. McCarthy said. ''I think
we've finally set the foundation for the way things are supposed to be. Working hard is great, but you have to work
smart.''
       Derrick Hatcher, president of the Fraternal Order of Police, the city's main police union, said he appreciated Mr.
Booker's zeal, but he rejected suggestions that some officers were not working hard enough. ''These officers, as far as
I'm concerned, do a helluva job for less, and have been for years,'' he said. ''I'm sure there are questions from citizens
about why there are still guys on the corner selling drugs, but our officers are often busy responding to a high-priority
calls.''
       In making surprise visits to precincts and monitoring the city's 911 system, Mr. Booker says he has discovered
that there is plenty of downtime and that idle officers do not always go out of their way to ''challenge conditions,'' as he
puts it. From station visits, he will take home log sheets to be analyzed. When driving around with his security detail at
2 a.m., he will chastise a patrol unit for parking at a housing project instead of moving around. ''We have 10 to 20 per-
cent of cops who are killing us,'' he said after an officer at one precinct pulled him aside to privately complain about his
colleagues.
      He also likes to drop in at the city's communications center and look over the shoulder of officers who are scan-
ning images from 43 newly installed police cameras. During an ice storm two weeks ago, the backlog of calls was so
great that Mr. Booker called to apologize to people, including a woman whose driveway had been blocked by a parked
car for three hours. Last Sunday night, after giving a ride to two 13-year-old boys who were walking through a rough
neighborhood, he directed members of his security detail to pull over a car whose occupants may have been looking to
buy drugs. (The driver's license came back clean, ruling out a search.)
                                                                                                           Page 23
 On the Streets and in the Police Stations, the Mayor of Newark Is on Patrol The New York Times December 29, 2007
                                                        Saturday

      As it neared 3 a.m., Mr. Booker stopped into the South Ward precinct, the city's most bloody, and listened to a
team of plainclothes detectives complain about the lack of computers for writing out reports. ''I'll give you two comput-
ers, you give me a January without a murder,'' he said.
       As they drove home through deserted streets, Mr. Booker asked his driver to turn on the vehicle's flashers -- a
symbolic shout of law and order -- and talked about his hope that Newark might one day be spoken of as a success sto-
ry. ''We need to turn the corner next year, and in 2009 we have to sprint home,'' he said, his face streaked by blue and
red strobes. ''By 2010, people really have to get it, feel it.''
      He checked with dispatch one more time and was pleased to learn there were no calls waiting in the queue. ''It's so
quiet out here,'' he said before turning in. ''I guess it's Christmas.''
      But the quiet was not to last. A few hours later, a dispute outside a diner led to gunfire. A man died, another homi-
cide in Newark, No. 97. Now only an 8.5 percent drop from 2006.
     The count was the same as of Friday, with three days to go.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: POLICE FORCES (90%); CRIME RATE (89%); CITY GOVERNMENT (89%); CRIME STATISTICS
(75%); CITY LIFE (72%); VEHICLE THEFT (71%); STATISTICS (67%); ROBBERY (56%); CONTROLLED SUB-
STANCES CRIME (70%); CRIME RATES (89%); CHRISTMAS (78%); HOMICIDE (74%)

LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Cory A. Booker in the back seat as he cruises through Newark, checking up on the activity and
productivity of police officers. (PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT STOLARIK FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               11 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                               December 28, 2007 Friday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Custom Models That Fit All Needs
BYLINE: By CINDY HIRSCHFELD

SECTION: Section F; Column 0; Escapes; SKI REPORT; Pg. 2

LENGTH: 1138 words

    WORKING from his solar- and wind-powered workshop near Telluride, Colo., Pete Wagner has been turning out
custom-built skis since last year. A former designer of individualized golf equipment, Mr. Wagner adapted the software
model he had developed for golf so that it could parse what he calls skier DNA.
                                                                                                                    Page 24
                  Custom Models That Fit All Needs The New York Times December 28, 2007 Friday


      In goes information about your ability, terrain preferences, equipment choices, goals and other data gleaned from
an extensive questionnaire; out comes design recommendations for everything from ski geometry to materials. About
two weeks later, a pair of finished skis that Mr. Wagner guarantees will improve performance shows up on your door-
step, at a cost of about $1,600.
      Wagner Custom, which plans to make 1,000 pairs of skis in the next year, is one of at least two dozen boutique ski
makers in the United States, run by people who have a passion for skiing and an entrepreneurial bent. While ski manu-
facturing's major players continue to consolidate -- about a half-dozen companies own established brands like K2,
Rossignol and Salomon -- the independents go after underserved niche markets, from big-mountain skiers seeking su-
preme flotation in powder to nonconformists who want to stand out in the lift line.
       Companies like Armada and 4FRNT have been able to trade on the reputations of the pro skiers -- household
names among X Games and ski movie fans -- who started and run these companies to achieve market presence within
just a few years. Following in their tracks, so to speak, is a host of smaller ski makers offering specialized products:
plump-waisted powder skis (Fat-ypus), asymmetrical tails (Scotty Bob), a continuously curved base (Praxis) and car-
bon-fiber construction (DPS), to name a few. The skis can cost as much as $2,000, though most fall in the $500 to
$1,000 range.
      Alicia Allen, of the trade association SnowSports Industries America, said that roughly 22 boutique ski companies
have emerged in the past five years or so. The Web site Exoticskis.com, dedicated to tracking boutique ski makers
worldwide, lists even more. Some will never sell more than a few hundred pairs of skis a season, but all are committed
to providing fellow skiers -- and themselves -- with various versions of a dream ski.
      Dissatisfaction motivated Dan Chalfant and James Satloff to start Liberty Skis, now in Avon, Colo. ''You could
buy a typical all-mountain ski, or you could buy a twin tip that was just a noodle,'' Mr. Chalfant said. ''We wanted skis
that were performance-oriented twin tips.'' (Twin tips glide equally well forward and backward, a characteristic required
by skiers who use terrain parks and halfpipes, and land jumps all over the mountain.)
       Mr. Chalfant, who had managed ski-boot-fitting shops, and Mr. Satloff, with a background on Wall Street, started
their company five years ago on a gamble. Literally. At the ski industry's annual trade show in Las Vegas, Mr. Satloff
won enough money at the dice table to buy a ski-molding press.
      Liberty now has four models of twin-tip skis. Instead of traditional hardwood cores, the skis use bamboo, for its
elasticity and favorable strength-to-weight ratio. Sales have doubled annually for the past four years, Mr. Satloff said.
And a lack of brand recognition actually helps. ''The market for free-skiing is characterized by a somewhat rebellious
personality,'' he said. ''They don't want to be skiing on the same brand as their dad, or uncle or neighbor.''
      In the early to mid-1990s, dozens of independent snowboard manufacturers sprang up as the sport gained traction;
few survived. The current crop of ski makers, however, may fare better, thanks to Internet-based marketing and distribu-
tion opportunities.
     Bluehouse Skis, of Salt Lake City, started this year by Adam Hepworth and Jared Richards, former roommates at
Brigham Young University, sells only through its Web site, www.bluehouseskis.com. One of its two models, a light-
weight yet stiff ski for both resort and backcountry terrain, sold out its 500-pair run in just a week and a half. Mr. Hep-
worth credits word of mouth, in the local ski community and on Web forums, for demand.
    When he started PM Gear in 2003, Pat Keane sought opinions from the online community at Powder magazine's
Web forum to design the ultimate versatile ski. The resulting 188-meter (74-inch Bro Model) handles everything, Mr.
Keane said, ''from ice to crud to deep powder, from groomer slopes to 55 degrees of solid ice.''
      Whereas anyone with a knack for combining wood, metal, fiberglass and epoxy can conceivably make and sell a
pair of skis, producing those skis on a mass level, even if it's a small mass, poses a challenge. Some companies contract
with the same European and Asian factories that make well-known brands, which puts them at the mercy of those larger
ski maker's production priorities. Liberty addressed that problem by buying its own machinery at a factory in China to
better control scheduling and quality.
     On the day that Mr. Keane's second-year shipment of skis was scheduled to arrive, he instead received a letter
from his manufacturer, declaring bankruptcy. Undeterred, he high-tailed it to the factory in Chicoutimi, Quebec. ''There
was one guy sitting there, the owner,'' Mr. Keane recalled. ''I told him, 'Why don't you call everybody and tell them to
                                                                                                                    Page 25
                  Custom Models That Fit All Needs The New York Times December 28, 2007 Friday


come back to work? We're going to build skis.' '' By the next year, PM Gear had set up its own small factory in Reno,
Nev., to avoid such calamities.
      Even a skier who never lays eyes on a pair of, say, Bluehouse skis, may ultimately benefit from the existence of
the boutique firms. ''A lot of innovation has come from these smaller companies,'' Mr. Hepworth said. ''We have the
ability to make small runs and test out crazy designs.''
      To maintain quality -- and sustain the skiing lifestyle that fueled their passion in the first place -- many small ski
makers aspire to stay just that: small. A perfect example is Igneous Skis of Jackson, Wyo., one of the longest-operating
boutique manufacturers. Founded in 1993 by Adam Sherman (and the star of an ad for Dewar's Scotch in 1999), Igne-
ous originally had big plans. ''We were kind of naive when we jumped into this, thinking we'd compete with these giant
companies,'' said Michael Parris, who became Mr. Sherman's partner in 2000.
      The strain of vying against ski makers with larger advertising budgets and lower production costs eventually
forced Mr. Parris and Mr. Sherman to realize that they loved making skis but not being a company. So in 2001 they cut
back on promotion and product (so much so that some thought they had closed up shop for good). Today, Igneous pro-
duces just two or three pairs of customized skis a week in its Jackson factory. Marketing is purely word of mouth. The
business model is bare bones. And Mr. Parris gets to ski every day.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: SKIING (91%); SPORTS (90%); SPORTS EQUIPMENT MFG (90%); GOLF (90%); MOUNTAINS
(89%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (74%); COMPUTER SOFTWARE (77%)

GEOGRAPHIC: COLORADO, USA (93%) UNITED STATES (93%)

LOAD-DATE: December 28, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: DETAIL WORK: Scott Hargreave cutting material at Pete Wagner's shop near Telluride, Colo.
THE PRODUCT: Pete Wagner's skis cost about $1,600 a pair. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICHAEL BRANDS FOR THE
NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                12 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 28, 2007 Friday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Essence Editor Is Leaving Magazine
BYLINE: By TIM ARANGO

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 7

LENGTH: 619 words
                                                                                                                    Page 26
                 Essence Editor Is Leaving Magazine The New York Times December 28, 2007 Friday




     Susan L. Taylor, the longtime editor and driving force behind Essence, the magazine aimed at black women, is
leaving the publication after 37 years to devote more time to an organization she founded to help troubled children.
      Ms. Taylor, 61, joined Essence in 1970, the year it was first published, as a freelance fashion and beauty editor af-
ter founding her own company, Nequai Cosmetics. She became editor in chief in 1981, a post she held until 2000, when
she was promoted to publications director.
      She has most recently been the magazine's editorial director and author of its In the Spirit column, which dispens-
es inspirational words about things like finance and prayer.
     Although Essence, which is owned by the Time Inc. division of Time Warner, did not make an official an-
nouncement, Ms. Taylor chose to send out word of the change via e-mail.
      ''I am taking a break in South Africa and will have little access to e-mail,'' she wrote in an automated out-of-office
message this month. ''When I come back to the states in mid-January, I will be leaving Essence to do what at this junc-
ture in my life has become a larger work for me -- building the National Cares Mentoring Movement, which I founded
as Essence Cares and today is my deepest passion.''
     Essence Cares encourages black adults to serve as mentors for at-risk young people. According to the program's
Web site, ''Essence Cares is a call to action for every able black adult to take under wing a vulnerable young person,
which costs nothing.''
      While Ms. Taylor rose to the top of the magazine world -- in 1999 she became the first black woman to receive
the Henry Johnson Fisher Award from the Magazine Publishers of America, one of the industry's top honors -- she used
her position to highlight civic causes. As an advocate for children and improving education, she once calling failing
schools ''the pipelines to prison.''
       This year she appeared on ''The Oprah Winfrey Show'' to promote the National Cares Mentoring Movement,
which she founded in 2006 with the goal of signing up more than one million people to become mentors. The organiza-
tion is a coalition of advocacy groups, including the National Urban League, 100 Black Men in America and the
Y.W.C.A.
      ''It's a burning desire to use whatever resources she has to help our young people,'' said Terrie Williams, a long-
time friend of Ms. Taylor's and a former communications executive at Essence who runs a public relations firm in New
York. ''She lives and breathes it.''
     Ms. Williams said that Ms. Taylor ''takes young people with her to most of the events she goes to. She's put kids
through college. She's made calls to get kids in distressed situations in to college. She really is an icon in the black
community.''
      After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Ms. Taylor used Essence as a platform to keep the plight of New Orleans, where
the magazine had long held an annual music festival, in the nation's consciousness. She was appointed by Gov. Kath-
leen Babineaux Blanco to the Louisiana Recovery Authority, a panel that advised the governor on rebuilding efforts.
      In July, an article in The Times-Picayune of New Orleans described her as a ''traveling saleswoman for New
Orleans and other hurricane-battered regions of the state.''
     Ms. Taylor's fourth book, ''All About Love,'' a collection of her columns, will be published in February.
      Essence, a monthly publication, has a circulation of about 1 million. On Dec. 18, Michelle Ebanks, the president
of Essence, sent a memo to the magazine's staff, saying of Ms. Taylor, ''it is not often that you have the chance to work
with a living legend, and we are all lucky to have had this extraordinary privilege.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CHILDREN (89%); WOMEN (89%); PERIODICAL PUBLISHING (78%); AFRICAN AMERICANS
(78%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (77%); COSMETICS & TOILETRIES (76%); AWARDS & PRIZES (75%); ELEC-
TRONIC MAIL (73%); INDUSTRY AWARDS (67%); PUBLIC RELATIONS (50%); PUBLISHING (78%); MAG-
AZINE PUBLISHING (78%); FREELANCE EMPLOYMENT (73%)
                                                                                                                    Page 27
                 Essence Editor Is Leaving Magazine The New York Times December 28, 2007 Friday


COMPANY: TIME INC (70%); MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS OF AMERICA (53%); GEMEY MAYBELLINE
GARNIER SNC (57%)

INDUSTRY: SIC2721 PERIODICALS: PUBLISHING, OR PUBLISHING & PRINTING (70%)

PERSON: OPRAH WINFREY (52%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (92%); SOUTH AFRICA (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 28, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Susan L. Taylor has worked for Essence magazine since 1970. She became editor in chief in
1981, a post she held until 2000. (PHOTOGRAPH BY CHESTER HIGGINS JR. /THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                13 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 28, 2007 Friday
                                                  Correction Appended
                                                   Late Edition - Final

A Post-Google Fraternity of Investors
BYLINE: By MIGUEL HELFT

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; V.C. NATION; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1132 words

DATELINE: SAN FRANCISCO

    Chris Sacca had a plum job as the Wi-Fi guru at Google. But with his stock options fully vested, he left the Internet
search company this month for a new career as a venture capitalist.
      Mr. Sacca, 32, joins a growing number of Google millionaires hoping to parlay their newfound wealth into even
greater riches by bankrolling technology start-ups. Three years after Google went public, a fast-growing network of
company veterans is fanning out across Silicon Valley. Some are joining the venture capital firms that financed the
technology boom of the 1990s. Others are raising investment funds or backing embryonic companies with their own
money as so-called angel investors.
      ''I had one of the best jobs in the world,'' said Mr. Sacca, who as head of special initiatives at Google led a number
of high-profile projects, including the creation of a free Wi-Fi network in the company's hometown, Mountain View,
Calif. ''But there is a world of opportunity.''
                                                                                                        Page 28
     A Post-Google Fraternity of Investors The New York Times December 28, 2007 Friday Correction Appended


       So after four years at Google, he struck out on his own to raise a venture fund. Like many Silicon Valley hands,
Mr. Sacca enjoys working at small companies. And Google, which now has more than 16,000 employees, is hardly the
start-up it once was. In their new careers, Google alumni like Mr. Sacca are increasingly turning to former colleagues
for money and ideas. They help each other line up investors, identify entrepreneurs and hire talented engineers and
managers.
     Some Google veterans hope to turn their loose affiliation into the next powerful network in Silicon Valley, where
webs of money and connections have helped build many companies.
      ''We are planning to bring all the ex-Googlers who are starting companies and investing in companies together to
tighten up the network,'' said Aydin Senkut, a former sales manager who joined Google in 1999, when it had 62 em-
ployees. Mr. Senkut left in 2005 to become a full-time angel investor.
      It often pays to stick together in Silicon Valley. PayPal, the online payments system, spawned a bunch of serial
entrepreneurs who went on to found and finance some of the hottest Web 2.0 companies, among them YouTube,
LinkedIn and Slide. Many PayPal alums invest in one another's companies. One co-founder, Peter Thiel, who now runs
a $3 billion hedge fund and venture firm in San Francisco, is the godfather of what people jokingly call the PayPal Ma-
fia.
      There are no guarantees, of course, that Google's growing crop of alumni-investors will succeed, either individual-
ly or as a group.
       ''The challenge for the Google guys is to demonstrate what value they can bring, beyond making introductions to
someone at Google,'' said Paul Kedrosky, a senior fellow at the Kauffman Foundation, which promotes entrepreneur-
ship. Mr. Kedrosky said that those at the center of the PayPal Mafia were founders and early employees who learned a
great deal by building their start-up into an online payments powerhouse. EBay eventually bought PayPal for $1.5 bil-
lion. ''They had experience at iterating strategy and making payroll,'' he said of the PayPal gang.
      But Silicon Valley has plenty of believers in the investing skills of at least some ex-Googlers.
      ''Google arguably is at the center of the online advertising ecosystem,'' said Roger Lee, a general partner at Battery
Ventures, a prominent venture capital firm. Mr. Lee recently recruited Satya Patel, who spent four years as a Google
advertising executive. ''If you understand how Google works and how associated business models work, it gives you a
great lens to understand other advertising companies,'' Mr. Lee said.
       So far, Google veterans have not invested that much in companies led by other ex-Googlers. But as they seek ex-
pertise, advice and early access to start-ups, they are increasingly turning to their former colleagues. Little by little, the
group is coalescing. Since leaving Google in 2005, Mr. Senkut, 38, may have become the most active angel investor of
the bunch, putting $25,000 to $100,000 each in about 35 companies. So far, only two of those were started by ex-
Googlers. But Mr. Senkut has invested alongside other former Google employees, including Paul Buchheit, 31, who
built the first versions of Gmail, and Georges Harik, 36, who ran many of Google's new businesses when the company
began expanding beyond Internet search.
      The three invested in Meraki Networks, which helps extend the reach of wireless Internet access technologies. The
company was started by a group of engineers who had worked at Google as summer interns. Meraki has also received
investments from Sequoia Capital, a venture capital giant that financed Google, and from Google itself.
     Mr. Sacca did not invest in Meraki but helped persuade Google to back it. He said that some of his former col-
leagues might invest in his new fund.
      ''My actual preference was to not take too much money from Googlers, as it could prevent selling some companies
into Google,'' Mr. Sacca said. Investing in companies led by former Google employees, however, is not likely to be off
the table. While at Google, Mr. Sacca made angel investments in two companies. One of them, the micro-blogging ser-
vice Twitter, was started by Evan Williams, the creator of Google's Blogger software.
      ''The bonds that are built at this place are tight and lasting, and it has been a great place to meet some of the most
talented people in this valley,'' Mr. Sacca said.
      And the network of Googlers turned investors keeps growing. Salman Ullah, one of the company's top deal mak-
ers, and a co-worker, Sean Dempsey, recently left to raise a venture fund, according to some of their ex-colleagues. Mr.
Ullah did not return an e-mail message seeking comment.
                                                                                                        Page 29
     A Post-Google Fraternity of Investors The New York Times December 28, 2007 Friday Correction Appended


     For now, the ties among all these ex-Googlers remain loose and haphazard. Connections are made by e-mail or
word of mouth.
      ''I am actually really impressed in how all of us are finding one another,'' said Andrea Zurek, a former West Coast
manager for Google's AdWords advertising system. After more than seven years at Google, Ms. Zurek, 37, left in Octo-
ber to become an angel investor. Ms. Zurek said she has conferred with both Mr. Patel and Mr. Ullah, and is considering
an investment in a company started by another Google alum.
      To strengthen the Google alumni network, Mr. Senkut plans to hold a dinner for some of his former colleagues
early next year. He said he hoped the group would start with about two dozen people and grow from there. ''It will be
unfortunate if all these great alumni didn't get together regularly,'' he said.
      Of course, the Google veterans must still prove they can pick winning start-ups. But Mr. Senkut already has some-
thing to brag about. ''I got my first PayPal deal,'' he said. ''You rarely see a company started by a PayPal guy not funded
by a PayPal guy.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: VENTURE CAPITAL (92%); STOCK OPTIONS (90%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (89%); INTERNET
& WWW (89%); INTERNET SOCIAL NETWORKING (89%); WEB SEARCH PORTALS (78%); WEB 2 (78%);
SEARCH ENGINES (73%); WEALTHY PEOPLE (73%); ELECTRONIC BILLING (73%); HEDGE FUNDS (70%);
SALES MANAGEMENT (70%)

COMPANY: GOOGLE INC (90%); PAYPAL INC (52%)

TICKER: GOOG (NASDAQ) (90%); GGEA (LSE) (90%); PYPL (NASDAQ) (52%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS518112 WEB SEARCH PORTALS (90%); SIC8999 SERVICES, NEC (90%); SIC7375 IN-
FORMATION RETRIEVAL SERVICES (90%); NAICS519130 INTERNET PUBLISHING & BROADCASTING &
WEB SEARCH PORTALS (90%)

GEOGRAPHIC: SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA (87%); SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, CA, USA (94%)
CALIFORNIA, USA (94%) UNITED STATES (94%)

LOAD-DATE: December 28, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

CORRECTION-DATE: January 9, 2008


CORRECTION: The V.C. Nation column in Business Day on Dec. 28, about former Google employees who have
become investors in start-ups, misstated the former employment status at Google of the founders of Meraki Networks, a
wireless technology company. Their work at Google in the summer of 2006 was financed through a grant; they were not
interns, or otherwise on the staff of Google.

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: ''I had one of the best jobs in the world,'' said Chris Sacca, who left Google. ''But there is a
world of opportunity.'' (PHOTOGRAPH BY LIBRADO ROMERO/THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg.C1)
 Andrea Zurek, a former manager for a Google ad system, left in October. She is considering an investment in a compa-
ny started by another Google alumnus. (PHOTOGRAPH BY NOAH BERGER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)
(pg.C6)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                                  Page 30




                                               14 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                              December 27, 2007 Thursday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Based on a True Story
BYLINE: By DAVID M. HALBFINGER

SECTION: Section E; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1264 words

DATELINE: LOS ANGELES

     At home, in gang territory near the 10 freeway, Malcolm Mays, 17, sleeps on the faded carpet of his grandmother's
living room.
     For the last week or so, however, he's been sleeping as often as not in an editing room on the Sony Pictures lot in
Culver City, crashing there late at night after viewing rushes of the movie that he is shooting by day.
      To a degree that would make any adult desperate to get into the film industry jealous, he has mustered the support
of studio executives, a powerful producer and a top talent agent. It would be easy to tell this as the story of a bunch of
Hollywood people doing a good deed in time for Christmas, except that it isn't. They all say they hope to get as much
out of Mr. Mays as he gets out of them.
     When he was in the eighth grade, Mr. Mays says, he told his friends he would become rich and famous making
movies one day -- he hoped to use his money and fame to ''make a difference'' somehow -- and that he'd have his first
movie out before he turned 18. ''They all laughed,'' he said.
      A year later he entered Fairfax High School, where the racial tension among students bused in from far and wide
was a jarring contradiction to its upscale West Hollywood neighborhood. That fall he was caught up in a black-and-
Hispanic melee. A friend was attacked with a knife; Mr. Mays says he saw the assailant lunging and headed him off
with a punch. His mother abruptly transferred him to another school. The violence continued without him. Three of his
best friends, he said, were killed that year.
      But Mr. Mays had found his movie. He banged out a screenplay that year and gave it the name of his main charac-
ter: Trouble, a boy who means well but always gets into jams, who does the wrong thing for the right reasons. An in-
corrigible Romeo, Mr. Mays gave his alter ego a Juliet: the sister of a Mexican-American gang member. And he imag-
ined an ending in which the cycle of violence between black and Hispanic teenagers might be broken, after a shocking,
sorrowful twist. He bounced from school to school, finishing 9th grade at a community magnet; 10th grade at Dorsey
High in South-Central, where his father is a coach; then, at his mother's insistence, another move, to University High in
West Los Angeles, which was safer but a long bus ride from home.
     He never stopped pursuing film. When the producer Peter Guber of Mandalay Entertainment spoke at his church,
Mr. Mays, a leader of the youth ministry, wangled a meeting. That didn't go anywhere. But when he injured his leg at
Dorsey, the athletic trainer mentioned that his wife worked for Martin Campbell, the director of ''Casino Royale,'' and
Mr. Mays soon had an internship in Mr. Campbell's office on the Sony lot.
      At 15, he co-directed the first of several dramatic shorts, ''Open Door,'' which was accepted to a Los Angeles short
film festival. At 16 his script and plans for ''Trouble'' were recognized by Panavision's highly selective New Filmmaker
Program, which lets novice directors borrow a camera package.
                                                                                                                     Page 31
                       Based on a True Story The New York Times December 27, 2007 Thursday


      He just needed a plan to put its camera to use.
     Last year he signed up for a mentor program at University High that is run by the United Talent Agency. Howard
Sanders, of the agency's book department, commended Mr. Mays for his interest in a film career. Mr. Mays corrected
him.
      ''He says: 'It's not what I want to do, it's what I'm going to do. I'm going to make a movie,''' Mr. Sanders recalled.
''He knew exactly what he wanted, and nothing was going to stop him.''
     The mentor quickly found himself more inspired by the teenager than the other way around. ''I learned so much
about who I want to be from Malcolm,'' said Mr. Sanders, who is 48. ''This kid, obstacles are thrown in his way, and yet
he remains utterly positive, passionate and confident in his abilities.''
     Mr. Sanders introduced Malcolm to DeVon Franklin, a junior executive in Sony's development department and
one of the few African-American executives at any studio. In this ''scrawny little kid,'' Mr. Franklin said, he saw a
glimmer of hope for a new generation of black filmmakers.
     Mr. Sanders also pointed Mr. Mays to Todd Black, a producer of the feel-good, true-life movies ''The Pursuit of
Happyness'' and ''The Great Debaters,'' who had discovered another eventual movie subject, Antwone Fisher, when he
was a security guard. Mr. Black too was blown away.
      ''I never met a kid that age who was that in command of, and secure with, who he was and what he needed and
wanted,'' Mr. Black said. ''He really made me listen to what he was saying, quickly and efficiently. He wanted to get his
scripts made into movies, he wanted to go to U.S.C. film school, he wanted a career in the business. He wanted to lift
himself out of the situation he was in. He's almost entrepreneurial. He knew exactly how to work it, but not in an ob-
noxious way. In a very professional, proper way.''
      Mr. Black steered Malcolm to Gary Martin, the president for studio operations at Sony, who said he was reminded
of a 21-year-old John Singleton making ''Boyz N the Hood.'' ''You just got the feeling this kid's got the same kind of
chutzpah,'' Mr. Martin said. He laid down one condition for helping Malcolm: ''Trouble'' must have its premiere on the
Sony lot.
     Mr. Martin got Kodak to donate 50,000 feet of film, about $25,000 worth. He also made a call to Panavision
when, according to Mr. Mays, it threatened to cancel the New Filmmaker Program in response to the Hollywood work
stoppage. The result? ''I had Bob Beitcher, the C.E.O. of Panavision, calling me in my third-period class, assuring me I'd
have a camera,'' Mr. Mays said.
      As Christmas vacation approached, Mr. Mays was a walking whirlwind at his school, lining up actors, hiring a ti-
ny crew, obtaining permits and insurance, putting out one fire after another as problems arose, even while taking his
exams. He planned to begin shooting on Monday, Dec. 17, with exteriors at Fairfax High.
      But at 3:10 p.m. the Friday before, he learned that his permission had been revoked. An assistant principal at Fair-
fax, David Siedelman, had just found out that Mr. Mays hadn't yet graduated.
     ''You were very professional, I agree,'' Mr. Siedelman told Mr. Mays. ''You convinced me that hey, you were a
former student, an alumni here. You never said you were still a high school student.''
      Mr. Mays politely said that Mr. Siedelman had never asked, and that he'd never lied. But Mr. Siedelman said his
decision was final and wished him luck.
      ''As usual, things crash down, right?'' Mr. Mays said as he hung up. ''But we'll pick 'em back up.''
       True to his word, as night fell that Friday, Mr. Mays bought time by rearranging his production schedule to start
with interiors. One of Mr. Black's location managers began making calls on his behalf to other Los Angeles schools,
hoping to find one to replace Fairfax. Mr. Mays raced across Hollywood with a $500 deposit to release the camera from
Panavision. And a giant lighting truck with a generator in tow rumbled up to his grandmother's tiny house, vainly
searching for a safe place to park. (Mr. Black and Mr. Martin wrote personal checks for $850 apiece when Mr. Mays
couldn't come up with the truck insurance fast enough, the only cash his powerful supporters have laid out on his be-
half.)
     He also stopped at Sony to meet with a postproduction supervisor about the arduous editing and mixing process.
The supervisor asked if Mr. Mays had a deadline in mind, say, for submission to a film festival.
                                                                                                                    Page 32
                       Based on a True Story The New York Times December 27, 2007 Thursday


     ''I'd like to get it done by Feb. 14,'' Mr. Mays replied softly. That's when he'll turn 18.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: FILM (90%); MOVIE & VIDEO INDUSTRIES (90%); GANGS (89%); ADOLESCENTS (78%); MOVIE
INDUSTRY (77%); STUDENTS & STUDENT LIFE (76%); MOVIE & VIDEO PRODUCTION (76%); ENTER-
TAINMENT & ARTS (71%); MOTORCOACHES & BUSES (70%); AFRICAN AMERICANS (70%); HISPANIC
AMERICANS (69%); ACTORS & ACTRESSES (90%)

COMPANY: MANDALAY ENTERTAINMENT (50%)

GEOGRAPHIC: LOS ANGELES, CA, USA (94%) CALIFORNIA, USA (94%) UNITED STATES (94%)

LOAD-DATE: December 27, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Cynthia Mays, Mr. Mays's mother, is usually in charge of bringing food to the set of ''Trouble.''
(PHOTOGRAPH BY J. EMILIO FLORES FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. E5)
Mr. Mays shooting a scene from ''Trouble'' in the kitchen of a friend's house in Los Angeles. (PHOTOGRAPH BY J.
EMILIO FLORES FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. E5)
 The actor-director Malcolm Mays, right, prepares for a shot with Misty Alli, who plays his girlfriend in ''Trouble,'' his
first feature (PHOTOGRAPH BY J. EMILIO FLORES FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. E5). The actor-director
Malcolm Mays, center, shooting his first feature, ''Trouble,'' at a friend's house in Los Angeles. (PHOTOGRAPH BY J.
EMILIO FLORES FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. E1)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                15 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 27, 2007 Thursday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Blogging as a Low-Cost, High-Return Marketing Tool
BYLINE: By MARCI ALBOHER

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; SHIFTING CAREERS; Pg. 3

LENGTH: 1146 words

     TO its true believers at small businesses, it is a low-cost, high-return tool that can handle marketing and public rela-
tions, raise the company profile and build the brand.
      That tool is blogging, though small businesses with blogs are still a distinct minority. A recent American Ex-
press survey found that only 5 percent of businesses with fewer than 100 employees have blogs. Other experts put the
number slightly higher.
                                                                                                       Page 33
        Blogging as a Low-Cost, High-Return Marketing Tool The New York Times December 27, 2007 Thursday


     But while blogs may be useful to many more small businesses, even blogging experts do not recommend it for the
majority.
       Guy Kawasaki, a serial entrepreneur, managing partner of Garage Technology Ventures and a prolific blogger,
put it this way: ''If you're a clothing manufacturer or a restaurant, blogging is probably not as high on your list as mak-
ing good food or good clothes.''
        Blogging requires a large time commitment and some writing skills, which not every small business has on
hand.
       But some companies are suited to blogging. The most obvious candidates, said Aliza Sherman Risdahl, author
of ''The Everything Blogging Book'' (Adams Media 2006), are consultants. ''They are experts in their fields and are in
the business of telling people what to do.''
      For other companies, Ms. Risdahl said, it can be challenging to find a legitimate reason for blogging unless the
sector served has a steep learning curve (like wine), a lifestyle associated with certain products or service (like camping
gear or pet products) or a social mission (like improving the environment or donating a portion of revenues to charity).
      Even in those niches, Ms. Risdahl said that companies need to focus on a strategy for their blogging and figure out
if they have enough to say.
    ''As a consultant, blogging clearly helps you get hired,'' she said. ''If you are selling a product, you have to be
much more creative because people don't want to read a commercial.''
     Sarah E. Endline, chief executive of sweetriot, which makes organic chocolate snacks, said she started blogging
a few months before starting her company in 2005 to give people a behind-the-scenes look at the business.
     The kind of transparency is a popular reason for blogging, particularly for companies that want to be identified as
mission-oriented or socially responsible.
     A typical post on sweetriot's blog described the arrival of the company's first cacao shipment from South America
and how Ms. Endline met the truck on Labor Day weekend after it passed through customs at Kennedy International
Airport.
     She wrote about climbing aboard to inspect the goods and then praised the owner of Gateway trucking company,
who helped her sort through the boxes so that she could examine the product.
     ''At sweetriot we don't use the word 'vendors' as we believe it is about partnership with anyone with whom we
work,'' she wrote.
     For companies in the technology sector, having a blog is pretty much expected. Still, Tony Stubblebine, the
founder and chief executive of CrowdVine, a company that builds social networks for conferences, said that one of his
main reasons for blogging is to show that his business model is different from the typical technology start-up.
      ''Everyone in Silicon Valley is focused on venture capital funding and having an exit strategy,'' he said. ''Because
I'm not focused on raising money, I can focus on my customers, since they aren't a stepping stone to some acquisition
or I.P.O.''
     He added: ''I'm trying to create a community of help for small Internet businesses like mine. My blogging philos-
ophy is like the open source model in software. It's sort of a hippie concept. If I can help other people, it's personally
rewarding. And those people will likely pay it back in some ways.''
     Mr. Stubblebine said he gets new customers largely by word of mouth, and he uses the blog as a way to share
news with friends and people who wield influence in his industry as well as a reference check for customers. ''That's
why I cover the growth of the company.''
      David Harlow, a lawyer and health care consultant in Boston, said he started his blog, HealthBlawg, as a way of
marketing himself after he left a large law firm and opened his own practice. Besides, he said, blogging was easy to get
started and the technology was straightforward.
     Now, after about two years of blogging, Mr. Harlow said he was pleased with the results. He gets about 200 to
300 visits a day, he said. He has also become a source for publications looking for commentary on regulatory issues in
                                                                                                     Page 34
      Blogging as a Low-Cost, High-Return Marketing Tool The New York Times December 27, 2007 Thursday


the health care field and has even gained a few clients because of the blog. In addition, he has formed relationships
with other legal bloggers (who call themselves blawgers) and consultants around the country.
     Many small business bloggers achieve their goals even if only a handful or a few hundred people read their blogs.
But some companies aim much higher.
     Denali Flavors, an ice cream manufacturing company in Michigan that licenses its flavors to other stores, for ex-
ample, is a small company with a limited ad budget. It decided to use a series of blogs to build brand awareness for
Moose Tracks, its most popular flavor of ice cream.
      John Nardini, who runs marketing for Denali and is responsible for the company's blogs, said he has experimented
over the last few years with different types of blogs to see which would generate the most traffic. One blog followed a
Denali-sponsored bicycle team that was raising money for an orphanage in Latvia. Another tracked the whereabouts of
a Moose character that would show up at famous landmarks around the country.
      But by far the most successful blog, in terms of traffic, turned out to be Free Money Finance, a blog that has noth-
ing to do with Denali's business. Mr. Nardini's plan was to create a blog with so much traffic that it could serve as an
independent media outlet owned by Denali Flavors, where the company could be the sole sponsor and advertiser.
       He chose personal finance because it is a popular search category on the Web and because he knew he would not
tire of posting about it. And post he does, about five times each weekday.
      He uses free tools like Google Analytics and Site Meter to understand how people are finding the site and which
key words are working. Free Money Finance receives about 4,500 visits a day and each visitor views about two pages,
which means they see two ads for Moose Tracks ice cream. The effort costs about $400 a year, excluding Mr. Nardini's
salary.
     The site also accepts advertising, which earns the company about $30,000 to $40,000 a year, all of which Denali
donates to charity. ''We run ads because it legitimizes the site; it's really not about the money,'' Mr. Nardini said. ''We're
hoping people will go into Pathmark, see the Moose Tracks logo and say, 'Hey, I just saw that on the Web site I go to
every day.' ''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: MARKETING & ADVERTISING SERVICES (90%); SMALL BUSINESS (90%); ENTREPRENEUR-
SHIP (89%); BLOGS & MESSAGE BOARDS (89%); APPAREL MFG (69%); PUBLIC RELATIONS (73%);
POLLS & SURVEYS (72%); RESTAURANTS (69%); ORGANIC FOODS (68%); EXCISE & CUSTOMS (60%);
TRUCKING (60%); AIRPORTS (60%)

COMPANY: AMERICAN EXPRESS CO (58%)

TICKER: AXP (NYSE) (58%); AMX (LSE) (58%); AMEXP (PAR) (58%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS522210 CREDIT CARD ISSUING (58%); SIC6141 PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS
(58%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (56%)

GEOGRAPHIC: SOUTH AMERICA (91%)

LOAD-DATE: December 27, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Tony Stubblebine, CrowdVine's founder, and Eggs, his dog, help small Internet businesses.
(PHOTOGRAPH BY NOAH BERGER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)
 The blog of Sarah E. Endline described the arrival of the company's first cacao shipment from South America. (PHO-
TOGRAPH BY RUBY WASHINGTON/THE NEW YORK TIMES)
                                                                                                        Page 35
         Blogging as a Low-Cost, High-Return Marketing Tool The New York Times December 27, 2007 Thursday


PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                        Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                   16 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                     The New York Times

                                                 December 27, 2007 Thursday
                                                     Late Edition - Final

In Europe, Tighter Lending but Not a Squeeze
BYLINE: By CARTER DOUGHERTY; Victoria Burnett in Madrid, James Kanter in Paris and Julia Werdigier in
London contributed reporting.

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 2

LENGTH: 1365 words

DATELINE: FRANKFURT

    Ralf Friedrichs's business in shipping finance has hit a rough patch.
     Mr. Friedrichs, a managing director at HCI Capital, based in Hamburg, sets up funds that allow small investors to
buy shares in the gigantic container ships that carry goods between Europe and Asia.
      For every euro that an investor brought to the table, Mr. Friedrichs landed two in bank financing, enabling his
fund to raise the millions needed for each ship. But these days, his bankers are more focused on navigating the global
credit crisis than on financing new container ships.
      ''This market has stagnated or ground to a halt entirely,'' Mr. Friedrichs said. ''The hope is that financing will come
back, but new deals of the sort we did earlier this year are unimaginable right now.''
       Mr. Friedrichs's situation is typical of the plight of European businesses that rely on heavy lending but not typical
-- for now at least -- of the European economy as a whole.
      Over all, an outright credit squeeze, broadly defined as a situation in which even solid borrowers cannot obtain
cash, has not arrived in Europe, according to business leaders, economists and central bankers.
      That contrasts with the situation in the United States, where figures collected by the Federal Reserve have shown
an abrupt contraction of credit since August.
         But European confidence has its limits, especially since an end to turbulence in the credit markets is not yet in
sight.
      As in the United States, interest rates for short-term lending among banks in Europe have remained elevated as
banks have hoarded liquidity and gobbled up new infusions from central banks. Borrowing costs in euros eased last
week after huge central bank cash injections, but they remain far higher than normal, and at some point banks will have
to pass the borrowing costs on to corporate customers.
    ''If this does not change in the next few weeks,'' said Jochen Felsenheimer, head of credit strategy at UniCredit in
Munich, ''then the credit market will leave much deeper footprints in the real economy than it has so far.''
                                                                                                                     Page 36
           In Europe, Tighter Lending but Not a Squeeze The New York Times December 27, 2007 Thursday


      The European Central Bank's most recent lending survey of the 13-nation euro area, conducted in late September,
showed tighter lending standards for corporate borrowers and home buyers, but easier credit for consumers. That result
reflected a global effort by banks to ferret out losses linked to securities backed by shaky United States mortgages and
to build up a buffer of liquidity to protect themselves in uncertain times.
     But since then, despite tumultuous conditions recently in very short-term, interbank lending -- known as the mon-
ey market -- banks in the euro zone have continued to lend at the pace that prevailed before the crisis erupted in early
August, central bank officials said.
      ''Neither price nor quantity of credit extended in the euro area has changed much,'' Lucas D. Papademos, vice
president of the central bank, said this month. ''Up till this point, the spillover effects from money markets to credit
markets have been very modest.''
      British lenders have also reduced corporate credit availability over the three months through September and said
they expected recent market developments to reduce significantly their capacity to extend corporate credit for the rest of
the year, according to the latest figures from the Bank of England.
     Still, only about 35 percent of companies expect less credit will be available in the coming months, according to a
survey by GfK and the Confederation of British Industry.
     Close to Americans in their free-spending spirit, British consumers have perhaps felt the most direct pain.
     Credit card companies have started to reject more applications because they are increasingly worried about con-
sumers who use credit cards to pay off other debts, like mortgages. Rejections increased 17 percent in the six months
through September from the six months through March, according to the financial comparison Web site
MoneyExpert.com.
       ''There's a lot more scrutiny from banks,'' said Neil Munroe, external affairs director for Equifax, which tracks
consumer creditworthiness. ''Minor misdemeanors, such as missing one payment in your mobile phone bill or credit
card,'' he said, ''are now more critical when applying for a mortgage.''
     The leaders in London finance are feeling squeezed as well.
      Fund-raising for leveraged buyouts has slowed to $41 billion this year, from $112 billion last year, according to
the European Venture Capital Association. About 100 billion euros, or $144 billion, in buyout loans is still on bank bal-
ance sheets waiting for syndication, figures from the European High Yield Association showed.
    Some companies recently abandoned private equity bidders in favor of initial public offerings. Among them were
Hamburger Hafen und Logistik, a German port operator, and Pronova BioPharma, a Norwegian pharmaceutical compa-
ny.
     Traces of turmoil in credit markets are not hard to find in Spanish real estate.
     Colonial, a large Spanish property developer, said recently that it was in talks to merge with Gecina, the French
property arm of Colonial's Spanish rival, Metrovacesa, a deal that could produce one of the biggest property groups in
Europe. Colonial's debt of nearly 9 billion euros ($13 billion), equivalent to 66 percent of net assets, makes the company
one of the sector's most highly leveraged, and the merger would help it reduce its debt-to-asset ratio and tap new financ-
ing.
     That money will come only from banks that are imposing much tougher conditions than in years past.
      So-called covenant-lite contracts, in which creditors give up certain rights but impose conditions on a borrower's
balance sheet, are harder to come by, while banks are slowly forcing down leverage ratios. With an eye to possible de-
faults, they are also reluctant to lend against small slices of land that would be harder to liquidate than bigger tracts.
       ''The real estate sector has been hardest hit here by the credit crunch,'' said Robert Tornabell, a professor of fi-
nance at the Esade business school in Barcelona, Spain. ''Companies are having to refinance short-term debt and finding
that it is extremely expensive to do so.''
      Some Spanish banks have 60 percent of their loan portfolios tied up in real estate, but Spanish finance experts said
they did not expect a crisis similar to that in the United States.
                                                                                                                        Page 37
           In Europe, Tighter Lending but Not a Squeeze The New York Times December 27, 2007 Thursday


      The Banco de Espana said in a November report on financial stability that the banking sector had laid in enough
capital to ride out the subprime storm.
      Distress in areas like real estate has led banks to deploy their best sales pitches for the clients that are the best
credit risks. Jurgen Fitschen, Deutsche Bank's senior executive in Germany, told makers of machine tools in September
that banks would stand by these world-class exporters, which form the backbone of Germany's fabled Mittelstand, or
small and medium-size companies.
      Since then, many such companies, usually family owned, have had banks chasing their business, keenly aware that
with full order books for the year ahead, they are among the best risks around.
      ''I don't have the impression that we can speak of a credit crunch,'' said Josef Trischler, director for financial issues
at VDMA, the machine tool makers' trade association. ''That would mean there is just no money out there, and that is
not the case.''
     But owners of small businesses that lack the track record of the experienced entrepreneurs of Germany are not so
lucky.
     Aurelie Giraud, the director and founder of Jironimo.com, a site that allows companies and computer experts to
exchange services, said the credit crisis was stiffening the reluctance of French banks to lend money for online projects.
      Ms. Giraud, who started her business in 2005, said that she needed financing to develop client databases and to
generate publicity, but that banks preferred to lend to more traditional businesses. So she is sounding out sources other
than banks, like ''business angels'' with venture capital and state subsidy funds.
      ''I see a lot of my peers struggling to get credit from banks these days,'' Ms. Giraud said. ''I've decided that I just
don't see banks as partners anymore.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: BANKING & FINANCE (90%); CENTRAL BANKS (89%); EURO ZONE (89%); PERSONAL FI-
NANCE (89%); EURO (89%); MONETARY UNIONS (89%); MORTGAGE BANKING & FINANCE (77%); COR-
PORATE DEBT (77%); COMMERCIAL LENDING (71%); INTERBANK LENDING (65%); INTEREST RATES
(64%); ECONOMIC NEWS (64%); CREDIT CRISIS (89%)

COMPANY: EUROPEAN CENTRAL BANK (63%); HCI HANSEATISCHE
CAPITALBERATUNGSGESELLSCHAFT MBH (58%)

ORGANIZATION: EUROPEAN CENTRAL BANK (59%)

TICKER: HXCI (FRA) (58%)

GEOGRAPHIC: FRANKFURT, GERMANY (79%) EUROPE (96%); GERMANY (94%); UNITED STATES (93%);
ASIA (90%)

LOAD-DATE: December 27, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Lucas Papademos of the European Central Bank saw little change in euro-area credit. (PHO-
TOGRAPH BY MARTIN LEISSL/BLOOMBERG NEWS)
 Hamburger Hafen und Logistik, which runs port operations in Hamburg, turned to an public offering rather than private
bidders. (PHOTOGRAPH BY KAI-UWE KNOTH/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                      Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                                    Page 38




                                                17 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                             December 26, 2007 Wednesday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Condos, Condos, Everywhere
BYLINE: By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1380 words

    Jim Clark and Tom Jermoluk cut a swath through Silicon Valley in the 1990s with companies like Silicon
Graphics, Netscape and WebMD. But they are finding that it is a lot harder to maneuver through the real estate market
than to master the Internet.
       Five years after they decided to put their entrepreneurial talents and technology fortunes to work building Miami
condominiums, the first two projects by their company, Hyperion Development, are plagued with delays and unhappy
buyers. Some residents at the first tower, named Blue, are threatening to sue the company for not delivering on ameni-
ties, while other owners at the 330-unit complex are trying to sell their condos for less than they paid.
        Blue's problems have hurt Hyperion's reputation so much that consultants say some buyers who put down depos-
its at the company's second tower, the 516-unit Marina Blue, may decide not to close. Other Marina Blue buyers have
sued to get their deposits back.
       The problems raise questions about the ability of Hyperion to repay a $110 million construction loan as well as its
ability to develop future projects in the Miami market. They also offer a look at what can happen when entrepreneurs
try to trade on their reputation as they branch into other areas.
      The setbacks are an unexpected turn for the two partners chronicled in the book ''The New New Thing'' by Mi-
chael Lewis as having a magic touch at starting multibillion-dollar technology companies. They entered real estate with
plans to build four or five projects in Miami and named their company after Mr. Clark's 155-foot yacht, Hyperion. His
net worth has been estimated at $1.4 billion.
      Mr. Clark, 63, and Mr. Jermoluk, 51, are not the only successful entrepreneurs who are struggling in Miami real
estate. Builders throughout the area are facing rising construction costs and a slowdown in demand. Many buyers who
paid deposits at the height of the market a couple of years ago now own apartments that are worth much less than they
had agreed to pay. Many are trying to sell.
      Another developer, Joe Cayre, who amassed a fortune distributing videotapes to Wal-Mart and who became a fi-
nancial backer for the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site, faces lawsuits and delays on his 54-acre midtown
Miami project. Even Jorge M. Perez, head of the Related Group, who is on the Forbes list of billionaires with Mr. Clark,
has retreated in the face of lawsuits and losses.
      ''It doesn't matter who the developer is, where the project is located, what price range the units are,'' said Jack
McCabe, a real estate consultant in Deerfield Beach, Fla., who has tracked Marina Blue for hedge funds seeking dis-
tressed properties. ''Every project is going to take hits, some more than others. None are insulated, and it doesn't matter
whose name is associated with it.''
       In an e-mail message, Mr. Jermoluk compared today's real estate market with the boom and bust in technology
during the last decade. He likened the construction challenges -- weather, worldwide concrete and steel price increases -
- to ''memory chip shortages and price increases.''
                                                                                                                      Page 39
                      Condos, Condos, Everywhere The New York Times December 26, 2007 Wednesday


          ''Anytime you start a new company in a new business,'' he wrote, ''you learn things.''
      The slowdown, Mr. McCabe said, has developers in Miami trying to sell 52 multifamily sites that they once mar-
keted as condos. Three other sites, he said, have fallen into foreclosure.
      At Hyperion, the name Jim Clark was what attracted many prospective buyers. In 2003, Hyperion started its Blue
condo project with a cocktail party where guests mingled with models painted head to toe in blue while partaking of the
''usual finger food and free-flowing Champagne,'' said Elaine Silverstein, a Miami advertising executive who attended
the party.
          She said that many guests had been interested in meeting the pair from Silicon Valley with a ''marvelous reputa-
tion.''
          ''They were there to take advantage of this moment in time,'' Ms. Silverstein said. ''They were businessmen.''
      Mitesh Gandhi, an information technology consultant in North Brunswick, N.J., remembers spotting Mr. Clark's
photograph and mention of his link to Netscape when he walked into the Blue sales office in early 2005. He and his
wife paid a deposit for a $555,000 condo.
      But they were disappointed when the apartment was finished -- they did not like the lobby and did not feel safe
in the neighborhood. They also said they thought the building needed more amenities.
      ''When we closed on the unit and walked through the lobby, we were like 'O.K., this looks kind of bland,''' he said.
''There's nothing for me to do but try and sell it.''
          The couple has priced the condo at $56,000 less than they paid. They have competition.
      Their broker, Samir Patel, said 88 condos are for sale in the 330-unit building at prices ranging from $300,000 to
$1.25 million. Blue's condo president, Sharon Walker, said the board has hired a lawyer to help resolve construction
defects and other questions.
       Ms. Walker said Hyperion did not deliver the spa, restaurant and lounge it promised, not to mention falling short
on ''the quality and the workmanship and the four or five stars that we were buying.'' While the complaints may seem
minor, residents say they bought with a certain expectation of what the homes would look like.
     ''We have a lot of empty space in here,'' Ms. Walker said, ''that was supposed to -- as I understood -- have the
lounges and the media rooms and all of the bells and whistles.''
      Mr. McCabe, the real estate consultant, estimates that nearly 130 buyers at the 516-unit Marina Blue may not
close on their condos. Another dozen have sued to get out of their contracts, he said, and buyers who put down deposits
are trying to sell 250 more units.
     Mr. Jermoluk disputes that there are problems. In an e-mail message, he said that he expected all Marina Blue
buyers to close and that Hyperion was meeting its obligations even though construction costs had increased 30 percent
because of rising steel and concrete prices.
          He did not respond to a question about what might happen to the other projects they had planned.
     Bernd Schmitt, director of the center for global brand leadership at Columbia University Business School, said
Mr. Clark's problems in real estate should not be surprising.
       ''You could ask the question whether it was a wise thing for him to use his name, which is very much associated
with Netscape and the tech industry, to a real estate venture,'' Mr. Schmitt said. ''That was stretching the brand quite
far.''
      Other wealthy entrepreneurs seem to have found themselves in unfamiliar territory as well. In 2002, Mr. Cayre,
the videotape distributor, and fellow investors bought the 56-acre former Buena Vista Rail Yard to build offices, shops,
a hotel and condos.
      Today, his company, Midtown Equities, faces roughly three dozen state and federal lawsuits over the project,
mainly from buyers who want their deposits back for buildings that were delayed or never started. Mr. Cayre told a re-
porter for South Florida CEO, a regional business magazine, that he did not expect to make money on his first condo
tower, Midtown Two.
                                                                                                                      Page 40
                  Condos, Condos, Everywhere The New York Times December 26, 2007 Wednesday


       But Stuart Weiss, a consultant representing private equity firms buying troubled projects, said that Mr. Cayre was
at risk of losing even more money because of the neighborhood. ''This is a real secondary location any way you cut it,''
he said.
     In an e-mail message, Mr. Cayre said he remained confident that his project would emerge as one of Miami's best
neighborhoods.
     The market changes have forced a third developer, Mr. Perez, who has built 50,000 condos in Miami over the last
decade with Related Group, into a defensive position. Now he is battling a lawsuit from buyers of 38 apartments at Har-
bour House and 26 condos at Biscayne Bay.
     His company is operating in emergency mode. He has set up a team to raise capital to buy back apartments that he
expects buyers will not close on, and he is focusing on two kinds of condos: $4 million apartments for the high end, and
urban housing that costs $200,000 to $300,000 a unit.
     There are some things, he said, that even billionaires cannot control.
     ''We are just in the down part of the cycle,'' Mr. Perez said. ''You can't exclude yourself from the market.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: REAL ESTATE (90%); RESIDENTIAL CO-OWNERSHIP (90%); CONDOMINIUMS (90%); CON-
STRUCTION (90%); DELAYS & POSTPONEMENTS (89%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (89%); HOUSING MAR-
KET (77%); INTERNET & WWW (77%); REAL ESTATE AGENTS (77%); WEALTHY PEOPLE (76%); CON-
STRUCTION COSTS (76%); BUSINESS TORTS (75%); HEDGE FUNDS (50%)

COMPANY: THE RELATED GROUP (62%)

GEOGRAPHIC: MIAMI, FL, USA (92%) FLORIDA, USA (92%) UNITED STATES (92%)

LOAD-DATE: December 26, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Builders are racing to finish condominium high-rises in Miami, even as buyers are walking
away from closings. Some buyers have sued the developers Jim Clark, below top, and Tom Jermoluk, saying they have
failed to deliver on promises. (pg.C1) (PHOTOGRAPHS BY ABOVE AND LEFT, BARBARA P. FERNANDEZ FOR
THE NEW YORK TIMES)
Jorge M. Perez, head of Related Group, is being sued by buyers of 64 units.
 After two years of delays at Joe Cayre's Midtown Miami project, buyers are suing to get out of their contracts and
avoid closing. (pg.C4) (PHOTOGRAPHS BY BARBARA P. FERNANDEZ FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               18 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                             December 26, 2007 Wednesday
                                                  Late Edition - Final
                                                                                                       Page 41
        Gum That Won't Stick to Shoes? It's in the Works The New York Times December 26, 2007 Wednesday



Gum That Won't Stick to Shoes? It's in the Works
BYLINE: By JOHN TAGLIABUE

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 3

LENGTH: 1155 words

DATELINE: BRISTOL, England

     Terence Cosgrove, an unassuming professor in this western English town, imagined a world where chewing gum
did not stick to sidewalks and shoes, theater seats or hair.
      Because Professor Cosgrove studies polymers -- the chemical compounds that, among other things, make plastics
plastic and chewing gum chewy -- his was no idle dream. If he could find the right chemical mixture, the professor sur-
mised, he could retain the chewy without the sticky.
      If Professor Cosgrove had been at an American university instead of Bristol University, he might have been able
to receive start-up capital for such a potentially commercially viable invention -- from a venture capitalist, private in-
dustry or perhaps even the government. But for most of his career there was no tradition in England of universities act-
ing as incubators for purely commercial products.
      ''The U.K. had a good track record in scientific research, but it could not replicate that in turning it into value,''
said Magnus Goodlad, chief operating officer of the IP Group, a London-based venture capital group.
      That may finally be changing, and one of the early beneficiaries, if it wins approval from European and American
regulators, could be Professor Cosgrove's start-up, Revolymer.
     City governments in Britain estimate they spend $305 million a year cleaning up chewing gum, according to
Revolymer. At the same time, sales are soaring. This year, sales in Western Europe of chewing gum and bubble gum are
expected to reach $5 billion, up from $3 billion five years ago, according to the market watcher Euromonitor.
      ''There has to be a market, there's a real benefit to it,'' says Stephen Brooke of Swarraton, another venture capital
fund investing in Revolymer. ''I tell all my friends, just look down at the street.''
       The number of commercial spinoffs at British universities has soared since former British Prime Minister Tony
Blair established a so-called university challenge fund in 1999 to enable schools to finance the commercialization of
their research results. In 2005 and 2006 combined, there were 669, compared to 592 in 2003-4, according to the gov-
ernment Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills.
     Venture capital is beginning to pour into these start-ups. Cooperative research by the universities and private
funds was valued at $1.2 billion in 2007, a 12 percent increase over 2006.
      But Britain and the rest of Europe still lag behind the United States when it comes to supporting innovation on
campus, said Mr. Brooke, the venture capitalist. ''If you think of the U.S., M.I.T. has been doing this sort of thing for 50
years,'' he said, referring to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ''In the U.K., it's only the last 5 to 10 years.''
     In the United States in 2006, research spending per start-up was $118 million, according to a 2006 study at Cam-
bridge University, compared with $35 million per start-up in Britain.
      Professor Cosgrove's experience shows how far Europe still has to go if it hopes to catch up with America.
      The professor's inspiration for a nonstick chewing gum came on a trip to academic conferences in the United
States -- not in a conference hall, but on American sidewalks, where he noticed wads of hardened chewing gum. ''You
think perhaps it's pigeon poo,'' he recalled.
      He added, ''I came home, and as things go round, I tried to make a polymer, to get as low an adhesive quality as
possible.''
      Eventually, his team came up with a formulation of polymers that would not stick. To determine whether it came
off sidewalks and other surfaces, they pitted it against standard chewing gums on main streets across western England.
                                                                                                      Page 42
       Gum That Won't Stick to Shoes? It's in the Works The New York Times December 26, 2007 Wednesday


While the other gums stuck, Professor Cosgrove's rinsed off with rainwater -- ''though some surfaces are better than
others,'' he said.
       Despite the promising results, Professor Cosgrove still had no interest in starting a business. Roger Pettman, an
entrepreneur with a Ph.D. in organic chemistry, had to coax him. Mr. Pettman had taken ChiRex, a pharmaceutical
start-up, to an initial public offering on Nasdaq before it was acquired in 2000 by the French chemical maker Rhodia.
     When Bristol University staged an enterprise competition in the summer of 2005 to showcase research at the
school, Professor Cosgrove's chewing gum won.
     Having raised seed money from the university to get started, he raised $1.5 million in a first round of fund-raising
from several venture capital funds. Last February, a group of venture capital funds led by Swarraton Partners pumped
another $4 million into Revolymer.
       Such sums are only a fraction of the money swirling around American universities, but in Britain their impact is
starting to be felt, and the IP Group is betting the entrepreneurial university trend will grow. Last year, the company,
whose technology fund invests in Revolymer, established a partnership with the European Investment Fund, a public-
private group that is one of Europe's biggest venture capital funds.
     Next year, Revolymer plans to begin its own product and brand -- Clean Gum, of course.
     Professor Cosgrove says chewing gum may be only the first product in Revolymer's pipeline.
     But he still hesitates to overcommit himself to business. ''There is a fine balance between academic work and mak-
ing money,'' he said.
      The professor dedicates about one day a week to Revolymer, where he is chief scientific officer, and the remain-
der of his time to research and teaching. (Mr. Pettman, the entrepreneur with a Ph.D. in organic chemistry, is
Revolymer's chief executive.)
       As Clean Gum prepares to enter the market, the chewing gum industry watches and waits. ''We're aware of
Revolymer and some of its claims,'' sniffed Christopher Perille, director of corporate communications at the Wm.
Wrigley Jr. Company, the world's biggest chewing gum company. Wrigley is the maker of Freedent, which advertises
that it will not stick to ''most dental work'' but makes no claim about sidewalks.
     ''Making sure you still have quality and the integrity of the product, that's where the challenge is,'' Mr. Perille said.
     Anna Lucuk, external affairs manager at Cadbury Schweppes, the European gum leader with brands like Trident,
Dentyne and Bubbaloo bubble gum, also seemed less than concerned about competition from Clean Gum. ''They are far
from regulatory approval,'' she said.
     Professor Cosgrove says Clean Gum has tested as well as traditional gums in taste tests.
      Of course, one might expect such claims from the man who not only discovered its polymers, but chose its flavor -
- mint and lemon -- and its fingernail-size pillowcase shape reminiscent of a Chiclet.
      As every entrepreneur knows, established competitors do not generally get nervous until there is a proven threat.
But Professor Cosgrove says if his team can manipulate the chemical bonds in Clean Gum to make it more elastic, non-
stick bubble gum is just a step away.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: STARTUPS (90%); VENTURE CAPITAL (90%); CHEMISTRY (90%); RESEARCH (89%); REGION-
AL & LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (78%); CITY GOVERNMENT (78%); COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES (78%); RE-
SEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (75%); CITIES (73%); PLASTICS (72%); EXPERIMENTATION & RESEARCH
(72%); SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (72%); SCIENCE NEWS (72%); HEADS OF STATE & GOVERNMENT
(69%); APPROVALS (66%); COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS (90%); PRIME MINISTERS (69%);
BRITISH PRIME MINISTERS (74%)

COMPANY: MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (60%)

PERSON: TONY BLAIR (53%)
                                                                                                       Page 43
        Gum That Won't Stick to Shoes? It's in the Works The New York Times December 26, 2007 Wednesday




GEOGRAPHIC: LONDON, ENGLAND (92%) MASSACHUSETTS, USA (79%) UNITED KINGDOM (96%);
UNITED STATES (94%); ENGLAND (92%); EUROPE (92%); WESTERN EUROPE (56%)

LOAD-DATE: December 26, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Professor Terence Cosgrove of Bristol University, left, with a piece of Clean Gum. He hopes it
will make high-pressure cleanings, right, less necessary.
 Gum on the sidewalk of Praed Street in London. Governments in Britain spend an estimated $305 million a year clean-
ing up chewing gum. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JONATHAN PLAYER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                19 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                             December 26, 2007 Wednesday
                                            The New York Times on the Web

Insurance Is Still Lacking
SECTION: Section ; Column 0; Editorial Desk; LETTER; Pg.

LENGTH: 242 words

    To the Editor:
     Re ''Insurers Seek Bigger Reach in Coverage'' (Business Day, Dec. 19):
     The latest health insurance proposal from the trade group, America's Health Insurance Plans, calls for states to
work with insurers to guarantee that no American be denied insurance based on a pre-existing condition.
      Any meaningful reform should include ''guaranteed issue'' coverage, where applicants aren't denied because of
their health status, but AHIP's plan misses the mark by continuing to rely on the fatally flawed individual insurance
market, rather than following initiatives by Massachusetts, California and the major Democratic presidential candidates.
      When I ran for president, I proposed fair, market-based insurance ''pools,'' where the uninsured can access an array
of private plans because Americans deserve access to the same great health insurance that members of Congress give
themselves.
      Four years later, isn't every family's health care still as important as any politician's in Washington? Aren't the 27
million small-business owners in this country still searching for solutions to deal with the burden of skyrocketing health
care costs?
    It's time for Washington to help provide quality health care coverage for every American who lacks it, starting
immediately with small businesses and their employees.
     John Kerry Washington, Dec. 20, 2007
                                                                                                                Page 44
                   Insurance Is Still Lacking The New York Times December 26, 2007 Wednesday


     The writer is chairman of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: HEALTH INSURANCE (94%); INSURANCE (90%); LETTERS & COMMENTS (90%); SMALL
BUSINESS (90%); INSURANCE INDUSTRY (90%); INSURANCE REGULATION (90%); INSURANCE COVER-
AGE (78%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (78%); LEGISLATORS (78%); HEALTH CARE COSTS (78%); DENIAL OF
INSURANCE COVERAGE (78%); US DEMOCRATIC PARTY (77%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (77%); EDITORI-
ALS & OPINIONS (74%); US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS (69%); POLITICAL CANDIDATES (69%)

COMPANY: AMERICA'S HEALTH PLAN INC (58%)

ORGANIZATION: AMERICA'S HEALTH INSURANCE PLANS (90%)

PERSON: JOHN KERRY (54%); MICHAEL MCMAHON (91%)

GEOGRAPHIC: CALIFORNIA, USA (79%); MASSACHUSETTS, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (97%)

LOAD-DATE: January 16, 2008

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Letter

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                              20 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                             December 25, 2007 Tuesday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

Jay-Z to Quit His Day Job As President Of Def Jam
BYLINE: By JEFF LEEDS

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 3

LENGTH: 474 words

   After an unusual three-year turn in the corporate suite, Jay-Z, the rap superstar, said Monday that he would step
down from his post as president of Def Jam Recordings, one of the world's best-known record labels.
      Jay-Z made the announcement with Def Jam's parent, Universal Music Group, as his employment contract was
expiring. Under a separate long-term recording contract with Def Jam, Jay-Z, whose real name is Shawn Carter, still
owes the company one or more albums.
                                                                                                                      Page 45
        Jay-Z to Quit His Day Job As President Of Def Jam The New York Times December 25, 2007 Tuesday


      Jay-Z's exit from the executive role comes after Universal, a division of Vivendi, declined to renew the contract
under more lucrative terms he sought, according to people briefed on the talks, who requested anonymity because the
negotiations were confidential. Under the deal that is expiring, Universal was to pay Jay-Z in the range of $10 million
over the course of the contract, if he hit certain financial targets.
     Jay-Z offered no hints at his future plans. ''It's time for me to take on new challenges,'' he said in a statement.
      But he is already one of music's most ambitious entrepreneurs, with business interests that include nightclubs, an
investment in the New Jersey Nets and a fashion line. His next move is unclear, though there has been speculation that
he might strike a deal with the concert giant Live Nation, which has been seeking stakes in artists' various business lines
beyond concerts.
     It is not clear whether Universal will fill the job Jay-Z is vacating.
      Though Universal pursued Jay-Z as an executive so that he could imbue Def Jam's then-uncertain rap business
with credibility, he leaves with a mixed legacy. Under his leadership, Def Jam released two top-selling albums from
Kanye West, the producer turned rapper who first came to Def Jam through Jay-Z's own imprint, Roc-a-Fella Records.
     But elsewhere, Jay-Z's results have ranged from muddled to lackluster. The rap act Young Jeezy enjoyed a smash
debut but a modest follow-up album and sales of rappers like Freeway and Beanie Sigel have been slow.
       On the pop side, Jay-Z is credited with discovering the top-selling pop act Rihanna, and as a performer he lent his
skills to an array of Universal acts, even rapping on a version of ''Rehab,'' the best-selling single from Amy Winehouse,
the British retro-soul singer.
      Jay-Z, one of the best-selling rappers in music history, also found that running the record label releasing his album
does not always guarantee success. His 2006 album, ''Kingdom Come,'' sold about 1.5 million copies, an underwhelm-
ing figure for him.
        He has said the album was somewhat too ''sophisticated'' for some fans. But his latest album, ''American Gang-
ster,'' which was inspired by the Denzel Washington movie of the same name and acclaimed by critics, has also per-
formed modestly so far, selling about 784,000 copies in its first six weeks on sale.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: RAP MUSIC (90%); CELEBRITIES (90%); HIP HOP CULTURE (90%); MUSIC (89%); RECORD
PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION (89%); MUSIC INDUSTRY (89%); RECORD INDUSTRY (89%); TALKS &
MEETINGS (77%); EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS (76%); ARTISTS & PERFORMERS (76%); ENTREPRE-
NEURSHIP (75%); HISTORY (50%); SINGERS & MUSICIANS (78%)

COMPANY: VIVENDI (57%); UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP (57%); UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP INTERNA-
TIONAL LTD (57%)

ORGANIZATION: NEW JERSEY NETS (55%)

TICKER: VIVA (AMS) (57%); VIV (PAR) (57%); VIV (LSE) (57%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS517212 CELLULAR AND OTHER WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS (57%);
NAICS515120 TELEVISION BROADCASTING (57%); NAICS512110 MOTION PICTURE AND VIDEO PRO-
DUCTION (57%); SIC7812 MOTION PICTURE & VIDEO TAPE PRODUCTION (57%); SIC4833 TELEVISION
BROADCASTING STATIONS (57%); SIC4812 RADIOTELEPHONE COMMUNICATIONS (57%); NAICS517212
CELLULAR & OTHER WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS (57%); NAICS512110 MOTION PICTURE &
VIDEO PRODUCTION (57%); NAICS517210 WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CARRIERS (EXCEPT
SATELLITE) (57%)

PERSON: JAY-Z (95%)

LOAD-DATE: December 26, 2007
                                                                                                                      Page 46
        Jay-Z to Quit His Day Job As President Of Def Jam The New York Times December 25, 2007 Tuesday


LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Jay-Z is not revealing his plans after he leaves Def Jam Recordings, but he will continue to rec-
ord for the record label. (PHOTOGRAPH BY GARY HE/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 21 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 23, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Ordinary Misfits
BYLINE: By ERIC BANKS.
    Eric Banks is editor of Bookforum.

SECTION: Section 7; Column 0; Book Review Desk; Pg. 15

LENGTH: 999 words

     The mark of greatness in golf is the ability to play long ball and sink a chip shot. Apply the same measures to writ-
ing, and you begin to get a sense of Michel Faber's talents. In his novel ''The Crimson Petal and the White'' (2002), Fa-
ber, who was born in the Netherlands and now lives in Scotland, delivered an 800-plus-page panorama worthy of Trol-
lope or Dickens. Following a collection of novellas, he is back with ''Vanilla Bright Like Eminem,'' a set of 16 stylish,
harrowing stories that get off to running starts and have concise, cut-to-the-chase precision. Does Faber write poetry
too? If so, I want to read it.
       In ''A Hole With Two Ends,'' the entrepreneurs Sandra and Neil, interviewing a dreadful lot of Highlanders to
staff their pottery business, viciously dismiss the ''whole countryside full of perpetual losers stranded in decrepit cot-
tages that stank of cigarette smoke ... and booze.'' Driving away, they run over a rare Scottish wildcat and crush its back
legs. Sandra sets off to find the ''shivering, cowering creature yanked rudely out of legend'' in the roadside field. It's not
hard to see how badly this blind date of city folk and feral beast will turn out, once they find the injured cat burrowed in
a rabbit's hole. But Faber builds up to the suspenseful moment when the animal strikes, rhyming a description of the
ferocious animal and Sandra's yellow cashmere sweater -- her own ''piebald pelt of yellow and black'' -- and lingering
on the ''flustered lick'' of Sandra's lips as she is transformed from pompous businesswoman to bloodied, stick-wielding
harridan. ''A Hole With Two Ends'' reads like a Scottish version of ''A Good Man Is Hard to Find,'' minus the Gothic
Catholicism, but with the violent lunacy coming no less tragically sudden.
      ''A Hole With Two Ends'' is a bit of an anomaly in this collection; Faber is typically drawn less to Sandras and
Neils than to more ordinary misfits. The supermarket dick in ''Less Than Perfect'' is a pimple-faced 18-year-old who
imagines himself a babe-slaying Columbo before getting conned by a sticky-fingered hottie who keys his prized car
with a judgmentally dirty word. In ''Beyond Pain,'' the drummer for ''North Ayrshire's foremost death-metal group
Corpse Grinder'' is sidelined by a migraine and finds himself dispensable as the group tours the Continent (''European
Tour 2000 -- Budapest, Bratislava, Prague, Wroclaw, Warsaw''). The morose gay divorce in ''All Black,'' granted a
grudging visitation with his daughter, labors to get her back to her nonplussed mom while the world literally and inex-
plicably begins to darken.
                                                                                                                        Page 47
                            Ordinary Misfits The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


       ''All Black'' reads like a mash-up of ''Twilight Zone'' and ''Six Feet Under,'' and indeed Faber ranges widely among
the mundane and the fantastic. In ''The Safehouse,'' missing persons, their status printed on their white T-shirts, are
gathered in a futuristic soup kitchen that is one part Salvation Army, one part Dachau. (The urinals resemble ''melted-
down teeth.'') But regardless of theme, a sense of empathic understanding pervades all these tales. The title story, which
is also the last in the book, somberly describes a fleeting moment in the life of an American family on an Inverness-
bound train -- a moment that in retrospect will in fact be the happiest in its protagonist's life.
      Faber's fellow Scottish writer Dan Rhodes is no less enamored of making limoncello out of a genre's lemons -- in
this case, the shaggy-dog story. In his laconic, likable short novel ''Gold,'' the action, if you want to call it that, takes
place in a Welsh pub called the Anchor, where tall Mr. Hughes, short Mr. Hughes and Mr. Puw are habitues -- though
the narrator is quick to point out that ''despite his name,'' tall Mr. Hughes ''wasn't particularly tall, just a bit taller than
short Mr. Hughes, who wasn't particularly short. They were each just an inch or two either side of average.'' Like the
two Mr. Hugheses, Miyuki Woodward, who visits the town for two weeks each winter, is a character defined as much
by what she isn't as what she is. The perennially unlucky-in-love lesbian daughter of a Welsh woman and a Japanese
man whom she never met, she has little more direct knowledge of Asia than her fellow drinkers. (''I'm about as Japanese
as laverbread,'' she says.)
      The Anchor is a setting at once analeptic and anodyne: returning to the same scene year after year, Miyuki passes
her two weeks tucked away at a small round table in the corner of the room, sitting under a stuffed pike embalmed un-
der a glass case, and returns home each night to a rented cottage to let her contact lenses sizzle on the wood-burning
stove.
      Precious little happens in Rhodes's story until Miyuki, revisiting a coastal view that has enchanted her during pre-
vious visits (in certain light, a boulder on shore appears to be a chunk of gold), decides to make the illusion more per-
manent. She spray paints the rock a glittering gold, only to see this act set in motion a series of events that upset the
indifferent atmosphere of the Anchor. Her handiwork is a dismal failure, tall Mr. Hughes temporarily disappears and her
sneezing fits -- which will eventually play a momentous part in the novel's denouement as well as in the sad fate of Mi-
yuki herself -- are exacerbated by the airborne presence of gold flecks.
      Against the currents of this slight tale, Rhodes creates an atmosphere so banal that its homey familiarity becomes
its charm. Like the jokes one character memorizes to impress women, most of the dialogue and description consists of
cliched speech, stale humor and passed-along familiars. Yet there is something affecting and affectionate in the way
Rhodes manipulates, ever so faintly, the ''Groundhog Day''like feel of the story. ''Gold'' may lack the existential drama
of Michel Faber's work, but its empathy is just as well earned.
      VANILLA BRIGHT LIKE EMINEM
      Stories.
      By Michel Faber.
      246 pp. Harcourt. $23.
      GOLD
      By Dan Rhodes.
      198 pp. Canongate. Paper, $14.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: NOVELS & SHORT STORIES (90%); BOOK REVIEWS (90%); GOLF (90%); SPORTS (90%); POET-
RY (78%); WRITERS & WRITING (78%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (74%); CHRISTIANS & CHRISTIANITY
(52%); RELIGION (50%); CATHOLICS & CATHOLICISM (50%); MAMMALS (58%)

GEOGRAPHIC: BUDAPEST, HUNGARY (64%); PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC (50%) SCOTLAND (93%);
UNITED KINGDOM (93%); HUNGARY (64%); EUROPE (72%); NETHERLANDS (88%); CZECH REPUBLIC
(50%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007
                                                                                                                  Page 48
                          Ordinary Misfits The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday




LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: DRAWING (DRAWING BY OLIVIER KUGLER)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Review

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               22 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                               December 23, 2007 Sunday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Capital Ideas And Social Goals
BYLINE: By MICHAEL FITZGERALD.
    Michael Fitzgerald writes about business, technology and culture. E-mail: mfitz@nytimes.com

SECTION: Section 3; Column 0; Money and Business/Financial Desk; PROTOTYPE; Pg. 3

LENGTH: 1033 words

     SINCE 2001, Lee Zimmerman's Evergreen Lodge has helped almost 60 low-income young adults get their lives
on track, while consistently paying 9 percent back to investors backing his business. Pura Vida Coffee, of which John
Sage was a co-founder in 1997, has generated $2.7 million in cash and resources for health and education programs for
children and their families.
      Both companies deserve praise for their good deeds. But what might be more remarkable about the founders of
Pura Vida and Evergreen Lodge is the way they raised capital to build businesses that have two bottom lines: one finan-
cial and one social.
      Such business models are becoming increasingly popular among philanthropists and foundations, which like the
idea of self-sustaining charities. They also want their investments to have the same kind of social impact as their dona-
tions, an idea called mission-related, or program-related, investing. A study released earlier this year by FSG Social
Impact Advisors, a consultancy founded by Michael E. Porter, a Harvard Business School professor, and Mark Kramer,
a former venture capitalist, calculated that mission-related investing has grown by 16.2 percent a year over the last five
years.
      At the same time, businesses like Pura Vida and Evergreen blur the line between charities and companies. That's a
hurdle to raising money, because investing in a for-profit company does not yield a tax deduction. And such businesses
often need extra time to succeed. Grameen Bank, which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for validating the idea of
microfinance, was subsidized for 15 years, notes J. Gregory Dees, a professor at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke
University. (In 2006, Grameen made $20 million on $135 million in revenue.)
     There is not yet a template for financing such businesses, says R. Todd Johnson, a lawyer at Jones Day who has
handled a number of deals for social entrepreneurs and is writing a book to be called ''Greed Is Bad.'' Because the en-
                                                                                                                     Page 49
                   Capital Ideas And Social Goals The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


trepreneurs want to make sure that investors can't change the social mission for the sake of profits, ''you get these one-
off, crazy, debt-equity weird structures,'' he says. ''People say, 'Gosh, you're making my head hurt.'''
      Mr. Sage's efforts to fund Pura Vida show just how migraine-inducing these deals can be. He set up Pura Vida
Coffee as a for-profit company, earmarking all profits for its nonprofit arm. To raise money the first time, and to allow
Pura Vida to accept grants, he created the nonprofit organization, Pura Vida Partners, which became the owner of Pura
Vida Coffee. Pura Vida Partners issued $1.8 million in interest-paying bonds, each of which would, when paid off, con-
vert into a warrant for a share in the parent organization. Shareholders were required to donate dividends to a charity but
couldn't claim that as a tax deduction.
      The structure of the deal wound up biting Mr. Sage, as it tied his hands early on. Pura Vida grew faster than he
expected, in part because its mission struck a chord with college students. The company needed money to buy new
equipment and supplies, but interest payments were eating up all of its cash. Led by Mr. Sage, the largest debt holder,
18 of the 19 other investors agreed to restructure their debt into common stock that would dilute their holdings from 60
percent of Pura Vida Partners to 12 percent and to allow the company to create preferred stock, which it sold to raise
more capital. It was thus similar to a typical private offering, but with a twist: the common shares -- held by those origi-
nal investors focused on the mission -- are the only ones with voting rights, to insulate the social goals of the company.
      Freshly capitalized, Pura Vida eventually was able to fund growth from its operations. It's on track to make a net
profit in 2008.
       The contrast between Mr. Sage's financing experience and that of Mr. Zimmerman and his co-founders suggests
that a simple and traditional financing structure makes the most sense for businesses that are considered socially respon-
sible. Evergreen Lodge, just outside of Yosemite National Park, hires promising young people from low-income areas.
The three co-founders believed that they could give these people a foundation for more stable lives by putting them in a
rural environment with a full-time ''counselor'' who paid close attention to their needs.
      Evergreen Lodge's holding company, First Light Destinations, raised money through a conventional debt-equity
financing, in which a third of its money came in the form of equity from investors and two-thirds from a bank loan. Its
results have been strong enough that First Light has paid dividends to its investors for the last two years. It also has in
place a provision allowing it to issue debt in the future to pay back investors the full amount of their original invest-
ment, without requiring them to give up their shares. That allows investors to get a good financial return on their in-
vestment without having to push for the company to go public or be acquired.
    Mr. Zimmerman and his partners and their investors are still refining the model. But he's excited that the basic
model has worked, and he says that ''what we're trying to do can be applied to many different kinds of businesses.''
      If he's right, the timing is excellent. Billions of dollars could soon start flowing to social entrepreneurs, especial-
ly from foundations. Recently, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the F. B. Heron Foundation and the Meyer Memorial
Trust called on all the nation's foundations to invest 2 percent of their endowments into such organizations. If answered,
that call would bring an estimated $10 billion into the social investing realm over the next five years.
      Mr. Dees at Duke cautions that there still aren't well-developed market mechanisms for double-bottom-line inves-
tors. But he called what's happening on the financing side of Pura Vida and Evergreen Lodge ''extremely exciting'' and
said he thinks that ''these kinds of companies will make headway against serious social problems.''
     Mr. Sage calls it compassionate capitalism, while stating the obvious: if the capitalism doesn't work, there will be
no compassion.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CHARITIES (90%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (89%); FUNDRAISING (89%); CHILDREN (78%);
FAMILY (78%); FAMILY SERVICES (78%); BONDS (77%); MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS (77%); FOUNDA-
TIONS (77%); VENTURE CAPITAL (77%); EDUCATION (76%); CORPORATE DEBT (76%); NONPROFIT OR-
GANIZATIONS (76%); PHILANTHROPY (74%); GRANTS & GIFTS (74%); TAX DEDUCTIONS (73%); RE-
SEARCH REPORTS (69%); NOBEL PRIZES (69%); CONSULTING SERVICES (67%); MAJOR US LAW FIRMS
(67%); AWARDS & PRIZES (64%); SHAREHOLDERS (60%); COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS (72%);
BUSINESS EDUCATION (89%); LOW INCOME PERSONS (73%)

COMPANY: GRAMEEN BANK (54%); JONES DAY (81%)
                                                                                                                  Page 50
                   Capital Ideas And Social Goals The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday




PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (51%)

GEOGRAPHIC: CALIFORNIA, USA (59%) UNITED STATES (59%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Above: The San Francisco-based owners of Evergreen Lodge, Lee Zimmerman, left, Dan
Braun, center, and Brian Anderluh, hire low-income young adults. At left, John Sage set up a fair-trade coffee company
to fund programs for the poor. Both initiatives harness businesses for charity. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY STUART ISETT
FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
 HEIDI SCHUMANN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               23 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                               December 23, 2007 Sunday
                                                 Correction Appended
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Sailing Toward Paradise
BYLINE: By MATTHEW POWER.
    MATTHEW POWER is a contributing editor at Harper's Magazine and National Geographic Adventure.

SECTION: Section 5; Column 0; Travel Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 2922 words

     THERE are few places on the planet more appropriate to contemplate a sea journey than at the Miraflores Locks,
on the western end of the Panama Canal. It is a balmy March evening, and the red tropical sun hangs low over the jun-
gle-covered hills. At eye level a container ship slides silently by, seeming close enough to touch. The size of a length-
wise Chrysler Building and stacked high with multicolored metal boxes, it slips into the lock, and great steel gates
swing closed as the 65,000-ton ship is lowered in its final stage from Lake Gatun. The lower gates open like the doors
of a cathedral, and the enormous vessel is pulled forward by tow lines. It fires up its engines and churns toward the Pa-
cific.
      I have come to Panama to join a ship. Not a tanker or freighter bound for the Far East, but rather a 48-foot, two-
masted sailboat named the Shangri La, owned and captained by my college friend Andrew Whyte and his wife, Fran-
cesca. Our primary destination is the Galapagos Islands, a two-week sail to the southwest across a thousand miles of
open water.
      Andrew and Francesca know what they are doing; they've made a life out of it, having sailed around the world
braving everything from storms to Somali pirates. Now the Shangri La is anchored at the Balboa Yacht Club near the
                                                                                                                      Page 51
            Sailing Toward Paradise The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday Correction Appended


mouth of the canal. The little white ketch bobs like a bath toy in the wakes of the constantly passing freight vessels. I
take a launch from the dock and join the other five crew mates aboard. At 32, I am the oldest. Everyone else is in their
mid-20s, just as Charles Darwin was when he sailed to the Galapagos aboard the Beagle in 1835.
      I've long had a fascination with ships and the sea, a passion limited by my disposition to get terribly seasick on
almost everything that moves, including cars, roller coasters and swing sets. This is one of the few traits I share with the
young Darwin. Serving as the expedition's naturalist, he was violently seasick for almost the entirety of the Beagle's
five-year circumnavigation. Two weeks I think I can handle, but as a precaution I am carrying enough Dramamine to
tranquilize a humpback.
      Motoring out of the mouth of the canal, we keep a watchful eye on the dozens of freighters maneuvering into line
for the Miraflores Locks. The skyline of Panama City vanishes in the morning haze as we head out to the open sea. Set-
ting the luffing white sails to a steady wind, Andrew puts us on a starboard tack, and the Shangri La plows happily
southward. In a few hours, we are alone in the Pacific.
      Surrounded by watery vastness, I am quickly confronted by the totality of our disconnection from terrestrial hab-
its. As an unrepentant media addict, the severing of the Bluetooth umbilicus is profound. There is no satellite phone
aboard, no cell service, no radio traffic and certainly no Internet.
      It is a difficult withdrawal, but our little group soon falls into a workable routine to sail the ship. We divide the
clock into two-hour watches at the wheel, and I pull the 2-to-4 shift, a.m. and p.m. The rest of the day is filled with
reading, and talking, and dozing in the shade. I finish a novel in a day for the first time since college. Andrew and Tuck-
er Thiele, a friend of ours from Vermont, invent a marathon hybrid of cribbage and Risk. Rhys Hayes, an Australian
Internet entrepreneur, passes the time by stitching a beautifully monogrammed iPod case out of leather for his girl-
friend.
      We trawl a fishing line, and hooking a smallish yellowtail is an event akin to a papal visit. Our Down East Maine
crew mate Jared Grant expertly hauls the catch on deck, and Andrew makes mercifully short work of it. Tucker con-
jures four brilliant courses from a single fish: sushi, ceviche, tacos and chowder.
      Days blend into one another. We cross the Doldrums, the vast belt of low pressure and light wind that girdles the
equator. We don't see a single other ship, but there is plenty of life: terns rest on the ship's rail, pods of pilot whales
breech beside us, and dolphins surf in our bow wake. We even spot a huge solitary leatherback turtle, paddling its way
to the Galapagos for its spring migration. At the wheel in the middle of the night, I steer with one eye to the long axis of
the Southern Cross, which points our way, or stare out at the dark water and the eerie green glow of the bioluminescent
sea creatures stirred up by our passing.
      At dawn on the 14th day out from Panama a rosy smudge appears on the horizon, barely discernible from the
smoky convergence of sea and sky. Francesca shouts ''I see it!'' and there, rising 500 feet straight out of the still water, is
the volcanic tuff cone Leon Dormido, ''Sleeping Lion.'' The rock serves as a sentinel to the Galapagos archipelago. Be-
hind it the low green island of San Cristobal comes into view.
      When Darwin arrived at San Cristobal (then called Chatham Island) on Sept. 17, 1835, he remarked in his journal:
''Nothing could be less inviting than the first appearance. A broken field of black, basaltic lava is everywhere covered
by stunted, sun-burnt brushwood, which shows little signs of life.'' He had very little inkling that the signs of life he
observed there would eventually help lead to one of the most revolutionary theories in the history of science.
      We anchor in the tiny harbor of Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, population 5,000, one of the two main ports of the Ga-
lapagos. Several dozen yachts and fishing boats are moored in the deep blue water. The public dock where we tie our
dinghy is covered with slick brown sea lions dozing in the equatorial sun. Hundreds are sprawled along the shore like
fat sunbathers, barking to one another. Having evolved with no terrestrial predators to fear, they don't move, or even
seem to notice us as we step gingerly over them. It is our first clue that the Galapagos are a place where humans are
utterly foreign.
       Arriving by private boat is an uncommon way to experience the Galapagos, and has both limitations and benefits.
Because nearly all of the archipelago is preserved as national park, there are only two permitted anchorages, here at
Baquerizo Moreno and at Puerto Ayora on the nearby island of Santa Cruz. The vast majority of the 70,000 annual tour-
ists to the islands arrive from the mainland by plane, and take multiday boat tours around the islands to observe the
wildlife, stopping at each for a few hours. We decide to keep the Shangri La anchored at San Cristobal for a week,
which will allow us to dig deep into San Cristobal's natural treasures.
                                                                                                                      Page 52
            Sailing Toward Paradise The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday Correction Appended


      The Galapagos have served as a laboratory for life ever since they bubbled up above the ocean's surface more than
five million years ago. Today there are 13 main islands, and the newest are still being created by volcanic activity. The
most recent eruption occurred in 2005. All species on the islands arrived through some extraordinary luck or toughness:
seeds blown by the wind or carried in the stomachs of birds; small land tortoises that drifted for months on ocean cur-
rents, or on rafts of vegetation that blindly bumped up against the new land. Those that survived the harsh environment
gave rise to an astonishing array of endemic species: marine iguanas, tool-using finches, giant tortoises that weigh al-
most 700 pounds. Life evolved in quiet isolation, unaffected by the outside world.
      No longer a lonesome outpost of life untouched by humans, today the Galapagos are a laboratory of conservation,
where humans' fraught relationship with the natural world can be studied and, hopefully, repaired. In 1959, the cen-
tenary of the publication of Darwin's ''Origin of Species,'' the Ecuadorean government declared the archipelago a na-
tional park. Today, 97 percent of the archipelago is preserved, along with 40,000 square miles of the surrounding ocean.
Working with the Ecuadorean National Park Service, organizations like the Charles Darwin Foundation finance conser-
vation programs, education and scientific research.
      A nascent ''voluntourism'' movement in the Galapagos allows for deeper connection with the place than that af-
forded from a cruise ship anchored off the coast. I encountered several travelers who had come to spend their vacations
helping to eradicate invasive plant species (like raspberry) with an organization called Jatun Sacha. Perhaps not the
most relaxing or glamorous vacation, but one that can have a real effect on a unique and fragile part of world heritage.
      But everyone, volunteers and package tourists alike, is really here for the charismatic megafauna. We visit the ex-
cellent interpretive center on the edge of town, with exhibits explaining the island's history, flora and fauna, and current
conservation issues. Armed with a head full of scientific trivia and an amateurish grasp of taxonomy, we set out to gawk
at the island's indifferent native inhabitants.
      The Galapagos are, in this regard, not so different from Manhattan, where the commoners breathlessly tally their
sightings of aloof celebrities. As if to drive this point home, I spot Julia Louis-Dreyfus walking by my table at a
dockside bar, unnoticed except by me. She's just another tortoise-tourist in a sun hat and capris. On San Cristobal, the
animals are the real celebrities.
      In the following days we cavort with baby sea lions at their colony on the tiny island of Isla Lobos. We snorkel
with hammerhead sharks and sea turtles and eagle rays off of Leon Dormido. Above forests of candelabra cactus and
saltbrush, we watch male frigate birds puff out their bright-red neck pouches like balloons in hopes of finding a mate.
From the deck of our boat we spot blue-footed boobies dive-bombing for fish.
      As the rest of the crew haul their boards to a nearby point break (the Galapagos have excellent surfing), I crouch
in the lava rocks along the shoreline, getting within a few feet of a sluggish, enormous pair of marine iguanas, their
mottled black skin a perfect camouflage on the basaltic rock. On encountering the creatures, the young Darwin, caught
up in the spirit of scientific inquiry, flung one repeatedly into the surf to see how well it could swim.
      ON our last day on San Cristobal, before Rhys and I fly back to the mainland and the rest of the crew sets sail for
the 3,500-mile crossing to the Marquesas, we pay a visit to the most famous inhabitants of the Galapagos: the giant tor-
toises. The tortoises are the undisputed kings here, the islands themselves are named for them (galapago is an archaic
Spanish word for ''saddle,'' so called for the shape of their shells). Surviving as long as two centuries, there are still Ga-
lapagos tortoises that lived here when Darwin explored the islands.
      Rhys and I take one of the island's few paved roads to the national park's tortoise breeding center. Following a
path through a parched and stunted forest of native manzanillo trees, we come across a dozen giant tortoises settling into
a lunch of fresh leaves. They are between 50 and 100 years old, and move at a pace that befits their longevity. They
bump one another as they feed, their shells making a sound like coconuts being knocked together.
      The tortoises had it rough in the early years of human intrusion into their world. Their population, once as high as
100,000, was nearly wiped out, many slaughtered for their fat that was rendered into lamp oil. Thousands more were
captured and stacked upside down in the holds of ships, where they would stay alive for years without food or water,
providing a source of fresh meat. Even Darwin notes in his journals that not only did he attempt to ride atop their shells,
but that ''the young tortoises make excellent soup.''
      Today, an active breeding program has been undertaken, and the 11 remaining subspecies of giant tortoises are be-
ing brought back from the brink. In May, scientists claimed they may even have found a genetic relative of Lonesome
George, long thought to be the last Pinta tortoise on earth. Rhys and I peer into a tortoise nursery at perfectly formed
                                                                                                                       Page 53
            Sailing Toward Paradise The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday Correction Appended


baby tortoises the size of golf balls. The hatchlings will spend years here before being released into the wild. With a
little luck and help, these babies will be plodding through the underbrush a century from now.
      I crouch down, watching as they slowly extend their long wrinkled necks to strip leaves from branches, their
black eyes glimmering with awareness behind the dusty green-gray of their faces. It is an astonishing, unmediated view
of the natural world, though I am certain I am anthropomorphizing when I detect a hint of both sadness and hope in their
eyes. It is more likely a reflection of my own sadness at the damage we have done, and hope that humans can turn
things around in time to save this unique corner of the world.
      What I discovered in our crossing and exploration of the Galapagos is hard to pinpoint: as with any such travels
the epiphanies come later. Darwin explored these islands for five weeks, out of a sea journey of five years. When he
returned to England he never left again, and did not publish ''The Origin of Species'' for 23 more years. But there is a
tantalizing moment in his journals from the Galapagos (later published as ''The Voyage of the Beagle'') that indicates all
he was on the cusp of understanding: ''Both in space and time, we seem to be brought somewhat near to that great fact --
that mystery of mysteries -- the first appearance of life on earth.''
      In an age of the disappearance of life on earth, I felt at least closer to understanding the significance of its diversi-
ty, and of its fragility.
      Where Once the Rarest Creature Was a Human
      GETTING THERE
      The Galapagos Islands are 600 miles from mainland Ecuador. TAME and Aerogal fly round trip from Quito and
Guayaquil to Isla Baltra, connecting to Puerto Ayora on Isla Santa Cruz (about $400) or to the capital, Puerto Baquerizo
Moreno, on Isla San Cristobal (about $350). Most tours and cruises are out of Puerto Ayora, the archipelago's largest
town. Galapagos National Park covers 97 percent of the islands' land surface, so foreign visitors must pay a $100 park
fee upon arrival and be accompanied by a guide in restricted park areas. A $10 tourist registration card is also required.
      TOURS AND ACCOMMODATIONS
     At the Panama Canal: Directions to the Miraflores Visitors Center, with views of the locks, a restaurant, a gift
shop and several exhibits on the canal's history, can be found at www.pancanal.com. Admission is $3.
      Sea-Based: Most visitors choose a multiday cruise ship and tour. High-end outfitters include National Geographic
Expeditions ($4,320 and up; 888-966-8687; www.nationalgeographic.com/ngexpeditions) and Lindblad Expeditions
($7,580 and up, double occupancy; 800-397-3348; www.expeditions.com). For other outfitters, get in touch with the
International Galapagos Tour Operators Association (www.igtoa.org).
      Land-Based: A cheaper option is to stay at hotels and inns on the inhabited islands, basing your explorations from
there. In Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, San Cristobal, the Hotel Orca (593-5-252-0233) is right on the harbor, with rooms
from around $90 a night. The Hotel Silberstein (593-5-252-6277; www.hotelsilberstein.com) is in the center of Puerto
Ayora; doubles begin at $142. The Red Mangrove Inn is nearby (doubles from $190 and up, breakfast included; 593-5-
252-6564; www.redmangrove.com). On Santa Cruz, Galapagos Camping ($90 a night; www.galapagoscamping.com;
reservations are made through the Red Mangrove Inn) can take you to their cave campsite. All hotels can arrange offi-
cial guides for about $60 a day.
      ACTIVITIES
      Diving and Snorkeling: The Galapagos Marine Reserve extends 40 miles beyond the islands and is home to an
astonishing array of marine life. Serious divers can join a live-aboard dive trip, such as the seven-day excursion offered
by Galapagos Network. Book with Ecoventura ($3,495 and up; 800-633-7972; www.ecoventura.com). Guided snor-
kelers can cavort with sea lions off Isla Santiago, swim with sea turtles along the coast of Isla Fernandina, or with eagle
rays and hammerhead sharks at Leon Dormido off of San Cristobal. La Loberia, a beautiful public beach near Puerto
Baquerizo Moreno, allows picnics and guide-free swimming with sea lions, sea turtles and marine iguanas.
      Paddling: Outfitters with special permits offer sea kayaking in restricted areas of the preserve. The Explorers'
Corner uses an eight-passenger catamaran to transport guests and a fleet of sea kayaks to the remotest islands of the
archipelago for eight days of hiking, snorkeling and kayaking ($3,700; 510-559-8099; www.explorerscorner.com).
Wilderness Travel leads guests on an active cruise with eight days of hiking and sea kayaking ($3,195; 800-368-2794;
www.wildernesstravel.com).
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           Sailing Toward Paradise The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday Correction Appended


      Surfing: With several world-class breaks, Isla San Cristobal is the surf capital of the Galapagos -- though surfing
is limited to designated areas, and is only for experienced surfers. Surfing trips are available through Wavehunters (sev-
en days for $1,910, all meals and lodging included; 760-994-4861; www.wavehunters.com).
     RESOURCES
      Conservation volunteering opportunities abound in the Galapagos. Jatun Sacha (www.jatunsacha.org) runs a con-
servation research station on San Cristobal and welcomes volunteers in its habitat restoration programs.
     Information on conservation efforts is also available on the Charles Darwin Foundation's site
(www.darwinfoundation.org) or the Galapagos Conservation Trust's (www.gct.org). Useful trip-planning tips can be
found at www.discovergalapagos.com.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CANALS & WATERWAYS (90%); MARINE SHIPPING (78%); CONTAINERIZATION (77%); IS-
LANDS & REEFS (67%)

GEOGRAPHIC: PANAMA (92%); ECUADOR (91%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

CORRECTION-DATE: January 6, 2008


CORRECTION: An article on Dec. 23 about the Galapagos Islands misstated the rate for a multiday cruise and tour
offered by Lindblad Expeditions. Prices for a trip to the Galapagos alone, double occupancy, start at $4,320; they do not
start at $7,580, which is the rate for the Galapagos cruise and a week in Peru.

GRAPHIC: Photos: (PHOTOGRAPH BY MATTHEW POWER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)(pg. 1)
TOP FROM LEFT Blue-footed boobies in Puerto Villamil
a Sally Lightfoot crab on Isla Floreana
marine iguanas at Puerto Egas
a flamingo on Isla Floreana
Galapagos tortoises at mealtime on Isla San Cristobal.
CLOCKWISE FROM CENTER Sea lions in Puerto Villamil
at sea, bound for Isla Isabella
 tourists on Volcano Chico on Isla Isabella. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICHAEL NAGLE FOR THE NEW YORK
TIMES)(pg. 8) Map of the Galapagos Islands

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               24 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                              December 23, 2007 Sunday
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          Seeking Role Models And Finding Human Beings The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday



Seeking Role Models And Finding Human Beings
BYLINE: By GEORGE VECSEY.
    E-mail: geovec@nytimes.com

SECTION: Section 8; Column 0; Sports Desk; SPORTS OF THE TIMES; Pg. 8

LENGTH: 870 words

     People keep saying they are outraged because a bunch of ballplayers took steroids. How are they going to explain
this to the kiddies?
     My basic response is, oh, boohoo. If you want outrage, save it for the wall of silence from the Jets and pro football
about the wave of head injuries, as described in The New York Times on Saturday.
     The one part of the steroids scandal that outrages me at this late date is that people still expect sports to be the last
outpost of fair play, still want athletes to be different from the rest of us finaglers.
     Let me ask why, after the parade of public figures in recent decades -- their lies, their finger-wagging denials, their
evidence-shredding insouciance -- should the public retain high moral expectations for athletes, who are famous mostly
because of hand-eye coordination? Who elected them role models?
      The Mitchell report provides a perfect opportunity for adults to prepare children for the decisions they will soon
have to make regarding smoking, drugs, drinking, cheating on exams, sex.
       It's like the current fuss over Britney Spears's sister, what's-her-name, who, I gather from the tabloids and the tube,
is pregnant at 16. This event is now supposed to provide a forum for sitting down and talking with our children about
teenage promiscuity. Setting up ballplayers as some elite caste is just as dangerous as taking our moral examples from
some teenager who was probably being exploited just by being put on television. A lot of societies have imperfect dei-
ties: jealous gods, lustful gods, prankish gods, and the worshipers say, look, they are just like us. But not necessarily in
a good way.
      It's that way with athletes. The Mitchell report, as limited as it is, gives us a pretty good peephole below the sur-
face of baseball. Ballplayers, who are trained to look for an edge, knew there was no test for steroids -- courtesy of their
union and lax officials of Major League Baseball -- so they went out and procured steroids, illegal under a 1990 federal
law. A cottage industry grew up, spread from player to player, locker to locker.
       I don't believe for a moment that Kirk Radomski and Brian McNamee were the only pushers in baseball. Despite
all those wonderful presidential candidates prancing around the primaries out there, campaigning against New York,
Sanctuary City, the fact is, we're pretty much like the rest of the world. In this one little corner of American baseball,
two entrepreneurs supplied illegal stuff to ordinary ballplayers looking to stay in the majors, and possibly to a few
great ones, as well.
      Personally, I believe McNamee mostly because he is under legal threat not to commit perjury. I believe he was ly-
ing originally when he defended his lord and liege, Roger Clemens. Now Clemens is wagging his finger at us and insist-
ing he did not use anything illegal from that gofer, that Mr. McNamee.
      We will see if Clemens testifies under oath in front of Congress in January. It would make a good show, just as
McGwire and Palmeiro and Sosa made for a good, if pathetic, show on March 17, 2005, despite the members of Con-
gress fawning all over these demigods.
     We are all too infatuated with our deities, but Clemens is not the point here, nor is Bonds, as obnoxious and dis-
honest as I think he is. Tuck the kiddies in at night and tell them this: Nobody is perfect.
       I remember back in the 1960s when we young sportswriters used to suggest that Mickey Mantle did not, wink-
wink, take good care of himself. Fans in those days did not want to know there was a dark side to sports heroes. I called
it the ''Oh no, not the Mick'' syndrome.
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         Seeking Role Models And Finding Human Beings The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


      As it turned out, the abscess on Mantle's buttock that bled through his pinstriped pants during the 1961 World Se-
ries came from a spurious injection for what was said to be a virus from the same Dr. Feelgood, Max Jacobson, who
injected John F. Kennedy with stimulants from time to time. Yes, that John F. Kennedy, the intelligent young president
who still brings a lump to my throat when Letterman runs those sound bites from articulate presidents we used to have.
The first president I ever voted for had some foibles. We can live with it.
      I learned my lesson two decades ago when I wrote a column advocating two prominent athletes as examples of re-
sponsible public behavior, admirable private lives, charity, good works, blah-blah-blah. Turned out both of them had
fathered children out of wedlock. Children. Plural. I have since gotten out of the role-model business.
      Admire them as athletes. The player you are booing for having a bad day on the field was probably the best athlete
in his home state or his province in Latin America or his prefecture in Japan. He worked hard to get this far, chemicals
or not. I riffle through the Mitchell report and see Mike Stanton, Brian Roberts, David Segui, Andy Pettitte, Lenny
Dykstra, guys I've enjoyed watching, enjoyed interviewing. Some of them opted for an edge. Cheated, that is to say.
       Some of them should probably be suspended for a while, but it was baseball's fault for not having testing and pen-
alties in place. There is room for complexity in the way we regard ballplayers. Tell that to the kiddies. And stop with the
outrage.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CHILDREN (90%); ATHLETES (90%); STEROIDS (90%); BASEBALL (89%); SPORTS (89%);
SPORTS & RECREATION (89%); PRIMARY ELECTIONS (73%); PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS (73%); CAM-
PAIGNS & ELECTIONS (73%); POLITICAL CANDIDATES (73%); PREGNANCY & CHILDBIRTH (67%); AC-
TORS & ACTRESSES (75%)

ORGANIZATION: NEW YORK JETS (58%)

PERSON: BRITNEY SPEARS (55%); MICHAEL MCMAHON (51%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Roger Clemens, right, is not the only public figure to perhaps fall short as someone to emulate.
Mickey Mantle, top left, was thought to be using stimulants in 1960s, and the actress Jamie Lynn Spears, the sister of
Britney Spears, became pregnant at 16. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY BARTON SILVERMAN/THE NEW YORK TIMES
MARIO ANZUONI/REUTERS
ASSOCIATED PRESS)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               25 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                               December 23, 2007 Sunday
                                                 Correction Appended
                                                  Late Edition - Final
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Where Historic Town Houses Still Hold Court The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday Correction Appended




Where Historic Town Houses Still Hold Court
BYLINE: By CHRISTOPHER GRAY.
    E-mail: streetscapes@nytimes.com

SECTION: Section 11; Column 0; Real Estate Desk; STREETSCAPES EAST 78TH STREET; Pg. 5

LENGTH: 827 words

    IT was around 1900 that 78th Street from Fifth Avenue to Madison began to make the transition from rows of
brownstones to individualized town houses. Apartment buildings never invaded the block, as they eventually did most
others, and their absence leaves a street unusually rich in the details of private house architecture.
     It is an airy, gentle street, with three of its four corners occupied by low buildings, allowing light and air into the
midblock.
     On the south side, the red brick and brownstone house at 4 East 78th Street was designed and built in 1889 by the
developer Edward Kilpatrick. It was first occupied by Arnold Falk, whose Water Street company imported Sumatran
tobacco. High up, on the second balcony, Mr. Falk and his family may have passed summer evenings under the pierced
ironwork hanging lamp that has somehow survived both the weather and the drastic removal of the stoop.
      Next door, the imposing limestone house at No. 6 was built in 1914 by Artemus Ward and designed by the archi-
tect John H. Duncan. Mr. Ward, an advertising entrepreneur, was vilified upon the opening of the subway in 1904 be-
cause the Rapid Transit Commission had sold advertising space on its platforms. Within a week of the opening, Mr.
Ward's company had plastered signboards for constipation cures, plays and the like all over the new tile work and mosa-
ic decoration.
      The line of town houses on the north side of the block -- Nos. 3, 5, 7 and 9 -- went up around 1900 in a sweep of
limestone. The suave neo-Gothic No. 3 was designed by C. P. H. Gilbert for Edmund C. Converse, the first president of
the Bankers Trust Company, who amassed the estate now known as Conyers Farm in Greenwich, Conn.
     No. 7, designed by Hoppin & Koen, was occupied by Ormond G. Smith. At his death in 1933, The New York
Times said Mr. Smith and his brother George were credited with discovering and first promoting the author O. Henry.
       The north-side buildings are mostly cut up into apartments and have seen hard wear. But when it is dark, one can
sometimes get a glimpse of elaborate interiors from across the street. And the vestibules are works of art, like that of
No. 9, with its intricate mosaic floors, a barrel-vaulted ceiling and walls of luscious book-matched marble -- in which
the adjacent panels are sliced from the stone so that the veins meet. The sidewalks are lovely bluestone flags extending
all the way out to the gutter, detailed so they don't even need curbstones -- masterworks of the mason's art.
     The south side of the block is built up from the framework of two rows of houses: Nos. 10 to 20, built in 1887 by
Charles Graham; and Nos. 22 to 26, built in 1871 by Silas M. Styles. The men were both developer-architects, but Mr.
Graham carried house design to a particularly high level.
      Both rows are fragmented by later alterations, but the high stoop at No. 12 is almost completely intact (albeit
slathered in taupe-colored paint). From the top step, it is possible to see the spectacular random-laid mosaic tile floor in
the vestibule, as if someone had dumped a bushel basket of semiprecious stones onto the floor.
      Another Graham house, No. 14, was altered to its present neo-Classical exterior in 1917, and then had its insides
gutted in 1983 by New York University for its Fine Arts Conservation Center. A great light well reaches down through
several floors -- an elegant, contemporary touch.
     The house at No. 16 had a conventional 1920s alteration, but the dense plantings of bamboo brush the arms of
passers-by, an unusual experience in the asphalt-and-concrete world of New York City.
     No. 18 was modernized in 1955; the architect, Rollin Caughey, included a remarkable spidery iron balcony, a bas-
ket-weave exemplar of the metalworker's art. And at curbside, nature shows its resilience: a London plane tree was once
                                                                                                     Page 58
Where Historic Town Houses Still Hold Court The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday Correction Appended


hemmed in by an iron tree guard. But the tree enveloped the guard, most of which was cut away. A few parts remain
trapped inside the growing trunk.
       The last house in Mr. Graham's 1887 row, No. 20, is fairly intact, and has an exquisitely patinated brass railing on
its fourth-floor balcony.
      At Mr. Styles's No. 22, the owners, Robert and Roxana Tetenbaum, have EdsonUSA rebuilding the lower section
-- the stoop and lower floors -- in brown stucco to something like the 1871 appearance.
     For some reason this type of repair is considered acceptable in preservation circles. But passers-by may judge for
themselves whether applying a coating of stucco is really restoration, as it is often called, by comparing No. 22 with its
mate at No. 26. The latter has most of its 1871 brownstone facing intact.
      Brown stucco is opaque and uniform, like imitation-wood paneling, but real brownstone is one of our most beauti-
ful building materials, rich and nuanced and translucent. The lintel over the main doorway at No. 26 has the intricate
warp and woof of layers and layers of sediment from millions of years ago.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: HISTORIC DISTRICTS & STRUCTURES (90%); RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY (78%); REAL ESTATE
(73%); MARKETING & ADVERTISING (68%); ART & ARTISTS (65%)

COMPANY: BANKERS TRUST CO OF FLORIDA NA (53%)

GEOGRAPHIC: CONNECTICUT, USA (53%) UNITED STATES (53%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

CORRECTION-DATE: December 30, 2007


CORRECTION: The Streetscapes column on Dec. 23, about 78th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues, mis-
spelled the given name of the advertising entrepreneur who built 6 East 78th. He was Artemas Ward, not Artemus.

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: ALL IN A ROW: Left, the south side of East 78th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues
right, the original architectural rendering of the homes now numbered 10 through 20 East 78th, which were built in
1887
below, the exteriors of Nos. 22, 24 and 26, which were constructed in 1871. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHESTER
HIGGINS Jr./THE NEW YORK TIMES
 AVERY LIBRARY)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                26 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                               December 23, 2007 Sunday
                                                  Late Edition - Final
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                          Intimate Shopping The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday




Intimate Shopping
BYLINE: By CHRISTOPHER CALDWELL.
    Christopher Caldwell, a contributing writer, is at work on a book about immigration, Islam and Europe.

SECTION: Section 6; Column 0; Magazine; THE WAY WE LIVE NOW; Pg. 13

LENGTH: 971 words

     ''Information,'' the apostles of cyberspace have been singing for more than a decade, ''wants to be free.'' Well, may-
be your information does. But in late November, the social networking Web site Facebook discovered that many of its
58 million members don't feel that way. On social networks, people can exchange photos, letters and information with
people they know, and ''friend'' people they don't. Facebook has grown so big, so rich (its market value is estimated at
$15 billion) and so addictive because it offers its users new ways to exchange information and intimacies with people
they care about. In early November, Facebook's 23-year-old C.E.O., Mark Zuckerberg, rolled out an advertising pro-
gram called Beacon. It would track users onto the sites of Facebook's commercial partners -- Coca-Cola, the N.B.A.,
The New York Times and Verizon, among others -- and keep their friends posted about what they were doing and buy-
ing there.
      Did it ever. A Massachusetts man bought a diamond ring for Christmas for his wife from overstock.com and saw
his discounted purchase announced to 720 people in his online network. What if it hadn't been for his wife? What if he
had been buying acne cream? Pornography? A toupee? You could go on. Researchers at Computer Associates, an in-
formation-technology firm, discovered that Beacon was more invasive than announced. MoveOn.org started a petition
movement against Beacon that rallied 75,000 Facebook subscribers.
     Facebook designed Beacon so that members would be able to ''opt out'' by clicking in a pop-up window. But these
windows were hard to see and disappeared very fast. If you weren't quick on the draw, your purchases were broadcast to
the world, or at least to your network. Since people, too, sometimes want to be free, privacy advocates urged that Bea-
con be made an ''opt in'' program, which members would have to explicitly consent to join. In early December, Face-
book agreed to this approach.
      The Beacon fiasco gives a good outline of what future conflicts over the Internet will look like. Whether a system
is opt-in or opt-out has an enormous influence on how people use it. He who controls the ''default option'' -- the way a
program runs if you don't modify it -- writes the rules. Online, it can be tempting to dodge the need to get assent for
things that used to require it. This temptation is particularly strong in matters of privacy. For instance, the ''default
option'' of the pre-Internet age was that it was wrong to read others' mail. But Google now skims the letters of its Gmail
subscribers, in hopes of better targeting them with ads, and the N.S.A. looks for terrorists not only in the traditional
manner -- getting warrants for individual wiretaps -- but also by mining large telecommunications databases.
      So it is with Facebook's Beacon. We used to live in a world where if someone secretly followed you from store to
store, recording your purchases, it would be considered impolite and even weird. Today, such an option can be rede-
fined as ''default'' behavior. The question is: Why would it be? The price in reputation for overturning this part of the
social contract is bound to be prohibitively high.
      For the owners of social-networking sites, it may be a price worth paying. Thanks to data-collection technology,
your shopping choices and preferences have value. Who owns those choices? Common sense says that you do. If a
company wants to use you to advertise its products, it can pay you, just as Nike pays Tiger Woods. But the idea that
your preferences (not to mention your conversations about them) are your property rests on an implicit social contract.
And the thing about implicit contracts is that people who can figure out ways to break them can often make a lot of
money.
      The concept of ''implicit contracts'' was developed in a landmark 1988 paper by the economists Andrei Shleifer
and Lawrence Summers. Their subject -- hostile corporate takeovers -- seems far from cyberprivacy, but it is not.
Shleifer and Summers showed that increases in share price following takeovers were not due to gains in efficiency, as
the defenders of those buyouts claimed. There often were such gains, but they were not the source of the profits. The
                                                                                                                    Page 60
                          Intimate Shopping The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


profits came from reneging on implicit contracts -- like the tradition of overpaying older workers who had been over-
worked when young on the understanding that things would even out later. These contracts, because implicit, were hard
to defend in court. But the assets they protected were real. To profit from them, buyout artists had only to put someone
in place who could, with a straight face and a clean conscience, say, ''I didn't promise nothin'!''
      As commerce moves from Main Street to the Web, lots of businessmen are in that position. All bets are off, and
entrepreneurs are seeking new ways to make money by trial and error. Sometimes they do so by adding value to the
economy. Sometimes they do so by abrogating implicit contracts. Like managers newly seated after a hostile takeover a
quarter-century ago, today's online innovators are not always skilled at telling the difference: ''Your friendships are your
own business? Golly, I wasn't here when they negotiated that.''
      Beacon was a clumsy attempt to reset the default on the common-sense understanding of discretion and to profit
off the resetting. As in the 1980s, technological sophistication, entrepreneurial genius and gains to efficiency are a part
of this story -- but a larger part was the attempt to monetize and sell a vulnerable implicit contract. Facebook was
thwarted, as the corporate raiders of years past were not, because it aimed not at pension plans and seniority-based pay
scales but at something considerably more valuable -- the unwritten rules of privacy that make civilized human interac-
tion possible.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: INTERNET SOCIAL NETWORKING (93%); INTERNET & WWW (89%); COMPUTING & INFOR-
MATION TECHNOLOGY (77%); ALLIANCES & PARTNERSHIPS (68%); PRIVACY RIGHTS (61%); PETI-
TIONS (50%); CHRISTMAS (66%)

COMPANY: FACEBOOK INC (90%); VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS INC (57%); COCA-COLA CO (56%);
GOOGLE INC (50%); CA INC (54%)

TICKER: VZC (LSE) (57%); VZ (NYSE) (57%); KO (NYSE) (56%); GOOG (NASDAQ) (50%); GGEA (LSE)
(50%); CA (NASDAQ) (54%); VER (SWX) (57%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS517212 CELLULAR & OTHER WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS (56%);
NAICS517110 WIRED TELECOMMUNICATIONS CARRIERS (57%); SIC4813 TELEPHONE COMMUNICA-
TIONS, EXCEPT RADIOTELEPHONE (56%); NAICS312111 SOFT DRINK MANUFACTURING (56%); SIC2086
BOTTLED & CANNED SOFT DRINKS & CARBONATED WATER (56%); NAICS518112 WEB SEARCH POR-
TALS (50%); SIC8999 SERVICES, NEC (50%); SIC7375 INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SERVICES (50%);
NAICS511210 SOFTWARE PUBLISHERS (54%); NAICS517210 WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CARRI-
ERS (EXCEPT SATELLITE) (57%); SIC7372 PREPACKAGED SOFTWARE (54%); NAICS519130 INTERNET
PUBLISHING & BROADCASTING & WEB SEARCH PORTALS (50%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: (PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL LEWIS)
CHART: ''Nothing Sacred?''

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                27 of 1258 DOCUMENTS
                                                                                                                     Page 61
                        36 Hours in Singapore The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 23, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

36 Hours in Singapore
BYLINE: By JOSHUA KURLANTZICK

SECTION: Section 5; Column 0; Travel Desk; Pg. 11

LENGTH: 1522 words

     SINGAPORE may be clean, efficient and manicured, but the prosperous island-state knows how to get down and
dirty, too. At a string of open-air bars near the main shopping drag, young Singaporeans with stylishly tousled hair toss
back martinis until the early morning. A sex therapist who styles himself ''Dr. Love'' has become one of the biggest ce-
lebs in town. And the Ministry of Sound, the famous British house music nightclub, has opened a branch in Singapore
that pounds with local D.J.'s. That's not to say Singapore has gone off the rails. Just stroll along its bougainvillea-draped
streets, where order is still enforced by Big Nanny signs, like the one that recently read, ''Low Crime Doesn't Mean No
Crime -- Be Vigilant.''
     Friday
     3 p.m. 1) ORCHIDARIUM
       Get a taste of Singapore's cultivated side at the Singapore Botanic Gardens (1 Cluny Road; 65-6471-7361;
www.sbg.org.sg), an ambling 157-acre park where you'll see a medley of Chinese, Indians and Malays practicing mar-
tial arts, doing yoga and flirting. Founded in 1859, the landscaped gardens are dotted with intricate Victorian gazebos, a
micro rain forest and a dazzling collection of orchids -- from the flamingo-pink hybrid Vanda Miss Joaquim (Singa-
pore's national flower) to varieties named after visiting V.I.P.'s like Margaret Thatcher.
     6 p.m. 2) BEER THERAPY
     Southeast Asia isn't known for beer, but that's starting to change. Brew connoisseurs recently opened Archipelago
Brewery (79 Circular Road; 65-6861-6200; www.archipelagobrewery.com), a microbrewery that revived a Singaporean
beer works originally founded in 1931. Archipelago mixes standard pilsners and ales with local flavors like lemongrass,
tamarind, star anise and wolfberries, a traditional ingredient in Chinese medicine.
     8 p.m. 3)SIDEWALK CHEFS
       Singapore has its share of white-linen restaurants, but food-mad locals salivate for hawker centers, open-air food
courts where each stall serves one dish and the cooks yell out their specialties like ballpark vendors. One of the most
popular, East Coast Lagoon Food Village (1220 East Coast Parkway), sits in a tropical park on the beach. With more
than 50 stalls, the Village offers everything from barbecued tiger prawns to Indonesian satay to drinks made from grass
jelly and aloe vera. Dinner for one, about 10 Singapore dollars, or $6.80 at 1.47 Singapore dollars to the U.S. dollar. For
a quieter, cleaner atmosphere, try the appropriately named Makansutra Gluttons Bay (Esplanade Mall; 65-6336-7025;
www.makansutra.com), by the Esplanade arts complex.
     10 p.m. 4)THE HILLS
      Cap off the evening in style. Skip the Boat Quay night-life area, unless you hanker to meet hundreds of sodden,
sunburned European tourists. Instead, head to Emerald Hill, an upscale area with a cluster of hip pubs, and sip martinis
at Alley Bar (2 Emerald Hill Road; 65-6738-8818), a long and sleek lounge frequented by aspiring fashion models.
     Saturday
     7 a.m. 5)WILD SIDE
      Singapore's skyscraping downtown makes it easy to forget that parks cover much of this island. But in recent
years, Singaporeans have gone wild for adventure sports. Get up before the mercury rises and head to the Bukit Timah
                                                                                                                 Page 62
                       36 Hours in Singapore The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


Nature Reserve (177 Hindhede Drive; 65-6468-5736; www.nparks.gov.sg/nature--bukit.asp), a 400-acre rain forest that
is home to garrulous macaques and some 500 other animal species. Hiking and biking trails wind through the jungle,
creeping with vines and giant ferns. Watch out for the flying lemurs: the possum-sized critters glide overhead between
huge jelutong trees.
     Noon 6)ARRESTING ART
      In the past decade, wealthy Singapore has become a regional hub for contemporary art, attracting painters and
sculptors from China, Vietnam, Myanmar and Thailand. For a glimpse of the expanding art scene, visit the MICA
Building (140 Hill Street; www.mica.gov.sg), a colorful gallery warehouse in a former police station, now run by the
Ministry of Information, Communications and the Arts. In the building, the Soobin Art International gallery (65-6837-
2777; www.soobinart.com.sg) features groundbreaking Chinese artists like Luo Jie, known for his sharp political car-
toons.
     2 p.m. 7)COOKING, LAH?
      Long before Jean-Georges, Singapore's chefs created the ultimate fusion food, a mishmash of Chinese, Indian and
Malay influences that resulted in unique, if not always pretty, dishes like chili crab and fish-head curry. Many of these
dishes are created in a single wok, and are much easier to master than, say, classic French cooking. Shermay's Cooking
School (Block 43 Jalan Merah Saga, 03-64 Holland Village; 65-6479-8442; www.shermay.com) was created by
Shermay Lee, who wrote the definitive cookbook on Nyonya cuisine, which marries Chinese and Malay cuisine. Cours-
es, which last roughly three hours, start at 109 Singapore dollars.
     5 p.m. 8)EXTREME SHOPPING
      Shopping is a national sport, and the main drag, Orchard Road, resembles a tourist mosh pit on weekends; one
tour group knocked me down as they scrambled, like escaped convicts, into a sporting goods store. (You can avoid the
crowds by arriving early, but then you'll miss the action.) Or skip Orchard altogether for the high-end boutiques in Hol-
land Village, a suburb of villas and leafy streets that draws local fashionistas and expatriates. Galerie Cho Lon (01-76
43 Jalan Merah, Saga; 65-6473-7922), an exquisitely cluttered boutique, has classic Chinese chairs and screens, antique
wood furniture and books on Asian history and art.
     8 p.m. 9)DINING WITH ART
      Singapore's National Museum (93 Stamford Road; 65-6332-2659; www.nationalmuseum.sg) is housed in a neo-
Classical-style building from 1887, but it's not just for art lovers. At night, the soaring marble rotunda becomes the
funky restaurant Novus (65-6336-8770; www.novus.sg). It serves modern European cuisine with Asian touches like
five-spiced duck with poached quince (32 Singapore dollars) and crispy-skinned snow cod with garlic pain perdu (34
dollars). If you arrive before your reservation (highly recommended), sidle over to the nearby bar, Muse, and rub el-
bows with the high-society crowd, who were spotted comparing their silver-plated cellphones on a recent visit.
     Midnight 10)ETHNIC CANTEEN
     Though many ethnic neighborhoods have lost their authenticity (Little India resembles a movie set), the Arab
Quarter remains dingy, crowded and real. Wander along Bussorah Street, the main drag, where you'll find halal cafes
open until the early morning. Most draw a mixed crowd of Singaporeans, Lebanese, Moroccans and Indonesians, who
come to smoke shisha pipes, snack on olives, flatbreads and other tidbits and occasionally watch local belly dancers
shake it up.
     Sunday
     Noon 11)COFFEE AND KABBALAH
     Take a cab to Chinatown, where young entrepreneurs have gutted classic old Chinese shop houses painted purple
and pink, and turned them into a warren of new and New Agey cafes. The Whatever (20 Keong Saik Road; 65-6224-
0300; www.whatever.com.sg) is a cafe that serves organic salads, soups and nutty coffee (10 Singapore dollars for
breakfast), along with yoga, reiki and enough kabbalah books to satisfy Madonna.
     2 p.m. 12) SPA ISLAND
      For a quick getaway, Sentosa is an island resort over a causeway bridge, or eight minutes on the new Sentosa Ex-
press monorail (www.sentosa.com.sg). The resort is being developed with two new casinos, but for now you can stroll
                                                                                                                Page 63
                       36 Hours in Singapore The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


through lush green scenery and small, Disney-esque theme parks. If you tire, stop at quiet Tanjong Beach. Or head for a
rubdown at Sentosa's Spa Botanica (65-6371-1318; www.spabotanica.com), a pleasure palace set inside tropical gardens
and complete with an open-air volcanic mud bath. A 90-minute steam bath and massage costs 170 Singapore dollars.
     The Basics
     Singapore Airlines flies nonstop from Newark to Singapore. A recent Internet search found fares starting at
$1,575 for January. Cheaper fares can sometimes be found with non-direct service, with changes in places like Bang-
kok or Tokyo.
      For colonial-era decor and exhaustive pampering, check into the Raffles (1 Beach Road; 65-6337-1886;
www.singapore-raffles.raffles.com). Dating back to 1887, the hotel has been painstakingly restored and is staffed by
Indian attendants in white coats with gold tassels. Rooms start at around 1,000 Singapore dollars, about $680 at 1.47
Singapore dollars to the U.S. dollar.
      Singapore has also blossomed with boutique hotels. The New Majestic Hotel (31-37 Bukit Pasoh Road; 65-6511-
4700; www.newmajestichotel.com) enlisted local contemporary artists to design each room, including one covered wall
to floor in mirrors. Rooms from 300 Singapore dollars.
     The Royal Peacock (55 Keong Saik Road; 65-6223-3522; www.royalpeacockhotel.com), in a converted Chinese
shop house, offers nicely designed rooms starting at 135 Singapore dollars. For deep hotel discounts, try
www.asiarooms.com, though you may have to pay for the room in advance.
      For event listings, check out Time Out Singapore (www.timeout.com/sg/en/), I-S (www.is-weekend.com), a free
local magazine, or The Straits Times (www.straitstimes.com), the leading English-language newspaper.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: BOTANICAL GARDENS (90%); ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES (89%); RESTAURANTS (77%); CE-
LEBRITIES (76%); PARKS & PLAYGROUNDS (72%); PERFORMING ARTS CENTERS (71%); ALTERNATIVE
MEDICINE (71%); CURRENCIES (70%); BREWERIES (69%); RAIN FORESTS (65%); BEACHES (60%); STA-
DIUMS & ARENAS (60%); MARTIAL ARTS (51%)

GEOGRAPHIC: SINGAPORE (92%) SINGAPORE (99%); SOUTH EAST ASIA (79%); ASIA (79%); INDONESIA
(79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: FROM LEFT East Coast Lagoon Food Village, a place to sample food hawkers' wares
young entrepreneurs are redoing shop houses in Chinatown
the Arab Quarter
 a dip off Sentosa Island. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY THE NEW YORK TIMES) MAP: Map of Singapore highlighting are-
as of interest.

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                              28 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times
                                                                                                                     Page 64
               Clicking the Way to Mortgage Savings The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


                                                December 23, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Clicking the Way to Mortgage Savings
BYLINE: By GRETCHEN MORGENSON

SECTION: Section 3; Column 0; Money and Business/Financial Desk; FAIR GAME; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1020 words

     LAST week, the Federal Reserve got around to tightening mortgage lending standards, hoping to eliminate some of
the practices that have made borrowing to buy a home so confounding and costly. Many of the Fed's changes make
sense, especially those that require hidden broker fees to be clearly disclosed and prepayment fees to disappear before a
huge rate reset occurs.
      But everybody knows that the key to driving mortgage scammers out of business is not necessarily new regula-
tions -- it's the enforcement of rules that are already on the books. Only time will tell if enforcement action from the Fed
and others follows all of the regulatory talk.
      Meanwhile, two entrepreneurs with decades of mortgage industry experience have devised a Web site that helps
consumers protect themselves from excessive fees and hidden relationships that can drive up the costs of buying a
home. The site is www.FeeDisclosure.com, and it is a good example of how the private sector can bring sorely needed
transparency to the entire home-buying and mortgage-origination process.
       Those entrepreneurs, Michael A. Kratzer, 42, and Mark Zimmerman, 35, are the founders of a company in
Westlake Village, Calif., that owns the site, and they have spent four years developing the software upon which it is
built. Both men know the ins and outs of the mortgage trade, having spent years in the business.
      ''We want to empower consumers to make informed real estate decisions and help them cut their mortgage trans-
action costs,'' Mr. Kratzer said.
      Indeed, while consumers can book travel arrangements, trade stocks and otherwise shop intelligently online, com-
paring costs associated with a mortgage has not been easy to do on the Internet. Much of the process is shrouded in
mystery until the last moment, when it is time to close on a property.
      By giving borrowers a way to compare early on what they will probably pay for a mortgage in commissions,
points, interest rates and fees, the founders of FeeDisclosure.com say they hope to bring transparency to what is not
only a mind-numbing process but also the biggest financial commitment a consumer typically makes.
     EVERY year, for example, home buyers pay an estimated $50 billion in transaction fees when they take out
mortgages. Some $17 billion of that consists of junk fees charged by lenders, Mr. Kratzer said. Items like $100 e-mail
charges, $75 document preparation fees and $25 FedEx charges are common.
       But other elements can also add to borrowers' costs -- like hidden relationships between service providers, ap-
praisers and lenders. The fee disclosure Web site helps consumers identify both junk fees and hidden relationships, and
it costs consumers nothing.
      First, the site's fee analyzer lets a borrower assess the data from a good-faith estimate supplied by a potential lend-
er and see if the fees are excessive. Such estimates include fees for hazard insurance, document preparation, lawyers'
services, appraisals and other items.
      The fee analyzer gives borrowers a range of fees charged for those services and a national average. It also pro-
vides a tool to help the borrower negotiate fees, Mr. Zimmerman noted. ''By simply asking the questions, the fees will
come down,'' he said. ''This is a baseline for people to educate themselves.''
     Consumers can also go a step further. In the top 50 metropolitan areas (the site plans to add more) prospective
borrowers can ask their real estate broker or banker to give them a fee disclosure report that the professional generates
                                                                                                                    Page 65
               Clicking the Way to Mortgage Savings The New York Times December 23, 2007 Sunday


from the Web site after feeding it data. This is a plain-English description of a loan's terms and costs, describing the
type of loan -- adjustable rate or fixed -- and whether there is a prepayment penalty, for example.
       The report also compares the fees levied in the transaction with national averages. Each fee is described and iden-
tified as either common or not, giving consumers a place to start negotiating for lower or fewer charges. In addition to
fees, relationships that may exist among the different providers are noted.
     A sample copy of a fee disclosure report can be found on the Web site.
      The service is driven by some 30,000 real estate professionals who have signed up with FeeDisclosure.com to
supply data about their offerings, including fees they charge, services they provide and affiliations. More professionals
are signing up every day, including lenders, notaries, appraisers, real estate brokers, mortgage brokers and providers of
hazard insurance.
      The site does not participate in consumers' real estate or mortgage transactions and does not collect a commission
or payment on the transactions. It earns money from real estate professionals in two ways. First, it charges brokers and
real estate agents $99 a year to join the site; those who want their companies and services highlighted on the service pay
an additional $49 a year. ''We made it so reasonable they couldn't afford not to join,'' Mr. Kratzer said.
     By joining the site, the professionals get exposure to prospective borrowers and home buyers. As the
FeeDisclosure.com site grows, so does competition.
      To help keep vendors on the site accountable to consumers, it also has a rating mechanism for participants to rank
the real estate professionals they used, on six factors, including service, accuracy and expertise.
      To be sure, none of the site's disclosures are meant to replace regulatory documents that also are legally required
to be given to borrowers. But the site's extra information can help borrowers get advance warning of costs and allow
them to chisel away at unnecessary or high fees before they are seated around the loan closing table and under the gun.
      The site also allows consumers to name the fees they are willing to pay and see which service providers may be
willing to work with them.
      ''People are very distraught about what the industry is doing to them,'' Mr. Zimmerman said. ''They know they are
getting ripped off, but they don't know exactly how.''
     Now, they can get a clearer picture of what has been a murky process. They can trust and verify.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: US FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (91%); MORTGAGE BANKING & FINANCE (90%); MORTGAGE
LOANS (90%); REAL ESTATE (90%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (89%); MORTGAGE BANKING (89%); AGEN-
CY RULEMAKING (78%); INTERNET & WWW (78%); INTEREST RATES (78%); ECONOMIC NEWS (78%);
COMPUTER SOFTWARE (69%)

GEOGRAPHIC: CALIFORNIA, USA (55%) UNITED STATES (55%)

LOAD-DATE: December 23, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                29 of 1258 DOCUMENTS
                                                                                                                       Page 66
             Ike Turner Is Eulogized as Misunderstood The New York Times December 22, 2007 Saturday


                                                    The New York Times

                                                December 22, 2007 Saturday
                                                    Late Edition - Final

Ike Turner Is Eulogized as Misunderstood
BYLINE: By JEFF LEEDS

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; Pg. 10

LENGTH: 427 words

DATELINE: GARDENA, Calif.

    Even in death, Ike Turner commanded center stage.
      A funeral service for Mr. Turner on Friday followed the same arc as his career as a trailblazer in rhythm and blues
and rock. It was all about the music, except in the moments when it was overshadowed by accusations of domestic
abuse.
      Musical luminaries like Little Richard, Solomon Burke and the producer Phil Spector spoke in tribute at the City
of Refuge Church while Mr. Turner's band, the Kings of Rhythm, performed signature Turner songs like ''Proud Mary''
and ''Rocket 88,'' the 1951 tune that is regarded as one of the first rock 'n' roll songs. Hundreds of fans, friends and fami-
ly members attended the service for Mr. Turner, who died on Dec. 12 at 76.
      Near his coffin were two Grammy trophies and a golden Fender guitar.
     Mourners were faced with the complexities of the legacy left by Mr. Turner, a musical pioneer who spiraled
downward amid drug abuse in the 1980s and was vilified after his ex-wife and former music partner, Tina Turner, ac-
cused him of having beaten her.
     But Mr. Turner offered his own perspective, in a sense, in the music chosen to accompany a video tribute that
played early in the service: ''I'm a bad boy, but Jesus loves me anyway,'' he sang in ''Jesus Loves Me,'' a song from his
Grammy-winning 2006 album, ''Risin' With the Blues.''
      A string of fellow musicians and family members who paraded to the podium to celebrate his creative achieve-
ments refuted the allegations of abuse as overstated while offering varying -- and in more than one instance, unflattering
-- portrayals of Ms. Turner.
       Mr. Spector, the record producer whose recent murder trial ended in a mistrial, said, ''Ike made Tina the jewel she
was.'' He called the 1993 film ''What's Love Got to Do With It,'' which portrayed Mr. Turner as a violent tyrant, a ''piece
of trash.''
      A spokeswoman for Tina Turner said last week that Ms. Turner would have no comment on Mr. Turner's passing.
      But one of the most affecting sentiments at the service came from Rob Johnson, the roots-music entrepreneur
who stoked Mr. Turner's late-career comeback by nudging him to record what would become the acclaimed 2001 album
''Here and Now.''
     His voice cracking, Mr. Johnson said he was relieved that societal ills could ''no longer be projected onto Ike
Turner.''
      The mourners stood as Mr. Burke delivered a deep-throated musical eulogy, which ended with his calling mem-
bers of the audience to the pulpit to be blessed. ''I refuse to bury Ike!'' Mr. Burke shouted at one point. ''I come to raise
him today.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com
                                                                                                              Page 67
             Ike Turner Is Eulogized as Misunderstood The New York Times December 22, 2007 Saturday


SUBJECT: DEATHS & OBITUARIES (90%); MUSIC (90%); JAZZ & BLUES (90%); MURDER (78%); ARTISTS
& PERFORMERS (78%); MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (77%); DOMESTIC OFFENSES (77%); POP & ROCK
(77%); CELEBRITIES (77%); ENTERTAINMENT & ARTS AWARDS (77%); DOMESTIC VIOLENCE (77%);
RECORD PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION (76%); RECORD INDUSTRY (76%); SUBSTANCE ABUSE (72%);
MISTRIAL (62%); SINGERS & MUSICIANS (77%)

PERSON: ARLEN SPECTER (72%)

GEOGRAPHIC: CALIFORNIA, USA (59%) UNITED STATES (59%)

CATEGORY: Music

Ike Turner

LOAD-DATE: December 22, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: Photos: Little Richard speaking at the service on Friday.
  Ike Turner Jr., foreground, being consoled, as Ike and Tina Turner's son, Ronald, stood. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY AX-
EL KOESTER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: News; Biography

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                             30 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                The New York Times

                                             December 21, 2007 Friday
                                               Correction Appended
                                                Late Edition - Final

Mel Cheren, 73, an Entrepreneur of Disco
BYLINE: By DOUGLAS MARTIN

SECTION: Section B; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; Pg. 9

LENGTH: 718 words

   Mel Cheren, an innovative record executive who helped start the Paradise Garage, a cavernous focal point of the
downtown Manhattan gay disco scene in the 1970s and '80s, died on Dec. 7 in Manhattan. He was 74.
     The cause was pneumonia as a complication of AIDS, said Sherri Eisenpress, the executor of his estate.
     As the AIDS epidemic began to ravage his nightclub's clientele, Mr. Cheren gave the Gay Men's Health Crisis, the
prominent AIDS service group, its first home, donating space for it in a building he owned in Chelsea.
                                                                                                       Page 68
   Mel Cheren, 73, an Entrepreneur of Disco The New York Times December 21, 2007 Friday Correction Appended


     It was Mr. Cheren's financial backing that helped his business partner and former lover, Michael Brody, create the
Paradise Garage in 1977 out of what was once a parking garage at 84 King Street in SoHo. In its heyday, patrons
crowded the club's 25,000-square-foot floor as they danced under the commanding sway of the inventive disc jockey
Larry Levan and the club's powerful sound system.
       The Paradise Garage was ''the epicenter of D.J. culture in the '80s,'' an article in Newsday said in 2002, describing
it as a place where Madonna and Diana Ross would mingle with artists like Keith Haring and gussied-up unknowns. In
a 2006 documentary about Mr. Cheren, ''The Godfather of Disco,'' he called the Garage ''the ultimate expression of the
whole fabric'' of gay night life in an era of extravagant parties, casual sex and recreational drug use.
      With his record label, West End, Mr. Cheren helped create the 12-inch vinyl single, which gained its greatest pop-
ularity in discos. The disc permitted longer playing time than the standard seven-inch record and was said to provide a
cleaner sound.
      Mr. Cheren was also considered the originator of the scratchy ''whoosh'' sound that became a staple of hip-hop
disc jockeys. And while working for another label, Scepter Records, before founding West End, he came up with the
idea of instrumental B-sides for dance singles.
     In the 1980s Mr. Cheren had to deal with a backlash against disco music, even though West End had some of its
biggest hits after the disco craze had peaked. He eventually gave up his interest in the company to his partner, Ed
Kushins. The Paradise Garage closed in 1987.
      A more serious problem was AIDS, which was infecting many men close to Mr. Cheren. In 1980, as he was con-
verting part of his Chelsea building into apartments, he offered space to the Gay Men's Health Crisis, then a young or-
ganization in need of headquarters.
        ''No one would rent to them,'' Mr. Cheren said in an interview with The New York Times in 1994.
      After the organization moved to other quarters in 1984, Mr. Cheren turned the building into the Colonial House
Inn, a 20-room gay-oriented guesthouse. He continued to live there.
      In the late 1980s Mr. Cheren founded 24 Hours for Life, a nonprofit group that raised money from the music in-
dustry for AIDS relief. That organization also published his autobiography, ''My Life and the Paradise Garage: Keep On
Dancin'.''
        Mr. Brody died of AIDS in 1987. Mr. Levan, the disc jockey, died in 1992. Mr. Cheren left no immediate survi-
vors.
      Melvin Cheren was born on Jan. 21, 1933, in Everett, Mass., and grew up in the Boston area. He got his first job
in the record business in 1959, as a salesman for ABC-Paramount Records. He also began painting, preferring to use his
fingers instead of a brush. Several of his canvases were reproduced on the covers of jazz albums, including Sonny
Rollins's ''East Broadway Run Down.''
       In the 1960s Mr. Cheren was drafted into the Army and served in Germany. On his return, in 1970, he went to
work for Scepter and urged the company to release a new sort of dance music he had been hearing. He became a ''disco
pest,'' he told The Times in 2000.
      Mr. Cheren and Mr. Kushins started West End Music Industries in 1976. The company's first release was
''Sessomatto,'' a disco instrumental by Sesso Matto. West End went on to release disco hits like Karen Young's ''Hot
Shot,'' Taana Gardner's ''Work That Body'' and ''Heartbeat,'' Bettye LaVette's ''Doin' the Best That I Can'' and the NYC
Peech Boys' ''Don't Make Me Wait.''
      Mr. Cheren liked to mix play and work, taking what he picked up at dance clubs in New York City and on Fire Is-
land as inspiration for his records and paintings. At age 69, he said, ''I still own the dance floor.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: ENTREPRENEURSHIP (90%); AIDS & HIV (90%); GAYS & LESBIANS (89%); MEN (89%); REC-
ORD PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION (89%); RECORD INDUSTRY (89%); MUSIC INDUSTRY (74%); POP &
ROCK (73%); ARTISTS & PERFORMERS (73%); EPIDEMICS (72%); PNEUMONIA (72%); MEN'S HEALTH
(72%); RESPIRATORY DISEASE (72%); HIP HOP CULTURE (72%); RAP MUSIC (61%); INTERVIEWS (60%)
                                                                                                       Page 69
   Mel Cheren, 73, an Entrepreneur of Disco The New York Times December 21, 2007 Friday Correction Appended




COMPANY: CHELSEA BUILDING SOCIETY (51%)

ORGANIZATION: GAY MEN'S HEALTH CRISIS (57%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS522120 SAVINGS INSTITUTIONS (51%); SIC6035 SAVINGS INSTITUTIONS, FEDERAL-
LY CHARTERED (51%)

PERSON: MADONNA (55%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (91%) NEW YORK, USA (91%) UNITED STATES (91%)

CATEGORY: Music

Mel Cheren

LOAD-DATE: December 21, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

CORRECTION-DATE: January 7, 2008


CORRECTION: A headline on Friday with an obituary of Mel Cheren, a record executive who helped start the Para-
dise Garage disco in Manhattan, misstated his age. As the obituary noted, he was 74, not 73.
     Because of an editing error, an obituary on Dec. 21 about Mel Cheren, a recording executive who promoted disco
and helped start the Paradise Garage, a focal point of the Manhattan gay disco scene in the 1970s and '80s, misstated his
role in the development of the scratchy ''whoosh'' sound that became a staple of hip-hop disc jockeys. Though Mr.
Cheren was among the first to use the technique, the disc jockey known as Grand Wizard Theodore is generally regard-
ed as its originator, not Mr. Cheren.

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Mel Cheren in 2000. (PHOTOGRAPH BY FRED R. CONRAD/THE NEW YORK TIMES)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Obituary (Obit); Biography

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               31 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                               December 21, 2007 Friday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

To Keep Doors Open, St. Bart's Opens Its Arms
BYLINE: By ROBIN FINN
                                                                                                                       Page 70
            To Keep Doors Open, St. Bart's Opens Its Arms The New York Times December 21, 2007 Friday


SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; PUBLIC LIVES; Pg. 4

LENGTH: 930 words

    THE Rev. William McDonald Tully, with his bald head bare and his clerical shirt and collar camouflaged by that
urban essential, a V-neck sweater in black cashmere, is loping down the center aisle of St. Bartholomew's Episcopal
Church, the gently decaying Park Avenue landmark where he has served as rector, and as a bit of a secular entrepre-
neur, since 1994.
      The church is hushed at midday, and dimly lighted. A Christmas tree glows to the left of the altar, and poinsettias
ring the pulpit. The public trickles in and out, murmuring at the grandeur, or perhaps realizing that this austere sanctuary
once provided the setting for the madcap wedding scene from ''Arthur,'' the Dudley Moore comedy.
      In the pews to Mr. Tully's left, in varying stages of slumping and dozing but not flat-out sleeping (that and disrup-
tive vocalizing are grounds for ejection), are the homeless denizens of the weekday congregation. ''Every once in a
while you run into somebody who is incredulous that this could happen on Park Avenue,'' says Mr. Tully. To his right is
a sprinkling of tourists and prayer-sayers. Musicians carrying lutes and zithers prepare to give a free concert in the
chapel. Out on the plaza, the church's Christmas bazaar is drawing last-minute shoppers.
      Peaceable coexistence -- street people and devout souls -- is the prevailing vibe, and Mr. Tully is its architect.
      ''I came here for the risk of it,'' he says. His job as rector of St. Columba's, the largest parish in Washington, ''was
getting too cushy after 14 years.''
      And after 14 years at St. Bartholomew's? Cushy address, certainly, Park Avenue at East 50th, but the luster stops
there. ''There was a question of whether we should even be here, of whether it is too costly to be running a world-class
landmark in the middle of New York City, a place where real estate is one of the religions,'' he says. ''We exist in a city
where it takes a lot of trouble and expense -- $8 million a year -- to keep the door open.''
       But open it is. As is Cafe St. Bart's, an upscale restaurant in the church's community house with a menu more syb-
aritic than ecclesiastical. Mr. Tully introduced it in 1995, and even performed waiter duties on Day 1. ''As I told our
board, 'If you think running a church in New York City is hard, you should try running a restaurant!''' The cafe is bus-
tling, as is the 10-bed shelter, the food pantry and the soup kitchen, which served 80,000 meals to the needy this year.
     Making this landmark a relevant citizen rather than an anachronism is his mission. Anyone who supposes he has
Vanderbilts filling the collection plates is mistaken. They are long gone, represented only by the church's Stanford
White entrance portal, which they commissioned at the turn of the 20th century.
      THE repairs and renovations the church now needs will ultimately cost $100 million, which means Mr. Tully must
depend on the kindness of strangers, like the corporations in the non-Romanesque skyscrapers surrounding St. Bart's, to
help foot the bill. That the church lost a long, internally divisive legal battle in 1992 against the Landmarks Preservation
Commission to replace its community house with a 59-story office tower, a transaction that would have provided secure
financial footing to its ministry, is why Mr. Tully was hired. A diehard Mets fan and father of two grown sons, Mr. Tul-
ly, 60, grew up in Los Angeles, flirted with journalism, and after a stint in the Model Cities Program here wound up in
the same profession as his great-grandfather.
       Only an outside-the-steeple thinker whose idea of a religious experience is donning cycling Spandex for a full-
throttle 12-mile bike ride through Central Park at daybreak could be unfazed about raising $30 million -- in phase one --
in the current fiscal climate. So far, his parish has come up with $15 million; corporate donations, led by a $1 million
gift from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, have yielded just over $2 million. Progress.
      His very first Sunday sermon at St. Bart's was, in a word, lonely. In a space designed to accommodate 1,300 wor-
shipers, there were perhaps 200. Extinction not only seemed a real possibility; in a sad way it seemed to make sense,
even to him. ''I didn't want to be known for being the rector of a fancy landmark and nothing more.'' Mr. Tully came to
the instant revelation that if reinvention was in the cards, putting new people in the pews was paramount. ''A theology of
radical welcome was what we needed,'' he says. ''Because there is no parish here in the traditional sense of a residential
neighborhood, we had to become a destination church. We are loose around the edges, but solid at the core. This is a
thinking person's church.''
                                                                                                                   Page 71
           To Keep Doors Open, St. Bart's Opens Its Arms The New York Times December 21, 2007 Friday


       He brought in a rabbi, Leonard Schoolman, to run the church's Center for Religious Inquiry, and hired an imam,
Feisal Abdul Rauf, to teach a course called ''What Every Christian and Jew Needs to Know About Islam.'' The radical
welcome mat worked. ''In a world in which religion is blamed for violence and death, here we all just talk to each oth-
er,'' he says. ''On Sept. 12, 2001, we looked like geniuses.''
      A deal was struck with a nearby hotel for free parking for St. Bartholomew churchgoers on Sundays. The mem-
bership slowly rose to 800, from 15 families with children to 200. A boys-and-girls choir was established. A charter
school for the musically inclined is in the advanced planning stage.
     With the soul of the ministry healthy, Mr. Tully feels the time is right to concentrate on the bones of the building.
Expensive, yes. Priceless? He thinks so.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: RELIGION (89%); RESTAURANTS (88%); TEMPORARY SHELTERS (77%); CHRISTIANS &
CHRISTIANITY (73%); STRINGED INSTRUMENTS (71%); ARTISTS & PERFORMERS (68%); MUSIC (66%);
FULL SERVICE RESTAURANTS (64%); FOOD CHARITIES (61%); CHRISTMAS (71%); SINGERS & MUSI-
CIANS (66%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (92%) NEW YORK, USA (92%) UNITED STATES (92%)

LOAD-DATE: December 21, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: ''I didn't want to be known for being the rector of a fancy landmark and nothing more.'' THE
REV. WILLIAM MCDONALD TULLY (PHOTOGRAPH BY MARILYNN K. YEE/THE NEW YORK TIMES)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Biography

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               32 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                              December 20, 2007 Thursday
                                                 Correction Appended
                                                  Late Edition - Final

A Social Order Shaped By Technology and Traffic
BYLINE: By STEVE LOHR

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1661 words

DATELINE: ALVISO, Calif.
                                                                                                     Page 72
  A Social Order Shaped By Technology and Traffic The New York Times December 20, 2007 Thursday Correction
                                                   Appended

   Palo Alto Networks is a high-tech start-up with ample financing and ambitious plans. But despite its name, the
company has no offices in Palo Alto, Silicon Valley's unofficial capital.
     Instead, it is based about a dozen miles farther south, on the outskirts of San Jose, in Alviso. The company is de-
veloping technology to protect computer networks from hackers and misuse, so it chose to be where engineers with
networking expertise are clustered: around big companies in the field like Cisco and Juniper Networks.
     Nir Zuk, its founder and chief technology officer, notes that Palo Alto is synonymous with high-tech innovation,
and he was living there when he came up with the name.
     ''But in Silicon Valley, you locate a company where the engineers are,'' he said. ''You would never locate a net-
working company in Palo Alto.''
      Silicon Valley, the wellspring of the digital technologies fueling globalization, is itself a collection of remarkably
local clusters based on industry niches, skills, school ties, traffic patterns, ethnic groups and even weekend sports teams.
      ''Here, we have microclimates for wines and microclimates for companies,'' said John F. Shoch, a longtime ven-
ture capitalist.
     Silicon Valley, home of Stanford and other universities, has long been the model of success for a modern regional
economy, and policy makers worldwide have tried to emulate it by nurturing high-tech companies around universities.
There have been a few winners, like the semiconductor manufacturing hub in and around Hsinchu Science Park in Tai-
wan.
      Yet a look at the microclusters within Silicon Valley demonstrates the business relationships, the social connec-
tions and the seamless communication that animate the region's economy. It also suggests the human nuance behind the
Valley's success and shows why that success is not easy to copy, export or outsource.
      ''These microclusters turn out to be a very efficient way to innovate, to see what works and what fails, and do it
extremely rapidly,'' said AnnaLee Saxenian, an expert in regional economies and a professor at the University of Cali-
fornia, Berkeley.
      New companies, and emerging industry clusters, seek to build on and tap the skills of older clusters. While there
are plenty of exceptions, it is generally true that hardware clusters -- semiconductors, disk drives and network equip-
ment, for example -- are in the South Valley, around San Jose and Santa Clara. The actual manufacturing of hardware,
of course, moved to cheaper places years ago. What remains in the Valley is product design and engineering.
      Moving farther north in the Valley typically means moving farther away from the guts of the machine and climb-
ing up the tiers of computing -- from chips to layers of business and consumer software and then into San Francisco,
home to people with online advertising and digital design skills.
      For start-ups, the location decision can be critical, particularly because of the area's notorious traffic jams. Lately
the calculations about traffic, talent and real estate have become trickier because the Valley's economy is surging again,
driving up rents and salaries and clogging roads.
      The boom is fueled by the accelerating march of Internet technology into advertising, media and entertainment,
and even into company data centers and the traditional software industry. Companies like Google and Facebook are the
best known, but a spate of start-ups are in their wake, pursuing both business and consumer markets.
      Yaniv Bensadon, the founder of FixYa, made a major location decision a few months ago. He started his company
-- a Web site for technical support and repair suggestions for consumer products, based on users' experiences -- two
years ago in Israel. But he moved to the Valley in August to be in the thick of things.
    ''For a consumer Internet company, this is where everything happens,'' he said. ''It's true that things can be done
anywhere on the Internet, but at the end of the day it's still a people business.''
      Many recent start-ups are hybrid companies. They combine computing with other fields, so they must tap a variety
of skills.
        Adchemy is a start-up that is still developing its technology and has not yet announced a product; in Valleyspeak,
it is in stealth mode.
                                                                                                     Page 73
  A Social Order Shaped By Technology and Traffic The New York Times December 20, 2007 Thursday Correction
                                                   Appended

       Adchemy's goal is to improve the efficiency of online advertising by using predictive algorithms and other scien-
tific techniques. It already has a team of 50 people, mainly computer scientists and software engineers. They typically
live in the Valley, mostly from Palo Alto south. But the company also needs people with advertising and marketing ex-
pertise, who are often young and single and prefer to live in San Francisco.
      So Adchemy is in Redwood City -- just north of Palo Alto, but a 30-minute drive from San Francisco. The choice
is important, since the company plans to double or triple its payroll over the next year. ''Recruiting is crucial for us,''
said Murthy Nukala, chief executive of Adchemy. ''There is a real war for talent in this field.''
      Big industry-leading companies tend to become the center of gravity in each cluster: in semiconductors in Santa
Clara, it is Intel; in networking in San Jose, Cisco; in database software in Redwood Shores, the giant is Oracle; and of
course, in Internet services in Mountain View, it is Google.
      Then there are the clusters that are based more on personal connections or affiliations than on geography. Stan-
ford, just outside Palo Alto, is perhaps the strongest cluster-generator in the Valley.
      Stanford students and staff have been behind countless companies in the Valley, from established ones like
Hewlett-Packard, Cisco and Sun Microsystems to more recent success stories like Google and VMware. And for dec-
ades, Stanford has been a source of ideas and talent for the Valley's venture capitalists, bunched around the Palo Alto
thoroughfare Sand Hill Road, the Wall Street of venture capital (and another Valley cluster).
      Navin Chaddha, a managing director of the venture capital company Mayfield Fund, personifies the Stanford net-
work of students, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. As a Ph.D. student, he developed video-streaming technology
that enabled Stanford to put its closed-circuit television programs on the Web.
     Alumni investors noticed the potential, and Mr. Chaddha and a professor, Anoop Gupta, formed a company,
VXtreme, which Microsoft bought in 1997. Its technology became part of Windows. ''If you are using Windows Media
Player, you are using our creation,'' Mr. Chaddha said.
      Mr. Chaddha also represents another social cluster in the Valley, the ethnic Indian community. When he and Mr.
Gupta needed advice, he said, ''we went back to our roots,'' tapping leaders of the Indus Entrepreneurs, a powerful
ethnic Indian networking group. Today, Mr. Chaddha is a senior member of the organization.
      New companies with deep ethnic links -- mainly Indian and Chinese -- are sprouting up in the Valley. Often, eth-
nic background is but one layer of social relationship. SnapTell, a start-up that seeks to marry image-recognition tech-
nology, cellphones and marketing, was founded last year by G. D. Ramkumar and Gautam Bhargava, Indian computer
scientists and Valley veterans. The company has 10 employees, six of whom have Ph.D.'s and three of whom are from
Stanford.
      The shared backgrounds, interests and schools make for frictionless communication that fosters rapid innovation.
      Even weekend sports, it seems, become the basis for informal business clusters in the Valley. Start-up ideas or job
opportunities often surface on the sidelines of a weekend soccer game or, increasingly, cricket match. Giriraj
Vengurlekar, an engineer who lives in Sunnyvale, plays in one of the Valley's cricket leagues, which now has 40 teams.
His team, the Centurions, includes employees of Sun Microsystems, eBay, Cisco, Yahoo and other technology compa-
nies.
      Last year, Mr. Vengurlekar joined Serus, a start-up that makes software for managing offshore manufacturing op-
erations. The cricket pitch, he finds, is a good place to scout recruits or learn of job openings. ''People don't play cricket
to get jobs, but it definitely happens,'' he said. ''Cricket definitely spills over into business.''
     There is a certain visual identity to the clusters, and a hint of cultural tension among them. The clearest schism,
perhaps, separates Valley dwellers from San Francisco residents.
      The hard core in the Valley jokes that San Francisco, with its Internet advertising and design cluster, has a ''high
P.I.B. coefficient,'' for People in Black. The city's companies also have more women than those in the Valley. San Fran-
ciscans regard Valley engineers as denizens of a style-free suburban zone for whom being well-dressed means wearing
jeans and a T-shirt with a company logo.
      In recent years, more companies have successfully tapped the pool of people, including engineers, who shun the
Valley: Craigslist, Linden Lab, Slide and Twitter. Salesforce.com, a thriving company that sells software as a service
over the Internet to business customers, was a pioneer when it chose San Francisco as its base at its start in 1999.
                                                                                                     Page 74
  A Social Order Shaped By Technology and Traffic The New York Times December 20, 2007 Thursday Correction
                                                   Appended

      San Francisco, said Marc Benioff, the founder of Salesforce and a former Oracle executive, has been ''an incredi-
ble recruiting tool and a differentiator when we are competing for talent with our suburban rivals.''
      The Valley residents see themselves as true entrepreneurs, entirely focused and dedicated. Marc Andreessen, 36,
the co-founder of three companies in the Valley (Netscape, Opsware and Ning), concedes that San Francisco is generat-
ing more start-ups these days.
      ''But in general, the nerds with minimal social lives like me are well down in the Valley, and the cool kids with the
trendy glasses and Prada shoes who like to go to parties are in San Francisco,'' Mr. Andreessen said in an e-mail mes-
sage. ''You can guess who has the leg up in building companies.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: COMPUTER NETWORKS (90%); STARTUPS (89%); ECONOMIC NEWS (89%); ENGINEERING
(89%); OUTSOURCING (78%); ELECTRONICS (78%); COMPUTER CRIME (78%); VENTURE CAPITAL (78%);
SEMICONDUCTORS (77%); GLOBALIZATION (76%); TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT (75%); SEMI-
CONDUCTOR MFG (70%); SPORTS (52%); SPORTS & RECREATION (52%); ETHNICITY (52%); MARKETING
& ADVERTISING (50%); ONLINE MARKETING & ADVERTISING (50%); ONLINE ADVERTISING (50%);
CLIMATOLOGY (71%); COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS (65%); COMPUTER SOFTWARE (71%)

GEOGRAPHIC: SAN JOSE, CA, USA (92%); SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA (79%); SAN FRANCISCO BAY AR-
EA, CA, USA (95%) CALIFORNIA, USA (95%) UNITED STATES (95%); TAIWAN (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 20, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

CORRECTION-DATE: December 21, 2007


CORRECTION: An article in Business Day on Thursday about the social networking of technology start-ups in Cali-
fornia misidentified the location of the part of Sand Hill Road where Silicon Valley venture capital firms are concen-
trated. It is in Menlo Park, not Palo Alto.

GRAPHIC: Photos: Giriraj Vengurlekar, an engineer who lives in Sunnyvale, says the cricket pitch can be something
of an informal job market.
 Nir Zuk of Palo Alto Networks, with Dave Stevens, right, and Jana Kameda, said, ''You would never locate a network-
ing company in Palo Alto.'' So his start-up is in Alviso, Calif., to the south. (PHOTOGRAPHs BY THOR SWIFT FOR
THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               33 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                              December 20, 2007 Thursday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Nanotechnology Near the Point When It's Time to Go Public
                                                                                                      Page 75
   Nanotechnology Near the Point When It's Time to Go Public The New York Times December 20, 2007 Thursday




BYLINE: By JAMES FLANIGAN

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; ENTREPRENEURIAL EDGE; Pg. 7

LENGTH: 1309 words

    NANOTECHNOLOGY companies, nurtured on billions of dollars in government grants and venture investments
through most of this decade, are getting ready to go public.
      Being near taking such a step is another stage in the evolution of nanotechnology, the science of materials meas-
ured at billionths of a meter or one-500th of a human hair.
     Experts note that nanotechnology-enabled products are already used in industry.
        ''There are 200 commercial products in cosmetics, apparel and sporting goods in which nanotechnology plays a
role,'' said Lynn E. Foster, emerging technologies director for the law firm Greenberg Traurig and author of the 2006
book ''Nanotechnology: Science, Innovation and Opportunity.'' He cites clothing with a coating of nanoparticles -- from
the Nano-Tex Corporation of Oakland, Calif. -- that repels stains.
      And increasing numbers of nanotech products are in the offing. Mihail Roco, senior adviser for nanotechnology
at the National Science Foundation and an architect of the government's research effort, predicted in an interview on
the Web site of the National Nanotechnology Initiative that by 2015 nanotechnology will play a crucial role in $1 tril-
lion worth of products, ''which would require two million workers.''
     Companies in nanotechnology speak of adapting their research to medical innovations, in which nanoparticles
would deliver medicine directly to individual cells, and to solar energy, in which nano-enabled photovoltaic coatings
would capture and store the sun's energy at a lower cost than today's solar panels.
      The NanoGram Corporation in Milpitas, Calif., is aiming some of its research efforts toward such solar ambitions.
''We have 58 of our 69 employees working in R.& D. in the clean technology area, including solar power,'' said Kieran
Drain, chief executive of NanoGram, which earns revenues by licensing innovations to manufacturers of optical and
electronic products.
      NanoGram has a venture with Nagase & Company of Japan, a manufacturer of light-emitting diode, or L.E.D.,
screens for digital devices. ''Our nanomaterials enable the screens to emit more light,'' Mr. Drain said. In its 11-year
history, NanoGram has spun off or sold operations to other companies in communications and medical electronics. In
the last two years, the company has raised almost $27 million in venture capital backing and looks to go public in 2009
''when we'll have become larger in annual revenues,'' Mr. Drain said.
      Another company hoping to go public in the near future is Unidym Inc., which works with clusters of carbon na-
noparticles that possess extraordinary properties in tensile strength and conduction of electrical current. Sean Olson,
vice president for operations and strategy, said Unidym is working with companies that produce the touch screens for
cellphone devices, A.T.M.'s and airport check-in terminals.
       ''Our carbon nanotube technology makes the light-emitting chipsets less brittle and able to emit more light,'' he
said. ''Our screens can take a pounding.''
     Unidym, based in Menlo Park, Calif., is a subsidiary of the Arrowhead Research Corporation, a public investment
company that was founded in 2003 to back small companies engaged in nanotechnology research. Arrowhead, based in
Pasadena, Calif., is advised by half a dozen professors at the California Institute of Technology. In March, Arrowhead
helped Unidym merge with Carbon Nanotechnologies, a Houston-based firm that was founded by the late nanotechnol-
ogy pioneer Richard Smalley of Rice University, who won the Nobel Prize for his work.
        ''Unidym and Carbon Nanotechnologies make a powerful combination for the future of the semiconductor indus-
try,'' said John Miller, vice president business development at Arrowhead. He explained that nanoparticles, working at
atomic scales, can produce semiconductors at more infinitesimal levels than current electronic technology and at lower
cost than today's manufacturing plants, which typically cost $5 billion to build.
                                                                                                      Page 76
   Nanotechnology Near the Point When It's Time to Go Public The New York Times December 20, 2007 Thursday


     Arrowhead Research is backed by Fidelity Investments, the mutual fund company, and York Capital Manage-
ment, a hedge fund company, and other public shareholders.
      ''As a public company, we can take a somewhat longer-term perspective on earning a return on investment,'' Mr.
Miller said. He gave that as a reason Arrowhead was able to combine Unidym with Carbon Technologies. Venture fund
investors in Carbon Technologies, which was founded in 2000, ''needed to get their money out,'' Mr. Miller explained.
Arrowhead can now reap its own return when it assists Unidym in going public, possibly next year if general market
conditions are favorable.
      The Arrowhead example points up two factors in the recent evolution of nanotechnology. One is the role of uni-
versities. In disbursing $8 billion in research grants since 2001, the National Nanotechnology Initiative has worked
through 60 or so universities all over the United States. And it is still working through the universities that have been
designated as Centers and Networks of Excellence, including the Center for Nanobiotechnology at Cornell University;
the Center for Scalable and Integrated Nano-Manufacturing at the University of California, Los Angeles; the Institute
for Nanoelectronics and Computing at Purdue University and others.
      The other factor is the fickleness of financial market opinion. At the beginning of this decade, nanotechnology
was greeted with predictions of instant wonders and investment success. But when technological developments seemed
to take longer than anticipated, investor enthusiasm cooled and nanotechnology was looked on as an overhyped prom-
ise. Now attitudes are becoming positive again, Mr. Foster, the nanotechnology author, said, and ''we'll see many firms
coming to the public markets.''
      Indeed, NanoDynamics Inc., a company based in Buffalo, that has developed a nano-enabled fuel cell that gener-
ates hydrogen energy at military bases and factories, filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange
Commission in May intending to raise $100 million with a public stock offering. It withdrew the registration statement
in November because of financial market uncertainties, but is a candidate to go public when markets settle down.
     NanoDynamics had $4.4 million in revenue in 2006 but spent $8.8 million on research that year. Currently the
company has a Defense Department grant for fuel-cell research and other financing from the National Institutes of
Health for research on infection-resistant medical devices and implants.
     The company needs to raise public money to build manufacturing plants for the products it is planning for the
emerging solar power industry, according to its registration with the S.E.C.
     NanoDynamics, Unidym and Nanogram all presented their stories at a forum on public finance for nanotechnol-
ogy at Caltech on Dec. 8.
      Clearly, federal and state government support for nanotech research has spawned a lively field of innovation. And
giant companies, including General Electric and Hewlett-Packard, are also involved in pursuing the new science.
     To be sure, questions are also being raised about the risks of unleashing materials of infinitesimal size and un-
known properties. The Economist magazine reported recently that some scientists in Britain and America were con-
cerned about possible toxic qualities of nano particles of materials that are harmless at their full size.
     Asked about potential dangers, Mr. Roco of the National Science Foundation responded that issues of possible
adverse effects for air, water and soil are being studied at several of the Nanotech Initiative Centers. Mr. Miller of Ar-
rowhead Research said he believed that ''questions of toxicity will be explored but balanced by the potential benefits for
medicine, energy and so many other fields.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: NANOTECHNOLOGY (95%); RESEARCH (89%); SOLAR ENERGY (89%); VENTURE CAPITAL
(89%); RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (89%); SCIENCE FUNDING (79%); NATURAL GAS & ELECTRIC
UTILITIES (77%); COSMETICS & TOILETRIES (76%); INTERVIEWS (75%); MAJOR US LAW FIRMS (75%);
AIRPORTS (60%); MOBILE & CELLULAR TELEPHONES (65%)

COMPANY: NAGASE & CO LTD (64%); GREENBERG TRAURIG LLP (83%)

ORGANIZATION: NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (56%)
                                                                                                      Page 77
   Nanotechnology Near the Point When It's Time to Go Public The New York Times December 20, 2007 Thursday


TICKER: 8012 (TSE) (64%)

GEOGRAPHIC: SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, CA, USA (90%) CALIFORNIA, USA (90%) UNITED STATES
(90%)

LOAD-DATE: December 20, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: Photo: A scientist at Unidym in Menlo Park, Calif., inspecting coated substrate used to manufacture touch
screens. Unidym uses clusters of carbon nanoparticles to make the substrate. (PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER DaSILVA
FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                              34 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                            December 19, 2007 Wednesday
                                                Correction Appended
                                                 Late Edition - Final

Joel Dorn, Record Producer, Dies at 65
BYLINE: By DOUGLAS MARTIN

SECTION: Section A; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; Pg. 35

LENGTH: 660 words

     Joel Dorn, who, having achieved his adolescent ambition of becoming a producer for Atlantic Records, went on to
influence the shape of pop music in the work of artists like Roberta Flack, Bette Midler and the Neville Brothers, died
on Monday in Manhattan. He was 65.
     The cause was a heart attack, said a spokesman for Hyena Records, the last of a string of record companies where
Mr. Dorn produced.
      Mr. Dorn's career included recording jazz greats like Max Roach and Herbie Mann, then discovering and shaping
pop musicians like the Allman Brothers. He infused pop music with soul and jazz and helped win a number of Grammy
Awards for Atlantic, then built a distinctive career with other companies, some of which he founded, by repackaging
older releases and unearthing unknown recordings from private collections and elsewhere.
     He claimed to be guided by intuition, saying in an interview with The Philadelphia City Paper in 1997: ''A bell
goes off in your stomach when you see or hear something that grabs you.''
      Mr. Dorn was born in Yeadon, Pa., on April 7, 1942. Growing up in Philadelphia, he learned to love music from
the radio his parents kept on to hear news about World War II. He developed a taste for Ray Charles, the Drifters and
other artists recorded by Atlantic. By his account, he was 14 when, hoping to join the company, he began writing to
                                                                                                      Page 78
  Joel Dorn, Record Producer, Dies at 65 The New York Times December 19, 2007 Wednesday Correction Appended


Nesuhi Ertegun, who founded Atlantic with his brother, Ahmet. In an interview with Luxury Experience magazine this
year, Mr. Dorn characterized the correspondence as ''blind ambition.'' He did not say whether Mr. Ertegun answered.
     In his early 20s Mr. Dorn worked as a disc jockey for WHAT-FM in Philadelphia at a time when that station was
noted for serious jazz. He had fallen in love with the station at 15 while working at a factory, he told National Public
Radio in 1998.
       In the mid-1960s, Nesuhi Ertegun heard Mr. Dorn on the radio and offered him a chance to produce ''The Laws of
Jazz,'' a record featuring Hubert Laws as band leader. He soon hired Mr. Dorn to produce other jazz records and made
him a vice president.
      Record producers are analogous to movie directors, controlling recording, mixing and mastering, among other
things. Mr. Dorn strove to allow musicians maximum freedom in recording sessions. Whether this approach brought out
the best in artists like Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Les McCann and Eddie Harris, the results incontrovertibly drew positive
notice from fans and critics.
      Mr. Dorn's production helped win two Grammys in 1973 for Robert Flack's hit ''The First Time Ever I Saw Your
Face,'' and three Grammys in 1974 for her ''Killing Me Softly With His Song.''
     Among popular albums he produced were Bette Midler's ''Divine Miss M''; the Allman Brothers' ''Idlewild South'';
Leon Redbone's ''On the Track''; and the Neville Brothers' ''Fiyo on the Bayou.''
      Mr. Dorn is survived by his companion, Faye Rosen, and his sons: Michael, of Philadelphia, Adam, of Manhat-
tan, and David, of Los Angeles.
     Like many producers, Mr. Dorn expanded in entrepreneurial directions after leaving Atlantic in 1974. He
worked on a freelance basis for Capitol, Warner Brothers, Columbia, Epic, A&M and Arista, Billboard magazine re-
ported. In the late 1980s he began specializing in repackaging back catalogs for Atlantic, Rhino and other labels.
      He founded or helped found several labels, including Night, 32 Records and Hyena, and used these to record mu-
sic originally taped for radio or personal purposes. He went to great lengths to hunt down some of this material.
      ''I heard a rumor that a radio station in Newark was throwing out a rare tape library,'' he said in an interview with
the Florida newspaper The St. Petersburg Times in 1991. ''So I hustled over there. I keep a pair of coveralls in the car
so when I'm snooping around I can look like a workman.
     ''I rooted around and found two Dr. John tapes about an hour and a half before they picked the trash up.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: POP & ROCK (91%); MUSIC (90%); RECORD PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION (90%); JAZZ &
BLUES (90%); ARTISTS & PERFORMERS (90%); MUSIC INDUSTRY (90%); RECORD INDUSTRY (90%); EN-
TERTAINMENT & ARTS (89%); ENTERTAINMENT & ARTS AWARDS (89%); INTERVIEWS (88%); MOVIE
INDUSTRY (73%); PUBLIC BROADCASTING (73%); PUBLIC RADIO (66%); WORLD WAR II (66%); SINGERS
& MUSICIANS (89%); FILM DIRECTORS (73%)

COMPANY: NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO (53%); NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO INC (53%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (73%) PENNSYLVANIA, USA (92%); NEW YORK, USA (73%) UNIT-
ED STATES (92%)

CATEGORY: Music

PERSON: Joel Dorn

LOAD-DATE: December 19, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

CORRECTION-DATE: January 5, 2008
                                                                                                      Page 79
  Joel Dorn, Record Producer, Dies at 65 The New York Times December 19, 2007 Wednesday Correction Appended




CORRECTION: An obituary on Dec. 19 about the record producer Joel Dorn, using information provided by a
spokesman for a record company with which he was affiliated, referred incorrectly to a survivor, Faye Rosen. She was
Mr. Dorn's wife, not his companion. The obituary also misstated the relationship of the recording executive Nesuhi
Ertegun, whom Mr. Dorn wrote to as a young man, to Atlantic Records in its early days. Mr. Ertegun joined Atlantic
after it was founded by his brother, Ahmet Ertegun, and Herb Abramson. He did not found it with his brother.

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Joel Dorn (PHOTOGRAPH BY REUTERS)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Obituary (Obit); Biography

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                35 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                             December 19, 2007 Wednesday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

It's Just Fine to Drink and Read
BYLINE: By ERIC ASIMOV

SECTION: Section F; Column 0; Dining, Dining Out/Cultural Desk; THE POUR; Pg. 8

LENGTH: 980 words

     BEEP, beep, beep, beep: it's the truck backing up with this year's crop of wine books for the holidays. Make no
mistake, reading is the next best thing to drinking for the wine lover, and much more practical on subways, buses and
trains.
      Vintage '07 is a bit straightforward and earnest -- foursquare, as Britons might say -- more ripe and informative
than inspiring. Still these six books have much to say and do it well.
      Foremost in interest is To Cork or Not to Cork: Tradition, Romance, Science, and the Battle for the Wine Bottle
(Scribner, $26) by George M. Taber, who recounted the famous 1976 blind tasting between France and California in
''Judgment of Paris'' (Scribner, 2005).
     On the surface, the issue of bottle closures would not seem to stir the soul, unless you've uncorked a precious old
wine and found not the aroma of transporting romance but the odor of moldy cardboard. Such frustration gives new
meaning to this saga of the cork industry and the upstart competitors who shocked it from its smug languor.
     Sealing a bottle of wine is more complicated than even the most dedicated drinkers might guess. Beverages like
sodas can simply be capped and sent down the assembly line, but fine wine is a living, breathing thing.
      Cork is nature's perfect closure -- when it works. It was not until the 1960s, surprisingly, that cork taint became an
issue. By the 1980s it had become a serious problem.
                                                                                                                     Page 80
                 It's Just Fine to Drink and Read The New York Times December 19, 2007 Wednesday


     Enter the plastic cork, the screw cap and, most recently, the glass stopper, each alternative closure's ascent fueled
by entrepreneurial vigor conspicuously lacking in the cork industry. Mr. Tabor sets forth the pros and cons of each in
no-nonsense prose that will make you want to pull out the dusty old microscope and examine a cork.
       As the title indicates, Rudolph Chelminski's new book, I'll Drink to That: Beaujolais and the French Peasant Who
Made It the World's Most Popular Wine (Gotham Books, $27.50), takes on two significant subjects. The first is Beaujo-
lais, the wine, the region and its people, and this Mr. Chelminski does in rich, vivid, affectionate detail. It is a story of
the indomitable peasant spirit, slogging on through wars, pestilence, natural disaster and even occasional prosperity.
      Perhaps the most famous Beaujolais peasant is Georges Duboeuf, the book's second subject, who built his family's
small wine business into one of the best-known wine brands on earth.
      It is an admirable tale of hard work and vision, and yet as well as Mr. Chelminski tells the story it's not entirely
persuasive. Whether Beaujolais was ever the world's most popular wine is certainly open to debate, and if Mr.
Duboeuf's success in marketing Beaujolais nouveau helped make it so, it would seem equally worth asking whether it
also contributed to Beaujolais's current state of crisis. But Mr. Chelminski is not dispassionate on the issue. As he says
straight out, he considers Mr. Duboeuf a friend and is partial to him, which doesn't make his story less compelling, just
less convincing.
       Bordeaux, with its corporate ownership, great wealth and subdued pleasures, may seem a far journey from Beau-
jolais, though it certainly has its troubles, too. Stephen Brook's exhaustive survey, The Complete Bordeaux (Mitchell
Beazley, $60), is a fresh and authoritative addition to the Bordeaux library.
      Mr. Brook is a British wine writer whose restraint does not undermine his authority. He freely concedes that writ-
ers can easily be seduced by Bordeaux's powerful marketing blandishments, and that chateaus often provide unreliable
information.
     Yet he probes deeply, and offers a clear-eyed look at 21st-century Bordeaux, with its reverse osmosis and micro-
oxygenation technology, its oenologists and its traditionalists. Despite a few errors -- maps of Pessac-Leognan and the
southern Graves have been swapped -- Bordeaux lovers should value this guide.
      How rapidly is the world of wine changing? China now has more acres planted with wine grapes than the United
States does. What else has changed? Just about everything, whether incrementally or drastically. To keep up, Hugh
Johnson and Jancis Robinson have put out a handsome sixth edition of The World Atlas of Wine (Mitchell Beazley,
$50), with improved graphics and expanded coverage of evolving places like Spain, California, Australia and Asia. It's
an essential reference for wine lovers.
     No wine region in America has evolved as rapidly as Washington State, and Paul Gregutt, a Washington wine
columnist, has been watching it grow for more than 20 years. In Washington Wines and Wineries: The Essential Guide
(University of California Press, $34.95) he looks in depth at the land, its people and its wines.
      Mr. Gregutt is an unabashed optimist: ''I believe -- and I hope you'll agree with me -- that Washington state is go-
ing to become one of the greatest wine regions in the world in the 21st century.'' Even if you don't agree, this is a re-
freshingly unpedantic way to keep track of all those wines now appearing in stores.
     Winemakers, like chefs, have stepped out of the shadows to become stars, nowhere more so than in California.
Even so, the vast majority toil anonymously, burdened with tasks that rarely live up to the glamorous image.
      New Classic Winemakers of California: Conversations With Steve Heimoff (University of California Press,
$27.50) is a fascinating peek into the lives of winemakers. Mr. Heimoff, an editor at Wine Enthusiast magazine, offers a
question-and-answer format and manages to penetrate the marketing mythology.
      Though he occasionally descends into the winespeak of Brix, malolactic and trellising, Mr. Heimoff stands back
as his subjects reveal their industry and themselves. Some seem to be thoughtful and well-rounded, others are fun-
loving and down to earth, and a few come across as rampaging egotists. Ego in the wine business? I'm shocked.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: WINE (90%); BOOK REVIEWS (78%); BEVERAGE PRODUCTS (78%); ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
(70%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (63%); NATURAL DISASTERS (50%)
                                                                                                                     Page 81
                 It's Just Fine to Drink and Read The New York Times December 19, 2007 Wednesday


GEOGRAPHIC: PARIS, FRANCE (56%) CALIFORNIA, USA (56%) FRANCE (79%); UNITED STATES (56%)

LOAD-DATE: December 19, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO (PHOTOGRAPH BY TONY CENICOLA/THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                36 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                              December 19, 2007 Wednesday
                                             The New York Times on the Web

Cafe's Growth Is Promising, but There's That Lack of a Stove
BYLINE: By BRENT BOWERS

SECTION: Section ; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg.

LENGTH: 1326 words

    This is the second in a series of three articles about start-ups and their founders' hopes for the year ahead. The first
appeared last week. This column will return to all three after six months, and again after one year, to compare their
achievements with their original goals.
     Caitlin Adler is grappling with an age-old conundrum of starting a business: growth is good but she still has to
meet the payroll.
      Opening day sales at Ms. Adler's Sweet Bites Bakery & Cafe in West Acton, Mass., on Oct. 2 were $329. On Oct.
13, she and her manager, Martha Lawton, let out whoops as they counted up the day's take at the coffee shop and a
booth they had set up at a local street fair: more than $1,800.
      Before November was out, the weekly tally was edging toward $7,000, beating projections by $1,000. By then,
Ms. Adler had introduced Sunday brunches, added upscale soups and sandwiches and treats like $6 lemon meringue
tortes and $5.50 chocolate praline mousse bombes and increased her full-time and part-time staff to 14 from five. She
was also offering ''open mike'' nights for customers to sing or do comedy acts, a staple of the previous owners.
      But the problem, Ms. Adler said, was ''payroll.'' It shot up to a peak of $11,000 a month in November, double her
projections, forcing her to dip into an emergency line of credit -- new cash infusions from her parents, who are bank-
rolling Sweet Bites. (She and her boyfriend, Chris Vuich, who runs the nonpastry side of the menu, have yet to pay
themselves a salary.)
     Far from feeling stressed, however, Ms. Adler is taking the financial squeeze in stride. She believes that she has
found her calling and that she will succeed.
      ''It's fun being the boss because you can do anything you want,'' she said last month. ''I'm feeling good.''
                                                                                                        Page 82
  Cafe's Growth Is Promising, but There's That Lack of a Stove The New York Times December 19, 2007 Wednesday


      This week, the 25-year-old Ms. Adler was feeling even better. Weekly sales are now above $7,000, and she has
cut back her staff, reducing monthly payroll to $9,000, which for the first time she can meet on her own. To woo more
customers, she plans to install a prepared foods case after Christmas and begin wine tastings in the spring.
     A month ago, she was forecasting revenue of $10,000 to $12,000 a week by June; now, she projects $12,000 to
$15,000.
      Like most entrepreneurs, she has had brushes with Murphy's Law. She started Sweet Bites in October 2006 as a
wholesale maker of gourmet brownies, but found she could not compete at craft fairs with vendors of cheaper choco-
late-covered apples and fudge. ''The lesson I learned was: find the right market,'' she said.
      At the Sweet Bites cafe, she has been dogged by other surprises. She had to postpone the opening by 10 days, for
instance, to hire plumbers to plug hidden leaks and electricians to repair faulty wires, and she is frustrated by how much
time she has to spend paying bills and doing other office work.
     Then there is the kitchen. She cannot afford to pay $15,000 to buy and install a stove and hood. So the cooks use
butane burners that go through $80 of fuel canisters a week.
     From the perspective of an expert, how is she really doing? John Foley, the restaurant adviser for
AllBusiness.com, an online resource for businesses, gives her a passing grade so far -- but warns of setbacks to come.
      On the plus side, he says, are her passion and her restaurant experience. On the minus side is her unfamiliarity
with actually running a business and, an element beyond her control, the chaotic nature of the restaurant trade.
       ''It is the most dysfunctional business in the world,'' he said. ''I've opened five restaurants, three delis and one bak-
ery. I've had winners and losers. It is a tough fight for everybody who goes into it. I get e-mails every day from people
who ask, 'How did this happen to me?'''
      He offers this practical advice for Ms. Adler:
       Make one of your parents a partner immediately and put your mother or father -- or somebody else -- in charge
of the books. (Ms. Adler's father is a former editor in the business section of The New York Times; her mother is a law-
yer.)
      Start a catering division immediately.
      Buy a stove immediately.
       Keep a close eye on costs and waste. ''I can tell you how much a teaspoon of mayonnaise costs on a sandwich,''
he said.
      Drop sidelines like open mike night if they do not pay off quickly.
      Create a detailed plan for selling the business when, and if, the time comes.
      Ms. Adler agrees with him on all points -- in principle. She says she has an accountant but does some bookkeep-
ing to hold down costs. She plans to do catering (and is working to update her Web site from her early wholesale days,
www.sweet-bites.com). She would install a stove if she could, she said. She keeps a tight rein on costs and a close eye
on what works and what does not, and, she said, she is already thinking about her next venture.
      She has also hewed to a cardinal rule of retailing, which is to toil in the trenches first. In high school, she worked
in a cafe and pastry shop. Later, she did a restaurant internship, earned a degree in bakery and pastry arts at the Culi-
nary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. and then took a summer job at the Ocean Edge Resort on Cape Cod.
         Her big break came when she landed a position as pastry cook at the Four Seasons in Boston. It was not a perfect
fit. ''I'd come in, make souffles and go home,'' she said.
      Meantime, she had taken a second job as the pastry chef at a popular Boston restaurant, where she met Mr. Vuich.
In October 2003, she was transferred to the Palm Beach Four Seasons. She had always wanted to work in Florida, but
the routine of a corporate kitchen still bothered her.
      A year later, she returned to the Four Seasons in Boston, and again took a second job at another restaurant, and
again rebelled against the daily routine. ''It was: come in, set up, make one of 10 things, whatever the menu was, like
seven-layer chocolate cake,'' she said.
                                                                                                       Page 83
 Cafe's Growth Is Promising, but There's That Lack of a Stove The New York Times December 19, 2007 Wednesday


     It was time, she said, to go out on her own. She had always wanted to own a restaurant because, like most entre-
preneurs, she hated reporting to a boss. She also wanted to make more money.
      She is willing to work for it. She puts in 12- to 13-hour days and takes catnaps to make up for sleep deprivation,
including one at 4 a.m. in her car that was briefly interrupted by an inquisitive police officer.
      Ms. Adler has adhered to another business maxim by hiring a talented No.2 as the day-to-day manager. Ms. Law-
ton is a former restaurant owner. And she has followed the basic principle of retailing success, finding a good location.
The cafe is just off the main street in West Acton, part of Acton, an upscale Boston suburb of 21,000. West Acton has
a Starbucks but Sweet Bites is the only privately run neighborhood coffee shop with its own style and idiosyncrasies.
      Ms. Lawton says customers love the huge beams, the airy space and the patio, as well as the pottery scattered
about the interior and the artwork on the walls (which, with prices ranging up to $1,500, are potential gravy for the bot-
tom line). One early morning regular, realizing the place was short-staffed, pitched in for several hours one day.
     If Sweet Bites succeeds, it will not be Ms. Adler's final stop on her entrepreneurial journey. ''Down the road, I
might sell it,'' she said. ''But sooner or later, I also want to open a place in Florida or California.''
     First, she has to turn a profit -- a daunting challenge, according to Mr. Foley, the restaurant consultant. ''You
never make money the first year,'' he said. ''You rarely make money the second year.''
      Complicating matters, Ms. Adler has to start paying back hefty loans from her parents -- interest-only for five
years, then a lump sum remittance of the principal. If she fails to meet those terms, she has agreed to make her father a
partner.
     ''Will his stake be 50 percent?'' she is asked. She frowns. ''I don't know about 50 percent,'' she replied.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: RESTAURANTS (89%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (78%); RETAILERS (76%); TEMPORARY STAND
RETAILING (76%); RETAIL BAKERIES (75%); WAGES & SALARIES (71%); BAKERIES (70%); ARTS FESTI-
VALS & EXHIBITIONS (68%); FULL TIME EMPLOYMENT (66%)

LOAD-DATE: December 19, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                37 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 18, 2007 Tuesday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

A Midnight Service Helps African Immigrants Combat Demons
BYLINE: By NEELA BANERJEE

SECTION: Section A; Column 0; National Desk; Pg. 24
                                                                                                   Page 84
  A Midnight Service Helps African Immigrants Combat Demons The New York Times December 18, 2007 Tuesday


LENGTH: 935 words

DATELINE: WASHINGTON

     At an hour when most people here are sleeping or sinning, the worshipers of the Spiritual Warfare ministry gather
in the cold sanctuary of a neighborhood church to battle evil.
       The students, taxicab drivers, homemakers and entrepreneurs, all Christians, mostly from French-speaking Afri-
ca, attend a midnight service four nights a week to seek deliverance from lust, anger, fear and sadness.
       They sing. They pray fervently. Finally, they kick and shadowbox with what they contend is the real force behind
life's problems: the witches and devils whose curses they believe have ground down their families, towns, entire nations
in Africa and that have pursued them to a new country, making it hard to find work, be healthy and survive.
     ''Some situations you need to address at night, because in the ministry of spiritual warfare, demons, the spirits be-
witching people, choose this time to work,'' said Nicole Sangamay, 40, who came from Congo in 1998 to study and is a
co-pastor of the ministry. ''And we pick this time to pray to nullify what they are doing.''
      Founded by a Congolese couple, Spiritual Warfare is one of many ministries and congregations in the growing Af-
rican diaspora in the United States and abroad grappling with witchcraft. In most other churches, Ms. Sangamay said,
you could not even raise the issue, let alone pray to combat its effects.
      Those other churches might argue that such a focus on witchcraft is a relic of Africans' old beliefs, a dangerously
pagan preoccupation. But scholars say this is Christianity made profoundly African. Spiritual Warfare considers itself
Pentecostal, and like many other Pentecostals, worshipers see the battle between God and Satan, or what they also call
the Bible against witchcraft, shaping the world.
     ''Religion for them is not like in the West,'' said Jacob K. Olupona, professor of African religious traditions at the
Harvard Divinity School. ''It's not simply seen as meaning and reference to a transcendental order. Religion is seen as
something that works. It has a utilitarian view, and people are looking for solutions in different angles and different
ways.''
     The Spiritual Warfare congregants here said that because their ancestors were not Christians, they were cursed,
Africa is cursed and the sins of their fathers are now visited upon all the children.
     One blustery Monday night, men and women trickled into the ministry's rented space at Deeper Life Bible Church
on Sargent Road Northeast, some groggy from the nap they had to take to stay awake to midnight.
      Rene Tameghi put his Bible and notebook down before kneeling, placing elbows in his chair and praying. Sita
Waba would have to be at work at 8:30 a.m., but these two hours, Ms. Waba said, holding a cup of coffee, gave her
strength. A few parents carried sleeping toddlers.
      ''Say, 'Jesus, I am here for you tonight,''' Jose Shinga told the congregation from a small, raised stage covered in
red carpeting and bordered by pots of silk flowers.
      The men and women, still in coats, vests and caps, sang a song of ''Allelujahs'' in French, stomping, clapping and
shuffling along with the joyful beat. The voices seemed stronger than those of the 25 people gathered, a quarter of the
regular Sunday attendance. The neighbors once called the police to complain, a congregant said, and the police told
them to keep it down.
     The day before, the parishioners began a fast. ''Why do we fast toward the end of the year?'' Mrs. Shinga said to
the worshipers. ''That is when Satan wants sacrifices, blood, and so we ask God to protect us and our families.''
      When Mrs. Shinga asked the worshipers to pray for forgiveness, the loud pleas of each man and woman, faces
turned to the floor or heavenward, rose together like the rumble of a train.
       People repeat accounts that they have heard of cancer and infertility cured through Spiritual Warfare. But few
such events have occurred so far in Washington, Ms. Sangamay said, because the congregation is just two years old.
Still, she said, people turn to her and her husband for ''soul therapy,'' which involves prayer and fasting. The ministry
does not turn away people from secular resources like counseling or medicine.
                                                                                                   Page 85
  A Midnight Service Helps African Immigrants Combat Demons The New York Times December 18, 2007 Tuesday


      ''Every day in the village, or even here, people are putting curses on you,'' said Yemba Shinga, Mrs. Shinga's hus-
band and the other preacher on Monday. ''They declare that you won't get a job, or will be separated from your family or
get an incurable disease.
      ''But you know how to pray to God. Tell them, 'C'est fini!' I will not repeat the story of my ancestors, of my past,
of the devil.''
     The congregants shouted, ''C'est fini!''
     They listened, they moved the red chairs to the back of the hall, and then they called on the Holy Spirit to fight the
enemy. Following Mr. Shinga, they said: ''I rise now against every form of the devil! You want me under a curse, but I
renounce you in the name of Jesus.''
       With each prayer, young men and middle-age women punched, kicked or stood and quaked. They pounded their
fists. They reviled the devil in all his forms.
      They sliced their arms through the air to cut the chains of evil binding them. They pretended to tie up Satan. A
toddler happily stamped the floor like the grown-ups. Mr. Shinga ran out of breath as he urged on the worshipers. The
prayers ended. They did all that they could.
      ''We declare this place to be blessed,'' Mrs. Shinga said, as the worshipers quieted down. ''Thank you, Lord, Jesus
Christ. Go in the peace of the Lord.''
     People had already zipped up against the chill. They walked out into the Washington night, ready.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CHRISTIANS & CHRISTIANITY (91%); RELIGION (91%); CHILDREN (89%); STUDENTS & STU-
DENT LIFE (89%); FAMILY (78%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (72%); COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS
(72%); PROTESTANTS & PROTESTANTISM (89%)

GEOGRAPHIC: AFRICA (95%); UNITED STATES (93%)

LOAD-DATE: December 18, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Alain Langueu praying at the midnight service of the Spiritual Warfare ministry in Northeast
Washington. Four nights a week, worshipers, all Christians and mostly from French-speaking Africa, seek deliverance
from lust, anger, fear and sadness. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY DANIEL ROSENBAUM FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                38 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                                December 17, 2007 Monday
                                                    Late Edition - Final

Tough Love, Conveyed With Nails and a Cross
                                                                                                                      Page 86
           Tough Love, Conveyed With Nails and a Cross The New York Times December 17, 2007 Monday


BYLINE: By SUSAN STEWART

SECTION: Section E; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; TELEVISION REVIEW 'HARD AS NAILS'; Pg. 8

LENGTH: 524 words

     In one of the strangest scenes from ''Hard as Nails,'' a documentary that will be shown Monday night on HBO, an
unordained Roman Catholic minister named Justin Fatica stands before a teenager and shouts, ''Jesus loves you!'' as an
assistant slams a metal folding chair against the minister's back. And that is not even the most painful scene in this inti-
mate and disturbing film.
       At another Catholic youth gathering, Mr. Fatica uses one of his team leaders, Kathleen Sciame, as an object les-
son. ''She's fat!'' he tells his audience over and over, mocking her, then hugging her, apparently as a demonstration of
Jesus' love for all his children, even the unattractive ones.
     Ms. Sciame bravely endures this abuse. ''If it's going to change some people,'' she says, ''I'd rather that than me be
happy.''
     Religion isn't easy, but it's rarely looked tougher than it does here. ''Nails'' follows Mr. Fatica, in his late 20s, on
his mission to schools and churches around the country and -- his first international trip -- in Barbados. At every stop
Mr. Fatica and his team stage simulated student re-enactments of the Crucifixion, featuring a life-size cross, large nails
and shouting.
       Although no actual Christians are harmed in the making of these makeshift passion plays, Mr. Fatica recognizes
the link between suffering and spiritual need, and welcomes it with an enthusiasm that borders on martyrdom. When he
is not being hit with chairs, he is inviting his young listeners to share their tales of woe, which include unpopularity, low
self-esteem and suicidal thoughts.
     Linking teenage misery to the suffering of Jesus seems to work; many in his audience end the sessions by giving
themselves over to Jesus -- but at a price. In Vermont officials at one Roman Catholic high school asked him to leave,
saying they didn't have enough guidance counselors to deal with the effects of his visit.
      Born to affluent parents, this self-styled prophet enjoyed a misspent youth before finding his calling. His mother
compares her son to his father, an entrepreneur, saying they are both ''visionaries.'' But ''Justin wants the world to be-
lieve what he believes, and that can be a problem,'' she adds.
      Whether with his parents, his newborn son, Joseph, or supporters who underwrite his ministry, Mr. Fatica is char-
ismatic and upbeat. Like his mother, his wife, Mary, seems to have the ability to keep his ego in check. They met when
he was ministering at her college, and she was having a bad day: ''He was like, you need Jesus, and you won't cry so
much. I was like, you need to get out of my room.''
     But Mr. Fatica won her over, as he has so many. Whether ''Hard as Nails'' will win viewers over probably depends
on how they feel about evangelism -- and teenage angst -- in the first place.
      HARD AS NAILS
      HBO, Monday night at 8, Eastern and Pacific times; 7, Central time.
     Directed by David Holbrooke; Sarah Klein, producer; David Klagsbrun, editor; Etienne Sauret, director of photog-
raphy; Sarah Holbrooke, co-producer; Tom Mason, associate producer; Milton, composer; senior producer for HBO,
Nancy Abraham; executive producer, Sheila Nevins.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: RELIGION (92%); CHRISTIANS & CHRISTIANITY (90%); DOCUMENTARY FILMS (78%); SUI-
CIDE (75%); CHILDREN (74%); CATHOLICS & CATHOLICISM (90%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (54%)

GEOGRAPHIC: VERMONT, USA (79%) BARBADOS (79%); UNITED STATES (79%)
                                                                                                                 Page 87
          Tough Love, Conveyed With Nails and a Cross The New York Times December 17, 2007 Monday




LOAD-DATE: December 17, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Review

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               39 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                              December 17, 2007 Monday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

A Familiar Editor for Gawker
BYLINE: By BRIAN STELTER

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 2

LENGTH: 446 words

     Nick Denton, the entrepreneur who has built Gawker Media into a formidable blog brand, said two weeks ago that
he wanted the new editor of his flagship site, Gawker.com, to oversee its evolution toward a more traditional news op-
eration.
     Now he has apparently determined that he is the right man for the job.
     Mr. Denton, who has parlayed his collection of 14 blogs into a multimillion-dollar enterprise, will become the
managing editor, at least on a temporary basis, of the prominent New York media blog on Jan. 2, according to three
employees who requested anonymity because the move has not been announced. Asked about the new position, Mr.
Denton declined to comment.
       The decision may indicate Mr. Denton's desire to have a more direct role in his first blog. On Nov. 30, immediate-
ly after three of Gawker's top editors quit, Gawker published a job listing for a managing editor.
     ''It's no longer enough to take stories from The New York Times, and add a dash of snark. Gawker needs to break
and develop more stories,'' the job listing stated.
     That dash of snark -- the hallmark of Gawker since it was introduced in 2002 -- is less valuable in a Web clogged
with Gawker clones. Mr. Denton was apparently not impressed by any of the initial job applicants; within days he had
decided to name himself managing editor.
     Last Thursday the Web site published another job listing, this time seeking reporters -- preferably with newspaper
backgrounds -- who will make and break news.
      Maggie Shnayerson, the associate editor of Gawker.com, said the transition from gossip blog to news-oriented site
was a natural one. ''If you own a business in an industry that changes every minute, you always have to look at what
you're doing,'' she said.
                                                                                                                Page 88
                   A Familiar Editor for Gawker The New York Times December 17, 2007 Monday


      Mr. Denton is fond of sending news tips, via pithy instant messages and subject-line-only e-mail messages, to the
editors of his 14 blogs. When those editors don't act on the tips, Mr. Denton has been known to publicly flog them by
posting messages in the comment threads of the blogs.
      In October Mr. Denton shared a tip with the editor of Valleywag, his Silicon Valley gossip blog, about the loca-
tion of the wedding of a Google co-founder. In a subsequent post about the wedding, Mr. Denton asked the editor in the
comments: ''I told you this. Why wasn't it worth floating?''
     Mr. Denton has edited one of his blogs once before: he oversaw Valleywag for seven months after firing the editor
in November 2006.
     For Mr. Denton, the number of page views is the foremost barometer of success or failure. He proudly noted that
page views at Valleywag doubled during his editing tenure. Gawker averages 10 million page views a month.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: BLOGS & MESSAGE BOARDS (90%); INSTANT MESSAGING (78%); ELECTRONIC MAIL (61%);
WEDDINGS & ENGAGEMENTS (60%); EMPLOYMENT SEARCH (76%)

COMPANY: GOOGLE INC (51%)

TICKER: GOOG (NASDAQ) (51%); GGEA (LSE) (51%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS518112 WEB SEARCH PORTALS (51%); SIC8999 SERVICES, NEC (51%); SIC7375 IN-
FORMATION RETRIEVAL SERVICES (51%); NAICS519130 INTERNET PUBLISHING & BROADCASTING &
WEB SEARCH PORTALS (51%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (53%)

LOAD-DATE: December 17, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                              40 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                             December 17, 2007 Monday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

You Can Go Home Again, but You'll Pay the Consequences
BYLINE: By BEN BRANTLEY

SECTION: Section E; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; THEATER REVIEW 'THE HOMECOMING'; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1272 words
                                                                                                   Page 89
    You Can Go Home Again, but You'll Pay the Consequences The New York Times December 17, 2007 Monday


     First of all, it really is that good. You would expect it to have shrunk over the years, the way buildings that loomed
large in your childhood seem smaller when you revisit them. But as the first-rate revival that opened Sunday night at the
Cort Theater makes electrifyingly clear, ''The Homecoming'' is every bit as big as its reputation.
      Forty years after its Broadway debut titillated and outraged American theatergoers, this Harold Pinter masterpiece
of family warfare continues to unsettle. It's not the play's sexual content or the blood-drawing viciousness of the clan it
portrays. After all, since ''The Homecoming'' first opened, kinfolk in kitchen-sink dramas, including the current hit
''August: Osage County,'' have regularly provided far more explicitly detailed catalogs of their hatreds and perversions.
     But like most great art ''The Homecoming'' operates on a mythic as well as an immediate level. It insists that some
shadowy part of you is part of it. It burrows under you skin and festers.
      Mr. Pinter, you see, knows where you live. ''The Homecoming'' conveys this knowledge by stealth and, more often
than not, by stillness. And the fine cast assembled for Daniel Sullivan's new production -- including Eve Best and Raul
Esparza in benchmark performances -- grasps the power of holding back in making a fathoms-deep impression.
      The timing for this ''Homecoming,'' the first play by Mr. Pinter on Broadway since he won the Nobel Prize in Lit-
erature in 2005, is ideal, and not just because it's the 40th anniversary of its New York premiere. It's December, remem-
ber? The month when children of all ages return to the family hearth and often get burned.
      You may initially think you have little in common with the North London household headed by the scabrous Max
(Ian McShane). But you soon start to sense a disquieting familiarity in the patterns of domestic friction.
      Come on, don't tell me that when you go home, or when relatives visit you, there aren't clashes over who does the
dishes, who ate the last snack, who goes to bed first, who sits in the most comfortable chair, whose memories of your
shared past are the truth. These small battles of one-upmanship are the fabric of existence for Max; his brother, Sam
(Michael McKean); and Max's two grown sons who still live with him, Lenny (Mr. Esparza) and Joey (Gareth Saxe).
     The stakes rise, as they will when a long-absent relative returns, when Teddy (James Frain), a professor of philos-
ophy living in the States, shows up in the middle of the night with his wife, Ruth (Ms. Best). Who's top dog now? The
claim to that title is ultimately fought in ways I hope will never be visited upon your family.
      That doesn't mean that the play's uncomfortable universality goes away. Mr. Pinter's particular brilliance is in slid-
ing imperceptibly from the ordinary surface to the primal darkness of what lies beneath.
      The nigh-perfect form of ''The Homecoming,'' as the critic Penelope Gilliatt wrote when it opened in London in
1965, is in ''the swaying of violent people as they gain minute advantages.'' That dynamic, which propels most of Mr.
Pinter's plays, is seldom successfully realized in American productions. (Recent Broadway revivals of Pinter plays I
love, like ''Betrayal'' and ''The Caretaker,'' left me cold.)
      That's partly because English class accents are important in landing the cadences (and establishing the balance of
power) in Mr. Pinter's famously pause-pocked dialogue. It is also no easy matter for any actor to find the character-
defining noise in Mr. Pinter's silences. Playing Pinter requires repressing the urge to act actively. Mr. Sullivan's cast
keeps the lid on itself so impressively that when eruptions occur, you feel you've been sucker-punched.
      Such restraint is especially remarkable in Mr. Esparza, who made his reputation as one of the showiest actors in
town (''The Normal Heart,'' ''Taboo''). For this year's revival of the musical ''Company'' he learned to stand still, with
gratifying results. That didn't prepare me for the intricate layers he brings to the entrepreneurial Lenny.
      With only minor adjustments of facial expression and vocal inflection, Mr. Esparza conveys a multitude of im-
pulses, simmering in coexistence. In a breath he suggests a petulant adolescent, an icy killer, a take-charge businessman
and an infant who only wants Mommy. His is the most visibly needy Lenny I've encountered. But this extra transparen-
cy never cancels out the enigma at the core of all Pinter characters.
      The same can be said of Ms. Best, a much-lauded London stage actress who made her Broadway debut this year
opposite Kevin Spacey in ''A Moon for the Misbegotten.'' This fine-boned actress did wonders then in expanding to fill
a part that calls for a ''giantess.'' Here she's an absolute knockout.
      Ruth is the most fraught of the roles, a sphinxlike woman who has been defined by critics as both a feminist and a
misogynistic creation. But like Mr. Esparza, Ms. Best lends her character the sense of a complete emotional history that
I'd never grasped before. In the company of men Ruth is as guarded and calculated as they come, calmly registering
disapproval and amused contempt with the merest lowering of her eyelids.
                                                                                                   Page 90
    You Can Go Home Again, but You'll Pay the Consequences The New York Times December 17, 2007 Monday


        But there are a couple of moments, when she thinks no one is watching, when this Ruth reveals the weary, wistful
face beneath the sang-froid. You sense she wishes that the rules of the game she must play were different. As it is, she
still trumps the competition.
      Mr. McKean, who became famous as a comic television and film actor, gives a beautifully calibrated, heartbreak-
ing performance as the proper, dutiful Sam. And the relatively unknown Mr. Saxe and Mr. Frain are superb as the
dopey, brawny Joey and the disdainful, uxorious Teddy. Like their fellow cast members they give archetypal characters
revelatory and particularizing shading.
     Mr. McShane (known as the ace expletive-spitter of television's ''Deadwood'') is also excellent, with one caveat.
He seems too robust for a decaying man who knows his virility is waning. He is dazzling, though, in switching between
scorching venom and synthetic sentimentality.
     Pretty much every detail is in correct place in this production, including Eugene Lee's cozy minefield of a living
room and Jess Goldstein's class-situating costumes. It's clear we're in the middle of the 1960s, but the view is not
through a telescope.
      People who were originally put off by ''The Homecoming'' may now find it too close to home. It's a bit like Picas-
so's shockingly severe painting of Gertrude Stein from 1906, the one he predicted in time would resemble its subject.
We may not have thought we saw ourselves in ''The Homecoming'' four decades ago. Now it feels like a mirror.
     THE HOMECOMING
      By Harold Pinter; directed by Daniel Sullivan; sets by Eugene Lee; costumes by Jess Goldstein; lighting by Ken-
neth Posner; sound by John Gromada; production stage manager, Roy Harris; fight director, Rick Sordelet; general
manager, Albert Poland; technical supervision, Hudson Theatrical Associates. Presented by Jeffrey Richards, Jerry
Frankel, Jam Theatricals, Ergo Entertainment, Barbara and Buddy Freitag, Michael Gardner, Herbert Goldsmith Pro-
ductions, Terry E. Schnuck, Harold Thau, Michael Filerman/Lynne Peyser and Ronald Frankel/David Jaroslawicz, in
association with Joseph Piacentile. At the Cort Theater, 138 West 48th Street, Manhattan; (212) 239-6200. Through
April 13. Running time: 2 hours 10 minutes.
      WITH: Ian McShane (Max), Raul Esparza (Lenny), Eve Best (Ruth), Michael McKean (Sam), James Frain (Ted-
dy) and Gareth Saxe (Joey).

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: THEATER & DRAMA (90%); THEATER (90%); CHILDREN (78%); NOBEL PRIZES (69%); PHI-
LOSOPHY (66%); AWARDS & PRIZES (64%); ANNIVERSARIES (63%); ENTERTAINMENT & ARTS AWARDS
(50%); BENCHMARKING (50%)

GEOGRAPHIC: LONDON, ENGLAND (53%) ENGLAND (53%); UNITED KINGDOM (53%)

TITLE: Homecoming, The (Play)>; Homecoming, The (Play)>

LOAD-DATE: December 17, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Ian McShane as the patriarch Max in ''The Homecoming.'' (PHOTOGRAPH BY SARA
KRULWICH/THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. E7)
 All in the warring family: from left, Ian McShane, Raul Esparza, Eve Best and Gareth Saxe in ''The Homecoming,'' 40
years after this Harold Pinter play had its Broadway premiere. (PHOTOGRAPH BY SARA KRULWICH/THE NEW
YORK TIMES) (pg. E1)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Review

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper
                                                                                                   Page 91
    You Can Go Home Again, but You'll Pay the Consequences The New York Times December 17, 2007 Monday


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                41 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 16, 2007 Sunday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Coming Up for Air
BYLINE: By CELIA BARBOUR

SECTION: Section 11; Column 0; Real Estate Desk; HABITATS SHERMAN, CONN.; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1026 words

    FIFTEEN hours a day is a long time to spend at any job. All the more so if your workplace happens to be the deep
end of a swimming pool.
      But Howard Schatz has no time to lose. At the age of 67, he is in the full flowering of a second career. He's a pho-
tographer whose work appears regularly in the pages of Vanity Fair and on the cover of magazines like Newsweek,
Time and Sports Illustrated. His commercial clients range from Ralph Lauren to McDonald's.
      But to him -- and to his wife and business partner, Beverly Ornstein, 59 -- success is more than a client list
chockablock with droppable names. It's having the freedom to make pictures that look as if they had been lifted straight
out of his imagination.
     And for Mr. Schatz, this means capturing what happens to the human body when it's submerged in water. Not the
wrinkled fingertips and bloodshot eyes, but the dreamlike freedom, the weightless joy. The record of this obsession --
100 photographs of dancers, models, athletes and acrobats taken in or on the water -- is collected in his 17th book,
''H2O,'' published this month by Bullfinch.
      Twenty years ago, Mr. Schatz was an ophthalmologist with a thriving practice in San Francisco and a professor-
ship at the UCSF Medical Center. ''Howard was one of the most famous retina specialists in the world,'' said Ms.
Ornstein, adding, ''I have to say it because he won't.''
     Then he started exploring photography in earnest.
      ''I love medicine,'' Mr. Schatz said. ''I was a serious academician and physician, and I didn't want to give any of
that up. So I decided to spend just Saturdays on photography. My colleagues were playing golf anyway, so what the
heck?''
    His first book, published in 1992, was called ''Gifted Women.'' That was followed by a collection of portraits of
homeless men and women.
     ''Between 1987 and 1995, we got a lot of attention for our work,'' Mr. Schatz said, ''even though it was a hobby.''
     Ms. Ornstein disagreed. ''I think 'hobby' is a misnomer,'' she said.
      By 1995, Mr. Schatz was getting more assignments than he could complete in a month of Saturdays. Ms. Ornstein,
who had been the director of news and current affairs at KQED-TV when they met, in 1986, was ready for a new chal-
lenge. ''Beverly always wanted to run a business,'' Mr. Schatz said, ''so she suggested I take a one-year sabbatical from
my work.''
     They moved to New York and rented a live-work studio in SoHo. ''We hung our shingle,'' Mr. Schatz said.
                                                                                                                      Page 92
                          Coming Up for Air The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


     They soon discovered that their new lives pleased them. ''We'd go to bed at night giggling about our adventures,''
Mr. Schatz said.
      When the year was up, Mr. Schatz called his colleagues in California and told them that he'd be staying for anoth-
er year. That was followed by another, and then another.
      Meanwhile, the couple still owned a house in Marin County, across the Golden Gate Bridge, and whenever Mr.
Schatz was commissioned to do underwater photography, they would both fly back to use the indoor pool that he had
retrofitted to meet his needs.
      Eventually, they realized that their center of gravity had shifted east for good, and they needed a house to anchor
it.
       It wasn't just a pool they were after. Inhabiting a 400-square-foot portion of a busy photography studio was taxing.
''Six people have keys to the front door,'' Mr. Schatz said, ''and walk into our place almost every day.''
      Ms. Ornstein, whose work overseeing the business didn't offer her much of a creative escape, was especially ea-
ger for a place that felt like home. ''We had two criteria,'' Ms. Ornstein said. ''It had to be within 90 minutes of the stu-
dio. And it had to be modern.''
      The 5,000-square-foot house in Sherman, Conn., which they bought in 2001 for $1.3 million, was both. A
midcentury kit house with a late '80s addition by David Specter, it also met Ms. Ornstein's other secret condition: it was
very, very bright. (In a 1994 Architectural Digest article about the Marin house, she was quoted as saying, ''Our goal
was to build a house in which you would have to wear sunglasses.'')
      At the new house, which is 72 miles from the SoHo studio, they painted everything white and furnished their
rooms very sparely. Outside, they tore out fussy landscaping and put in a smooth, undulating lawn. ''We made a mini-
malist place,'' Mr. Schatz said.
     He and Ms. Ornstein have the habits to match. They inhabit the house as neatly and quietly as cats, padding softly
through its spare, clean rooms. ''For me, it's not just an aesthetic choice,'' Ms. Ornstein said. ''I'm extremely tuned in to
the world around me. If there's something there, I have to pay attention to it, and I don't want to.''
      Not surprisingly, she is the type of person who will cross a room to close a drawer left slightly ajar.
      A year after buying the house, they put in an outdoor pool, then bought a clear vinyl dome to enclose it -- and
keep it warm -- in winter.
      Photographing underwater is not easy, especially for someone seeking to isolate only its most romantic, liberating
qualities. Mr. Schatz faced daunting technical challenges, but here his scientific training helped.
       Early on, he discovered how to adjust the water's pH so it wouldn't sting models' eyes, and he vaporizes the chlo-
rine from the water on shoot days. He also learned to light the set so that skin colors appear warm rather than blue.
      But even more useful was the bedside manner Mr. Schatz had developed in 23 years as a physician. Patients once
came to him terrified that they were going blind, and he quickly learned how to put them at ease. These days, models
often need similar reassurance. ''Holding your breath for a minute or more is inherently scary,'' Mr. Schatz said. ''When
they're fighting it, you can't make a good picture.'' So he teaches them how to be safe and relaxed.
      ''Howard is really interested in people,'' Ms. Ornstein said. ''People say, 'Oh, ophthalmologist, camera, eye.' But
really it's Howard's connection to people that makes him good at what he does.''
      Mr. Schatz added: ''I like the work I do. Having a passion is a lucky thing.'' Even if that passion often finds you at
the deep end.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: PHOTOGRAPHY (89%); SPORTS & RECREATION (77%); SPORTS (77%); PHOTOGRAPHY SER-
VICES (76%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (75%); WRITERS & WRITING (71%); OPHTHALMOLOGY (67%);
HOMELESSNESS (50%)

PERSON: RALPH LAUREN (57%)
                                                                                                                     Page 93
                          Coming Up for Air The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday




GEOGRAPHIC: CALIFORNIA, USA (74%) UNITED STATES (74%)

LOAD-DATE: December 16, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: BEYOND THE YELLOW SUBMARINE: A year after buying their house in 2001, Howard
Schatz and Beverly Ornstein put in an outdoor pool, then bought a clear vinyl dome to enclose it -- and keep it warm --
in winter. Inside the house, everything is painted white, and furnishings are kept to a minimum. Mr. Schatz's underwater
photographs, like the one below, explore the romantic, liberating qualities of being in a buoyant, otherworldly environ-
ment. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY WENDY CARLSON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. RE4)
 THE PLAY OF LIGHT: Beverly Ornstein and Howard Schatz at home in Sherman, Conn., where his underwater pho-
tographs are displayed on the gallery-white walls. (PHOTOGRAPH BY WENDY CARLSON FOR THE NEW YORK
TIMES) (pg. RE1)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                42 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 16, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Yale and New Haven Find Common Ground
BYLINE: By DAVID McKAY WILSON

SECTION: Section 14CT; Column 0; Connecticut Weekly Desk; HIGHER EDUCATION; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1101 words

DATELINE: New Haven

      AS a former real estate developer, Bruce D. Alexander is particularly well positioned to lead Yale University's
effort to improve downtown New Haven. On a recent tour, he crowed about the city's revival as a destination for urban
shoppers and suburbanites out for a night on the town, and was quick to promote the city's thriving restaurant scene.
      ''We should do a little brochure with the 25 best restaurants,'' Mr. Alexander, Yale's vice president of New Haven
and state affairs and campus development, said to an aide. ''We need to get that published.''
       Mr. Alexander's boosterism is just one facet of a well-financed program that over the past 14 years has trans-
formed Yale from the punching bag of New Haven politicians and community activists into a welcome partner in the
city's revitalization. The change in attitude was ushered in by Richard C. Levin, an economics professor who became
the university's president in 1993.
      Mr. Levin was determined to end the longstanding battle between town and gown. He did so by brandishing
Yale's financial might and intellectual firepower to invest in the city, for the mutual benefit of the school and its envi-
rons.
                                                                                                                        Page 94
             Yale and New Haven Find Common Ground The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


      Among those observing the turnabout has been Roxanne Condon, chairwoman of the Dixwell Management
Team, a grass-roots community group from Dwight, the neighborhood on Yale's northern border. Yale recently pledged
to invest $500,000 in Scantlebury Park, a vacant piece of city-owned land in Dwight that Yale and community activists
have worked on developing into a playground for neighborhood children.
       ''When I moved here in 1985, it was like a fortress, and it seemed like Yale just forgot about the community,'' said
Ms. Condon, 52, a clinical therapist who works with children. ''Now everybody is realizing that we are in this together,
that if the community improves, that improves Yale because Yale benefits from the improvement of the community. It's
a whole new mind-set.''
      That mind-set starts in Mr. Levin's office in Woodbridge Hall. He took the reins two years after Yale was rocked
by the murder of a 21-year-old student on Hillhouse Avenue. Among his first initiatives was the Yale Homebuyer Pro-
gram, which subsidizes the purchase of city homes for Yale employees, who receive $5,000 for down-payment and
closing costs, and $2,000 a year for 10 years. So far, 830 Yale employees have bought homes in the city, helping stabi-
lize neighborhoods, with Yale leveraging more than $100 million in sales with an investment of $18 million into city
real estate for its employees.
      Yale also began increasing its voluntary contributions to the city in response to criticism of its property-tax-
exempt status for university buildings. Those payments have grown to $4.3 million this year, from $1.2 million in 1992.
In addition, the state's tax relief program, which reimburses municipalities for a portion of the property taxes that would
have been paid by tax-exempt institutions, brought $43 million to New Haven in 2007, according to a university report.
      The university's support of the Science Park at Yale has provided start-up space for entrepreneurs in the region's
biotech industry, which now includes 22 firms in New Haven. Yale's expanded commercial holdings have also driven
up its portfolio of taxable property; the university pays $3.5 million a year in commercial property taxes, making it
New Haven's largest taxpayer.
      The university is also New Haven's largest employer, and its $400 million annual capital budget provides con-
struction jobs for hundreds of craftspeople.
      In 2006, the partnership between the city and the university deepened when New Haven agreed to give Yale three
dead-end streets that run through campus, providing land that may be used for new undergraduate residence halls. In
return, Yale pledged to spend up to $10 million on public improvements in the city, including street and sidewalk re-
pairs and development of the Farmington Canal Greenway near campus.
      Yale's involvement in reviving the city's retail districts began in the mid-1990s, after the Federal Deposit Insur-
ance Corporation foreclosed on 16 properties in the Chapel Street district, on Yale's western border. John DeStefano Jr.,
the mayor since 1994, urged Yale to buy the entire lot as opposed to the properties being sold individually. Yale has
since bought retail properties on Broadway and in the Audubon Street commercial district.
      ''It made sense, from the university's point of view, to create a healthy retail district for its students, faculty and
alumni,'' Mr. DeStefano said. ''Our interest is for taxable properties, and Yale is a good owner. Its interests are long-
term, not short-term, so they can take a longer view on their rate of return.''
      By serving as landlord, Yale has created the kind of commercial life on the edge of campus that serves the com-
munity and its students. Chapel Street is thriving with its mix of specialty boutiques, coffee shops and restaurants. On
Broadway, Mr. Alexander wooed national chains like J. Crew and Urban Outfitters along with Gourmet Heaven, a
Manhattan-style deli with bouquets of flowers on the sidewalk and a takeout buffet inside. They are just around the cor-
ner from Koffee Too? a local coffee shop that was jammed with students one recent afternoon.
      These stores are among 90 in downtown New Haven that rent from Yale. Mr. Alexander, who worked for the
Rouse Company when it developed Faneuil Hall in downtown Boston in the mid-1970s, said that the mix of stores, and
uniform operating hours, had positioned the downtown commercial area to compete with suburban malls. For example,
Yale requires its tenants to stay open until 9 p.m., to attract working couples who cannot shop during the day.
      ''I felt that New Haven's assets and potential far outran its reputation,'' said Mr. Alexander, a member of Yale's
Class of 1965.
      Andrea van den Heever, president of the Connecticut Center for a New Economy, based in New Haven, said that
Yale's support for community groups and neighborhood organizations had also helped transform the city's view of the
university.
                                                                                                                      Page 95
             Yale and New Haven Find Common Ground The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


     Ms. van den Heever noted that Yale certainly had the wherewithal to make the investment: Yale's endowment has
grown to $22.5 billion from $1.1 billion in 1984, when she arrived in New Haven to help organize disgruntled Yale
workers.
        ''The Yale bashers aren't around any longer because Yale makes a point to contribute to community organiza-
tions,'' she said. ''It makes a difference in how people view the institution. It was a deliberate and smart strategy on their
part.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT (90%); REAL ESTATE (89%); CHILDREN (89%); REAL ESTATE
INVESTING (89%); URBAN DEVELOPMENT (78%); ECONOMIC NEWS (78%); UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRA-
TION (78%); COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES (78%); CITIES (78%); TAXES & TAXATION (63%); PROPERTY
TAX (60%); TAX EXEMPTIONS (60%); COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS (78%); BUSINESS EDUCA-
TION (78%)

ORGANIZATION: YALE UNIVERSITY (94%)

GEOGRAPHIC: CONNECTICUT, USA (73%) UNITED STATES (73%)

LOAD-DATE: December 16, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: COMMERCIAL: As a landlord, Yale wooed some national chains. (pg. 7)
MUTUAL: Yale has become a welcome partner in a revitalization. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS MCDONALD
FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)(pg. 1)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 43 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 16, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

H (as in Humming) Street
BYLINE: By CLAY RISEN

SECTION: Section 5; Column 0; Travel Desk; DAY OUT WASHINGTON; Pg. 4

LENGTH: 604 words

     IT'S been almost 40 years since riots ripped through Washington in the wake of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassina-
tion, and few areas were hit harder than the H Street Northeast corridor. Running from just north of Union Station to-
ward the Anacostia River, H Street never fully recovered, even as other riot-scarred neighborhoods began picking up in
the 1990s.
                                                                                                                   Page 96
                      H (as in Humming) Street The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


       Over the last few years, though, H Street, also known as the Atlas District, has seen a marked revival. Four years
ago, half of the street's 300 storefronts were empty; now only about 45 sit unoccupied. The area's anchor is a collection
of bars and music clubs opened last year by a local entrepreneur named Joe Englert, who also helped drive the night-
life explosion in the Adams-Morgan neighborhood.
      One of Mr. Englert's venues, a popular stop-off for indie bands called the Rock and Roll Hotel (1353 H Street;
202-388-7625; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com), has become a neighborhood hub, with a wide range of acts and a spa-
cious upstairs bar and lounge, outfitted with worn-in sofas and winged guitars hanging from the ceiling. A few doors
down is the Atlas Performing Arts Center (1333 H Street; 202-399-7993; www.atlasarts.org), a renovated Art Deco
movie house with two 250-seat theaters and two smaller spaces and performances from plays to cabaret to to jazz to
light opera.
      The 1200 block is home to the Palace of Wonders (1210 H Street; 202-398- 7469; www.palaceofwonders.com), a
bar that doubles as a vaudeville theater, and the Cajun-inflected Red and the Black (1212 H Street; 202-399-3201;
www.redandblackbar.com), another Englert enterprise, which offers Abita beer ($5) and a spicy chicken jambalaya ($8)
downstairs and rock shows upstairs. At the H Street Martini Lounge (1236 H Street; 202-397-3333;
www.hstreetlounge.com), bar-hoppers can enjoy jazz acts while sampling from a 60-drink martini menu.
       Perhaps just to see how many bars one block can handle, the 1200 block is also home to the Pug (1234 H Street;
202-388-8554), an inviting neighborhood bar, and Dr. Granville Moore's Brickyard (1238 H Street; 202-399-2546), a
cozy two-floor pub featuring Belgian beers, a range of mussel dishes and enormous bowls of twice-fried frites (mussels
start at $14; large frites are $7).
      Clubgoers looking to check out go-go, the D.C. homegrown dance music style, should stop by Rose's Dream Bar
and Lounge (1370 H Street; 202-398-5700; www.rosesdream.com), where the go-go veteran Little Benny takes the
stage every Friday night.
     The one drawback to H Street is its lack of Metro access. Fortunately, local proprietors offer a free shuttle service
(301-751-1802) Friday and Saturday to and from Union Station, where patrons can catch the Red Line.
      H Street gets less hectic during the day, with little commercial activity beyond a Payless shoe store and an auto
parts store. But that is slowly changing, too. A few art galleries have opened recently, including Dissident Display (416
H Street; 202-332-3346; www.dissidentdisplay.com), as well as Sidamo (417 H Street; 202-548-0081;
www.sidamocoffeeandtea.com), an airy coffeehouse with a roaster on the premises.
     In Washington, wherever night life flourishes, high-end condo development is never far behind. The street's first
luxury condo building debuted recently, and local developers are quickly buying up land along the entire strip.
      If H Street is anything like 14th and U, the now-trendy neighborhood that was the center of the 1968 riots, in five
years it will be completely made over -- and jam-packed. For those who want to see the area before it really takes off,
get to H Street now.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: RIOTS (90%); DRINKING PLACES (88%); JAZZ & BLUES (88%); MUSIC (88%); MUSIC GENRES
(74%); MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (74%); MUSICAL THEATER (74%); POP & ROCK (74%); PERFORMING
ARTS CENTERS (74%); VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS (74%); FILM (70%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (69%);
STRINGED INSTRUMENTS (69%); THEATER (52%)

GEOGRAPHIC: DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 16, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: DRAWING (DRAWING BY JULIETTE BORDA)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper
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                       H (as in Humming) Street The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday




                                      Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 44 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                    The New York Times

                                                 December 16, 2007 Sunday
                                                    Late Edition - Final

Handmade 2.0
BYLINE: By ROB WALKER.
   Rob Walker writes the Consumed column for the magazine. His book, ''Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between
What We Buy and Who We Are,'' will be published by Random House next June.

SECTION: Section 6; Column 0; Magazine; Pg. 76

LENGTH: 5160 words

     The declaration from something called the Handmade Consortium materialized on a Web site called
buyhandmade.org in late October. ''I pledge to buy handmade this holiday season, and request that others do the same
for me,'' it said, and you could type in your name to ''sign'' on; within a few weeks, more than 6,500 people had done so.
''Buying handmade is better for people,'' a statement on the site read in part, and ''better for the environment,'' because
mass production is a ''major cause'' of global warming, among other things. There were links to an anti-sweatshop site
and a Wal-Mart watchdog site.
      The pledge echoed the idealistic language of a tree-hugger activist group, but actually the consortium's most
prominent member was the online shopping bazaar Etsy, a very much for-profit entity that bills itself as ''your place to
buy & sell all things handmade.'' Etsy does not fulfill orders from an inventory; it's a place where sellers set up virtual
storefronts, giving the site a cut of sales. While eBay rose to prominence nearly a decade ago as an endless garage sale
for the auctioning of collectibles and bric-a-brac, Etsy is more of an online craft fair, or art show, where the idea is that
individuals can sell things that they have made. How many such people can there be? At last count, more than 70,000 --
about 90 percent of whom were women -- were using Etsy to peddle their jewelry, art, toys, clothes, dishware, station-
ery, zines and a variety of objects from the mundane to the highly idiosyncratic. Each seller has a profile page telling
shoppers a bit about themselves, and maybe offering a link to a blog or a MySpace page or a mailing list; most have
devised some clever store or brand name for whatever they're selling.
      Maybe you're interested in a ''random music generator'' called the Orb of Sound ($80), built by an Australian tink-
erer calling himself RareBeasts. Or a whistle made out of a tin can and bottle caps ($12), by loranscruggs, near Seattle.
Or the ''hand-painted antique ceramic doll-head planters'' sold under the name Clayflower22 by a retired schoolteacher
near Las Cruces, N.M. Or the ''Kaleidoscope Pearberry Soapsicle'' ($5), made by a woman in Daytona Beach, Fla., who
calls her shop Simply Soaps. Or a porcelain bowl with an image of a skull on it, from a Chicago couple who call them-
selves Circa Ceramics. Or an original painting from an artist in Athens, Ga., who goes by the moniker the Black Apple.
      Browsing Etsy is both exhilarating and exhausting. There is enough here to mount an astonishing museum exhibi-
tion. There is also plenty of junk. Most of all there is a dizzying amount of stuff, and it is similarly difficult to figure out
how to characterize what it all represents: an art movement, a craft phenomenon or shopping trend. Whatever this is, it's
not something that Etsy created but rather something that it is trying to make bigger, more visible and more accessible --
partly by mixing high-minded ideas about consumer responsibility with the unsentimental notion of the profit motive.
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       On July 29, Etsy registered its one-millionth sale and is expecting to hit two million items sold by mid-
December. Shoppers spent $4.3 million buying 300,000 items from the site's sellers in November alone -- a 43 percent
increase over the previous month. Thus far in December, the site has had record-breaking sales every day. Only about
two years old, the company is not currently profitable but is somewhat unusual among Internet-based start-ups of the
so-called Web 2.0 era in having a model that does not depend on advertising revenue. It depends on people buying
things, in a manner that the founders position as a throwback to the way consumption ought to be: individuals buying
from other individuals. ''Our ties to the local and human sources of our goods have been lost,'' the Handmade Pledge
site asserts. ''Buying handmade helps us reconnect.'' The idea is a digital-age version of artisanal culture -- that the fu-
ture of shopping is all about the past.
      STEP 1: Weave Do-It-Yourself Spirit Into a Community
     The path that has led to Etsy begins with a motto -- do it yourself -- that implies distaste for consumer culture.
That notion was front and center last year, when O'Reilly Media, best known for computer-related publications, in-
troduced a magazine called Craft. A
       spinoff of Make magazine (a latter-day Popular Mechanics for the hacker-tinkerer set), Craft addresses ''the new
craft movement.'' The issue contained a variety of instructional projects: ''Stitch a Robot,'' one cover line read. ''Felt an
iPod Cocoon,'' said another. Inside, an essay by a longtime crafter named Jean Railla argued that making something
yourself is a form of ''political statement'' and a protest against chain stores that are turning ''America into one big mini-
mall.''
      This dissonant-sounding juxtaposition -- politics and felted iPod cocoons? -- is what makes the craft thing hard to
pin down. Of course Railla wasn't saying that stitching a robot is akin to a march on Washington; she was writing about
a broader do-it-yourself idea that she has watched gradually permeate popular culture over the course of a decade.
      Railla, who is 37, founded a Web site called Getcrafty back in 1998, when renewed interest in traditional crafts
among young women was still something of a curiosity. It wasn't as if such skills and hobbies had ceased to exist; from
Martha Stewart to nationwide chains like Michaels, major businesses catered to a range of quilt makers and
scrapbookers. But the new wave of crafters infused uncool-sounding domestic skills like knitting and sewing with a
postpunk attitude that revolved partly around mall-rejecting self-sufficiency. Railla wrote about how to make your own
soap and lip gloss -- and also about how to knit a bikini. ''I really came to it from more of an indie-rock, do-it-yourself
kind of political place,'' she told me recently. ''Sort of married with making peace with feminism.''
      Getcrafty was filled with project ideas and how-tos as well as discussion forums, which played a crucial role in
building the craft-as-community idea that Etsy would later tap into. ''Knitting is part of the same do-it-yourself ethos
that spawned zines and mixtapes,'' Debbie Stoller, editor of Bust, a pop-culture-meets-feminism magazine, declared.
Stoller wrote a series of ''Stitch N Bitch'' books, which became part of a trend toward the formation of social-crafting
groups across the country. More Web gathering points emerged, like Craftster and SuperNaturale. Offline, a communal
make-stuff group called Church of Craft formed chapters in several cities.
      Crafting had attained a subculture status by 2004, when Railla hired a New York University student named Robert
Kalin and some friends to redesign Getcrafty. Kalin had been studying philosophy and classics, but, he told me, he was
pessimistic about the job-market value of his degree and was looking for something more entrepreneurial. While he
had a bit of woodworking experience, he and his friend Chris Maguire were basically techie types; they hadn't known
much about the handcrafting movement that was bringing so many young women to Getcrafty. ''We were the only guys
around,'' Kalin recalls.
      Soon he had an idea for a different kind of site that this burgeoning craft community might find useful: an online
marketplace. By that time, plenty of crafters were not simply doing it themselves -- they were selling what they had
done. There's nothing surprising about people who enjoy doing something (playing guitar, writing poetry, knitting a
bikini) wondering if maybe there isn't a way to make a living at it. But the scene that Kalin stumbled upon turned out to
be brimming with entrepreneurial spirit.
     Consider, for instance, the Austin Craft Mafia. This group of nine indiepreneurs traces its roots to a 2001 meeting
of young women who hoped to leverage their craft skills into a way to quit their day jobs. Each member built her own
business and helped the others do the same. They continued to offer advice and connections with others in Austin and,
eventually, beyond. There are now 42 officially sanctioned Craft Mafias, in cities from Omaha to New Orleans to An-
chorage to Glasgow. (The Austin Craft Mafia, like Etsy, is a member of the consortium backing the Handmade Pledge.)
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     For some years now, crafters have been selling on their own sites online. Craft boutiques have opened as fast as
independent book and record stores closed. And a new wave of fairs has come to life, not of the country-craft, ''Bless
This Mess'' style, but venues for a younger, more indie-punk aesthetic. These happen all over the country now -- the
Bazaar Bizarre in Boston and other cities, the Renegade Craft Fair in Chicago, the Girlie Show in Oklahoma City -- and
each one seems to get bigger every year.
      So it's no surprise that when Kalin suggested something akin to an online version of a craft fair but infinitely large
and open all the time, to everyone, everywhere, Railla thought it was a ''brilliant'' idea. She was happy to consult on the
new enterprise but gives Kalin and his partners credit for spotting the business opportunity and making it a reality. To
her, crafting remains more of a philosophy, and its satisfactions are in participation, not consumption. She reiterated that
idea in her Craft magazine column, arguing that the practice satisfies the urge to create, values feminine art forms, pro-
vides relief from the digital world and, yes, is a form of ''political statement'' against the dehumanizing global supply
chain.
      But she also understands the appeal of the handmade to those who might not have the inclination to do the mak-
ing. Readers of the first issue of Craft magazine might have eagerly followed the instructions to stitch a robot. But
surely others gravitated to a related article about the popularity of a style of hand-stitched robot that you could buy on
Etsy. The article discussed how one doll maker's creations were so popular that every time she posted a new one, it
sold within 20 minutes. It was hard to read this without wanting to visit the site immediately and see what the fuss was
about. And perhaps to participate in the idea of D.I.Y., at least by buying D.I.Y.
      STEP 2: Emboider With Webbiness
      This summer I visited the Etsy offices, in downtown Brooklyn . The company that Robert Kalin and his pals
founded now has about 50 employees. (They remain jokily cryptic about what the name they chose for their enterprise
means. It has been variously suggested that it is a play on the Latin phrase ''et si'' (''and if''), or that the secret can be
found in Fellini's ''8 1/2.'') I got a tour of the rambling warren, spread over about 6,000 square feet on the sixth floor of
an old building on Gold Street. It had a clubhouse feel that was equal parts venture-backed start-up and D.I.Y. enter-
prise: Here was the skateboard ramp; there the homemade greenscreen for Web casts. I was introduced to a number of
young women at work silk-screening Etsy promotional materials onto bandannas, and also to the company lawyer.
      Kalin is 27 and seems even younger, with boyish features and reddish hair. Serious in a way that could be read as
either earnest or deadpan, he told me the stories behind a stuffed animal and an interesting metal sculpture on his desk,
both from Etsy sellers. He then handed me a piece of crocheted bacon. In order to explain his company, he offered me a
seat and reached for a book. It was a children's book, about a fish named Swimmy. He pulled his chair closer and read
aloud. The upshot was that a whole bunch of little fish gang up and begin swimming in a formation that resembles one
huge fish, thus warding off predators. In their formation, the fish named Swimmy assumes the position where the eye
would be. Kalin closed the book. ''We want to be the eye,'' he said, in case I'd missed the point. ''Like Swimmy.''
      Tilting back in his chair, he spoke for some time, with the supreme self-confidence of the college bull-session rac-
onteur, referencing Marshall McLuhan, beginning a discourse about the problem with central banks with the phrase, ''If
you read the Founding Fathers . . . ,'' and so on. He wasn't so much making arguments as patiently spelling out the way
things work. He informed me, for instance, that young people today are different, having grown up with the Web and
all. He had sought guidance from his grandfather about making Etsy a reality but ignored the tedious advice about writ-
ing a business plan, figuring the site itself would serve that function. Later he wrote a ''fan letter'' to one of the founders
of Flickr, the popular online photo-sharing site, and she became an investor. A founder of del.icio.us, the social-
bookmarking site, invested, and so did a New York venture-capital firm. Kalin's grandfather was flummoxed.
      All of which is a familiar-enough Internet-start-up story line. I was more interested in what made Etsy seem dif-
ferent from so many current efforts to ''build community'' online: the luck or genius of the site is that Kalin and the other
founders encountered in the D.I.Y./craft scene something that was already social, community-minded, supportive and
aggressively using the Web. It seemed to me that the company's future would depend not only on the success of its
sellers but also on its reputation among them. Nor could its reputation simply be for business acumen. If all Etsy did
was channel D.I.Y.-ism into a profit machine, it could easily be seen as monetizing -- exploiting -- the creativity and
hustle of 70,000 indiepreneurs. There was a cultural dimension, too.
       Kalin clearly understood all this. The company does not, for instance, demand exclusivity. Indeed it seems to want
its sellers to market themselves aggressively on their own sites, in stores, at fairs. So in its idealized role as Swimmy,
Etsy constantly holds entrepreneurial workshops (how to build your ''global microbrand''), pointing to ''best practices''
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among Etsy sellers, offering shop critiques, advising how to ''write a killer press release.'' Its magazine-videocast, The
Storque, often feels like a D.I.Y. business school. In addition, Kalin has hired about a half-dozen of the best Etsy sellers
to work directly for the company, in jobs meant to spread their skills to as many sellers as possible. Some help run Etsy
Labs, a community-centric program held at the company's headquarters, teaching craft skills.
        On some level the Etsy idea is not really techno-progressive at all. It's nostalgic. The company is host to a book
club, which Kalin participates in, and when I visited, the most recent reading assignment was ''The Wal-Mart Effect,'' a
book that assesses the societywide impact of that mass retailer's success. Kalin seems flabbergasted that anyone would
shop at Wal-Mart to save 12 cents on a peach instead of supporting a local farmer. Buying something from the person
who made it is ''the opposite of what Wal-Mart is right now: just this massively impersonal experience,'' he told me ear-
lier. ''When you get an item from Etsy, there's this whole history behind it. There's a person behind it.'' I asked whether
Wal-Mart was really the right comparison, given Etsy's eclectic, artistic merchandise, and the more workaday product
mix of a big-box discounter. He brushed that aside, noting that Etsy sells clothes, which everyone needs.
       His real point, it seemed to me, was not about Wal-Mart or any other particular retailer. It was far more expansive.
If the marketplace today has become alienating and disconnected, then buying something handmade, from another indi-
vidual, rolls back the clock to an era before factory labor and mass production. That's a lot of clock-turning, if you recall
Adam Smith's excitement about the efficiency of an 18th-century pin factory. Really, Kalin has a problem with the en-
tire modern marketplace. ''Everything since the Industrial Revolution has been so fragmented,'' he told me, sounding
more like a character in Slacker, wasting time in a cafe, than a guy running a briskly growing business.
       Kalin is nothing if not grandiose about what he thinks Etsy can accomplish. For example, he knows that individual
crafters face a problem of scale: there is only so much one person can produce. (Hence the Industrial Revolution.) So he
mentions creating ''co-production'' sites across the country, where groups of crafters would band together in a co-op-
style model, ideally occupying space in distressed areas and offering training to people who want to learn handcrafting
skills. Handmade isn't a fad, he told me, it's a resurgence, one that is of a piece with the booming interest in organic
food. In 25 years, he said, Etsy would be both worldwide and personal, a global-local marketplace, a Web version of the
Athenian agora.
        The business proposition behind this extravagant vision is rather more straightforward. Etsy charges 20 cents per
listing and 3.5 percent of the final sale price; this is generally lower and certainly less complicated than eBay's fee struc-
ture; it also charges up to $15 if creators want to highlight a particular item on the site's high-traffic showcase pages.
More competition may be mixed news for individual artisans as newcomers keep flooding in to peddle their wares, but
it's all good news for Etsy. The company makes money from successful crafters, but it also makes money from wishful
thinkers who never get beyond the hobby stage. The entrepreneur who makes something by hand might face a scale
problem. Etsy doesn't.
       That said, what's surprising about Kalin is that his interest really does seem to transcend the profit motive. It's
pretty clear that he not only respects the values of the D.I.Y. world and the earnest idealism of the Handmade Pledge;
he also really believes in them. The quasi-libertarian certainty of the Web entrepreneur and the equally confident ex-
philosophy-student discourse about the alienating nature of mass society seem contradictory. But to Kalin, they are
intertwined. ''In a way,'' he said when I met him in Brooklyn, ''I see Etsy as an art project.'' And after a brief recap of
art history through Duchamp, he suggested that Etsy could ''disturb'' the way people see the world, rethinking what
makes their possessions important or trivial, leading us to re-evaluate the way we consume. Surely plenty of crafters
see what they are up to as a mix of art and business as well -- although they may be coming at that from a somewhat
different angle.
      STEP 3: Stitch Together Ideals and Entrepreneurialism
      This past March, I went to Pittsburgh to attend the first-ever Craft Congress, which was made up of about 60
of the best-known and most established figures on the D.I.Y./crafter scene. I had heard the agenda would include a dis-
cussion of how their movement ought to be defined and thought about by participants. This is what makes crafting feel
distinct from a garden -variety consumer trend: It's hard to imagine the leading figures in, say, the premium-denim
fad or the limited-edition-sneaker craze getting together to hash out what those things are really about, what participat-
ing in them really means.
      I wondered if the discussion would be translated into some sort of manifesto. Would they lay out rules for who is a
crafter and who isn't? Would they determine where screen-printing on bulk-ordered T-shirts, or working with factory-
made beads, falls on the continuum of ''handmade''-ness? (I had read some spirited discussion in Etsy's forums about the
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definition of ''mass produced.'') I was also interested in the Craft Congress because I'd heard that someone from Etsy
would be there, and I wondered how the company would be perceived.
      The congress participants (almost all were women) included organizers of fairs in Atlanta, Toronto, Washington
and elsewhere, as well as crafters from all around the country. Many had met online but never before in person. The
discussions and presentations, spread over two days, began with an attempt at ''defining the craft movement'' and ranged
into politics and recent corporate interest in D.I.Y.-ism. But there was little interest in rule making and manifesto-
writing. Jenny Hart, an Austin Craft Mafia founder, went out of her way to make the point that the congress participants
should be careful not to come across like self-appointed leaders.
      The topics of discussion often weren't ideological at all, but more practical matters like marketing tactics, taxes
and health insurance. Etsy was represented by Matthew Stinchcomb, its 32-year-old marketing chief. When he met
Kalin, he was in a rock band. Tired of touring, he got involved in Etsy, applying the sorts of underground promotional
ideas he picked up as a musician, like creating Etsy ''street teams.''
      Gregarious and easygoing, he gave the Etsy pitch. ''I think there's a larger story that we are selling,'' he said, pre-
senting Etsy's goal as recreating the marketplaces of old. Marketing has ''crass connotations,'' he allowed, but to make
those one-on-one connections, sellers had to promote themselves. Later he added that the craft movement needed to
keep ''providing resources for each other, so we're not all working against each other.'' In other words, he fit right in: his
presentation -- like the congress in general -- was equal parts entrepreneurial seminar and subculture colloquium.
      Somehow all the talk made that most conventional American path -- small business -- seem like an instrument of
radicalism. I talked to another attendee, a 29-year-old crafter named Faythe Levine, about the motivations of craft artist-
entrepreneurs. She had told me about the thrill of discovering the craft scene: ''No corporate backing -- it was people
doing things, full-on D.I.Y.'' Last year she began working on a documentary called ''Handmade Nation,'' and by the time
of the Craft Congress had videotaped 80 hours of interviews with crafters in a dozen cities. Some of her subjects were
making a living, but some were still trying to quit dull day jobs, and others were stay-at-home moms. ''I didn't necessari-
ly ask people if they were making stuff and selling it to be political,'' she said. But many told her that ''running a small
business yourself, and trying to separate yourself from the masses -- it's a political statement in its own. That was kind
of interesting, and it did come up repeatedly.''
      It's still tempting to characterize anything that looks edgy and has an online component as somehow a function of
youth culture. But the age of the average Etsy seller turns out to be 34. Many crafters no doubt feel passionately about
the ideals suggested by the Handmade Pledge a horror of sweatshop labor and corporate conformity, concern about the
environment and would be pleased to see the broader consumer culture embrace them too. Meanwhile there is also the
more salient matter of how to make a rewarding, meaningful and satisfying living without having to give up on those
ideals. The women who have led the craft movement don't want to work for the Man. But many are also motivated by
having reached adulthood at a time when the Man is slashing benefits, reneging on pensions, laying people off and, if
hiring, is looking for customer-service reps and baristas. This is not a utopian alt-youth framework; it's a very real-
world, alt-grown-up framework.
       Listening to the discussions at the Craft Congress, it seemed to me that while there's a case to be made that this is
an art movement, or an ideological movement, or a shopping movement, it is also -- and probably fundamentally -- a
work movement. At one point, talk turned to corporate interest in D.I.Y.-ism, and in particular how companies like
Toyota were sponsoring craft fairs. Some argued that ''megacorporations'' trying to burnish their hipster images had
no legitimate role on the scene. Others suggested that corporate money could be put to beneficial uses. No consensus
emerged, but toward the end of the discussion one crafter articulated the precise commerce-and-ideals dilemma of the
crafty businessperson. ''If we can't have a job where we make enough money,'' she observed, ''then this movement
isn't sustainable.''
      STEP 4: Sell
      It is worth noting another element of the Handmade Pledge: ''The ascendancy of chain-store culture and global
manufacturing has left us dressing, furnishing and decorating alike.'' It's a shrewd pitch, because the consumer crav-
ing for novelty, for the unique, the special, seems unquenchable. It has spawned, for instance, a number of blogs dedi-
cated specifically to ferreting out the exciting new thing, usually with a helpful link to a potential transaction. (One of
the most popular such sites, Design*Sponge, is another backer of the Handmade Consortium.) Buying something from
an indie craft artist can result in a buyer-seller connection, but it can also make consumption itself feel like a creative
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act. This is the crucial element fueling the craft boom: People show up at the fairs, the shops and the Web sites. And
they spend money.
       One afternoon last summer, a young artist based in Athens, Ga., unveiled her latest work. Emily Martin is 24 years
old. She graduated from art school about two years ago and has never had a gallery show. She announced the date and
time of the unveiling on her blog, so at 2 p.m. on Aug. 28, I clicked over and watched as she posted the new work to her
Etsy shop: Six original paintings priced between $160 and $250, and nine hand-sewn dolls, for $37 to $65. They disap-
peared faster than I could click ''refresh.'' By 2:02 p.m. most had been sold, and Martin had made about $1,400 (minus
fees). Martin fully expected to be working as a waitress and confining her art-making to her off hours at this stage of her
life. Instead, the Black Apple, as she is known on Etsy, is a full-time artist and perhaps the site's most famous success
story.
       Martin's paintings often depict cartoonish girls with unnaturally wide eyes, and her shy voice sounds as if it were
emanating from one of these innocent figures. ''You're told in art school, 'O.K., well, one out of a hundred of you is go-
ing to make a living with the training that you're getting here,' '' she said. While sweet and appealing, Martin's aesthetic
is more thrift store than Chelsea gallery; she was ''really intimidated'' by ''the whole capital-A art thing.'' But at a local
craft fair, someone told her about this new site called Etsy. ''The idea of a shop online, being a more democratic thing,
really appealed to me,'' she says. As of early December, she had sold more than 10,000 items through her Etsy store --
mostly 8-by-10, open-edition prints priced at $13 apiece, but also postcards, buttons, hand-sewn dolls and original
paintings.
      It's a feel-good story of Webby empowerment and the triumph of a niche-culture underdog. Martin recognizes that
what the Web in general, and Etsy in particular, has done for her is to make a market. It has exposed her work to more
people than ever would have seen it in Athens, without any auditions for capital-A art power brokers. Just as important,
though, is that her aesthetic turned out to have unusually broad appeal, and she doesn't know quite what to tell the aspir-
ing crafter-artists who besiege her with requests for advice. ''I had no idea that my work would appeal to grandmas, 12-
year-old girls, hipsters, guys buying things for their girlfriends and wives,'' she says. The real lesson of the Black Apple
may be not how many Emily Martin stories there have been (not many) but how many people figure that they, too, can
achieve what she has (lots).
       Inevitably, not everyone can, and it's no surprise that Etsy has detractors. Some point out that for all the talk of
consumers wanting to escape mall-fueled conformity Etsy's online-mall format amplifies market-driven trends. (Images
of birds, especially owls, are inexplicably popular. One crafter told me she was sick of making the same owl over and
over -- but that's what her customers wanted.) Others grouse about another side effect, price pressure: The competition
is so intense on the site that new crafters can't break out, and some established ones feel they cannot raise their prices.
That's a particularly thorny problem if part of your sales pitch is that you've made a thing yourself; a careful artisan can't
respond to lower prices with greater volume. The most extreme version of this critique practically makes Etsy sound
like Wal-Mart in its ripple-effect power through the broader D.I.Y. business community.
       These aren't really Etsy problems; they are consumer-marketplace problems. An enterprise founded on its creator's
passion still has to satisfy consumer demand if it's going to be a profitable enterprise. Consider another Etsy seller story,
one less splashy, but perhaps more representative, than Emily Martin's. Circa Ceramics is two Chicago-based potters,
Andy Witt and Nancy Pizarro. A few years ago, their work had a fairly traditional aesthetic Southwestern color schemes
in stripes, flower shapes and other patterns. They sold these pieces at traditional fairs, or to business customers like cof-
fee shops.
      More recently they stumbled across some design blogs and learned about Etsy and the apparent demand for pot-
tery work with an edgier look -- which the potters themselves happened to prefer. At the Renegade fair in Chicago, their
booth was full of porcelain pieces of all kinds -- cups, magnets, wall-hanging tiles and so on -- decorated with images of
manual typewriters, skulls, vintage cameras and bugs. It was their first time at Renegade, and they seemed enthusiastic
about how it was going. Their gradual move toward the ''indie community,'' and to a customer base they describe as 25
to 35 years old, rather than 35 to 75, has been good for business. A year ago they opened an Etsy storefront, and while
they weren't sure how many people would go for $30 coffee mugs ordered via mail, it turned out that hundreds would.
Recently Circa Ceramics helped form the Etsy Chicago Street team. Etsy sales now represent 25 percent of their busi-
ness, with orders going to customers as far away as Spain, Belgium, even Australia.
     For Circa Ceramics, and for crafters in general, Etsy is another manifestation of how D.I.Y.-ism has evolved. Its
motivation may still be the independence from capitalism that Railla wrote about. But it can also be about a form of
independence economic independence within capitalism. Many of the artist-entrepreneurs opening up their virtual
                                                                                                                   Page 103
                            Handmade 2.0 The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


shops on Etsy want what Circa Ceramics or Emily Martin or the Austin Craft Mafia have achieved: Making a living
from what they love to do. It's a goal that reconciles ideology and self-branding, not so much to change the world as to
stake out a place in it.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: INTERNET SOCIAL NETWORKING (78%); INTERNET RETAILING (78%); BLOGS & MESSAGE
BOARDS (78%); WEB SITES (78%); INTERNET AUCTIONS (78%); RETAILERS (73%); AUCTIONS (72%);
ARTS FESTIVALS & EXHIBITIONS (70%); ART & ARTISTS (69%); GLOBAL WARMING (69%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (64%)

GEOGRAPHIC: FLORIDA, USA (79%); GEORGIA, USA (65%); NEW MEXICO, USA (51%) UNITED STATES
(79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 16, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: Photo: (Photograph By Thomas Hannich For The New York Times)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 45 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                    The New York Times

                                                December 16, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Gone Wild And Gone All Wrong
BYLINE: By MIREYA NAVARRO

SECTION: Section 9; Column 0; Style Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1803 words

DATELINE: Reno, Nev.

       THE multimillionaire creator of ''Girls Gone Wild'' sits in a jail visiting room here, wearing a uniform of orange
shirt and gray pants and looking pale but rested from eight months of incarceration. He talks to a visitor through glass,
often yelling, sometimes tapping on the glass with his index finger for emphasis, railing into a handset against ''evil'' and
''vengeful'' government officials and vowing to sue them all.
     ''Enough is enough,'' he spits out. ''I am not a criminal.''
      Joe Francis, 34, has long been a polarizing figure, having made his riches enticing young women at Spring Break
locations (many of them drunk) to bare their breasts for the cameras for his popular videos. He has not been scoring
                                                                                                                   Page 104
                  Gone Wild And Gone All Wrong The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


brownie points by calling local officials in Florida -- where Spring Break 2003 in Panama City Beach went terribly
wrong for him -- ''Nazis'' and ''cockroaches.''
       But, stuck in jail in Reno, Mr. Francis is now desperately trying to drum up public sympathy, if not win release, to
expose how unfairly he believes authorities have treated him. For the last two and a half months, he has taken out ads,
sent out news releases, appeared on dozens of radio and TV talk shows and used a Web site, www.meetjoefrancis.com,
to relate his convoluted story while his lawyers file motions charging prosecutorial misconduct and ask for investiga-
tions.
     And as he goes about trying to transform his image from soft-porn entrepreneur to victim of vindictive officials,
support has come from unusual quarters. His most vocal allies are not the Hollywood A-listers who have vacationed at
his Mexico estate, but conservative radio hosts and their listeners, who suspect government shenanigans.
      ''EVEN though I don't approve of what Joe Francis does for a living, he's caught up in a nightmare,'' said Mike
Gallagher, one of the syndicated radio hosts who have given Mr. Francis a platform in recent weeks via jail telephone.
''There's a real issue here of somebody not getting bail.''
      But Florida officials have been doing some p.r. of their own. The prosecutor, State Attorney Steve Meadows, has
sat down for interviews on ''Nightline'' and VH-1 and issued news releases vowing to ''pursue the prosecution against
Joe Francis at every stage and in every court.''
      And the former mayor of Panama City Beach, Lee Sullivan, one of the first Florida officials to lock horns with
Mr. Francis, maintains he has only his ''arrogance and bad judgment'' to blame for his travails. Last year, when Mr. Sul-
livan unsuccessfully ran for state representative, his campaign listed as his proudest mayoral achievement ''taking 'Girls
Gone Wild,' their slick California lawyers and their exploitation of young women to court and making certain their por-
nography would never be made on the Emerald Coast again.''
      Mr. Francis's troubles started nearly five years ago when he included Panama City Beach, a Panhandle city of
white-sand beaches on the Gulf of Mexico, in a highly publicized pay-per-view event from three Spring Break loca-
tions. ''Girls Gone Wild'' camera crews, who usually film college women at bars, parking lots, hotel rooms and other
party hangouts, had been to Panama Beach City before, but in 2003 they arrived with unusual hoopla.
       Mayor Sullivan took exception and law enforcement officials cracked down on acts of lewd behavior, which inter-
fered with the filming. Mr. Francis sued the officials, claiming violation of his First Amendment rights, and got them to
settle and back down. But Mr. Francis and some of his crew were arrested when the father of one of two women filmed
in a shower scene at the hotel room the filmmakers had rented contacted the county sheriff's office, saying the girls
were minors.
      The officials came down hard: They confiscated Mr. Francis's Ferrari and private jet, announcing cocaine had
been found on the plane. Mr. Francis was charged with more than 70 counts, including racketeering, drug trafficking,
prostitution and promoting the sexual performance of children.
      A judge ended up throwing out all but six of the criminal counts, which revolve around the use of minors in a sex-
ual performance, because of a flawed search warrant. And as it turned out, no cocaine was found on the plane.
      But Mr. Francis was also saddled with a civil suit for emotional distress from the two girls, each 17, in the shower
scene, along with five women. While he was out on bail in the criminal case, which is pending, the judge overseeing the
suit ordered Mr. Francis to return to Florida to mediate the suit. That civil case landed Mr. Francis in jail in April when
the women's lawyers complained he was verbally abusive in negotiations. Judge John Richard Smoak Jr. of the North-
ern District of Florida held Mr. Francis in civil contempt for not properly participating in mediation and ordered him
into custody. Mr. Francis, by then back home in Los Angeles, showed up to do his time four days late, which earned
him another contempt order, this time for criminal contempt.
       Mr. Francis settled the lawsuit while in jail in Bay County, Fla., but his troubles were not over. Before he could
get out, guards found sleeping pills, prescription medication for anxiety and high cholesterol and $700 in cash in his
cell, and he soon faced criminal charges for introducing contraband into a detention facility.
      Because of the new charges, his bail on the 2003 criminal case was revoked, and bail in the contraband case was
denied by Judge Dedee S. Costello of Bay County Circuit Court, who said Mr. Francis had ''impugned the integrity of
the judicial process.''
                                                                                                                 Page 105
                  Gone Wild And Gone All Wrong The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


       Mr. Francis would still be jailed in Florida if not for another twist: Federal officials in Nevada charged him with
two counts of tax evasion, so in June he was transferred to Washoe County jail here to answer the new charges. He fac-
es trial on the tax evasion case but denies any wrongdoing.
      In fact, he says, he sees the tax evasion case as a godsend. That case keeps him from going back to Bay County,
where he claims in court papers he suffered abusive treatment. He remains in Nevada while his lawyers, including the
well-known Miami lawyer Roy Black, try to get the Florida charges dismissed. The chance of that happening is slim,
his lawyers said, and Mr. Francis is looking at more jail time.
      Here, Mr. Francis spends his days on the pay phone talking to his lawyers, arranging interviews and keeping tabs
on ''Girls Gone Wild'' and Mantra Entertainment, his Los Angeles-based company. The business, with 350 employees,
now brings in nearly $100 million a year in revenue, he said, and has branched out from DVDs to the Internet, mobile
phones and apparel lines.
      Mr. Francis admits having made mistakes. He said he regretted reporting to jail in Florida late while trying to get
the judge's order stayed.
      But he is hardly contrite. He has a defense for every bad turn along the way: The two minors filmed in Panama
City Beach lied about their age to the cameraman and would have been vetted before the video was released; the media-
tion of their suit turned sour on both sides and it didn't help him that one of the girls' lawyers was Judge Smoak's former
law partner; Mr. Francis says he walked into jail with pills and cash because he was not searched and didn't know better.
      Mr. Francis, who sees himself as a Larry Flynt figure, argues this is all payback for defying the power structure in
Bay County with his First Amendment lawsuit. Mr. Sullivan, the former mayor, denied this, but said Mr. Francis's
''cavalier attitude'' and ''obvious disdain'' for authority have not helped him.
     ''If he's looking for his worst enemy, he'll find it in the mirror,'' he said.
       JOE GRAMMER, a spokesman for the Florida attorney's office, said Mr. Meadows, the prosecutor in the original
underage-girls case, is no longer commenting because of a judge's admonition to lawyers to limit public statements. In
his latest salvo, Mr. Francis filed a motion last October to have charges dismissed, accusing Mr. Meadows of tainting
the jury pool by making disparaging statements against him on national TV and showing a portion of the shower video
to ''Nightline.''
     Greta Van Susteren, who has aired the feud between Mr. Francis and the Florida officials on her news show on the
Fox News Channel since the beginning, said the case seemed out of control.
     ''This is a grudge match,'' said Ms. Van Susteren, a lawyer. ''They're messing with him, without a doubt, and that's
because Joe has poked a stick in the eyes of the prosecutors who have the power to hold him.''
      Mr. Francis and his company have faced numerous suits from women over his videos and have paid hefty fines for
violating record-keeping laws by failing to document the ages of young women in his videos and for the unauthorized
shipping and billing of his DVDs. A few years ago a man broke into Mr. Francis's home in Bel Air, bound and gagged
him at gunpoint and forced him to pose partly naked for a video as part of an extortion attempt. The man was sentenced
to over 10 years in prison.
      Mr. Francis was in the news again when a bachelor party in Mexico he gave for Richard Johnson, a gossip editor
for The New York Post, figured in a scandal about Post gossip staff accepting favors from sources.
     Mr. Francis's Hollywood friends, some of whom have written testimonials for his Web site, say they don't know
what to make of his current situation.
       ''It's been so long and no bail,'' said Quincy Jones, a neighbor in Bel Air who accompanied Mr. Francis's parents to
Florida when Mr. Francis was first jailed. ''I don't know what that's about.'' Mr. Jones, 74, said he knew Mr. Francis as a
''giving'' person with a good heart.
      E-mail messages to Mr. Francis at Mantra Entertainment get an automatic ''I am out of the office'' reply, as if he's
just momentarily gone on business. But Mr. Francis said he lost a $300 million offer for his business as a result of his
legal problems. At least he has found a much friendlier jail atmosphere in Washoe County than in Florida. He's in a spe-
cial housing unit because of his high profile and sheriff's deputies have accommodated his numerous press interviews.
He has his own cell but works handing out meals and doing other chores and has posed no problems, a spokeswoman
for the jail said.
                                                                                                                  Page 106
                  Gone Wild And Gone All Wrong The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


      Mr. Francis says his fellow inmates -- bank robbers, drug dealers and the occasional hair stylist on D.U.I. who has
cut his hair -- have been sympathetic. Many are ''Girls Gone Wild'' fans, he said, and he has even signed autographs.
       But while his money is good for phone calls all day long, ordering out for food and the best lawyers, it can't buy
his freedom.
      ''They joke with me every day here,'' he said of his guards. '''Another murderer got out, Francis! Call your lawyer!'
At least they know that I shouldn't be here.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CITY GOVERNMENT (89%); US STATE GOVERNMENT (89%); RADIO BROADCAST INDUSTRY
(86%); WOMEN (78%); WEALTHY PEOPLE (78%); JUSTICE DEPARTMENTS (76%); LAWYERS (76%); IN-
VESTIGATIONS (75%); MISCONDUCT (72%); INTERVIEWS (70%); MEDIA SYNDICATION (70%); TELEVI-
SION PROGRAMMING (50%); LEGAL ETHICS (64%); JAIL SENTENCING (78%)

GEOGRAPHIC: MIAMI, FL, USA (79%) FLORIDA, USA (94%); NEVADA, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (94%)

LOAD-DATE: December 16, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: VIDEOGRAPHER: Joe Francis, in jail, says he is not guilty. (PHOTOGRAPH BY COURTESY
OF THE WASHOE COUNTY JAIL)
UNREAL GIRLS? Jerry Palacio, right, works on a ''Girls Gone Wild'' video in Miami Beach. Above, a video cover.
(PHOTOGRAPH BY BARBARA P. FERNANDEZ FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)
 PERP WALK: Joe Francis leaving the courthouse in Panama City, Fla., in April. Some conservatives are among the
most vocal supporters of Mr. Francis. (PHOTOGRAPHER BY TERRY BARNER/THE NEWS HERALD, VIA AS-
SOCIATED PRESS)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                46 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                               December 16, 2007 Sunday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Paid Notice: Deaths CHEREN, MELVIN
SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Classified; Pg. 53

LENGTH: 516 words

     CHEREN--Melvin. (January 21, 1933-December 7, 2007) Affectionately known as ''The Godfather of Disco'' for
his championing of DJs, dance music and club culture from the early days of the Disco Movement, Mel began his five
decade career in the music business at ABC/Paramount, where he eventually became Head of Production. He held the
same position when he moved to Scepter Records.
                                                                                                                 Page 107
              Paid Notice: Deaths CHEREN, MELVIN The New York Times December 16, 2007 Sunday


     During his tenure at Scepter he was responsible for many innovations such as the first 12 inch record for DJs and
the first instrumental mix on the B-side, earning Scepter the ''Trendsetter of the Year'' Award from Billboard in 1974.
With a former Scepter colleague he formed his own company, West End Records in 1976, which has been associated
for over 30 years with enduring dance classics like ''Hot Shot'' and ''Heartbeat''. In recent years West End released popu-
lar compilation CD's of remixes and live performances by legendary Paradise Garage DJ Larry Levan. Mel was the fi-
nancial backer of the landmark club created by his former life-partner Michael Brody. This history is well documented
in Cheren's autobiography, My Life and the Paradise Garage: Keep on Dancin' published in 2000 and in a recent docu-
mentary, The Godfather of Disco. In 2005 Mel was inducted into the Dance Music Hall of Fame with their Lifetime
Achievement Award, an honor which meant a great deal to him. For all of his accomplishments in the music industry,
Mel was most proud of his work in support of various causes and charities and in particular his efforts in support of the
LGBT Community and the fight against AIDS. He was part of the vanguard of gay men who first responded to the
AIDS crisis in New York in the early Eighties and gave GMHC their first home in his Chelsea brownstone which he
later operated for over 20 years as a successful bed-and-breakfast, the Colonial House Inn. He was the founder of 24
Hours For Life, an AIDS charity that was the fiscal sponsor for LIFEbeat, on whose Board he served as a Charter Direc-
tor. Mel was also quietly a friend to many friends and strangers in need as well as an accomplished painter. A large
number of Mel's works of art memorialize friends lost to AIDS. It is a sad irony that he is a fatality of the same health
crisis that he fought so long to eradicate. Even in his last days he took a stand for AIDS prevention in a cautionary in-
terview aired on the LOGO channel throughout the week of World AIDS Day. Mel Cheren is survived and will be
greatly missed by many family members, prominent among them being Illya Dekhtyar, Mark Cheren and Barry Cherin,
as well as a large extended family of close friends, colleagues and fellow activists. An announcement will soon be made
about a memorial service/celebration and various memorial benefit parties taking place over the third weekend in Janu-
ary which would have marked his 75th birthday. Donations in Mel's honor can be made to GMHC, 119 West 24th
Street, New York, New York 10011; The LGBT Community Center at 208 West 13th Street, New York, New York
10011; or LIFEbeat, 630 9th Avenue Suite 1010 New York, New York 10036.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: MUSIC (90%); MUSIC GENRES (90%); MUSIC INDUSTRY (90%); RECORD INDUSTRY (89%);
AIDS & HIV (89%); ENTERTAINMENT & ARTS (89%); RECORD REVENUES (89%); DEATHS & OBITUARIES
(91%); VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS (77%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (77%); SPONSORSHIP (77%); PRO-
FILES & BIOGRAPHIES (72%); INTERVIEWS (72%); DOCUMENTARY FILMS (71%); BIOGRAPHICAL LIT-
ERATURE (71%); CHARITIES (69%); AWARDS & PRIZES (69%); VOLUNTARY HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS
(68%); GAYS & LESBIANS (66%); BED & BREAKFAST INNS (61%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, USA (73%) UNITED STATES (73%)

LOAD-DATE: March 7, 2008

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Paid Death Notice

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               47 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                              December 15, 2007 Saturday
                                                                                                                Page 108
                                  The New York Times December 15, 2007 Saturday


                                                   Late Edition - Final

BYLINE: By ANDREW E. KRAMER

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; TODAY IN BUSINESS; Pg. 2

LENGTH: 698 words

     STRIKE ENDS IN RUSSIA The Ford Motor Company and a union representing part of its Russian employees
agreed to end a strike that was corroding Ford's profit in one of Europe's hottest markets. Already, two-thirds of Ford's
assembly line employees at a plant in Vsevolozhsk, outside St. Petersburg, had broken ranks with the union and re-
turned to work since the strike began Nov. 22. On Friday, the remaining union employees also agreed to return begin-
ning with the late shift on Sunday, though negotiations on salaries and benefits in the 2008 contract continue, according
to a statement from Ford. Russia, awash in oil money, is projected to surpass Germany as the largest car market in Eu-
rope by the end of the decade. ANDREW E. KRAMER
      A SALE FOR BOEING The Boeing Company said AWAS, an airplane leasing company in Ireland, has ordered
31 of its single-aisle 737-800 jets. While specific deal terms were not disclosed, Boeing said the order was worth $2.3
billion at list prices, although airlines typically negotiate discounts. AWAS owns and manages 315 airplanes. (AP)
     BUYING INTO LLOYD'S Japan's largest insurer, Millea Holdings , said its Tokio Marine and Nichido Fire In-
surance unit would buy Kiln Ltd. for $:442.2 million ($902 million) to gain a seat at Lloyd's of London.
     Kiln, which provides energy, marine, property and aviation coverage, is the second Lloyd's insurer to receive
takeover interest this month, after Ironshore of Bermuda said that it approached Heritage Underwriting Agency about a
potential cash offer. (BLOOMBERG NEWS)
      RETIREMENT AT RBS RBS Greenwich Capital Markets, the American securities unit of Royal Bank of Scot-
land, said its chief executive, Jay Levine, would leave in March. He is retiring because the subsidiary, based in Green-
wich, Conn., will be reorganizing as a result of Royal Bank's purchase of ABN Amro Holding. ''It was really something
Jay wasn't interested in,'' a company spokesman, Peter Ward, said. ''He really wanted to get to a smaller, more entre-
preneurial endeavor.''
       (BLOOMBERG NEWS) WARNING FOR DRUG The European health regulator said Pfizer's Champix, a stop-
smoking aid, should carry a warning about the risk of suicide attempts among patients. In urging the warning, the regu-
lator, the European Medicines Agency, followed the lead of American health officials who said last month doctors
should monitor patients for mood shifts and patients should tell their doctors of changes.
      Pfizer has until Wednesday to propose new prescription information for the drug, the regulator said. Champix is
sold as Chantix in the United States.
     (BLOOMBERG NEWS)
     RESIGNATION AT CREDIT SUISSE The United States head of asset management at Credit Suisse, Keith
Schappert, left the company, the bank said. ''He has resigned,'' a spokeswoman, Suzanne Fleming, said. She declined to
comment on whether a successor was being considered.
    Mr. Schappert, 56, was hired in November 2006 to run Credit Suisse's $160 billion American investment-
management unit. The business accounts for about a quarter of the $614 billion in global assets managed by the bank.
(BLOOMBERG NEWS)
       SIEMENS REVERSES DECISION Siemens, the German engineering giant, revoked the appointment of a finance
executive on suspicion that he might have links to a bribery investigation facing the company. Siemens announced a
week ago that the executive, Hannes Apitzsch, would become chief financial officer of its industry sector. That sector
is a recently created grouping of business lines including automation machinery, building technologies and light bulbs.
     But on Friday, Siemens pulled back and hinted that Mr. Apitzsch's name might have surfaced in an inquiry by
prosecutors over suspected bribery in labor relations. The company did not specify why the appointment was being
withdrawn, except to say that it had ''examined this week the investigation records'' of prosecutors in Nuremberg.
                                                                                                              Page 109
                                  The New York Times December 15, 2007 Saturday


      The authorities there are looking into accusations that Siemens gave improper payments to top officials of the
Association of Independent Employees, a smaller, employer-friendly rival to IG Metall, the largest union at the compa-
ny. CARTER DOUGHERTY

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: AUTOMAKERS (90%); INSURANCE (90%); STRIKES (90%); LABOR UNIONS (90%); HOLDING
COMPANIES (89%); PHARMACEUTICALS INDUSTRY (89%); TAKEOVERS (78%); RESIGNATIONS (78%);
AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR PERFORMANCE (78%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (78%); BANKING & FINANCE
(77%); PROPERTY & CASUALTY INSURANCE (74%); WAGES & SALARIES (73%); AVIATION INSURANCE
(73%); CAPITAL EQUIPMENT LEASING (72%); OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE (71%); HEALTH DEPART-
MENTS (69%); LEASING INDUSTRY (68%); AIRLINES (68%); PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS (62%); SMOKING
(60%); SUICIDE (50%); SMOKING CESSATION (65%)

COMPANY: FORD MOTOR CO (96%); BOEING CO (84%); ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND GROUP PLC
(82%); MILLEA HOLDINGS INC (68%); ABN AMRO HOLDING NV (81%); BLOOMBERG LP (54%); HERIT-
AGE UNDERWRITING AGENCY PLC (54%); PFIZER INC (52%); LLOYD'S OF LONDON (UK) (83%);
LLOYD'S OF LONDON (GAMBIA) (67%); TOKIO MARINE & NICHIDO FIRE INSURANCE CO LTD (68%);
TOKIO MARINE HOLDINGS INC (68%); CREDIT SUISSE GROUP AG (50%)

TICKER: FORDP (PAR) (96%); FORDA (AMS) (94%); FDM (LSE) (96%); F (NYSE) (96%); BOE (LSE) (84%);
BAB (BRU) (84%); BA (NYSE) (84%); 7661 (TSE) (83%); RBS (NYSE) (82%); RBS (LSE) (82%); 8766 (TSE)
(68%); ABN (NYSE) (64%); AAR (FRA) (81%); AABP (PAR) (64%); AABA (AMS) (64%); HUA (LSE) (54%); PFZ
(LSE) (52%); PFE (NYSE) (52%); RBS (AMS) (82%); PFEB (BRU) (52%); ABO (ASX) (81%); F (SWX) (96%);
CSGN (SWX) (50%); CS (NYSE) (50%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS336112 LIGHT TRUCK & UTILITY VEHICLE MANUFACTURING (96%); NAICS336111
AUTOMOBILE MANUFACTURING (96%); SIC3711 MOTOR VEHICLES & PASSENGER CAR BODIES (96%);
NAICS336414 GUIDED MISSILE & SPACE VEHICLE MANUFACTURING (84%); NAICS336412 AIRCRAFT
ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS MANUFACTURING (84%); NAICS336411 AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURING (84%);
SIC3761 GUIDED MISSILES & SPACE VEHICLES (84%); NAICS551111 OFFICES OF BANK HOLDING COM-
PANIES (82%); NAICS522110 COMMERCIAL BANKING (82%); NAICS523920 PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT
(81%); SIC6712 OFFICES OF BANK HOLDING COMPANIES (81%); SIC6282 INVESTMENT ADVICE (81%);
SIC6029 COMMERCIAL BANKS, NEC (81%); NAICS519110 NEWS SYNDICATES (54%); NAICS516110 IN-
TERNET PUBLISHING AND BROADCASTING (54%); NAICS511120 PERIODICAL PUBLISHERS (54%);
SIC7383 NEWS SYNDICATES (54%); SIC4899 COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES, NEC (54%); SIC4832 RADIO
BROADCASTING STATIONS (54%); SIC2741 MISC. PUBLISHING (54%); SIC2721 PERIODICALS: PUBLISH-
ING, OR PUBLISHING & PRINTING (54%); NAICS519130 INTERNET PUBLISHING & BROADCASTING &
WEB SEARCH PORTALS (54%); NAICS524126 DIRECT PROPERTY & CASUALTY INSURANCE CARRIERS
(55%)

GEOGRAPHIC: SAINT PETERSBURG, RUSSIA (92%) CONNECTICUT, USA (78%) UNITED STATES (94%);
RUSSIA (92%); EUROPE (93%); JAPAN (75%); IRELAND (73%); GERMANY (58%)

LOAD-DATE: December 15, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Summary

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                                   Page 110




                                                48 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 15, 2007 Saturday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Paid in Dollars, Some Americans Are Struggling in Europe
BYLINE: By DOREEN CARVAJAL

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 4

LENGTH: 873 words

DATELINE: PARIS

    Erica Nevins's faith in the dollar was shaken the moment she pressed a crumpled $1 bill into the hand of a little girl
begging for money on the streets of Marrakesh, Morocco.
     ''I don't want this. This is nothing,'' Ms. Nevins recalled the scornful reaction of the child, who demanded more.
       Since then Ms. Nevins, an American fashion executive, has replayed that moment over and over in her head as she
confronts the harsh reality of living on a dollar income in Paris and then moving to costly London. ''The absurdity of
this is that it's so true,'' she said. ''A dollar really means nothing. It's scary.''
      With plunging exchange rates, American expatriates whose pensions or incomes are paid in dollars are scrimping.
No more dinners out when a bottle of Perrier for 3.50 euros translates to $5 and no more holiday shopping binges when
a shiny iPod for 159 euros is equal to $230. Ultimately, some are moving to greener pastures that match the color of
their money.
     ''Those that can hold out are holding their breath and we're hoping for a return of the dollar, but those that can't are
going,'' said Susie Bondi, an American who has lived in Paris for 12 years, but is moving to Vienna in January with her
husband, Fred, to stretch their pension dollars in a city with a lower cost of living.
       The last six months have been anxious for expatriates, with the dollar sinking against the euro, the pound and cur-
rencies like the Czech koruna and the Costa Rican colon. The declines are accelerating the flight of expatriates in Eu-
rope, according to tax lawyers who listen to the problems of clients who are giving up because they see no relief in
sight.
    Even United States government employees are feeling the pinch in countries with strong currencies like the Czech
Republic, where the koruna has gained 17 percent this year against the dollar.
       Radio Free Europe, the United States-backed broadcaster based in Prague, is suddenly facing a housing crisis for
many of its 500 employees. And the chief executive, Jeffrey Gedmin, ranks the weak dollar as one of the critical issues
that the news organization is facing, along with attacks around the world on journalists, who have been kidnapped in
Baghdad and jailed in Azerbaijan.
      ''For me it's become an ethical issue,'' said Mr. Gedmin, who was in Washington this month lobbying legislators
for relief and trying to raise funds privately to aid hard-hit employees. ''I have a genuine ethical issue to take care of
people who are trying hard to take care of their own countries.''
      Employees who have long been paid in dollars pumped the money into the local economy and to landlords who
gratefully accepted dollars when the currency was strong.
                                                                                                      Page 111
    Paid in Dollars, Some Americans Are Struggling in Europe The New York Times December 15, 2007 Saturday


      Now most of the organization's employees living in Prague are being pressured to convert rental contracts from
dollars to korunas and have received notices about rent increases.
       The impact of the sagging dollar has been particularly acute for expatriates who live on fixed pensions paid in dol-
lars, or self-employed workers whose clients are largely based in the United States.
      Josh Soskin moved from San Francisco to Barcelona in September to start a freelance video production company
that supplies clients like Current TV in the United States with short video features on European stories.
      These days, he said, he finds himself sitting on his bed, with his head in his hands, obsessively checking currency
rates on his laptop. ''They pay us $2,500 for a piece, and you cash it in and it's 1,400 euros or less. That's shocking,'' Mr.
Soskin said.
      To survive and hedge currencies, Mr. Soskin is now scouting for European clients who will pay him in euros.
Other self-employed workers -- from medical translators to online entrepreneurs -- are simply cutting off American
clients because it is no longer worth working for them.
      Vincent Gagliostro is a graphic designer and freelance video filmmaker who left the New York advertising indus-
try two years ago to settle in Paris with its promise of cheaper living, which reduced his monthly housing costs from a
$6,000 mortgage to an 18th-century apartment rental for 1,700 euros. When he first moved to Paris, he said, he worked
for a base of clients from the United States, but he is trying to diversify to earn euros.
      ''The dollar still heavily weighs on the quality of my life. As long as I continue to rely on at least 50 percent of my
income with American clients, it's going to do that,'' Mr. Gagliostro said. ''My goal would be to lose the American cli-
ents altogether.''
      Mr. Gagliostro's partner, Richard Nahem, a Brooklyn native, has also sought to supplement their income by offer-
ing customized tours of the Marais, but his new business, Eye Prefer Paris Tours, is dominated by Americans and Cana-
dians who pay him in a mix of euros and dollars. To economize, he has cut back on his own indulgences, like clothing
purchases. But he cannot resist his favorite high-end patisserie, Gerard Mulot, where a chocolate eclair costs 2.80 euros
($4).
      Some employees have successfully pressed their companies to shift from dollars to local currencies. Ms. Nevins,
who was paid in dollars while living in Paris, changed her income to pounds when she moved to London earlier this
year.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CURRENCIES (90%); EURO (89%); ETHICS (84%); LEGISLATORS (78%); US DOLLAR (78%);
COST OF LIVING (75%); EXCHANGE RATES (73%); LOBBYING (68%); FUNDRAISING (67%); JOURNALISM
(66%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (64%); TAX CONSULTING (63%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (55%)

GEOGRAPHIC: PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC (53%); BAGHDAD, IRAQ (51%) UNITED STATES (96%);
FRANCE (92%); MOROCCO (90%); CZECH REPUBLIC (90%); EUROPE (94%); CENTRAL EUROPE (79%);
AZERBAIJAN (72%); IRAQ (51%)

LOAD-DATE: December 15, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Dinners out are rare for Americans when a bottle of Perrier for 3.50 euros translates to $5.
(PHOTOGRAPH BY ED ALCOCK FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                                  Page 112




                                               49 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                              December 15, 2007 Saturday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

What's On Tonight
BYLINE: By KATHRYN SHATTUCK

SECTION: Section B; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; Pg. 19

LENGTH: 490 words

     8 P.M. (HBO) DREAMGIRLS (2006) Three Motor City singers, portrayed by Beyonce Knowles, Jennifer Hudson
and Anika Noni Rose, discover the price of fame in Bill Condon's adaptation of the Broadway musical of the same title.
Jamie Foxx plays the musical entrepreneur who trades in Effie White (Ms. Hudson, in her Oscar-winning role), the
lead singer of the Dreamettes, for her thinner, lighter-skinned sidekick Deena Jones (Ms. Knowles). Eddie Murphy won
an Oscar nomination for his turn as James (Thunder) Early, a soul man loosely based on Berry Gordy Jr. of Motown.
(Above, from left, Sharon Leal, as the singer who replaces Effie; Ms. Knowles; and Ms. Rose.)
      8 P.M. (ABC Family) SNOWGLOBE (2007) A woman (Christina Milian) yearning for a perfect Christmas winds
up inside her grandmother's snow globe, where she finds her true love (Matt Keeslar).
      8:30 P.M. (Fox) COPS Police officers across the country break up domestic disputes in this special holiday epi-
sode. We're guessing that the fights are about more than the Christmas goose.
      9 P.M. (Hallmark) LOVE'S UNFOLDING DREAM (2007) The saga continues in this latest installment in the
''Love Comes Softly'' series. Two years after the death of Willie LaHaye, his widow, Missie (Erin Cottrell), and their
son, Maddie, leave Tettsford Junction to rebuild their lives on Missie's father's ranch. There, she takes in Belinda (Hol-
liston Coleman), an orphan with a secret, and dabbles in romance.
      9 P.M. (Style) MY DESTINATION WEDDING WITH THE KNOT SPECIAL Brooke Fischer and Neil
Aggarwal of New York want to combine Roman Catholic and Hindu traditions in not one but two wedding ceremonies
on the Caribbean island Little Cayman. Meanwhile, family medical problems threaten to cast a pall over the affair.
     9 P.M. (Lifetime) CHRISTMAS IN PARADISE (2007) Two single parents, who both try to escape bad holiday
memories by taking their children on a cruise, meet and find love at a Puerto Rican resort. Then a visitor from the past
unexpectedly shows up and threatens to ruin everything. Colin Ferguson and Charlotte Ross, above, star with Devon
Werkheiser.
     9:30 P.M. (CMT) BILLY RAY CYRUS: HOME AT LAST Mr. Cyrus ends the season by heading home to
Nashville, where he tries to come to terms with the fact that the career of Miley, his 15-year-old daughter and the star of
Disney's ''Hannah Montana,'' may be hotter than his own. Ouch.
     10 P.M. (VH1) THE CRITICS' CHOICE: BEST MOVIES OF 2007 Peter Hammond (Maxim, The Los Angeles
Times), Jeanne Wolf (Parade), Carrie Keagan (No Good TV) and Mark S. Allen (''Good Day Sacramento'') debate the
nominees for the forthcoming Critics' Choice Awards.
      10 P.M. (BBC America) THE GRAHAM NORTON SHOW Mr. Norton butters up the food personality Nigella
Lawson, who explains to her fellow guest Marilyn Manson that she'll eat anything at least once. Ms. Lawson says, ''I've
got a very robust constitution, no aftereffects at all.'' KATHRYN SHATTUCK
                                                                                                              Page 113
                        What's On Tonight The New York Times December 15, 2007 Saturday


URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: TELEVISION PROGRAMMING (90%); ENTERTAINMENT & ARTS AWARDS (78%); COUNTRY
MUSIC (78%); MUSIC (78%); CELEBRITIES (78%); NETWORK TELEVISION (74%); MUSICAL THEATER
(73%); DOMESTIC VIOLENCE (69%); RELIGION (62%); SINGLE PARENTS (69%); CHRISTMAS (88%); WED-
DINGS & ENGAGEMENTS (68%); ORPHANS (73%); SINGERS & MUSICIANS (90%)

COMPANY: LOS ANGELES TIMES (60%); WALT DISNEY CO (56%)

TICKER: MCKY (LSE) (56%); DIS (NYSE) (56%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS713110 AMUSEMENT & THEME PARKS (56%); NAICS515112 RADIO STATIONS (56%);
NAICS512110 MOTION PICTURE & VIDEO PRODUCTION (56%); NAICS453220 GIFT, NOVELTY & SOUVE-
NIR STORES (56%)

PERSON: BEYONCE KNOWLES (92%); MILEY CYRUS (50%); MICHAEL MCMAHON (55%)

GEOGRAPHIC: PUERTO RICO (79%); CARIBBEAN ISLANDS (79%); CAYMAN ISLANDS (53%)

LOAD-DATE: December 15, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                              50 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                The New York Times

                                             December 15, 2007 Saturday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

Corrections: For the Record
SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; Pg. 2

LENGTH: 31 words

     An article in Business Day on Friday about billionaires who push for social change in poorer countries misspelled
the surname of one such entrepreneur. He is Warren E. Buffett, not Buffet.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: WEALTHY PEOPLE (85%)

PERSON: WARREN BUFFETT (91%)
                                                                                                                   Page 114
                    Corrections: For the Record The New York Times December 15, 2007 Saturday




LOAD-DATE: December 15, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Correction

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                51 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 14, 2007 Friday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

A New Breed Of Billionaire
BYLINE: By LANDON THOMAS Jr..
   Landon Thomas Jr. reported from Istanbul and elsewhere in Turkey in October and did additional reporting from
New York.

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; AGE OF RICHES; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 2003 words

DATELINE: ISTANBUL

    Stuck in a traffic jam in his bulletproof BMW, the richest man in Turkey lets loose with a satisfied grin.
      Since 2000, Husnu M. Ozyegin has spent more than $50 million of his own money, building 36 primary schools
and girls' dormitories in the poorest parts of Turkey. Next to the Turkish government, Mr. Ozyegin is the biggest indi-
vidual supporter of schools in the country -- and an official from the education ministry has told him that his market
share is increasing.
     ''Not bad,'' he says in his gruff, cigarette-scarred voice as he pockets his mobile phone. ''If I can have an impact on
one million Turkish people in the next 10 years, I will be happy.''
      The global wealth boom has created a new breed of billionaire in once-destitute countries like Turkey, India, Mex-
ico and Russia. Propelled by their rising economies, robust currencies and globally competitive companies, they have
ridden a surge in local stock markets that have reached previously untouchable heights in a short five-year timeframe.
Now, a number of them are using their wealth to bolster their standing and push for social changes.
       These entrepreneurs, who have made their billions in private sector industries like telecommunications, petro-
chemicals and finance, are distinct from a past generation of international billionaires, most with ties to Middle Eastern
oil or valuable land holdings. Not only have they become the richest men in their countries; they are among the wealth-
iest in the world.
                                                                                                                        Page 115
                      A New Breed Of Billionaire The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


      For these emerging economies, where loose regulation, opaque privatization processes and monopolistic business
practices abound, this extraordinary and uneven creation of wealth rivals in many ways the great American fortunes
made at the turn of the 20th century.
      While such countries have long been accustomed to vast disparities between a tiny class of the wealthy elite and
the impoverished masses, the new elite shares some characteristics with counterparts in the United States. And just as
Rockefellers, Carnegies and Morgans once used philanthropy to smooth the rough edges of their cutthroat business rep-
utations -- as have a current generation of wealthy Americans that includes Bill Gates of Microsoft and Sanford I. Weill
of Citigroup -- local billionaires in emerging markets are trying to do the same.
      Global Philanthropy
     Carlos Slim Helu, the telecommunications entrepreneur in Mexico who is worth more than $50 billion, has
pledged billions of dollars to his two foundations that will aid health and education. Roman Abramovich, Russia's rich-
est man, who has a net worth of $18 billion, has channeled more than $1 billion into the impoverished Arctic area of
Chukotka, where he also serves as governor, building schools and hospitals.
      And in India, Azim Premji, the chairman of the software company Wipro who is worth $17 billion, has estab-
lished his own foundation that supports elementary education.
      To be sure, as these fortunes are still being made, the sums donated are relatively small in light of the pressing so-
cial needs of these countries. But as return-driven philanthropy has gained in popularity through the efforts of Mr.
Gates and others, emerging market billionaires are applying similar bottom-line oriented lessons to their own countries.
     ''What we are seeing in these countries,'' said Jane Wales, president of the Global Philanthropy Forum, ''are people
emerging from the private sector with tremendous wealth who are attracted to highly strategic philanthropy.''
      A Nontraditional Climb
      Here in Turkey, Mr. Ozyegin, who is 62 and has a net worth of $3.5 billion, did not secure his wealth by buying
government assets on the cheap or by belonging to a rich family that controls a monopoly -- two traditional routes to
great wealth in the developing world.
       The founder of a midtier corporate bank called Finansbank, he cashed in on a rush of interest by foreign financial
institutions in Turkish banks last year and sold a controlling stake in his bank to the National Bank of Greece, receiving
$2.7 billion in cash.
     Flush with money and ambition, he is doing all that he can to lift Turkish educational standards at the primary and
university level.
     Sitting in his personal conference room atop Finansbank's main office in Istanbul, Mr. Ozyegin recalls Aug. 18,
2006, when the sale of his 49 percent stake officially closed.
      ''I remember that day better than my birthday,'' he said, as he leaned back in a plush leather chair. ''I was not only a
billionaire but the richest man in Turkey. It's a great feeling, but your responsibilities increase.''
      Like many self-made billionaires, Mr. Ozyegin has a direct, demanding manner, and a day spent traveling with
him does not yield much casual conversation. He carries two cellphones, Throughout a long day he juggles calls from
his wife, his assistant, his son and assorted government bureaucrats, as well as the managers of his various businesses.
      He typically works 11-hour days, not solely from his suite of offices but also from his car, plane or boat, checking
in on his far-flung operations in Turkey as well as Russia, Romania and China.
      ''I'm first generation, that gives me satisfaction,'' he said. ''Getting to the top is not so easy; staying there is more
difficult.''
      Mr. Ozyegin's grandparents came to the southern Turkish city of Izmir from the Greek island of Crete in the late
19th century, during the dying days of the Ottoman Empire. The son of a doctor, he attended Robert College, an elite
academy in Istanbul, before setting off to Oregon State University in 1963 with $1,000 in his pocket.
     An overachiever, he played basketball and led the student government, but earned mediocre grades. Harvard
Business School seemed like a long shot given that he was in need of a scholarship. But he attached a picture of himself
                                                                                                                    Page 116
                      A New Breed Of Billionaire The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


welcoming Robert F. Kennedy to Oregon State to his application and was accepted. ''I guess they liked me for my lead-
ership abilities,'' he said.
      After a successful banking career, he founded Finansbank in 1987, selling his two homes and borrowing $3 mil-
lion to get the deal done.
      At the outset, the bank's ambitions were small, providing corporate banking services to Turkish businesses. The
bank's fortunes fluctuated in line with the volatile economy, expanding rapidly during the heady years of strong eco-
nomic growth, but facing extinction on two separate occasions, in 1994 and 2001, when the Turkish markets suffered
contractions.
      Becoming Competitive
      As a businessman, his frequent interaction with Southeast Asia, China and Russia has impressed upon him the
need for Turks to become more competitive in today's global economy.
      ''The most important problem that Turkey has is education,'' he said.
     He cites the rapid increase of applications to Harvard Business School from Chinese and Indian students. Turkey,
a smaller country, sends only four to eight students a year, said Mr. Ozyegin, who meets with the students when he vis-
its.
     Beyond his public school investments, Mr. Ozyegin has plans to spend up to $1 billion over the next 15 years on a
new private university, to be called Ozyegin University.
      ''I want to do something on a major scale,'' he said. ''My vision is that we can train and export people like India
does.''
      Since he started his building program in 2000, Mr. Ozyegin has completed 36 schools and girls' dormitories at a
cost that varies from $400,000 to $1.8 million each. He wants to reach 100 by 2010. He works closely with the gov-
ernment, with most of the building taking place in the country's poorest regions in the south and northeast.
     ''That is a lot, it is a very significant number,'' said Filiz Bikmen, the executive director of Tusev, a philanthropy
foundation in Istanbul.
      Turkey has the lowest ratio of girls to boys in primary and secondary school of any country in the Organization for
Economic Cooperation and Development, which requires its 30 members to meet minimum requirements for living
standards and democratic practices. Turkey's low standing is a result of a traditional culture that, especially in poorer
areas, places a higher premium on a boy's education than a girl's.
      In a country where the ruling party draws its root support from an electorate that is becoming more Islamic in atti-
tude and outlook, Mr. Ozyegin's aim to reach out to undereducated girls touches a sensitive cultural vein (through his
wife's foundation, Acev, he has also helped pay for women's literacy and early education programs in poor parts of the
country.)
      A practicing Muslim but avowedly secular in outlook, Mr. Ozyegin embodies the hopes as well as fears of Tur-
key's elite, many of its ranks now supporters of the ruling Justice and Development party, which has led the revitaliza-
tion of the Turkish economy.
       Mr. Ozyegin hopes that focusing on education as an economic development tool will help transcend the current
bitter disputes over religious practice, including whether the increase in the number of women wearing head scarves
signifies the emergence of a more Islamic, less secular Turkey.
      ''I want Turkey to have the same education levels as Europe 25 years from now,'' he said. ''Whether you wear a
scarf should not matter.''
      A Focus on Education
     When Mr. Ozyegin visits a school, he is frequently met by the district's mayor, a representative from the education
ministry and various other local notables. His visits, like his business meetings, are swift and to the point -- a sweep
through the school's halls and a barrage of questions directed at school officials.
                                                                                                                   Page 117
                     A New Breed Of Billionaire The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


      At a primary school bearing his name, in a working-class district on the outskirts of Istanbul, he marches into a
classroom of wide-eyed sixth graders who jump to their feet with the spirit and alacrity of a platoon hailing its general
and he exhorts them to heed their studies.
     At another school, he upbraids an official for countenancing stained carpets and trash that lines the building's long
hallways. ''This place is full of garbage,'' he said, his voice low and angry. ''Do something about it. It's shameful.''
      There are touching moments, too. A newly built primary school in a village close to the border with Armenia ech-
oes with shouts of its 360 students as Mr. Ozyegin's wife, sister and brother-in-law, who oversee the logistics of the
building program, stop by for a visit.
      Rarely do the children here attend high school. Many of them speak Kurdish as their first language, and their par-
ents eke out an existence as sheep and cow herders.
    Clothes are frayed and toes poke through the holes of plastic shoes. But, like the fading evening light on the
snowy peak of nearby Mount Ararat, there are glimmers of hope, too.
      Danyan Kuba, a tall, nervous seventh grader dressed in a coat and tie, is asked what he wants to be when he grows
up. He shifts awkwardly, looks down at his shoes and back up again. ''I want to be a math teacher,'' he says in a strong,
clear voice.
      For Mr. Ozyegin, becoming one of the richest men in the world has brought its own pressures. He gets many let-
ters each day. Some ask him to erase the debt they have on their Finansbank credit cards.
       Others are more poignant -- recently he received a letter from an admirer in jail asking for a pair of shoes and a
suit, a request he plans to honor.
     Like some who have made so much, Mr. Ozyegin likes to keep score.
    Warren E. Buffet may be the richest man in the world, but Mr. Ozyegin says, his wealth has risen faster. ''My
compounding is better than Buffet's, but my track record is only one-half as long,'' he said.
      He is also a student of the life of J. P. Morgan: he reels off how much Morgan, who dominated the world of fi-
nance at the turn of the 20th century, left to his son, daughter and wife, as well as the salary he awarded the captain of
his yacht. But Mr. Ozyegin's lack of renown on the larger global stage nags at him.
     ''I'm giving away 2 percent of my net income every month,'' he said. ''I don't think Bill Gates is doing that.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: WEALTHY PEOPLE (93%); CHARITIES (89%); FOUNDATIONS (89%); PRIMARY SCHOOLS
(89%); EMERGING MARKETS (89%); PHILANTHROPY (85%); EDUCATION SYSTEMS & INSTITUTIONS
(77%); PRIVATIZATION (77%); DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (76%); TELECOMMUNICATIONS (75%); ECO-
NOMIC NEWS (73%); EDUCATION DEPARTMENTS (72%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (72%); SCHOOL BUILD-
INGS (72%); EDUCATION (72%); PETROCHEMICALS (65%); MONOPOLIZATION (64%); GOVERNORS
(62%); SOFTWARE MAKERS (60%); COMPUTER SOFTWARE (60%)

COMPANY: MICROSOFT CORP (52%); CITIGROUP INC (58%)

TICKER: MSFT (NASDAQ) (52%); CGP (LSE) (52%); C (NYSE) (58%); 8710 (TSE) (58%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS511210 SOFTWARE PUBLISHERS (52%); SIC7372 PREPACKAGED SOFTWARE (52%);
NAICS523120 SECURITIES BROKERAGE (58%); NAICS522210 CREDIT CARD ISSUING (58%); NAICS522110
COMMERCIAL BANKING (58%); SIC6021 NATIONAL COMMERCIAL BANKS (57%)

PERSON: CARLOS SLIM HELU (52%); BILL GATES (52%); ROMAN ABRAMOVICH (51%); SANDY WEILL
(52%)

GEOGRAPHIC: ISTANBUL, TURKEY (73%) TURKEY (98%); UNITED STATES (93%); INDIA (92%); RUSSIA
(90%); MIDDLE EAST (79%); ARCTIC (56%)
                                                                                                                Page 118
                     A New Breed Of Billionaire The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday




LOAD-DATE: December 14, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Husnu M. Ozyegin has spent $50 million building 36 primary schools and girls' dormitories in
the poorest parts of Turkey. (PHOTOGRAPH BY LYNSEY ADDARIO FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) GRAPHIC:
REAL MONEY
 CHART: A NEW GLOBAL ELITE

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Series

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               52 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                               December 14, 2007 Friday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

JetBlue Sells Stake to Lufthansa for $300 Million
BYLINE: By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN and JEFF BAILEY; Michael J. de la Merced contributed reporting.

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 2

LENGTH: 955 words

     JetBlue, the struggling discount carrier, sold a 19 percent stake in its business to Lufthansa of Germany for $300
million Thursday, the first major investment by a foreign airline in an American rival since British Airways took a stake
in American Airlines in the early 1990s.
     The transaction is also the latest example of a foreign company's taking advantage of the weak dollar to invest in a
prominent American company.
      The stake sale may help shore up the lagging finances of JetBlue, which has $433 million in current debt obliga-
tions and has already substantially curtailed its growth plans and sold some assets like older planes. Some analysts have
even suggested that the Lufthansa investment amounted to a rescue effort.
     William J. Greene, a Morgan Stanley analyst, said JetBlue was ''hard pressed'' to pay back its debt using cash flow
from its operations and money on hand.
     While Lufthansa's investment is strictly financial and does not include any strategic partnership for now, industry
watchers speculated that the deal could lead to further cooperation and give Lufthansa an important foothold in the
United States.
     Under the terms of the deal, Lufthansa, Europe's second-largest airline after Air France-KLM, will buy 42 million
newly issued shares at $7.27 each. It will also gain a seat on the discount airline's board.
                                                                                                                       Page 119
           JetBlue Sells Stake to Lufthansa for $300 Million The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


    Federal law limits foreign ownership of an airline to a 25 percent voting stake and 49 percent of equity. Both
companies say they have not agreed on specific areas of cooperation.
      Among the biggest benefits for Lufthansa could be tapping into JetBlue's huge presence at Kennedy International
Airport in New York, one of the nation's biggest hubs for foreign flights. Because of overcrowding and delays, officials
are considering reducing the number of takeoffs and landings; any cuts would make each existing slot much more valu-
able.
      JetBlue expects to complete a new terminal at the airport next year and has an option to build a second. The termi-
nal opening in 2008 is being built solely for domestic flights on single-aisle jets and it has no customs office. But Jet-
Blue could build a second terminal with international capacity, a spokeswoman, Jenny Dervin, said.
      Lufthansa flies direct to 17 United States cities, and has three daily flights from both J.F.K. and Newark Liberty
International Airport. It currently has ticketing partnerships -- called code-sharing agreements -- with United Airlines
and US Airways.
      It is unclear what the deal portends for consolidation in the United States. Several of the chief executives of the
largest airlines in the nation -- including Delta, UAL, US Airways and Northwest -- have talked about the need for con-
solidation.
      Mr. Greene said that Lufthansa's investment made it unlikely JetBlue would be a candidate for a merger with an-
other domestic airline.
      The interest from Lufthansa, which is based in Germany, is the latest example of foreign investors leveraging the
strength of their currencies against the dollar. In the last several months foreign companies and so-called sovereign
wealth funds have been on a buying spree, acquiring stakes in businesses including Citigroup, Sony and the Carlyle
Group.
      Before trading was halted, shares in JetBlue rose as much as 35 percent after The New York Times reported the
deal. The stock closed up 90 cents, or 14.4 percent, at $7.15.
      In a conference call Thursday afternoon, JetBlue's chief executive, David Barger, said Lufthansa first made an ap-
proach this summer. ''It will improve our balance sheet and give us greater financial flexibility,'' Mr. Barger said in the
call.
      Lufthansa, one of the most profitable international airlines, has aggressively sought to extend its reach through
stakes in other carriers in recent years. It owns a 30 percent share of British Midland Airways, which holds valuable
landing slots at Heathrow Airport in London, and could wind up with a majority stake depending on the actions of Brit-
ish Midland's two other owners.
     Lufthansa also bought Swiss International Air Lines, starting with a 19 percent stake in 2005 and completing the
purchase this year. JetBlue, founded in 1999 by a former Morris Air and Southwest Airlines employee, David G.
Neeleman, has become one of the best-known discount domestic airlines, with regular coast-to-coast flights.
      The airline's stock has tumbled over the last two years amid a string of troubles. When fuel prices surged more
than two years ago, JetBlue's costs rose rapidly because it had not hedged against the price increase. It could not imme-
diately raise fares fast enough in the hypercompetitive East Coast air market to offset those costs, and it reported a small
2006 loss.
      Since then, JetBlue has slowed its growth, taking delivery of fewer planes than originally planned, and has in-
creased its fares. It reported a profit of $23 million, or 12 cents a diluted share, for the third quarter, versus a loss of
$500,000 a year ago.
       The company also promoted its president, Mr. Barger, to chief executive, bringing a nuts-and-bolts airline opera-
tor to the top job. Mr. Neeleman was a charismatic entrepreneur who at times pushed the company's growth past its
ability to manage.
       Perhaps the worst black eye the airline suffered came in February, when nine JetBlue planes and their passengers
were stranded on the tarmac at Kennedy for hours during an ice storm. The highly publicized event damaged the air-
line's formerly sterling reputation.
                                                                                                             Page 120
          JetBlue Sells Stake to Lufthansa for $300 Million The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


     JetBlue is facing increased competition as Virgin America, another low-cost airline, flies from New York to San
Francisco. While other airlines lobbied the Transportation Department to block Virgin America's debut, JetBlue was not
among them.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: AIRLINES (91%); AIRPORTS (89%); MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS (89%); FOREIGN INVEST-
MENT (78%); ALLIANCES & PARTNERSHIPS (78%); NEW ISSUES (78%); AIRLINE ALLIANCES & PART-
NERSHIPS (78%); TRANSPORT TERMINAL CONSTRUCTION (77%); US DOLLAR (77%); BUSINESS FORE-
CASTS (75%); DELAYS & POSTPONEMENTS (72%); EXCISE & CUSTOMS (50%); MERGERS (78%); CASH
FLOW (75%)

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INDUSTRY: NAICS481111 SCHEDULED PASSENGER AIR TRANSPORTATION (92%); SIC4512 AIR TRANS-
PORTATION, SCHEDULED (92%); NAICS481112 SCHEDULED FREIGHT AIR TRANSPORTATION (92%);
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(93%); CENTRAL EUROPE (58%); EUROPE (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 14, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Wolfgang Mayrhuber, the chairman of Lufthansa. (PHOTOGRAPH BY DOUG
KANTER/BLOOMBERG NEWS)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                             53 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                The New York Times

                                             December 14, 2007 Friday
                                                Late Edition - Final

Up From The Mines
BYLINE: By CHRIS DIXON

SECTION: Section F; Column 0; Escapes; Pg. 1
                                                                                                                       Page 121
                          Up From The Mines The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


LENGTH: 1783 words

     LOOKING down from the hilltop cemetery, Barbara Beaver remembered that when she was a girl growing up in
the Tennessee mountains, Copperhill was a blighted but starkly beautiful moonscape. ''It would kind of make you think
of Moab, Utah,'' she said.
       The land around the mining town, in the southeast corner of Tennessee overlooking Georgia and North Carolina,
was literally stripped bare for 40 square miles. ''In Georgia and Tennessee, all you could see was the red hills,'' she said.
''But then you could look way over to North Carolina and see the greenery. They were far enough away that they didn't
get what we called 'the gas.' ''
     ''The gas'' was an acidic vapor generated by hellish ore smelters and sulfuric acid plants fed by the mines that gave
the Copper Basin its name. It wafted unchecked for better than a generation, poisoning air and water and obliterating
vegetation.
      ''My mother and daddy would grow tomato plants, and that gas would come through,'' Ms. Beaver, 70, continued.
''The next day they'd just be wilted and hailed over like someone went through them with a fire.''
     But today, that's all changed. ''It doesn't look like that anymore,'' she said. ''It's like daylight and dark. Yesterday it
was all red hills, and then you wake up the next day and it's all turned to green.''
      Nearly 45 years ago, Ms. Beaver fled 100 miles south to Atlanta in search of opportunity. But over the last several
years she has joined a trickle of other retirees, second-home buyers and entrepreneurs who are renovating inexpensive
old homes, restaurants and shops. Nearby, a remarkable cleanup of the mine site is nearing completion, ushering in what
is hoped will be a far greener future for what was once one of the most devastated places in North America.
     The basin's most optimistic newcomers include artists, outdoor enthusiasts and a small cadre of Atlanta real estate
developers who have specialized in revitalizing neighborhoods around the Cabbagetown district of Atlanta.
       John Blankenship, 41, owner of Copper City Brokers, splits time between Atlanta and a 100-year-old Craftsman
cottage he restored in downtown Copperhill. In March 2006, the town's mayor, Herbert Hood, asked Mr. Blankenship to
fill a council seat (he resigned late last month, citing time pressures). Mr. Blankenship has since pushed for Copperhill
and adjacent McCaysville to spruce up their downtowns to attract more investment.
      ''This area has the perfect retail street,'' Mr. Blankenship said. ''And this is one of the few mountain downtowns
with such a substantial historical district. Throw into that mix the river, the history of the mine site and the fact that
remediators will be turning it into a recreational area with trails and interpretive tours, Copperhill's going to be a serious
draw.''
       In January, Mr. Blankenship and a partner, Greg Tinsley, bought the historic downtown building that holds the
New York Hotel and Restaurant, which also contains a small bar, a corner space he hopes to lease as a bakery or other
retail space, and a 17-room apartment building. They plan to restore the restaurant and create a boutique hotel.
      Councilman Mike Williams, who runs a local cabin rental business, said he sees opportunity in ventures like Mr.
Blankenship's because Copperhill is one of the few places nearby where it is possible to have a drink with dinner. Much
of this corner of Appalachia is dry.
      ''I was just in Savannah walking past the restaurants and bars, and strolling vacationers,'' he said. ''That's what can
help us become a tourist town and will generate jobs. There's just not much here for our younger generation.''
      Scott Nichols and Kay Jones, both local real estate agents, say the perception of the Copper Basin as blighted has
kept prices down while nearby towns like Blue Ridge, Ga., have thrived. Mountain cottages near that town run into the
hundred thousands, while properties on Lake Blue Ridge, where big Nashville country artists have homes, run into the
millions.
      But in Copperhill, a historic bungalow within walking distance of downtown can be found for $40,000 to $50,000.
Off Main Street, Mr. Blankenship is asking $115,000 for a beautifully restored four-bedroom, one-bath 1923 Craftsman
house. Just outside Ducktown, Ms. Jones is offering acre-plus lots in a planned neighborhood called Highland Woods
for $30,000 to $60,000. Just up Highway 64 lies Campbell Cove, an 88-acre lake where a waterfront lot can be had for
$199,000, and homes in the $300,000s to $600,000s.
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                          Up From The Mines The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


      ''As the scars and memories of the copper mining and chemical company fade further into memory, people will
once again see this area for the natural beauty it has,'' Mr. Nichols said. ''The mountains are there, the rivers are there,
the outdoor adventure is there, and 4.5 million stressed-out Atlantans are just two hours south.''
      Copperhill's new life could hardly have been imagined 50 years ago.
      From the mid-1800s until a generation after World War II, ore from the Copper Basin's mines brought both devas-
tation and prosperity. Timber-fueled smelting operations resulted in the logging of every tree for miles, while smog ru-
ined remaining plant life. Rains depleted topsoil and poured acid and metals into streams. The smelters were somewhat
cleaner by the time Ms. Beaver was a teenager, but the ''beloved scar,'' as many called the mine site, had denuded at
least 40 square miles.
      The last shaft closed in 1987, leaving embittered miners and a rusting, toxic badlands. Then in 1990, a devastating
flood put much of Copperhill and McCaysville underwater.
      But there were signs of renewal.
     After the flood, Joe Jacobi, an Olympic gold medal kayaker, led a successful lobbying effort to bring the Atlanta
Olympic white-water event to the rapids of the Ocoee River in 1996. His wife, Lisa, today a local Internet entrepre-
neur, quit a job at CNN as a news producer and the pair opened a downtown bed-and-breakfast.
       ''Even among people who had been here for a long time, the effect of the Olympics was profound,'' Mr. Jacobi
said. ''People were exposed to different cultures, accents and customs.''
     Some reforestation had commenced decades earlier, but serious mine cleanup began in 2001, when Glenn Springs
Holdings, an Occidental Petroleum subsidiary, entered into a formal agreement with Tennessee and the federal Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency. To date over 40,000 dump truck loads of contaminated soil have been hauled off.
      On a drive through the mine site, the construction manager, Ron Wiggins, pointed to dense stands of forest that
had either been seeded or had established themselves in the last couple of decades. At Potato Creek, polluted water
flowed into a deep lake. The acidic poisons sink to the bottom, where they are piped into a tower, precipitated out with
air and lime and entombed deep in former mine shafts. The resulting water, which sometimes flows into the Ocoee at
91,000 gallons a minute, is clean enough to drink. ''We didn't set out to do it, but we created the biggest acid rock drain-
age water treatment plant in the world,'' Mr. Wiggins said.
      Across Highway 68, a rail bed will become a bicycle trail. Near the New London mine, a reed-filled wetland fil-
ters sulfurous water. A mile distant, a verdant valley is now home to mice, turkeys, bobcats, snakes and bears. Down a
short dirt road, another lake now teems with fish.
      Mr. Wiggins won't guess when the site might become a public park, but tours have left locals astonished. ''We've
had to overcome the idea that this place is still a polluted wasteland,'' he said. ''A lot of old timers don't believe it can
ever be cleaned up.''
      Hundreds of tourists from the increasingly popular Blue Ridge Railroad have discovered Copperhill and
McCaysville. They peruse a small but growing collection of antiques and craft shops, or wander into the Nifty 50's, a
riverside cafe, the Georgia Boy's Barbecue or El Rio, a busy Mexican restaurant. In the summer, visitors stream to the
Ducktown Basin Museum, which holds not only a fascinating exhibition on the old mines, but also a fairly astonishing
hilltop view of what was once a vast circle of devastation. ''Pickin' in the Park,'' a weekly gathering outside
McCaysville, draws hundreds of bluegrass fans and musicians.
      It's against this backdrop that Mr. Blankenship and other entrepreneurs saw opportunity. Kevin Nickell, 37, said
he was compelled to open a photography gallery while driving through Copperhill on a rainy night. ''I really hope to see
a functional tourist town, a place where people will love to come to go out at night over a glass of wine or beer,'' he said.
      Gil Carter, a 41-year-old hiker from Ellijay, is in the midst of opening his second outdoor outfitting store. ''Here,
people can hike one day, raft the next and bike the day after that. There's a natural backdrop few places can match,'' he
said.
     In July 2007, Penney Farlow, 46, and her husband, Jim, 49, of Blue Ridge, paid $48,500 for a rundown three-
bedroom Copperhill bungalow, a place where they say they might one day retire. ''With the train coming in from Blue
Ridge, Copperhill might become the perfect place for an artists' colony,'' she said. ''Every year more and more people
                                                                                                                  Page 123
                         Up From The Mines The New York Times December 14, 2007 Friday


are on the Ocoee. I keep thinking that for those who come to bike or raft, how much fun it would be to finish your day,
clean up and be able to walk right down to the little pub and restaurant and hang out downtown. I hope we're right.''
      In May of 2002, Richard Scott, 54, gave up a job as a news director for a Philadelphia radio station after finding a
turnkey cabin rental business on nine acres with four cabins, a live-in two-bedroom, two-bath log home, a lake and a
stream. ''I paid what a three-bedroom house would have cost me in Cherry Hill, N.J. We sit outside and watch bear, deer
and foxes.''
      Ms. Beaver, a former accountant who is now widowed, has made it her mission to resurrect the long-derelict
hilltop cemetery where her grandparents and the Copper Basin's founders are buried. But she expressed a sense of loss
and hope common to many of her peers.
       ''To some old-timers, Copperhill's now a foreign place,'' she said ''I was talking to another lady who grew up here
about how we used to get out and sweep our yards a certain way to keep them neat and clean because we didn't have
grass. And I took a tour of the mine in the summer, which made me just a little bit sad. Those red hills, that was our
history. Now it's all green with kudzu and trees. But I'm glad I came back. I'd love to see this become a thriving place.
I'd like to see kids grow up here and not have to leave to make a living. I think it can happen. I really do.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: MINE PLANNING & MANAGEMENT (89%); MOUNTAINS (78%); REAL ESTATE (77%); RE-
GIONAL & LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (77%); CITY GOVERNMENT (77%); MINE & QUARRY RECLAMATION
(77%); MAYORS (72%); REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT (72%); BUILDING RENOVATION (68%); HISTORIC
DISTRICTS & STRUCTURES (67%); RESTAURANTS (62%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (62%)

GEOGRAPHIC: ATLANTA, GA, USA (94%) TENNESSEE, USA (95%); GEORGIA, USA (94%); NORTH
CAROLINA, USA (93%); UTAH, USA (90%) UNITED STATES (95%); NORTH AMERICA (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 14, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: TO LET: Richard and Patricia Scott moved from Philadelphia and rent out cabins in Copperhill
FREEWHEELING: Shannon Morrison, left, and Ed McCalley outside Ducktown, Tenn
RETURN OF THE NATIVE: Barbara Beaver left Copperhill 45 years ago, but has recently returned
BORN AGAIN: Pollution from mining in Copperhill, Tenn., once denuded trees from much of the area, but green has
been restored (PHOTOGRAPHS BY ERIK S. LESSER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. F1). COMEBACK: An
old ore roasting field in Ducktown, right
a simulated mine at Ducktown Basin Museum, below
 the Ocoee, bottom left, and Kevin Nickell's photography gallery. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY ERIK S. LESSER FOR THE
NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. F8) MAP Map of Copperhill in Tennessee. (pg. F8)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                54 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


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                 The Other ''Atonement'' Love Story The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday



The Other ''Atonement'' Love Story
BYLINE: By ADAM BEGLEY

SECTION: Section F; Column 0; House & Home/Style Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 2209 words

DATELINE: ONIBURY, England

      PICTURE this: Your humdrum city life is turned upside down when you inherit, wholly unexpectedly, a vast Vic-
torian country estate. You manage to scrape together enough cash to fix the leaky roof and settle precariously into your
new home, leaving behind your job, your friends, your plans for the future. For more than a decade, you scramble to
keep up with the expense of maintaining the huge establishment. And then lightning strikes again: A film company
comes along, asking to use the house as the set for its adaptation of a best-selling novel. The production pays a hefty
six-figure rent and helps renovate the long-neglected interior, and you also get a surprise dividend: a little of the stars'
glamour rubs off on you and your suddenly famous country seat.
       That is the Hollywood story line of Caroline Magnus's life in the last 15 years, since the night she came home
from a dinner party in London and learned that she and her brother had inherited the bulk of their aunt's property, in-
cluding the gargantuan Stokesay Court. The house, built in 1891 in the so-called Jacobethan style, is the rich backdrop
for the first half of ''Atonement,'' the Joe Wright movie based on Ian McEwan's novel, starring Keira Knightley and
James McAvoy. Ms. Magnus -- who now gives guided tours to visitors who want to step into the film, surround them-
selves with acres of gleaming oak paneling and gaze upon the fountain where Ms. Knightley takes an impetuous plunge
-- is understandably delighted.
      ''It has put the house on the map,'' she said -- and allowed her to charge $25 a head to groups of 20 people or more.
(She estimated that she has given some two dozen tours since September, when ''Atonement'' opened in England.)
        In the movie, Stokesay Court stands in for Tallis House, which Mr. McEwan describes in his novel as frankly ug-
ly: squat and made of bright orange brick. Both the fictional and real houses were built in the 1890s by Victorian entre-
preneurs with stacks of newly minted money (the Tallises' from ''a series of patents on padlocks, bolts, latches and
hasps''; the Stokesay Court Allcrofts' from the manufacture of gloves). And although Stokesay is neither squat nor ugly,
''it's not a beautiful building,'' said Mr. McEwan, who spent a good deal of time on the set. ''It's not far off'' Tallis House,
he added, a millionaire's mansion, built to impress. ''Even from the back it's quite overbearing, all those windows staring
down at you.''
      Caroline Magnus, who grew up in a converted inn in Kent, used to think of Stokesay as ''huge and daunting -- but
I'm not in awe of it in the way that I was at first.''
     ''Now I see it as a friendly house, actually,'' she added. Her first visit came when she was 15. She was summoned
by her father's elder brother, Sir Philip Magnus, and his wife, Jewell Allcroft, who wanted to get to know their niece. ''It
was a terrifying experience,'' she said.
      Her uncle, who died in 1988, was a distinguished biographer, old-fashioned, courteous and erudite. Ms. Magnus
remembers him asking impossible questions like ''What are young people thinking these days?'' Her aunt was shy, silent,
very large -- and somewhat frightening to a young girl. In the four years between her husband's death and her own, Jew-
ell Allcroft was essentially an invalid, using just a few of Stokesay's 90 rooms. Ms. Magnus would occasionally visit
when her work brought her up from London.
      Nothing in their relationship prepared her for what happened next.
      ''A week after my aunt died, I got an envelope in the post,'' Ms. Magnus said. ''It had in it a copy of the will and a
compliments slip. No explanation or anything.'' Her aunt had left Stokesay, along with several adjacent farms, to Ms.
Magnus and her brother, Laurence, and eventually Ms. Magnus decided that she would like to keep the house as part of
her share of the bequest. ''Talk about a bolt out of the blue,'' she said. ''I just assumed it was entailed on some distant
member of the family.''
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                 The Other ''Atonement'' Love Story The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday


      She was 40, living in London in a semi-detached house in Shepherd's Bush, working as a headhunter for a re-
cruitment firm and training to become a youth counselor. ''I had to make a choice,'' she said. ''Do I come here and take
this on, in which case I have to do it full time and properly. Or do I stay in London.''
       Moving to Stokesay, which is in Shropshire, three hours northwest of the city, would mean giving up a lot. In her
counseling work she felt she had at last discovered her true vocation, and she was considering training as a psychother-
apist.
      But there was also the house to consider. Developers had expressed interest in turning it into a hotel, and Ms.
Magnus could easily imagine a project hastily begun and then abandoned partway (''You know: the financing falls
through''), and Stokesay left a crumbling ruin. ''In the end I said to myself, How many people get a chance to take some-
thing like this on? And if I don't do it, I'm going to spend the rest of my life wondering if I could have done it.''
      It was immediately apparent that Stokesay Court was in dire need of maintenance, as were the 1,000-odd acres of
land surrounding it. In their later years, her uncle and aunt had confined themselves to what's known as the Ladies'
Wing and had done little to keep up the rest of the property.
       There were serious leaks all over the house -- on several occasions water poured into both the oak-paneled central
hall and the entrance hall. The roof required comprehensive repair. The only way to pay for the construction work (not
to mention the inheritance taxes, the essential renovations and the daily upkeep) was for Ms. Magnus and her brother to
sell the contents of the house: all the paintings, furniture, books, china and silver, even the curtains and bric-a-brac -- in
Ms. Magnus's words, ''the glorious Victorian clutter.''
      Sotheby's produced a glossy three-volume catalog and conducted an auction over four days in September 1994,
leaving the house almost completely bare. The sale brought $6.7 million, enough, after taxes and disbursements to other
beneficiaries, to save the house -- but at a heavy cost.
      It's now watertight, but some would argue that it was the hoard of Victorian goods -- the paintings by Bouguereau
and Thomas Sidney Cooper, the mahogany side tables, the crimson Agra carpets, the Italianate marquetry cabinets, the
mahogany and bronze torcheres, the bedroom suite made entirely of Oregon pine, the white marble statuettes of modest-
ly draped nudes -- that made Stokesay special. Had Ms. Magnus been able to preserve the house intact, it would be a
dazzling monument to Victorian opulence.
      Instead it's been a work in progress, a painful compromise dictated by what Ms. Magnus calls ''the economic
problem'' of historic houses. She has borrowed some furniture from friends, inherited some from her parents, and bought
some, none of it of the quality of the Allcroft furnishings sold at auction. Until ''Atonement'' came along, she had done
very little in the way of decoration.
      Starting in 1999, she has pushed the house to pay for itself, first by renting out two apartments in the Service
Wing, and by renting out storage space. More recently, thanks to renovations, she has been able to rent the house out for
weddings and corporate events. Other than the new roof, the major project of the last 12 years has been the rewiring, top
to bottom, with thousands of yards of new electric cable. She has also replaced much of the plumbing, though a great
deal remains tobe done.
      ''I hope I'm not obsessive, but I'm certainly driven,'' Ms. Magnus said of the energy she pours into the house. ''I
know it needs all my focus to do it properly.'' A slight woman with a determined smile, she said she considers herself
very lucky to have Stokesay, and has no regrets about having decided to devote her life to it -- though she admits it
takes up too much of her time.
      There's something inevitably lonely about one person camped out in an enormous mansion. Ms. Magnus left a
partner behind when she moved up from London, a man she had been living with for eight years. She enjoys her own
company, she said, between new friends near Stokesay and the old friends who come to visit, she finds she actually
needs to make time for herself. ''If I'd had children,'' she said, ''there's no way I would have been able to take this house
on. I don't think I could have done it if I'd had to look after a family.''
      FOR years, Ms. Magnus dreamed of a windfall. In 2001, an article in The Independent reported that ''her great
hope is that a film or television company will base a production in the house, do up some of the rooms, and, by making
a financial contribution, accelerate Stokesay's restoration.'' Five years later, that's precisely what happened. Scouting for
a location, Sarah Greenwood, the production designer for ''Atonement,'' came across an article about Stokesay in a back
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                 The Other ''Atonement'' Love Story The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday


issue of Country Life magazine. ''In a way,'' Ms. Magnus said, '' 'Atonement' being filmed here vindicated my faith in
the house. It made me feel as though I hadn't wasted my time.''
       It took seven weeks to turn Stokesay into a movie set. Ms. Magnus, who stayed put even though most of her furni-
ture was packed off into storage, watched with fascination as Ms. Greenwood and her team made over the interior so
that it perfectly matched the circumstances of the Tallis family, circa 1935. Chintz panels in the drawing room, a flower
pattern on a white background. Somber brown paint in the dining room (''disgusting,'' according to Ms. Magnus). Also
upstairs, in Keira Knightley's room -- known at Stokesay as the Young Ladies' Sitting Room -- there was brand-new
upholstery, in a delicate pink floral pattern, for the elaborate fireplace surround with built-in seating, an original feature.
The oak paneling in the central hallway and the gallery above, and in the grand staircase were polished to a high sheen,
a constant reminder of abundant wealth and social standing.
      For Ms. Magnus, it was as if the film crew had turned the house into a blank canvas and painted their ideas on it.
''They dressed it up from scratch,'' she said. ''It was like seeing with someone else's eyes.''
      Then, for five and a half weeks starting in April of 2006, Joe Wright and more than 100 others took over the re-
decorated house. Clearly a little star-struck (Keira Knightley was ''delightful,'' James McAvoy ''absolutely charming''),
Ms. Magnus was also, she said, utterly fascinated by the film crew's daily activities. As she guided this visitor around
the house on a generously extended version of the ''Atonement'' tour, her enthusiasm for the remnants of the set seemed
undiminished -- even now, a year and a half after the last camera had been packed up and hauled away.
      The tour included excursions into the rooms she considers private (but not her own bedroom), down long corridors
that have yet to be renovated, into locked rooms piled high with odds and ends (with the original Victorian wallpaper,
faded, of course, and an impressive period dado, also faded), into the old kitchen and the meat larder with its fearsome
hooks for hanging game and sides of lamb or beef, and down into the labyrinthine cellars. She pointed out the artfully
weathered polystyrene statue that had graced Ms. Knightley's fountain, now proudly displayed in the central hall of the
house, framed by the panel staircase.
      She showed off the grounds and the stable block (which could comfortably accommodate three or four families).
Walking back up to the house, she confessed that if she could change something, she would lop off the Ladies' Wing,
which turns an already imposing structure into a massive, ponderous affair. (Joe Wright was clearly of the same mind.
In the film, the wing has been digitally erased.)
      One of the highlights of her ''Atonement'' tour is the library the film crew built in the billiard room. This is where
Ms. Knightley and Mr. McAvoy make desperate, furtive love. None of the passion lingers, and the painted green book-
shelves with the gold decorative motif don't look quite right as a backdrop for the grand mahogany billiard table (which
the crew removed for the shot, then replaced). Upstairs, a bedroom was converted for the movie's purposes into an elab-
orate nursery with columned arches, and in this strange faux environment, Ms. Magnus has erected a small shrine to the
film, a mini-museum documenting the four months during which Stokesay was a small part of movie history. A news-
paper clipping shows Ms. Knightley standing in front of the fountain in a sheer slip.
      Ms. Magnus is aware that interest in the movie version of ''Atonement'' is unlikely to last indefinitely, and is hop-
ing for another film company to come along. ''The house has to have a future,'' she said with her brave, fixed smile, ''and
the future can't be to have a few people rattling around in it.''
      There is a kind of prophecy in the fate of Mr. McEwan's Tallis House: The family sold it, and developers turned it
into a hotel and made a golf course in the grounds.
     Could the prophesy come true? ''That would be a nightmare,'' Ms. Magnus said. ''It would tear the heart out of the
house. I'm still optimistic that it won't happen.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: NOVELS & SHORT STORIES (89%); FILM (89%); WEALTHY PEOPLE (78%); ENTREPRENEUR-
SHIP (77%); MOVIE & VIDEO PRODUCTION (76%); MOVIE INDUSTRY (76%); CITY LIFE (73%); CITIES
(73%); GLOVE & MITTEN MFG (70%)

PERSON: KEIRA KNIGHTLEY (67%)

GEOGRAPHIC: LONDON, ENGLAND (56%) ENGLAND (87%); UNITED KINGDOM (87%)
                                                                                                            Page 127
               The Other ''Atonement'' Love Story The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday




LOAD-DATE: December 13, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: ORIGINAL: Details dating from the early days of the house include, from left: floor grills cov-
ering heating pipes
an exposed-bulb light fixture
bath taps and a telephone
and old wallpaper and a wooden duct for electrical wires. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JONATHAN PLAYER FOR THE
NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. F10)
ON SCREEN AND OFF: The drawing room, right, retains decor from the movie, above. Bookshelves added to the bil-
liard room, below right, turned it into a library. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JONATHAN PLAYER FOR THE NEW YORK
TIMES
INSET LEFT, ALEX BAILEY) (pg. F10)
BUILT-INS: Stokesay Court's elaborate detailing includes seating in the Young Ladies' Sitting Room, top, and a dining
room sideboard, below
above, a polystyrene statue used in the film now sits in the central hall. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JONATHAN PLAYER
FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
INSET LEFT, ALEX BAILEY) (pg. F10) FAITHFUL: ''Atonement,'' adapted from Ian McEwan's novel, above, was
filmed at Stokesay Court, left and below, an 1891 manor house in Shropshire, England, that Caroline Magnus, left, in-
herited from an aunt. She has spent 15 years as its caretaker. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JONATHAN PLAYER FOR THE
NEW YORK TIMES
 INSET TOP RIGHT, ALEX BAILEY) (pg. F1)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



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                                            December 13, 2007 Thursday
                                               Correction Appended
                                                Late Edition - Final

In a Funk, Italy Sings an Aria of Disappointment
BYLINE: By IAN FISHER; Peter Kiefer contributed reporting from Rome and Trieste, and Elisabetta Povoledo from
Rome.

SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Foreign Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 2675 words

DATELINE: ROME
                                                                                                        Page 128
    In a Funk, Italy Sings an Aria of Disappointment The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday Correction
                                                      Appended

      All the world loves Italy because it is old but still glamorous. Because it eats and drinks well but is rarely fat or
drunk. Because it is the place in a hyper-regulated Europe where people still debate with perfect intelligence what, real-
ly, the red in a stoplight might mean.
       But these days, for all the outside adoration and all of its innate strengths, Italy seems not to love itself. The word
here is ''malessere,'' or ''malaise''; it implies a collective funk -- economic, political and social -- summed up in a recent
poll: Italians, despite their claim to have mastered the art of living, say they are the least happy people in Western Eu-
rope.
      ''It's a country that has lost a little of its will for the future,'' said Walter Veltroni, the mayor of Rome and a possi-
ble future center-left prime minister. ''There is more fear than hope.''
    The problems are, for the most part, not new -- and that is the problem. They have simply caught up to Italy over
many years, and no one seems clear on how change can come -- or if it is possible anymore at all.
     Italy has charted its own way of belonging to Europe, struggling as few other countries do with fractured politics,
uneven growth, organized crime and a tenuous sense of nationhood.
     But frustration is rising that these old weaknesses are still no better, and in some cases they are worse, as the
world outside outpaces the country. In 1987, Italy celebrated its economic parity with Britain. Now Spain, which joined
the European Union only a year earlier, may soon overtake it, and Italy has fallen behind Britain.
      Italy's low-tech way of life may enthrall tourists, but Internet use and commerce here are among the lowest in Eu-
rope, as are wages, foreign investment and growth. Pensions, public debt and the cost of government are among the
highest.
     The latest numbers show a nation older and poorer -- to the point that Italy's top bishop has proposed a major ex-
pansion of food packages for the poor.
      Worse, worry is growing that Italy's strengths are degrading into weaknesses. Small and medium-size businesses,
long the nation's family-run backbone, are struggling in a globalized economy, particularly with low-wage competition
from China.
      Doubt clouds the family itself: 70 percent of Italians between 20 and 30 still live at home, condemning the young
to an extended and underproductive adolescence. Many of the brightest, like the poorest a century ago, leave Italy.
      The stakes have risen so high that Ronald P. Spogli, the American ambassador and someone with 40 years of ex-
perience with Italy, warns that it risks a diminished international role and relationship with Washington. America's best
friends, he notes, are its business partners -- and Italy, comparatively, is not high among them. Bureaucracy and unclear
rules kept United States investment in Italy in 2004 to $16.9 billion. The figure for Spain was $49.3 billion.
       ''They need to sever the ivy that has grown up around this fantastic 2,500-year-old tree that is threatening to kill
the tree,'' Mr. Spogli said.
       But interviews with possible prime ministers, businesspeople, academics, economists and other Italians suggest
that the largest reason for this malaise seems to be the feeling that there is little hope that the ivy can be cut, and that is
making Italians both sad and angry.
      An Angry Message
      ''Basta! Basta! Basta!'' Beppe Grillo, a 59-year-old comic and blogger with swooping gray hair, howled in an in-
terview. The word means ''enough,'' and he repeated it to make his point to Italy's political class clear.
      In recent months, Mr. Grillo has become the defining personification of Italy's foul mood. On Sept. 8, he gave that
mood a loud voice when he called for a day of rage, to scream across Piazza Maggiore in Bologna an obscenity politely
translated as ''Take a hike!''
     A few thousand people were expected. But 50,000 jammed into the piazza, and 250,000 signed a petition for
changes like term limits and the direct election of lawmakers. (Voters now cast their ballots for parties, which then
choose who serves in Parliament, without the voters' consent.)
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                                                     Appended

     His message was enough inaction and excess (Italian lawmakers are the best paid in Europe, driven around by the
Continent's largest fleet of chauffeured cars), enough convicted criminals in Parliament (there are 24), enough of the
same, tired old faces.
     ''The whole kettle of fish stinks to high heaven!'' he yelled. ''The stench rises from the sewers and swirls around
and you can't cope.''
      Mr. Grillo leans to the political left, but he spares neither side in his sold-out shows and popular blog. The prob-
lem, he said, is the system itself.
      There is a link between the nation's errant political system and its worsening mood. Luisa Corrado, an Italian
economist, led the research behind the study at the University of Cambridge that found Italians to be the least happy of
15 Western European nations. The researchers linked differences in reported happiness across countries with several
socio-demographic and political factors, including trust in the world around them, not least in government.
      In Denmark, the happiest nation, 64 percent trusted their Parliament. For Italians, the number was 36 percent.
''Unfortunately we found this issue of social trust was a bit missing'' in Italy, Ms. Corrado said.
       Two popular books that set off months of debate capture the distrust of large powers that cannot be controlled.
One, ''The Caste,'' sold a million copies (in a nation where sales of 20,000 make a best seller) by exposing the sins of
Italy's political class and how it became privileged and unaccountable. Even the presidency, once above the fray, was
not spared; the book put the office's annual cost at $328 million, four times as much as Buckingham Palace.
        The other book, ''Gomorrah,'' which sold 750,000 copies, concerns the mob around Naples, the camorra. But poli-
tics, it argues, allows the camorra to flourish, keeping Italy's lagging south poor, and organized crime, by a recent study,
the economy's largest sector.
     These are Italy's age-old problems, but Alexander Stille, a Columbia University professor and an expert on Italy,
argues that this moment is different. While the economy expanded, from the 1950s to the 1990s, Italians would tolerate
bad behavior from their leaders.
       But growth has been slow for years, and the quality of life is declining. Statistics now show that 11 percent of
Italian families live under the poverty line, and that 15 percent have trouble spreading their salary over the month.
     ''The level of anger is great because before you could slough it off,'' Mr. Stille said. ''Now life is harder.''
      Italians rarely associate the current crop of aging leaders with a capacity to change. They are the same people who
have traded terms in power for more than a decade. Last year, Silvio Berlusconi, Italy's richest man who became prime
minister for the first time in 1994, was voted out for not keeping his promises for American-style growth and opportuni-
ties based on merit. When he left office, economic growth was at zero.
      But it became clear that getting rid of the center-right Mr. Berlusconi would be no magic cure. Romano Prodi,
who had served as prime minister from 1996 to 1998, won, but he was saddled with a shaky coalition of nine warring
parties.
      He promised a clean slate, but his unwieldy center-left government disappointed with its first symbolic act: its
cabinet had 102 ministers, a new record. He has pushed through two reform packages, and the economy is growing
again. ''Ours is not a happy situation, but it is better than before,'' he said.
      But the government has fallen once and threatens to fall again at every difficult vote. Small proposals bring pro-
testers to the streets, one hurdle to making changes as protected interests seek to preserve themselves. Pharmacists shut
their doors this year when the government threatened to allow supermarkets to sell aspirin. The cost for just 20 aspirin
tablets at a pharmacy is $5.75.
     The measure passed, but the government is largely paralyzed. Voters are fed up, and Mr. Prodi's foes know it.
     ''I understand the bad humor, the malaise,'' said Gianfranco Fini, leader of National Alliance, the second-largest
opposition party. ''People are starting to get strongly angry because you have a government that doesn't do anything.''
     The Generational Divide
     ''It's a sadness that what could be isn't -- that we are not a normal country,'' said Gianluca Gamboni, 36, a financial
adviser in Rome, summing up how he feels about Italy, which he loves, but which drives him insane.
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   In a Funk, Italy Sings an Aria of Disappointment The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday Correction
                                                     Appended

       Unlike the older generation, he travels and sees how much better things work elsewhere. He does not spare him-
self: he still lives with his parents, not because he wants to, but because only now, after seven years at his job, can he
afford Rome's high rents. He is finally considering a place of his own.
      Mr. Gamboni is on the younger side of Italy's generational divide -- a lens through which many of the country's
problems come into focus. It is one of several subterranean forces, easy to overlook at first, but that taken together make
clear how much Italy has changed over the past several decades and how little that change has been digested.
      Over a century, ending in the 1970s, 25 million Italians left for better lives elsewhere. Now, Italy is home to 3.7
million immigrants. The Roman Catholic Church's position is diminishing, from a cultural pillar to a lobbying group.
     Politically, Italy seems not to have adjusted to the death, in 1992, of the Christian Democrats, who governed for
more than 40 years. Economically, it was once easy to solve problems by devaluing the currency, the lira. That is now
impossible with the euro, which has also increased prices, particularly for housing.
      Then there is the family. The divorce rate has risen. Large families are a thing of the past. Italy has one of Eu-
rope's lowest birth rates, the fewest children under 15 and the greatest number of people over 85, apart from Sweden.
Unemployment is low, at 6 percent. But 21 percent of the population between 15 and 24 did not work in 2006. And the
old are not letting go.
      Evidence of Italy's age is everywhere. In parks, clutches of old ladies coo at a single toddler. On television, stars
are craggy. (The median age for the presenters of this year's Miss Italia contest was 70. The winner, Silvia Battisti, was
18.) In the political sphere, Mr. Prodi is 68, Mr. Berlusconi 71.
       ''The generational problem is the Italian problem,'' said Mario Adinolfi, 36, a blogger and an aspiring lawmaker.
''In every country young people hope. Here in Italy there is no hope anymore. Your mom keeps you home nice and soft-
ly, and you stay there and you don't fight. And if you don't fight, it is impossible to take power from anybody.''
     ''We don't have a Google,'' he added. ''We can't imagine in Italy that a 30-year-old opens a business in a garage.''
     Selling a Notion of Italy
      In September, word spread through a house of young Romans, over beer and pasta, that Luciano Pavarotti, the
tenor and arguably the world's most famous Italian, had died. ''Damn it!'' yelled Federico Boden, 28, a student. ''Now all
we have is pasta and pizza!''
      Italy does not seem to rank as it once did for greatness. There is no new Fellini, Rossellini or Loren. Its cinema,
television, art, literature and music are rarely considered on the cutting edge.
     But it does have Ferrari, Ducati, Vespa, Armani, Gucci, Piano, Illy, Barolo -- all symbols of style and prestige.
What Italy has is itself, and many believe that the future rests in trademarking mystique into ''Made in Italy.''
      Italian wine was an early test. Producers moved with success from quantity swill to quality. Illy, the coffee house,
has flourished by combining quality and uniformity with innovation in methods and style in presentation.
     ''This is where Italians are winners,'' said Andrea Illy, the company's president. ''Use your particular strengths,
which are beauty and culture.''
      But Italian industry depended on low wages, making it vulnerable to competition from China as labor costs rose.
Alarms began ringing years ago, with fears that many of Italy's traditional businesses -- textiles, shoes, clothes -- could
not compete. Many could not. In Friuli-Venezia Giulia, a chair-making capital, the number of chair companies has
shrunk to about 800 from 1,200.
     ''At first they thought this phase would just pass,'' said Massimo Martino, director of Maxdesign, a furniture com-
pany. ''But in reality, many businesses ended up closing because fundamentally the market didn't need them anymore.
They didn't want to change.''
      Some companies took up the challenge. Wood was the primary material there, but Mr. Martino began to create
chairs, mostly of molded plastic, well designed but inexpensive. Others decided that competing against China on price
was impossible. Instead, the aim would be quality and Italy's uniqueness, something China could not match.
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   In a Funk, Italy Sings an Aria of Disappointment The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday Correction
                                                     Appended

      Pietro Costantini, who runs a third-generation furniture company, said he began focusing not just on the upper end
-- he makes extra-large furniture for big Americans -- but also on creating lines that would sell the Italian lifestyle itself.
Customers are returning.
      But entrepreneurs complain that they are alone. Politicians offered little help making Italy competitive, and this
remains a major impediment to making their gains grow. Businesses want less bureaucracy, more flexible labor laws
and large investments in infrastructure to make moving goods around easier.
      ''Now it's time to change,'' said Luca Cordero di Montezemolo, the chairman of Fiat and the president of Ferrari
and the influential business group Confindustria. ''If not, why are we going down in every classification of competition
in the country? The reason is that in the best of cases we are stopped.''
     It is not clear that this ''Made in Italy'' strategy will be enough. Skeptics argue that foreign investment, research
and development funds and money invested by venture capitalists remain too low, as does Italy's competitiveness.
      But the nation's entrepreneurs are a bright spot in a landscape with few others. Some argue that the younger gen-
eration is another key, if not now then when those in power die. They are educated, they are well traveled and, as Beppe
Grillo does when he is attracting his masses, they use the Internet.
      Two center-left parties merged to produce the Democratic Party, aimed at overcoming the system's crippling
fragmentation. All sides finally agreed that a new electoral law must be redone to give more breathing room to the win-
ner of the next elections -- crucial for pushing through any major changes.
      But understanding the problems is the smallest step. Many worry in the meantime that Italy may share the same
fate as the Republic of Venice, based in what many say is the most beautiful of cities, but whose domination of trade
with the Near East died with no culminating event. Napoleon's conquest in 1797 only made it official.
       Now it is essentially an exquisite corpse, trampled over by millions of tourists. If Italy does not shed its comforts
for change, many say, a similar fate awaits it: blocked by past greatness, with aging tourists the questionable source of
life, the Florida of Europe.
     ''The malaise is: 'I can see all that, but there isnothing I can do to change it,''' said Beppe Severnigni, a columnist
for Corriere della Sera.
     But, he said, ''to change your ways means changing your individual ways: refusing certain compromises, to start
paying your taxes, don't ask for favors when you are looking for a job, not to cheat when your child is trying to reach
admission to university.''
     ''That's the tricky part,'' he said. ''We have reached a point where hoping for some kind of white knight coming in
saying, 'We'll sort you out,' is over.''
      ''We Italians have our destiny in our hands more than ever before,'' he said.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: ADOLESCENTS (78%); POLITICS (75%); PUBLIC DEBT (68%); GLOBALIZATION (66%); EMBAS-
SIES & CONSULATES (65%); FAMILY COMPANIES (64%); PUBLIC FINANCE (64%); WAGES & SALARIES
(62%); FOREIGN INVESTMENT (61%); ORGANIZED CRIME (50%); PRIME MINISTERS (70%)

COMPANY: CNINSURE INC (62%)

TICKER: CISG (NASDAQ) (62%)

GEOGRAPHIC: ROME, ITALY (94%) ITALY (97%); UNITED STATES (93%); EUROPE (96%); WESTERN
EUROPE (88%); SPAIN (79%); EUROPEAN UNION (79%); CHINA (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 13, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
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   In a Funk, Italy Sings an Aria of Disappointment The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday Correction
                                                     Appended

CORRECTION-DATE: December 28, 2007


CORRECTION: A picture caption with the continuation of a front-page article on Thursday about a collective malaise
in Italy misspelled the name of the city where Beppe Grillo, a performer who has given voice to the country's mood,
was shown preparing for a performance. It is Novara, not Novarra.
     A front-page article on Dec. 13 about a collective malaise in Italy misspelled the surname of a columnist for
Corriere della Sera, a leading Italian newspaper, who commented that many people feel helpless about the country's
problems. The columnist is Beppe Severgnini, not Severnigni. The article also referred imprecisely to the 102 cabinet
ministerial appointments made by Prime Minister Romano Prodi last year. While that number was a record and reflect-
ed the unwieldy nature of Mr. Prodi's nine-party coalition, as the article noted, the 102 appointments included deputy
ministers, not just cabinet ministers.

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: A protester waited for allies before a recent labor protest in Rome. Italians say they are caught
up in a widespread malaise. (PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES HILL FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. A1)
BUT WHAT OF THE FUTURE?: Loves eases some pains, but many young Italians are unable to find jobs and cannot
afford to move out of their parents' home. (PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES HILL FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg.
A23)
A HOWL FOR ITALY: Beppe Grillo, a comic and blogger who has given voice to Italy's foul mood, prepared for a
recent performance in Novarra. (PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES HILL FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. A23)
A HARD ROAD AHEAD: A priest passes an abandoned garage on a Milan street. Italians say they are not a very hap-
py people these days, according to a research study of 15 Western European nations. (PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES
HILL FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. A23)
 TIME FOR CHANGE: The Fiat Center in Rome. The new model of the Cinquecento has been selling fast, the compa-
ny says. Italian businesses want less bureaucracy and more flexible labor rules. (PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES HILL
FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg. A23)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               56 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                             December 13, 2007 Thursday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

Carried Away With Imitation Luxury
BYLINE: By RUTH LA FERLA

SECTION: Section G; Column 0; Style Desk; Pg. 9

LENGTH: 835 words

     ''LOOK sharp!'' Waving a passer-by to his cart at Madison Avenue and 67th Street, Omar, the vendor, pointed to
the logo on one of his most popular items, a canvas tote bag patterned in a familiar-looking interlocking chevron. ''This
one is the wrong writing,'' he murmured.
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                Carried Away With Imitation Luxury The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday


       The correct ''writing,'' he went on expertly, appears only on his premium fake: a copy of the Goyard Saint Louis
carryall, which in recent months has supplanted styles by Vuitton and Fendi as a totem of blue-blood chic. In the hierar-
chy of knockoffs, most of Omar's bags are credible impostors. Like the patrician originals, which are sold in Manhattan
only at Barneys New York and Bergdorf Goodman, they display the Goyard logo and Paris address discreetly on their
sides.
      Simone Fee, an interior designer in New York, studied the cream of the fakes, intending to pick one up as a holi-
day gift for her mother. The asking price, though, stopped her dead. A steal at $135, compared with around $1,000 for
the original, it was steep just the same. Even for this Cadillac of counterfeits, ''that price is a bit silly,'' Ms. Fee said,
adding, witheringly, ''Everyone in New York is walking around with one of these.''
      She may have been stretching a point. But to judge by the dozens of Goyard sightings last week at the corner of
Lexington and 59th Street alone, the mock Goyard in aggressively sunny colors like corn yellow, tangerine and Bazoo-
ka pink is the most coveted knockoff of the season. If it is not as swell as the original, which can be personalized with
the buyer's monogram and colorful stripes, it is this year's faux-status holiday gift of choice to those buying them in
multiples for loved ones and friends.
      ''I think people get a kick out of copies,'' said Roseann Hirsch, a book packager in Manhattan. ''It's a fun present
even if you don't use it as a serious bag.''
     Ms. Hirsch, who owns an authentic Goyard and some pricey imitations, considers herself a connoisseur of fakes,
having purchased faux Hermes bags in Beijing, along with a perfectly convincing Vuitton knockoff priced at $6.99.
Like others of her style-smart friends, she is disinclined to make snobbish distinctions.
     ''I've discovered that if something costs $50 or it costs $1,000, my interest in it is similar,'' she said. As a fashion
trophy, ''the item has a shelf life in my mind; once it runs its life span, I don't want to see it again.''
      Peri Wolfman, a writer and product designer, is considering buying a top-of-the-line fake Goyard for her daugh-
ter-in-law. ''It could make a good stocking stuffer,'' she mused, and provide ''a little fashion thrill.''
      ''But you have to get the good copy,'' Ms. Wolfman stipulated, not those shoddy pretenders now bargain priced at
$40 that are popping up around Midtown. The discerning are quick to spot the replicas' vinyl handles and piping, which
are far less pliable than Goyard's signature luggage leather and the leather trim on the best of the quality knockoffs.
        At lunch with friends not long ago, she compared her classy counterfeit with their originals. ''We looked at the de-
tails, the lining, the stitching,'' she recalled. ''I promise you, you couldn't tell the difference.''
       Such assertions do not amuse Maison Goyard, the 144-year-old Parisian luggage maker that prides itself on pedi-
gree. ''Goyard is fully committed to its brand protection,'' said Charlotte Letard, a company spokeswoman. She added
that the company is addressing the issue of street vendors through targeted civil seizure orders, and is working closely
with Customs to seize counterfeit merchandise.
      A decade ago, Jean Michel Signoles, a fashion entrepreneur, bought the somewhat stodgy Goyard brand from
descendants of the founders, dusted it off and reissued the classic bags in spiffy new colors. The gambit worked, attract-
ing consumers on the prowl for the next big status sign. To retain an aura of hauteur -- reinforced on the company's Web
site by promotional copy that reads, ''Each detail of fabrication whispers exclusivity'' -- Goyard sells luggage, handbags,
wallets, agendas and canvas-rimmed doggie bowls in only 12 stores around the world.
       For all the best efforts of law enforcement to stem the billion-dollar world counterfeit trade (in the United States, a
first-time counterfeiter can face up to 10 years in prison and $2 million in fines), fake Goyards continue to proliferate.
     Only last spring, ''You really had to look for a good copy,'' Ms. Wolfman said. Now trophy hunters are unearthing
high-price knockoffs at stalls on the Upper East Side -- especially along Madison Avenue between 65th and 75th Street.
      Earlier this month, Ben Little, a visitor from London, scoured the Goyard shop at Barneys for a suitable bag for
his girlfriend. Informed by a shopper that passable copies could be found only a few blocks up the street, Mr. Little in-
quired, ''Where did you say, 67th Street?''
      Then he turned to his friend and said playfully, ''That's where I'm going to get your gift.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com
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               Carried Away With Imitation Luxury The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday


SUBJECT: PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (77%); COUNTERFEITING (71%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (73%); BEIJING, CHINA (51%) NEW YORK, USA (91%); NORTH
CENTRAL CHINA (51%) UNITED STATES (91%); CHINA (51%)

LOAD-DATE: December 13, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: PRICED TO MOVE: A stand with fake Goyard bags, above, on the Upper East Side. Below, a
real Goyard bag on Madison Avenue. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY HIROKO MASUIKE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               57 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                             December 13, 2007 Thursday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

T-Shirts, Slogans and Enthusiasm Give Rise to Hopeful Ventures
BYLINE: By BRENT BOWERS

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; IN THE HUNT; Pg. 9

LENGTH: 1038 words

      TINA ERICSON'S new company, Mamaisms Gear, has not shipped any products yet, but she predicts that sales
will grow rapidly to $100,000 next year, $1 million by 2010 and ultimately to tens or hundreds of millions of dollars.
      She plans to sell everything from $25 T-shirts emblazoned with ''Mamaisms'' like ''Mama Says ...Watch your
mouth'' to light-fabric Hot Mama pajamas for women who suffer from hot flashes and a BYOB line of reusable con-
tainers, including a Bring Your Own Box for restaurant leftovers and to start a Web site for women that she believes
will attract advertisers.
       The Web site for the venture in Wilmington, N.C., (www.mamaismsgear.com), began Wednesday, and 1,200 T-
shirts that arrived from a manufacturer in Turkey two weeks ago have been stamped with the ''Mama Says'' slogans and
are ready to be shipped.
      But are her plans too ambitious? Neal Thornberry, who teaches business management at Babson College and is
the author of ''Lead Like an Entrepreneur,'' says he is impressed by her enthusiasm, essential for starting a business.
But he also sounds a note of caution. He points out that about 80 percent of start-ups fail within the first two years.
      ''Her projections seem based too much on wishful thinking,'' Mr. Thornberry said. ''She has a great idea, but we
don't know yet if this is a great opportunity.''
      It should be illuminating to hear back from her six months from now on whether she has had to lower her expecta-
tions, and if so, by how much.
                                                                                                      Page 135
 T-Shirts, Slogans and Enthusiasm Give Rise to Hopeful Ventures The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday


     Right now, Ms. Ericson's expectations run high. She says she believes that Mamaisms Gear may someday be-
come a household name and a force for good.
      She wants to set an example of philanthropy, she says, by donating 5 percent of profits to the Parenting Place, an
outreach program in Wilmington for troubled families.
     Mamaisms is just part of the story because Ms. Ericson is also starting another company.
      She already owns a consulting firm that specializes in online marketing. It is small -- she works out of her home
and earns, she says, $175,000 a year. This month, she plans to sign a partnership agreement with two and perhaps three
people to create a company called Shout Option Marketing to do consulting for the financial sector, with an emphasis
on options trading and futures trading services.
      ''Say you publish an investment newsletter,'' Ms. Ericson said, ''and want to grow your subscriber base and reve-
nue but don't want to hire a copy editor, designer, assistant marketing director and so forth. We'll provide a turnkey so-
lution. We'll write the copy, do the positioning, do the branding, the marketing, everything you need.''
     She believes she has found a lucrative niche that no other company has exploited, and is confident she can build it
quickly. Already, she says, she has signed up 10 clients.
      And while she is the chief executive of both enterprises, she does not expect the dual jobs to wear her out. She
actually likes working 15-hour days, she says, and returning home from business trips to the West Coast at 4 a.m., as
happened recently. Besides, she adds, being in charge has been a natural role for her going back to the time a nun at her
parochial school gave her the nickname ''the ringleader.''
     ''I'm a hypersocial person,'' she said. ''I'm a networker. Both my companies are extensions of my personality.''
      She also has two children, Sean, 7, and Ingrid, 5. But her husband, Adam, agreed upon the arrival of his first
child to step out of his career as a book buyer and become a stay-at-home dad.
     Mr. Thornberry of Babson College says she has more going for her than just her passion. ''She has a real job -- a
backup plan that allows her to play around a lot, and learn while she makes mistakes.''
       Even so, he saw it as a risky investment for now. For one thing, Mamaisms Gear appears to him ''fragmented and
unfocused,'' he said. ''If there is a unified theme, it seems to be, you can trust the Mamaisms Gear brand and advice. But
it takes a long time to build trust in a brand.''
      He went on: ''What's her one-minute elevator pitch to a potential investor? At this stage, I think she'd be hard
pressed to do that.'' However, he said, ''she's on the right track. She's going to get her hands dirty and test the market.
She will probably learn a lot more over the next six months about what the real opportunities are. If so, outside invest-
ment will come.''
       Ms. Ericson says she did her homework before plunging into Mamaisms Gear. She and a partner, Jane Chaucer, a
stay-at-home mother with a creative bent (she invented a foam-rubber stabilizing pad for infant car seats that produces a
steady stream of licensing fees), wore prototypes of their T-shirts emblazoned with ''Mama Says'' admonishments and
were stopped wherever they went by women who said, ''My mama told me that 50 times a day.''
      Together, they have put $35,000 into the venture. They have also persuaded Ms. Ericson's sister, Katie Atkinson, a
national marketing director for an online company, and Ms. Chaucer's sister, Kathleen Smith, to help out.
      Partnerships are known for foundering in disputes over uneven workloads. Ms. Ericson acknowledges that, but
says, ''We're very candid about dividing the duties fairly and making sure everybody pulls her own weight.''
       At present, she is doing most of the work, from writing content for her Web site to lining up contributors. So far,
she has pressed into service a human resources specialist, a lawyer, a real estate professional, a pediatrician and a jour-
nalist.
     She has no illusions about the difficulties she faces. She and Ms. Chaucer cannot afford to rent space, so they will
work out of their homes. They are also feeling the usual stings of entrepreneurial misfortune.
       ''You think you have everything covered, and then details pop up that you hadn't thought about,'' she said. ''Like
color choices, whether the shirts will shrink if you wash them in hot water and put them through a hot drying cycle. I'm
                                                                                                      Page 136
 T-Shirts, Slogans and Enthusiasm Give Rise to Hopeful Ventures The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday


a believer, but I underestimated the steps from A to B.'' As a result, she said, ''We're being extra careful to get things
right the first time around. To go through the process of trial and error before the launch, not after.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: SALES PROJECTIONS (90%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (90%); SECURITIES TRADING (78%);
MARKETING & ADVERTISING (75%); ONLINE MARKETING & ADVERTISING (75%); CONSULTING SER-
VICES (72%); BRANDING (69%); BANKING & FINANCE SECTOR PERFORMANCE (66%); PARENTING
(64%); PHILANTHROPY (62%); FUTURES (60%); BANKING & FINANCE (60%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NORTH CAROLINA, USA (76%) UNITED STATES (76%); TURKEY (56%)

LOAD-DATE: December 13, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Tina Ericson, left, and Jane Chaucer put $35,000 into Mamaisms Gear, which they want to turn
into a popular brand. (PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL HENNINGER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Series

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                 58 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 13, 2007 Thursday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

How Dyslexics Think
SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Editorial Desk; LETTER; Pg. 40

LENGTH: 192 words

    To the Editor:
      ''Tracing Business Acumen to Dyslexia'' (Business Day, Dec. 6), on the high prevalence of dyslexics among the
ranks of entrepreneurs, describes possible explanations for this phenomenon, including perfecting the art of task dele-
gation and the honing of compensatory skills.
     It is also plausible that there is something inherent in the way that dyslexics think that enables them to see the
world through a distinctive and thus advantageous filter.
      The burdens of a neurodevelopmentally based processing deficit can be offset by this capability.
     The clinical challenge is to clearly define these domains of superiority, provide realistic feedback about strengths
and weaknesses and explore practical ways of implementing life goals.
                                                                                                                 Page 137
                      How Dyslexics Think The New York Times December 13, 2007 Thursday


     Overcoming an ingrained perception that one is intellectually defective can be a requisite step in this process.
     Such an approach can embolden some to pursue entrepreneurship and empower others to make their unique
mark on more conventional occupational pursuits. Mark S. Greenberg
     Boston, Dec. 9, 2007
     The writer is a practicing clinical neuropsychologist affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: LETTERS & COMMENTS (90%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (90%); EDITORIALS & OPINIONS
(74%); PSYCHOLOGY (64%)

GEOGRAPHIC: BOSTON, MA, USA (69%) MASSACHUSETTS, USA (69%) UNITED STATES (69%)

LOAD-DATE: December 13, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Letter

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                               59 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                 The New York Times

                                            December 12, 2007 Wednesday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

For Casino Owner, Winning a License Was Not a Matter of Luck
BYLINE: By SEAN D. HAMILL

SECTION: Section A; Column 0; National Desk; Pg. 20

LENGTH: 931 words

DATELINE: PITTSBURGH

     Don H. Barden could have scheduled the groundbreaking for his $450 million casino on his 64th birthday, Dec. 20,
if he wanted. After all, he owns what is projected to be the most lucrative of Pennsylvania's 14 slots casino licenses.
      But already irritated by a year's worth of delays, Mr. Barden, the country's only African-American owner of a na-
tional gambling company, decided against that.
     ''I didn't want to lose two weeks of the good weather'' for construction, he said before the ceremony on Tuesday
along the banks of the Ohio River, where his Majestic Star casino will rise.
                                                                                                   Page 138
For Casino Owner, Winning a License Was Not a Matter of Luck The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      It was a landmark day for Mr. Barden, a soft-spoken, sometimes prickly Horatio Alger figure who grew up poor
with 12 siblings in the Detroit suburb of Inkster, the son of auto workers and the great-grandson of a freed slave. The
new casino is projected to nearly double his Detroit company's annual revenue, pushing it over $1 billion.
      ''This is a great day for our company, and this is a great day for me,'' Mr. Barden told a cheering crowd of about
300 local officials, friends and family.
      In an industry known for its glitz, Mr. Barden ''flies pretty much below the radar, and I think he likes that,'' said
Andy Holtmann, editor of Casino Journal, a magazine based in Las Vegas, where Mr. Barden owns a casino. ''The oper-
ators here in Vegas probably don't think of Don Barden at all.''
      Mr. Barden has been a millionaire since the 1980s and a casino owner for 12 years, with six casinos in five states.
But it was how he won Pittsburgh's only license that caught people's attention, beating two major companies in the
gambling industry, Harrah's and Isle of Capri.
     Harrah's site on the South Side had traffic problems, and Isle of Capri's downtown site abutted a residential
neighborhood. But Mr. Barden's 12-acre riverfront site has highway access and is separated from residences. It was no
accident that he chose that site.
     ''Unlike the others who were running around trying to establish political influence, I was busy doing my home-
work,'' said Mr. Barden, who keeps in his pocket a wad of cash held together with a rubber band.
    It was also no accident that Mr. Barden ended up in Pittsburgh. He helped win passage of legislation to permit
gambling in Pennsylvania and had worked with the owner of the casino site.
      The casino, he said, will provide jobs for about 1,000 people and, besides the tax revenue it will generate, will
give the city $7.5 million a year for 30 years to help build an indoor arena.
      ''We're here to bring positive change,'' he said. ''We're here to do good things.''
       To see Mr. Barden's resume, which includes jobs in music, cable television, development and automobile sales, it
might seem by chance that he ended up here as a casino mogul. But he always had a plan, establishing new goals every
five years. ''When he was a very young guy I just knew that he was going to be something,'' said his older sister, Helen,
67. ''He just had that drive and that energy.''
     After sleeping four to a bed with his brothers, he started college in Ohio but realized he could not afford to contin-
ue and moved to Lorain, Ohio, where his older brother, Bernie, was working at the local Ford factory. But following his
brother and his parents' life path was not for him.
      ''I didn't want to go to work for Ford,'' he said, ''because I would have been in a factory and I would have felt
trapped, because that's typically what young African-Americans do. Get a job in a factory that pays good money. Then
they get into debt with a car, a house or apartment, and then they get married.''
      After two years working in the offices of a local shipyard, rapidly moving up from the mailroom to an assistant in
the president's office, Mr. Barden set out on his own.
     ''I figured I'd give myself 10 years trying to be an entrepreneur. If I didn't see the light at the end of the tunnel, I
could always go at 30 to 32 and get a job in the factory and still retire at the same time as all my fellow mates,'' he said.
     If Inkster was where Mr. Barden's character was formed, it was in Lorain where he was schooled in business.
There, he found a melting pot of nationalities where a business-minded black man, though still a distinct minority, was
embraced by the business community.
      ''He was a kid with no money and no background except a desire and vision to succeed,'' said Carl Adams, a for-
mer newspaper publisher and bank director in Lorain whom Mr. Barden considers a mentor. ''He never took advantage
of his race. He didn't have to.''
      Still, for Mr. Barden, whose company was listed as the sixth-largest black-owned industrial/service company in
the country this year by Black Enterprise magazine, race is always a factor, said Bella Marshall, his wife of 19 years.
      Part of his drive, she said, is that ''he believes he was given an opportunity, particularly as an African-American,
so he should do the best he can do.''
                                                                                                   Page 139
For Casino Owner, Winning a License Was Not a Matter of Luck The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      Smaller successes in development in Lorain, and then getting the cable franchise in his hometown, Inkster, led to
the project that set Mr. Barden on his way -- winning the franchise for Detroit's cable system in 1983.
      Foreseeing consolidation, Mr. Barden sold his Detroit franchise in 1995 to Comcast for $115 million -- giving him
the capital he needed to build a casino in Gary, Ind.
     Now, on the verge of his biggest project, Mr. Barden harbors hopes of buying a casino in Detroit and, maybe, in
Lorain.
       ''A lot of his future really hinges on how things go in Pittsburgh,'' Mr. Holtmann of Casino Journal said. ''He has a
lot riding on this.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: CASINOS (93%); GAMING (90%); DELAYS & POSTPONEMENTS (78%); RESIDENTIAL PROPER-
TY (76%); AFRICAN AMERICANS (76%); WEALTHY PEOPLE (73%); AUTOMOTIVE WORKERS (68%);
COMPANY REVENUES (67%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (50%)

GEOGRAPHIC: PITTSBURGH, PA, USA (93%); LAS VEGAS, NV, USA (79%) PENNSYLVANIA, USA (94%);
NEVADA, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (94%)

LOAD-DATE: December 12, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Don H. Barden, the country's only African-American owner of a national gambling company,
grew up poor in a suburb of Detroit. (PHOTOGRAPH BY JEFF SWENSON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                60 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                             December 12, 2007 Wednesday
                                                 Correction Appended
                                                  Late Edition - Final

S.E.C. Planning to Delay Accounting Rules for Small Companies for An-
other Year
BYLINE: By FLOYD NORRIS

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 4

LENGTH: 520 words
                                                                                                      Page 140
S.E.C. Planning to Delay Accounting Rules for Small Companies for Another Year The New York Times December 12,
                                      2007 Wednesday Correction Appended

     The Securities and Exchange Commission plans to delay for another year the requirement that small companies re-
port on the state of their internal financial controls, the agency's chairman, Christopher Cox, is expected to tell lawmak-
ers on Wednesday.
      In testimony prepared for a hearing of the House Small Business Committee, Mr. Cox said that he would propose
delaying the rules until 2009 and that the decision on whether to require compliance would then be based in part on a
study of costs to be conducted by the commission's economists.
      ''More than five years since the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was signed into law, there are roughly 5,000 firms in the
smaller public companies category that still aren't required to provide an auditor's report on their internal controls, as
required by Section 404(b),'' Mr. Cox said, according to a copy of his prepared testimony provided by a Congressional
staff member.
      The exempt companies generally have market capitalizations less than $75 million and represent a small percent-
age of the total market value of American companies, but they include a majority of all traded companies.
       The rule requiring that companies review internal controls and have them audited, provoked loud complaints
about costs when it was initially put in place. The commission responded by granting repeated delays, and by revising
the rules. The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board published a new standard for auditors aimed at lowering
costs.
      Under the new rules, smaller companies were supposed to begin having audits for fiscal years ending after Dec.
15, 2008. But many complained that they still did not want to do it and sought more delays. Mr. Cox said he could sup-
port a delay for one more year.
     He said the S.E.C. staff would study the costs and benefits of the new standard by sending a survey to companies
and conducting more detailed interviews with some companies.
      Mr. Cox said that he expected the study to be completed no earlier than next June and that he wanted to see the re-
sults before making a final decision.
      The decision was praised by Representative Nydia M. Velazquez, Democrat of New York, the chairwoman of the
committee. ''This postponement is long overdue,'' she said, adding that forcing small companies to comply in 2008
''would have had a detrimental effect on our economy.''
      The commission ''should use this time to garner the information necessary to ensure that the implementation of
SOX 404(b) does not stifle innovation and entrepreneurship,'' she said, referring to the section of the Sarbanes-Oxley
act that would impose the accounting requirement.
     In the past, Mr. Cox said that all companies would have to comply, although he did not say when. But he did not
repeat that statement in his prepared testimony, instead saying that the commission would consider the results of the
new study.
      If the full commission approves a delay, as seems likely, that would mean that a new president will be in office
before most American companies are required to obey a law that was passed overwhelmingly during the second year of
President Bush's first term.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: ACCOUNTING (92%); BANKING & FINANCE AGENCIES (90%); US FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
(90%); ACCOUNTING STANDARDS (90%); AUDITS (90%); DELAYS & POSTPONEMENTS (90%); BANKING
& FINANCE REGULATION (90%); TESTIMONY (89%); SARBANES OXLEY ACT (89%); ENTREPRENEUR-
SHIP (78%); LEGISLATORS (78%); AGENCY RULEMAKING (78%); SMALL BUSINESS (78%); LEGISLATION
(77%); MARKET CAPITALIZATION (72%); US DEMOCRATIC PARTY (66%); US SARBANES OXLEY ACT
(89%)

ORGANIZATION: SECURITIES & EXCHANGE COMMISSION (94%)

PERSON: NYDIA VELAZQUEZ (52%); CHRISTOPHER COX (94%)
                                                                                                      Page 141
S.E.C. Planning to Delay Accounting Rules for Small Companies for Another Year The New York Times December 12,
                                      2007 Wednesday Correction Appended

GEOGRAPHIC: UNITED STATES (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 12, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

CORRECTION-DATE: December 15, 2007


CORRECTION: An article in Business Day on Wednesday about plans by the Securities and Exchange Commission
to delay requiring small companies to adhere to some auditing requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act left the in-
correct impression that the S.E.C. chairman, Christopher Cox, was leaving the door open for an indefinite stay of the
requirements. As the article noted, testimony prepared for Mr. Cox to deliver to a Congressional panel did not explicitly
say that he wanted the commission to require small companies to obey the law after the delay. His testimony, however,
did include a reference to a time ''when, eventually, smaller public companies do come into full compliance'' with the
law.

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                61 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                             December 12, 2007 Wednesday
                                                  Late Edition - Final

Seeking Leaders, U.S. Companies Think Globally
BYLINE: By LOUISE STORY

SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1077 words

    The corner offices of corporate America are increasingly being filled from every corner of the world.
     Citigroup, the world's largest bank, named Vikram S. Pandit, a native of Nagpur, India, as its chief executive on
Tuesday. Mr. Pandit joins 14 other foreign-born chiefs who are running Fortune 100 companies.
      The head of the Altria Group was born in Egypt, for example. PepsiCo's is from India, the Liberty Mutual Group's
is a native of Ireland and Alcoa's was born in Morocco.
      Their numbers have jumped from roughly a decade ago; there were nine foreign-born chief executives on For-
tune's list of the 100 largest companies in 1996. But the size of the new group does not reflect a noteworthy change --
they come from more far-flung countries now than then, when they were more likely to hail from Canada or Europe.
     The shift reflects, in part, the focus that companies place on foreign markets for growth. For the first time, for ex-
ample, the companies in the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index are expected to achieve more than half their sales from
abroad next year, on average.
                                                                                                   Page 142
       Seeking Leaders, U.S. Companies Think Globally The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


       By contrast, six years ago, large American companies that disclosed their foreign earnings earned about a third of
their revenue from foreign sales, according to Standard & Poor's.
      Many of these foreign-born chief executives were recruited by companies like General Electric and Procter &
Gamble in the 1970s and 1980s for their overseas operations. Now they hold top positions at companies that also in-
clude Chiquita Brands International, the Eastman Kodak Company and the Kellogg Company. Chief executives at Dow
Chemical, Altria and Alcoa started in foreign units of their companies.
    ''Even though they're based in the United States, companies are less and less thinking of themselves as American
companies,'' said Michael Useem, a management professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
      The ranks of top executives will probably become more international, as many business schools now fill their
classes with 40 percent or more foreign students, and more companies recruit worldwide.
       ''It's just a numbers game,'' said S. P. Kothari, deputy dean of the Sloan School of Management at the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology. ''It's absolutely nothing wrong with the United States, but our population here is only 300
million. Imagine two billion people from the outside start getting a decent education and going through the pipeline.
Well, we are going to encounter more of them who rise to the top.''
      Mr. Kothari, who grew up in India and attended business school there, has seen the trend firsthand. Some of his
M.B.A. classmates from the early 1980s were recruited by Citigroup, Goldman Sachs and Nike, he said, and now they
are in line for top positions.
      Marijn E. Dekkers, 50, the Dutch chief executive of Thermo Fisher Scientific, based in Waltham, Mass., came to
the United States in 1985 through a General Electric program that required new hires to work their first stint in a conti-
nent far from their own.
      ''You're not intimidated doing business with people who are different than you,'' Mr. Dekkers said. ''I'm more open
to exploring Asian alliances and comfortable doing business in Asia, even though I'm from Europe.''
       Executive recruiters at firms like Korn/Ferry International say that corporate boards are asking more for leaders
with experience outside the United States. And American-born executives increasingly are spending part of their careers
in different countries.
       ''As you move through the company and you're looked at for a promotion, one of the things we're going to look at
is, do you have international experience?'' said Susan Bishop, a spokeswoman for General Electric.
      Some companies have long track records of appointing chief executives with foreign roots. Coca-Cola last week
named Muhtar Kent, the company's president and chief operating officer, to succeed E. Neville Isdell as chief executive.
Mr. Isdell was born in Northern Ireland but moved to Zambia as a child. Mr. Kent was born in the United States but
grew up in Turkey. (Previous chief executives included Roberto C. Goizueta and Douglas N. Daft, who were also born
abroad.)
      M. Farooq Kathwari, chief executive at Ethan Allen Interiors, said he had been shaped by his experience moving
on his own at age 21 from the Kashmir region of India to the United States.
      ''A foreign-born person is by nature an entrepreneur,'' Mr. Kathwari said. ''When you leave your home, leave
your family and come to a different country, you have had the instincts of an entrepreneur.''
     Mr. Kathwari said his childhood in Kashmir, hiking up mountains, taught him the importance of pacing himself.
The political conflict there, he said, taught him the importance of fairness. ''Justice'' is now a leadership principle at
Ethan Allen.
      Some chief executives, like Mr. Pandit at Citigroup, moved to the United States for their education. Indra K.
Nooyi, the chief executive of PepsiCo, attended the Yale School of Management, and Sidney Taurel, the chief of Eli
Lilly who was born in Morocco, attended Columbia Business School. Mr. Pandit earned undergraduate, master's and
doctorate degrees at Columbia.
      Howard M. Anderson, a professor of entrepreneurship at the Sloan School at M.I.T., said change in the execu-
tive suite has come more slowly than companies' sales growth abroad. He said that some corporate boards may still not
be comfortable with foreign-born chief executives because they feel they have more in common with another American.
     ''It's prejudice, but remember, when you're picking a C.E.O., it's not an equal opportunity job,'' Mr. Anderson said.
                                                                                                   Page 143
       Seeking Leaders, U.S. Companies Think Globally The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      But Ramani Ayer, the chief executive of the Hartford Financial Services Group, said he thought that because
boards were accountable to shareholders who care about returns above all else, they would pick the best candidate, re-
gardless of race or country of origin.
      Mr. Ayer grew up in India, but moved to the United States to attend graduate school at Drexel University. He
credits his bosses at the Hartford with helping guide him in his rise to the top, but he also said he had acquired a strong
work ethic in India.
      ''I've benefited from my Indian background,'' Mr. Ayer said. ''Growing up in a very simple family with a real pas-
sion for hard work. In other words, you never stopped working. You just worked. Work was liberating and work was
part of what defined who you were.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: COMPANY LISTS & RANKINGS (90%); STOCK INDEXES (90%); EDUCATION (85%); TRENDS
(74%); FOOD INDUSTRY (72%); STUDENTS & STUDENT LIFE (61%); COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PROFES-
SORS (66%); BUSINESS EDUCATION (88%)

COMPANY: LIBERTY MUTUAL GROUP (72%); KELLOGG CO (66%); EASTMAN KODAK CO (66%);
CITIGROUP INC (85%); ALTRIA GROUP INC (83%); ALCOA INC (57%); PEPSICO INC (57%); CHIQUITA
BRANDS INTERNATIONAL INC (54%); PROCTER & GAMBLE CO (54%); GENERAL ELECTRIC CO (54%);
DOW CHEMICAL CO (53%); MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (62%); GOLDMAN SACHS
GROUP INC (58%)

TICKER: K (NYSE) (66%); EKD (LSE) (66%); EK (NYSE) (66%); CGP (LSE) (84%); C (NYSE) (85%); PMO
(BRU) (83%); PHM (PAR) (83%); MO (NYSE) (83%); MO (AMS) (57%); ALA (LSE) (57%); ALI (LSE) (57%); AA
(NYSE) (57%); AA (AMEX) (57%); PEP (NYSE) (57%); CQB (NYSE) (54%); PGP (PAR) (54%); PGM (LSE)
(54%); PG (NYSE) (54%); GNEA (AMS) (54%); GNE (PAR) (54%); GEC (LSE) (54%); GE (NYSE) (54%); DOWCP
(PAR) (53%); DOWB (BRU) (53%); DOW (NYSE) (53%); DOW (LSE) (53%); 4850 (TSE) (53%); 8710 (TSE)
(85%); GEB (BRU) (54%); GS (NYSE) (58%); AAI (ASX) (57%)

INDUSTRY: SIC6331 FIRE, MARINE, & CASUALTY INSURANCE (72%); NAICS311412 FROZEN SPECIALTY
FOOD MANUFACTURING (66%); NAICS311230 BREAKFAST CEREAL MANUFACTURING (66%); SIC2043
CEREAL BREAKFAST FOODS (66%); SIC2038 FROZEN SPECIALTIES, NEC (66%); NAICS325992 PHOTO-
GRAPHIC FILM, PAPER, PLATE & CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING (66%); SIC3861 PHOTOGRAPHIC
EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES (66%); NAICS523120 SECURITIES BROKERAGE (85%); NAICS522210 CREDIT
CARD ISSUING (85%); NAICS522110 COMMERCIAL BANKING (85%); SIC6021 NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
BANKS (85%); NAICS312221 CIGARETTE MANUFACTURING (83%); NAICS311919 OTHER SNACK FOOD
MANUFACTURING (83%); SIC2111 CIGARETTES (83%); NAICS331312 PRIMARY ALUMINUM PRODUC-
TION (57%); SIC3334 PRIMARY PRODUCTION OF ALUMINUM (57%); NAICS312111 SOFT DRINK MANU-
FACTURING (57%); SIC2096 POTATO CHIPS, CORN CHIPS, & SIMILAR SNACKS (57%); SIC2086 BOTTLED
& CANNED SOFT DRINKS & CARBONATED WATER (57%); NAICS111339 OTHER NONCITRUS FRUIT
FARMING (54%); SIC0179 FRUITS & TREE NUTS, NEC (54%); NAICS325620 TOILET PREPARATION MAN-
UFACTURING (54%); NAICS325611 SOAP & OTHER DETERGENT MANUFACTURING (54%); NAICS322291
SANITARY PAPER PRODUCT MANUFACTURING (54%); SIC2844 PERFUMES, COSMETICS, & OTHER TOI-
LET PREPARATIONS (54%); SIC2841 SOAPS & OTHER DETERGENTS, EXCEPT SPECIALTY CLEANERS
(54%); SIC2676 SANITARY PAPER PRODUCTS (54%); NAICS336412 AIRCRAFT ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS
MANUFACTURING (54%); NAICS335222 HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR & HOME FREEZER MANUFAC-
TURING (54%); NAICS335211 ELECTRIC HOUSEWARES & HOUSEHOLD FAN MANUFACTURING (54%);
SIC3724 AIRCRAFT ENGINES & ENGINE PARTS (54%); SIC3634 ELECTRIC HOUSEWARES & FANS (54%);
NAICS325320 PESTICIDE & OTHER AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING (53%); NAICS325211
PLASTICS MATERIAL & RESIN MANUFACTURING (53%); NAICS325181 ALKALIES & CHLORINE MANU-
FACTURING (53%); SIC2879 PESTICIDES & OTHER AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS (53%); SIC2821 PLAS-
TICS MATERIALS, SYNTHETIC & RESINS, & NONVULCANIZABLE ELASTOMERS (53%); SIC2812
ALKALIES & CHLORINE (53%); NAICS523930 INVESTMENT ADVICE (58%); NAICS523920 PORTFOLIO
MANAGEMENT (58%); NAICS523110 INVESTMENT BANKING & SECURITIES DEALING (58%); SIC6289
                                                                                                   Page 144
       Seeking Leaders, U.S. Companies Think Globally The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


SERVICES ALLIED WITH THE EXCHANGE OF SECURITIES OR COMMODITIES, NEC (58%); SIC6282 IN-
VESTMENT ADVICE (58%); SIC6211 SECURITY BROKERS, DEALERS, & FLOTATION COMPANIES (58%)

PERSON: VIKRAM PANDIT (92%); MICHAEL MCMAHON (53%)

GEOGRAPHIC: PENNSYLVANIA, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (96%); INDIA (95%); CANADA (93%);
EGYPT (92%); IRELAND (92%); MOROCCO (88%); SPAIN (79%); NORTHERN IRELAND (79%); UNITED
KINGDOM (79%); EUROPE (79%); NETHERLANDS (92%)

LOAD-DATE: December 12, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: CHART: IMPORTED CHIEF EXECUTIVES: Foreign-born chief executives run some of the country's
biggest and best-known companies. (pg. A22) Imported Chief Executives Foreign-born chief executives run some of the
country's biggest and best-known companies. 4 8 10 19 23 40 63 70 71 73 82 88 94 95 97 149 182 232 488 549 620
N.A. David J. O'Reilly Vikram S. Pandit Martin J. Sullivan R. Kerry Clark Louis C. Camilleri Andrew N. Liveris Indra
K. Nooyi Gregory M. Spierkel Alain J.P. Belda Ronald D. Sugar Ramani Ayer Rupert Murdoch E. Neville Isdell Ed-
mund F. Kelly George W. Buckley Sidney Taurel Antonio Perez David MacKay Fernando Aquirre Marijn Dekkers
Henri Termeer M. Farooq Kathwari Ireland India Britain Canada Egypt Australia India Canada Morocco Canada India
Australia Northern Ireland Ireland Britain Morocco Spain Australia Mexico The Netherlands The Netherlands India
AMONG THE TOP 100 COMPANIES As ranked by Fortune magazine OTHER EXAMPLES ''You're not intimidated
doing business with people who are different from you.'' Marijn Dekkers Thermo Fisher Scientific BORN: Netherlands
''A foreignborn person is by nature an entrepreneur.'' M. Farooq Kathwari Ethan Allen BORN: India Chevron
Citigroup American International Gp. Cardinal Health Altria Group Dow Chemical PepsiCo Ingram Micro Alcoa
Northrop Grumman Hartford Financial Services News Corp. Coca-Cola Liberty Mutual Group 3M Eli Lilly Eastman
Kodak Kellogg Chiquita Brands Thermo Fisher Scientific Genzyme Ethan Allen

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                  Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                             62 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                               The New York Times

                                          December 12, 2007 Wednesday
                                         The New York Times on the Web

Republican Presidential Debate
SECTION: Section ; Column 0; ; TRANSCRIPT; Pg.

LENGTH: 15839 words

   REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES DEBATE PARTICIPANTS: FORMER NEW YORK MAYOR
RUDOLPH GIULIANI REPRESENTATIVE DUNCAN HUNTER FORMER ARKANSAS GOVERNOR MIKE
HUCKABEE SENATOR JOHN MCCAIN REPRESENTATIVE RON PAUL FORMER MASSACHUSETTS GOV-
ERNOR MITT ROMNEY REPRESENTATIVE TOM TANCREDO FORMER TENNESSEE SENATOR FRED
THOMPSON FORMER AMBASSADOR ALAN KEYES MODERATOR: CAROLYN WASHBURN
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                   Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      MS. WASHBURN: We're going to start with a discussion about the financial situation facing our country, which
was the single biggest issue Iowans of both parties wanted you to talk about. I'd like to ask everyone briefly to answer
this question, and then we're going to talk more specifically.
     The comptroller general has said the U.S. faces a tsunami of debt that is a great threat to our national security. Do
you agree our country's financial situation creates a security risk? And why or why not?
     We're going to just go down the line, starting with Mayor Giuliani. And please limit your answers on this to 30 se-
conds.
      MR. GIULIANI: I believe that it's a major problem, and it's one that hasn't been addressed the way it should be
over the course of the last seven, eight, maybe really 20 years. And there are three major things that we have to do.
      First, we have to reduce government spending, and we have to be very disciplined about that. And we have to do it
by imposing spending caps on the civilian agencies in governments -- 5 percent, 10 percent, maybe 15 percent. We have
to say that we're not going to rehire half of the civilian employees that come up for retirement. Forty-two percent are
coming up over the course of the next eight to 10 years. They should not be rehired. That would give us a $20 billion,
$22 billion reduction. The other would even be higher. And then we have to reduce taxes. Right now we should reduce
the corporate tax. We should reduce it from 35 percent to 25 percent.
      It would be a major boost in revenues for the government. Most importantly, it would be a way of dealing with
our fiscal policy in the same way that the Fed is dealing with our monetary policy to create more liquidity.
      And then there are other taxes we should get rid of. We should get rid of death tax and a whole group of others,
but the first one should be the corporate tax.
        MS. WASHBURN: Okay. Yes or no. I just want to be sure that I'm clear. Is the debt a threat to our national secu-
rity?
        MR. GIULIANI: I would say I would look at it --
        MS. WASHBURN: (Inaudible.)
      MR. GIULIANI: I wouldn't call it national security. I would call it economic security. It's very, very important. I
think --
        MS. WASHBURN: Congressman?
        MR. GIULIANI: -- Islamic terrorism as being national security. Economic security is also very important.
      REP. HUNTER: There are two debts that are a threat to the national security. One is the budget deficit, which is
going to be about $161 billion this year, but the real deficit, the real loss that we have right now that is a threat to na-
tional security is a trade loss. The trade loss this year is going to be $800 billion. It's going to be $200 billion to com-
munist China, which is rapidly becoming our banker, and there's an old saying, ''You don't want to have a banker who
doesn't have your best interests at heart.'' We should level the playing field. We should stop China from cheating on
trade, bring back a lot of those high-paying manufacturing jobs to this country that we pushed off-shore. That means
bigger paychecks. That means more money going into the Federal Treasury and to Social Security and to Medicare,
eliminate those twin deficits, and we'll be on the right track.
        MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
        We do need to stay at 30 seconds. This is not the time to get behind.
        Congressman?
      REP. PAUL: It's absolutely a threat to our national security because we've spent too much, we tax too much, we
borrow too much, and we print too much. When a country spends way beyond its means, eventually it will destroy the
currency, and we're in the midst of a currency crisis. Our dollar is going down rapidly as we speak. It's because we have
lived beyond our means. We can't afford the foreign policy that we have. We have to cut back. We have to live within
our means. If we're going to spend money, we ought to spend it at home, and that is why we have to change this foreign
policy. We can't afford it to do what we're doing today because it will destroy our dollar.
        MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      REP. TANCREDO: The reason why it becomes a national security problem is because the bulk of our imbalance
of trade is a result of our importation of oil from countries that are not our friends. That's really where it rests. Most of
the stuff that -- the rest of the stuff we bring in doesn't constitute that kind of threat to the United States. But when we
are supplying funds, supplying the funds for the people in other countries that have an intent -- a malicious intent in
regard to the United States, it's a national security issue.
      So of course, energy independence is one huge step in the direction of trying to alleviate that problem.
      MS. WASHBURN: Senator?
      MR. THOMPSON: Our country has a 9 trillion-dollar debt. A good chunk of that is owned by China. We're bank-
rupting the next generation without any question. Every economist in Washington who's looked at it will tell you that. It
affects our national security; for one reason is because we're squeezing military spending. We're spending at below his-
toric norms under these circumstances for our defense, and we're spending twice as much for entitlements.
       That's why I put out a specific Social Security plan that'll save Social Security while saving the government $4
trillion. It's all in entitlements. We've got to spend more for the military, as a matter of fact. But we've got to look at
Social Security and Medicare and do some things now that won't hurt anybody badly but will save it for the next gen-
eration.
      MS. WASHBURN: Governor?
      MR. ROMNEY: This is, indeed, a time of extraordinary challenges in this country, and the overspending in Wash-
ington and the overpromises that we've made are certainly among those challenges. But this is not a time for us to wring
our hands and think that the future is bleak. In fact, the future is bright. We need leadership in Washington that'll rein in
excessive spending, and we also need leadership that will help America grow.
       The best answer for our economic woes is to make sure we have good jobs for our citizens, good schools for our
kids, good health care for everyone, and that we have policies that promote the growth of the nation. We can have a
little playing field around the world, get ourselves off of foreign oil, reduce the excessive spending in Washington, and
have a bright future for our kids. This, again, is based upon the strength of the American people. If you want to see a
strong America, you don't look to Washington; you look to ways to strengthen the American people.
      MR. HUCKABEE: It's most certainly a national security threat because a country can only be free if it can do
three things.
      First, it has to be able to feed itself. It has to be able to put food on the table for its own citizens.
     Secondly, it's got to be able to fuel itself. If it looks to somebody else for its energy needs, it's only as free as those
are willing for it to be.
      And it also has to be able to fight for itself. It's got to be able to manufacture its own weapons of defense -- tanks,
airplanes, bullets and bombs.
      When we start outsourcing everything and we are in that kind of a trade deficit, then just remember, who feeds us,
who fuels us and who helps us to fight, that's to whom we are enslaved. So if we can't do those three things, our national
security is very much at risk.
      SEN. MCCAIN: Of course, any nation that no longer has economic strength sooner or later will lose its military
strength, so it's a national security issue.
      We have many trillions of dollars of unfunded liability. Obviously, we've been on a spending spree. We cannot in-
crease taxes.
     If oil reaches $100 a barrel, which many people think it may, $400 billion from America treasure will go to oil-
producing countries. Some of those -- those monies will go to terrorist organizations. We have got to achieve energy
independence, oil independence in this nation. I will make it a Manhattan Project, and we will in five years become oil
independent.
      MS. WASHBURN: Ambassador?
      MR. KEYES: I think it's obviously a national security problem, but you have to understand what national security
is. The Constitution defines it as securing the blessings of liberty. It has to do with the freedom of our people. If you
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


want to secure the blessings of liberty for the American people, you cut off the spigot that funds the political ambition
of our leaders by abolishing the income tax and restoring control of 100 percent of their income to the American work-
er. That means you replace it with a fair tax system that puts the American people in control of their money. By doing
that, you will encourage the politicians to stop spending to fund their little political cliques and only limit their spending
to what actually produces results for the American people.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     I want to dig into the budget issue a little bit more. You'll have 30 seconds to answer this next question, and again,
I want to start with Mayor Giuliani.
      What sacrifices would you ask Americans to make to lower the country's debt? And I'd like you to be specific.
      MR. GIULIANI: Well, I think the most important thing is the federal government has to restrain its spending.
That's the area in which we're hurting ourselves and in which we're creating this problem -- national security, economic
security, however you define it. The problem is not the American people.
      What we should be doing is restraining the amount of money that Washington spends in a concerted way, with
major reductions in civilian spending, using attrition, and returning -- actually leaving more money in the pockets of the
American people. The strength of America is not its central government; the strength of America are its people. Restrain
the central government, give people more choice, more money to spend, we're going to see our economy booming.
      That's the kind of future where we can have unlimited dreams.
     MS. WASHBURN: So, Mayor, you've said you would cut non-military spending 10 percent across the board.
What sort of sacrifices would that require from people who use those government services?
       MR. GIULIANI: Well, that would -- that would require their trying to figure out other ways to do it. I mean, ra-
ther than moving in the direction of more people on government medicine, I'd rather see us reduce the income tax bur-
den, create an exemption for health care so people can buy their own health care. So that's going to require they take a
little bit more time, take a little more ownership of their health care. Rather than relying on government as the nanny
government, let's rely on people to make choices about their health care. Let's rely on, instead of 17 million people buy-
ing their own health insurance, 50, 60, 70 million. You'll see the price come all the way down and you'll see the quality
come up. That's an American solution. It's a bold one, but it's the kind of thing America has done in the past. We rely on
our people, not on our government.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      Congressman Paul, what sacrifices would you ask Americans to make for debt reduction?
      REP. PAUL: I think it's absolutely unnecessary to sacrifice. We want to give people more freedom, more chance
to spend their own money. It's unnecessary.
      We can cut by looking at our foreign policy. We maintain an empire which we can't afford. We have 700 bases
overseas. We are in 130 countries. We cut there, and then we have a better defense of this country, and the people get
that money and they get to spend it here at home. There's no need to sacrifice. We need more liberty, more rights for the
people to spend their own money. And in this -- in that situation, there is no sacrifice and no need for it.
      MS. WASHBURN: So, Governor Huckabee, your colleagues seem to think there is no sacrifice needed to reduce
the debt. Do you agree? What would you do?
     MR. HUCKABEE: Sometimes it's not so much doing things so that people sacrifice; it's doing them differently.
Let me give you an example. A lot of the federal budget goes to health care. We need to
      do what most American companies are finding works in reducing health care cost. That's moving from the inter-
vention-based health care model to a prevention-based.
     Our current model is upside-down. We wait until people are catastrophically ill and then we spend the most ex-
pensive ways of trying to cure incurable diseases. If we would put the focus on prevention, we would find, like Ameri-
can business is finding, that there really is savings if you kill the snake rather than just treat the snakebites, which is the
way our current system is built.
      MS. WASHBURN: Governor Romney, I'd like you to address this first. You'll have one minute.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      Are there programs or situations that are so important that you'd be willing to run a deficit to pay for them?
      MR. ROMNEY: Well, we don't have to run a deficit to pay for the things that are most important because we can
eliminate the things that aren't critical. You know, in the private sector, where I spent the first 25 years of my life and
most of my career, you learn how to focus on the things that are most important, and you get rid of the things that aren't.
We have, in the federal government, 342 different economic development programs, often administered by different
departments.
      We don't need 342. We probably don't need a hundred of those. We probably need a lot fewer than that. We have
40 different programs for workforce training. There are probably five or six that are really working and a lot that are not
working terribly well. We can get rid of some of those. We have 13 different programs to prevent teenage pregnancy.
Well, they're obviously not working real well, and we can probably cut it down to one or that are making a difference.
      And so what anyone in the private sector's learned how to do is to focus their resources on those things that have
the biggest impact, that are most important. Surely, protecting our country and our defense of our military is critical.
Getting our free market finally able to allow all of our citizens to have insurance, health insurance, that's something we
did in Massachusetts. Improving our schools with school choice, better pay for better teachers -- these are a lot of things
that we can do, but they don't require us to eliminate the things that are most critical in our society. Instead they require
us to get rid of those things that are unnecessary.
      And the sacrifice we need from the American people, it's this: it's saying let the programs that don't work go.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. ROMNEY: Don't lobby for them forever.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      Congressman Tancredo, how would you answer that?
      REP. TANCREDO: I would say that there is a way and a very clear way to actually establish what the government
needs to do in order to reduce its -- the cost that it incurs and to do what is right, and that is called follow the Constitu-
tion of this country. The Constitution is a limiting document. It tells the federal government what it can and cannot do.
Today we do far too many things that exceed our constitutional -- the constitutional bounds that are placed there.
       We have a responsibility. It is to protect and defend this country. Concentrate on that. Concentrate on doing what's
right and what the Constitution itself gives us the responsibility for, and the rest of that stuff becomes extraneous. And
honestly, if you think about it, if you ask America, what would you do, what would you sacrifice, the one thing I would
say is this: Don't ask the government for womb-to-tomb protection for your life, to build a bubble around you because
all of that will cause a humongous amount of money and money that we don't have.
     But we will respond to you, politicians will do it, because they want the vote. Don't ask, and I guarantee you my
administration will remain inside the bounds of the Constitution.
      MS. WASHBURN: Senator Thompson, could you answer that? Are there programs or situations so important
you'd be willing to run a deficit for them?
      MR. THOMPSON: Yes, the military, the security of our people, first and foremost, always; our infrastructure,
which is coming apart; and research and development, which is going to help us solve some of the problems in the fu-
ture as far as energy and a lot of other issues.
      But I want to take a chance on telling the truth to the American people. Our entitlement programs, by 2040 or so
we're going to eat up our entire budget. Now we'll go all day here and nobody else will talk about that obvious problem
that we've got we've got to address.
      The thing about it is that we can do it now without hurting those programs with -- actually strengthening those
programs so that our kids and grandkids have -- I don't think we as American people are so selfish that we're going to
put this off the table, kick the can down the road and let everybody else solve that problem, you know, when our grand-
kids get to be working age. That's not America; that's not what makes us strong.
      And specifically, as far as Medicare is concerned, we need to tell people that are in Warren Buffet's category we're
not going to take care of all your Medicare in the future; we can't afford it.
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                    Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


     MS. WASHBURN: Well, which leads me nicely to the next question. I want to go down the line in reverse order
and hear from everyone very briefly, please, 15 seconds or so.
      Who in this country is paying more than a fair share of taxes relative to everyone else: the wealthy, the middle
class, the poor or corporations?
         Starting with Mr. Keyes.
      MR. KEYES: It's one of those let you and him fight questions the people in the media always want to get us in-
volved in; because they would like to pretend that the tax question is about fighting amongst ourselves when the real
sacrifice that's required from the American people we need to start sacrificing some of these incumbents who have
funded their political ambition using our money --
         MS. WASHBURN: Remember, we have 15 seconds.
       MR. KEYES: -- who have spent overboard into deficits after promising us on the Republican side that they would
limit the government, and then produced the highest budget deficits in the history of our country.
         MS. WASHBURN: Senator McCain?
       MR. KEYES: I think we need to stop listening to these phonies and start looking for people who will actually ful-
fill the words that they speak. That's what I think.
         MS. WASHBURN: Senator McCain?
      SEN. MCCAIN: I know that I'm happy to say low-income Americans, except for payroll taxes, don't pay taxes,
but we've got to reform the tax code. Nobody understands it. Nobody trusts it. Nobody believes in it. And we have to fix
it. And we can't raise taxes as our Democrat friends want.
      So I don't know exactly who's paying the most of the burden, but I would say that the American people need a tax
code they can understand and that they know is fair.
         MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee?
      MR. HUCKABEE: Over 80 percent of the American people know that the tax code is irreparably broken. I would
lead one to a fair tax, and that means that the rich people aren't going to be made poor, but maybe the poor people could
be made rich. That ought to be the goal of any tax system -- not to punish somebody, but to enable somebody so that
they can have a part of the American dream. The fair tax does just that.
         MS. WASHBURN: Governor Romney?
         MR. ROMNEY: I don't stay awake at night worrying about the taxes that rich people are paying, to tell you the
truth.
      I'm concerned about the taxes that middle class families are paying. They're under a lot of pressure. Gasoline's ex-
pensive. Home heating oil, particularly in the Northeast, is very difficult for folks. Health care costs are going through
the roof. Education costs and higher education are overwhelming. And as a result, we need to reduce the burden on
middle-income families in this country.
         MS. WASHBURN: Okay, a little snappier, gentlemen. (Laughter.)
         Senator Thompson.
     MR. THOMPSON: My goal is to get into Mitt Romney's situation, where I don't have to worry about taxes any-
more. (Laughter.)
         MR. ROMNEY: (Off mike) -- your situation. (Laughter.)
         MR. THOMPSON: (Off mike) -- you know, you're getting to be a pretty good actor actually. (Laughter, cross
talk.)
      Five percent of Americans pay over half the income taxes in this country. 40 percent of Americans pay no income
taxes at all. I think we need to concentrate on preserving the tax cuts of '01 and '03. That's going to be a monumental
battle that's going to be coming at the end of 2010.
         MS. WASHBURN: Congressman.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      REP. TANCREDO: Everyone that is presently paying tax, you could be -- you can make a case that they're paying
too much. The reality is, of course, you need a different system entirely. We do need to move away from this archaic --
a system that taxes productivity, which is what we do, to a system that allows for a fair tax. I believe in that.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     Congressman.
     REP. PAUL: The most sinister of all taxes is the inflation tax and it is the most regressive. It hits the poor and the
middle class. When you destroy a currency by creating money out of thin air to pay the bills, the value of the dollar goes
down, and people get hit with a higher cost of living.
     It's the middle class that's being wiped out. It is most evil of all taxes.
      REP. HUNTER: The tax that we're all paying that doesn't help anything -- it doesn't go to defense, it doesn't go to
the roads, it doesn't go to medical care -- is the $250 billion-plus that we pay each year not to the federal government, to
the Treasury, but to prepare our taxes, defend our taxes, and for the massive cost of the IRS. That's all overhead -- 250
billion-plus dollars. What we ought to do is have a system -- the fair tax system is a good one, or a flatter tax or a sim-
pler tax, because that young couple that pays 1,450 bucks in taxes may pay $450 to their tax preparer. That's a second
tax.
     MS. WASHBURN: Mayor?
     MR. GIULIANI: A flatter tax, a simpler tax that you could file on a one page, as an option, would be a good idea.
Reducing the corporate tax, as I suggested. Reducing income tax rates across the board, which would mostly benefit the
middle class. That's where the focus should be.
      But we've got to reduce taxes across the board, and we should give the death penalty to the death tax. It really is a
very unfair tax.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     Periodically throughout the debate, we'll give each of the candidates 30 seconds to make a free statement. The
candidates drew for the order, and we'll hear from the first two candidates now: Senator McCain, followed by Con-
gressman Hunter.
     SEN. MCCAIN: Thank you.
      I've devoted my life in uniform and in public office to keeping this nation safe. I've been involved in every major
national security issue of our time.
      That kind of experience is what's given me judgment, the judgment to oppose a failed strategy in Iraq, a judgment
to call for the strategy that's succeeding now. And I wasn't very popular because of it. I have the judgment and the expe-
rience, and I believe that I can ask every American to serve. I have one guiding principle, one ambition, and that is to
keep America safe and to achieve and maintain our greatness.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Hunter?
      REP. HUNTER: You know, I stand for a strong national defense, enforceable borders and bringing back high-
paying manufacturing jobs to this country that we've pushed off-shore with bad trade deals. I've been a member of the
Armed Services Committee for 26 years now, and I've chaired that committee for four years. And I'm one of the few
guys up here whose worn the uniform of the United States, and my own son has done now three tours in the Middle
East, coming back on Thanksgiving.
      I know what it takes to secure this country, and I also built that border fence in San Diego that worked so well.
And I wrote the law that takes it across Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, and as president, I will finish that border fence
in six months.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      I want to come back to some issues that affect the economy. You'll have 30 seconds again. The longer you go on,
the shorter we'll have to go. Thirty seconds to answer these questions, and we're going to start with Congressman Paul.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      One in five jobs in Iowa depends on exports to foreign countries, but we're also exporting a lot of high-wage man-
ufacturing jobs. What's your plan for keeping foreign markets open while protecting good-paying American jobs?
      REP. PAUL: Well, we need to adopt free trade agreements with other countries. Today we inhibit the export of,
say, farm products to countries like Cuba. It's time we changed our attitude about Cuba. We should be looking to open
these markets, but our markets get closed for monetary reasons because our chief export is our dollar.
      Because we have the reserve currency of the world, people take these dollars and our jobs go overseas. You can't
solve any of these problems if you don't look at the monetary system and how it contributes to these job losses in order
to provide the prosperity for our people here at home.
     MS. WASHBURN: Governor Romney, would you answer that?
      MR. ROMNEY: You know, I've spent the last -- as I told you, 25 years in the private sector. I understand why
jobs come and why jobs go. I've done business in over 20 countries around the world, and I understand how we can
build more strength in our own economy and that's by investing in education, investing in technology and innovation,
getting ourselves off of foreign oil, and making sure that the playing field we play on around the world is level. It's not
right now. We're going to have to re-negotiate deals with people like those in China that manipulate their currency to
put their products in advantage over ours. We want to make sure that we do not have a circumstance where people close
down their markets to our goods because we can compete anywhere in the world. One out of three agricultural acres is
planted to go off-shore, so don't put up barriers to keep us from being able to trade.
     America can compete anywhere in the world, and to remain a superpower, we must compete around the world.
     MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee?
      MR. HUCKABEE: Well, job migration is a result of three things: when you have excessive taxation that penalizes
the productivity of a company; you add to that excessive regulation, which means that you've got more red tape than is
possible to get through. And I would say that as president one of my goals would be I can't part the Red Sea, but I be-
lieve I can part the red tape. And the third thing is we've got too much litigation. When a company goes into business,
particularly small business, from which 80 percent of all American jobs come, most small business people can't fight off
the potential liabilities that they come from all of the lawsuits and litigation.
     Take care of those three things, we won't see the incredible level of job migration that we see today.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     Some of our big trading partners commit human rights violations.
      Considering that poverty and abuse are often blamed for fostering terrorism, should we alter trade policies with
those countries?
     Senator McCain.
      SEN. MCCAIN: Well, obviously we should make sure that every nation respects human rights, and we should ad-
vocate that and try to enforce it. But I will open every market in the world to Iowa's agricultural products. I'm the big-
gest free marketer and free trader that you will ever see.
       And I will also eliminate subsidies on ethanol and other agricultural products. They are an impediment to competi-
tion; they are an impediment to free markets. And I believe that subsidies are a mistake, and I don't believe that anybody
can stand here and say that they're a fiscal conservative and yet support subsidies which distort markets and destroy our
ability to compete in the world, and destroy our ability to get cheaper products into the United States of America.
     MS. WASHBURN: I'm going to move to the next question. What specific changes should be made in NAFTA?
     Mayor Giuliani.
      MR. GIULIANI: I think the main thing is it should be enforced. And the reality is, NAFTA has been a good thing.
I was concerned about NAFTA and I became convince, watching it, that it's actually helped us.
     Our percentage of exports, percentage of our GDP, has gone up dramatically from something like 9 percent to 11
percent. It's brought more jobs to America.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      America should think about free trade, global economy, as something we want to embrace. This is what we've al-
ways wanted. And America's a country of entrepreneurs and dreamers and creators, and what we should be thinking
about is, how much can we sell to these people? As they're coming out of poverty -- 20 million, 30 million people in
India, China -- these are new customers for the United States of America.
      And then we have to make sure that we have a level playing field. That's very important. But we shouldn't lose the
goal of free trade.
      We're big dreamers here in this country. We've got plenty we can sell all over the world that will make up for what
we're buying.
     MS. WASHBURN: Senator Thompson, what specific changes would you make to NAFTA?
       MR. THOMPSON: Well, I think free trade and fair trade is the backbone of our economy. I think it's been just as
good for us as it has Mexico. In fact, I think Mexico needs to think about that when they criticize us for trying to en-
force our border. They export or send more people out of the country every year than we do, in terms of illegal aliens.
So it's been a good thing for both countries.
    It's a long, complex document. I have nothing in particular to point out. I just think we need -- need to make a
commitment to free and fair trade and make -- and enforce the agreements that we've got.
     The problem is, too many people close their markets to us.
       They want to trade with us, but they want to place undue restrictions to our manufacturers and to our farmers. We
can't stand for that.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Tancredo?
       REP. TANCREDO: NAFTA has been a disaster for a lot of places and especially Mexico. Southern Mexico it was
a disaster. It destroyed the entire agricultural economy. Guess what happened? They all came north. If NAFTA had
worked so well as everybody on the stage appears to think it did, why would we still have so much pressure on our
southern border from people trying to escape from a country that does not provide them with the economic opportuni-
ties that it -- that NAFTA promised?
     What, of course, is also ingrained in this whole discussion is the lack of sovereignty, the fact that our borders are
now meaningless, the fact that Mexican trucks can come across essentially without being checked. These are the prob-
lems with NAFTA, and they have to be unwound.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Hunter, you wanted in on that?
     REP. HUNTER: Absolutely. You know, when we had a $3 billion trade surplus with Mexico when we passed
NAFTA, and the advocates said we're going to build on that surplus. Today we have a massive trade loss. We went im-
mediately to a $15 billion trade loss. We've had that now for the last many years. And let me tell you, if you take your
product made in Iowa down to the Mexican border right now and tried to get it across, you will pay a 15 percent tariff,
which they moved into place after we passed NAFTA.
      You know, trade deals are business deals between nations, and we haven't made good business deals between na-
tions. And NAFTA is a bad business deal.
      MS. WASHBURN: I want to move on and hear the three statements from our next two candidates, Congressman
Paul first, and then Senator Thompson.
    REP. PAUL: The goal of all political action should be to preserve liberty. We need more freedom in this country.
We need to look to ourselves in what we are doing.
      We have drifted so far from our Constitution that the government that -- the Constitution was written to restrain
our government. Yet we turned around, and the Constitution now is used to restrain the people. But we have no chance
if we don't restrain the government, all that they do in undermining our personal liberties, controlling our economic
well-being and using our -- using it as an excuse to police the world. If we don't change the role for government, this
country is going to suffer a very, very serious economic crisis.
     MS. WASHBURN: Senator Thompson.
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     MR. THOMPSON: On all these issues, I've been a strong, consistent, common-sense conservative. But the most
important issue facing our country, and will be for a long time, is national security and the safety of our people.
      I've spent a lot of time, both in and out of government, traveling, talking to foreign leaders, dealing with these is-
sues. I know the world we live in. I think I know what we need to do. I think that it's going to require strong leadership.
      And I would ask people to think one thing before they cast a vote. When our worst enemy is sitting down at the
negotiating table thinking about what he can do to the United States of America, who do you want sitting on our side of
the table representing you? That's probably the guy you ought to elect president.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     I want to take on a new issue. I would like to see a show of hands. How many of you believe global climate
change is a serious threat and caused by human activity?
     MR. THOMPSON: Well, do you want to give me a minute to answer that?
     MS. WASHBURN: No, I don't. I --
     MR. THOMPSON: Well, then I'm not going to answer it. (Laughter, applause.)
     MS. WASHBURN: Okay.
     MR. HUCKABEE (?): How about 30 seconds?
     MS. WASHBURN: No, I -- you know, I want --
     MR. THOMPSON: You want a show of hands, and I'm giving it to you.
     MS. WASHBURN: We're going to follow up on that, but what I need to know is who believes global climate
change is serious and caused by human activity.
     MR. GIULIANI: I do.
     MS. WASHBURN: And then we'll talk in more detail about it.
     MR. : Serious? It is.
     MR. GIULIANI: I believe that global climate change is a serious --
     (Cross talk.)
     SEN. MCCAIN: And I think climate change is real, and I --
     MR. HUCKABEE (?): Let's have a chance about it --
     (Cross talk, laughter.)
     MS. WASHBURN: Go -- I'm going to start with Senator McCain, come back to Mayor Giuliani.
    SEN. MCCAIN: I've been involved in this issue since the year 2000. I have had hearings. I've traveled the world. I
know that climate change is real.
      But let me put -- put it to you this way. Suppose that climate change is not real, and all we do adopt green technol-
ogies, which our economy and our technology is perfectly capable of. Then all we've done is given our kids a cleaner
world.
      But suppose they are wrong. Suppose they are wrong, and climate change is real, and we've done nothing. What
kind of a planet are we going to pass on to the next generation of Americans? It's real. We've got to address it. We can
do it with technology, with cap-and- trade, with capitalist and free enterprise motivation. And I'm confident that we can
pass on to our children and grandchildren a cleaner, better world.
     MS. WASHBURN: Mayor Giuliani?
      MR. GIULIANI: I agree with -- I agree with John. Climate change is real. It's happening. I believe human beings
are contributing to it. I think the best way to deal with it is through energy independence.
     MS. WASHBURN: Who doesn't agree?
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      MR. GIULIANI: And I think energy independence is a --
      MR. : That I agree with.
      MS. WASHBURN: Who doesn't agree?
      REP. HUNTER (?): But he said ''contributing'' but not totally --
      MR. : No -- yes.
      MR. : No.
      MR. : Yeah.
      MR. : Oh, okay.
      MR. : Yeah.
      MR. : Yeah.
      MR. : Well, and I -- (laughter) --
      (Cross talk.)
      REP. HUNTER (?): On our party, you're getting closer --
      SEN. MCCAIN: More than contributing, my friend --
      MR. ROMNEY (?): Give us -- give us each a chance.
      MS. WASHBURN: I did.
      MR. GIULIANI: And I think that our party should embrace this as an issue for us, in our positions --
     MS. WASHBURN: Well, let me come at this way. Let me come at it this way. What impact on the economy
would be acceptable in order to reverse global warming and greenhouse gas emissions?
      Governor Romney?
      MR. ROMNEY: Well, it's going to help our economy because we're going to invest in new technologies to get
ourselves off of foreign oil, and as we get ourselves off of foreign oil, we also dramatically reduce our CO2 emissions.
That's good for the environment; it's also good for our economy. Because $300 to $400 billion worth of oil a year from
other people who use it against us, that's bad for our economy, it's also bad for the environment.
      MS. WASHBURN: So then our --
      MR. ROMNEY: We can do these things in a way that help both the environment and the economy and national
security. That's the beauty of what we're talking about here, which is, yeah, is global warming an issue for the world?
Absolutely. Is it something we can deal with by becoming energy independent and energy secure? We sure can.
      But at the same time, we call it global warming, not America warming. So let's not put a burden on us alone and
have the rest of the world skate by without having to participate in this effort. It's a global effort, but our independence
is something we can do unilaterally.
      MS. WASHBURN: Mr. Keyes, what do you think about this?
      MR. KEYES: Well, what I think is that a lot of folks out there ought to understand that what you're watching rep-
resents the situation in our country. Ask yourself who represents the people they don't let you hear from, and you'll
know who you should vote for in the Iowa caucuses. Who represents the voice that they're absolutely determined to
overlook in the discussion of our sovereignty and the betrayal of this people's sovereignty -- on the border, on our moral
principles, on the major export overseas, which is our jobs.
      These folks represent the very elite, who year after year after year have destroyed our Constitution, betrayed our
rights and undermined our strength, created by our people in the world. And yet the one person willing to talk about that
is overlooked time and time again. That person represents you.
      MR. THOMPSON: I agree with Alan Keyes's position on global warming. (Laughter, cross talk.)
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                    Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      MR. KEYES: I'm in favor of reducing global warming because I think the most important emission we need to
control is the hot air -- (off mike) -- politicians, who pretend one thing and don't deliver. (Laughter, cross talk.)
         MS. WASHBURN: Let me come to a question that Iowans may not let you out of answering.
      Governor Huckabee, you've said you support increasing government mandates requiring motorists to use $36 mil-
lion of biofuel by 2022, which is six times what we're producing this year. Are you willing to increase that mandate,
even if it will drive up feed for livestock producers or force consumers to by flex-fuel vehicles?
      MR. HUCKABEE: I don't think that's what's necessary. And the reason that this issue ought to be important is be-
cause we don't own this earth. We are simply stewards of it, caretakers. And I know on a day like today, it's hard to be-
lieve there is global warming, if anybody's been in Iowa on a day like today.
         But climate change and who's causing it is of less importance than what Senator McCain said, and he's exactly
right.
      We have done no harm if we take better care of this planet and give it to our children with cleaner air, cleaner soil
and cleaner water. We have done --
         MS. WASHBURN: So are you willing to increase the mandate?
      MR. HUCKABEE: I am willing for us to make the decisions which will not necessarily create the mandates. And
let me tell you how we do it.
      You know who one of the biggest energy users is in the whole country? The United States government. If the
government commits to being the primary user of alternative forms of energy, we have a market built in. And therefore,
the big argument against having alternative energy is there's no market for it. Well, let the government be a marketplace
and we'll create the kind of demand that lowers the price rather than raises the price.
         MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Hunter.
      REP. HUNTER: You know, I'd say instead of mandates, incentives. The problem with mandating only biofuels --
and you know, ethanol's not the -- is not the greatest thing in show business. You use a lot of energy to create ethanol,
and there's other biofuels out there -- biodiesel, et cetera. But by giving incentives in R&D and by bringing our govern-
ment laboratories together with business, with our educational institutions, the United States can become the center with
a grand new industry of energy innovation. We can be the leaders in the world in this. But you don't want to -- you don't
want to push away things like hydrogen, fuel cells and other things. Incentives is the way to go. And we should take the
entire array of alternative energy sources and give incentives to private enterprise to get involved and get into the busi-
ness of delivering us a great product. And we can produce a great new industry for this next generation.
         MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Tancredo, what would you do about mandates?
     REP. TANCREDO: No, I don't believe in mandates. I don't believe that they should be increased. I believe that
the market is the best determinant of exactly how these problems should be addressed.
      I don't mind and I would not be opposed to any investment in research and development, but the idea that the gov-
ernment knows the right amount somehow, some way -- some brilliant analyst -- usually some politician who hasn't the
slightest idea of the issue -- will make a decision about what is the right amount of mandate to impose on the rest of the
country. And you know what? It never works out right. Let the market -- I trust the market more than I do the govern-
ment.
    MS. WASHBURN: Let's hear free statements from two more candidates -- first, Congressman Tancredo, and then
Governor Huckabee.
      REP. TANCREDO: We have had 40 years of unlimited -- 40 or 45 years, really -- of unlimited immigration, both
legal and illegal, into this country. It has become a -- that is a problem. Unlimited, massive immigration is a problem.
But when it happens commensurately without the same amount of assimilation, it becomes a catastrophe.
      It will become what Teddy Roosevelt warned of when he said you have -- you can have immigration, but if it hap-
pens without assimilation, all you end up with is not a nation, but a polyglot boarding house. Some of my friends on the
stage, both governors and senators, said they -- we should trust their judgment. Well, their judgment is what got us into
this problem, so we need to trust somebody else to get us out.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee.
      MR. HUCKABEE: I think people in this country are looking for leadership. They're looking for change. They're
not looking that people would be elected to be so much a ruling class, but a servant class. We've forgotten that. Our
Founding Fathers had a brilliant, really revolutionary idea, that the people elected would not represent the elite, but
would represent the ordinary. Our Founding Fathers had the idea that when we are elected, we're not elected as a part to
be elevated up, but to truly remember who it is we work for. I think sometimes that's what's happened in America: we
forget that our job is to keep this country safe first and foremost, and it's to try to encourage Americans to be their best
at everything they do. And I can tell you, it's a long way from the little rent house I grew up in to this stage. I'm still in
awe that this country would afford kids like me the opportunity to be a president. I'll try not to forget where I came from
and where this country needs to go.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      A new topic that some Iowans say hasn't had enough debate during this campaign, and that's education. American
15-year-olds ranked behind 16 other countries in a recent assessment of science literacy. What educational standards
does the U.S. need to adopt or improve to compete in the global economy, and what will you do to move us toward
those standards, and what's your timetable?
      Senator McCain.
     SEN. MCCAIN: The answer to the problem in education in America is simple: We need more choice and more
competition. Entrance by a good student into a college today, they have a number of choices and people are seeking
them to be part of those educational institutions.
     We don't have a choice in competition. We need it in K through 12. We need more charter schools. We need
vouchers where it's approved by the local state and school boards. We need to have clearly home- schooling if people
want that. We need to reward good teachers and find bad teachers another line of work. We need to have all of these
compete.
     In my home state of Arizona, we have charter schools, some have failed, but they're competing with the public
schools, and the level of education is increasing. In New York City today, there's some remarkable things happening
under Mayor Bloomberg and Joel Klein, who have done marvelous work with an educational system that was clearly
broken. Those can be examples of a way to improve education in America, provide choice and competition and give
every American family the same choice I and my family had, and that is to send our child to the school of our choice.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you. Thank you.
      Mayor Giuliani?
     MR. GIULIANI: I'm here because of the educational choices my parents made or I wouldn't be here or have
achieved anything that I've achieved, and that's the place where the decision should be made. Instead of having these
education standards done in Washington by the Education Department or some bureaucrats in a state capital or -- or in a
board, the choice should be made by parents.
      Parents should choose the school that their child goes to, the same way people choose higher education.
     Has it ever occurred to -- to us that higher education is still the very, very best in the world? And it's -- you're ask-
ing me about K through 12. Well, higher education is based on choice. It's based on a large consumer market. It's based
on competition.
      It's the area of K through 12 where we have this government command sort of approach. And if we -- if we give
the choice to parents, where they can choose a private school, a parochial school, a public school, a charter school,
home schooling --
      MS. WASHBURN: Time.
      MR. GIULIANI: -- let them be the -- be the decider, I think we'll see a big revolution in education.
      MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Hunter?
      REP. HUNTER: Three words: Jaime Escalante and inspiration. Jaime Escalante was a great math teacher who in
the barrio of Lose Angeles taught young kids calculus, and he taught them so well that the school district called up and
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


said, ''We got a problem. We think your kids are cheating on the tests.'' And he said, ''Test them again.'' And he estab-
lished this incredible system of calculus in the school district by inspiring young people.
      How many of us have -- have our careers -- can -- can point back to a teacher and say, ''That teacher inspired me''?
What we have to do is take away the bureaucratic credentialing of teachers and allow people who are aerospace engi-
neers and -- and pilots and scientists and retired folks to come in and inspire young people in third, fourth, fifth, sixth,
seventh and eighth grades. Let -- let's inspire them to reach for the stars and give them the incentive to work hard
enough to get there -- inspiration, changing the credentialing system, and school choice.
      MS. WASHBURN: Hasn't that teacher since left the public school system?
      REP. HUNTER: And you know why? I read the -- the -- the post- mortem on Jaime Escalante is that the unions
ran him out of the school district, and I think that goes right to one of the -- one of the big problems that we have.
      MS. WASHBURN: If we need to improve our educational system quickly to be more competitive in the world,
does the federal government need to exercise different influence than it has historically over educational standards?
      If so, in what ways? And if not, how do you encourage state to meet national goals to move us forward?
      Governor Romney.
      MR. ROMNEY: Carolyn, these are 60-second answers, right?
      MS. WASHBURN: Yes.
      MR. ROMNEY: Okay, let's make sure, because time's going pretty quick here.
      Education's an important topic. And the president was right to fight for No Child Left Behind, because we allow
states now to test our kids and see how well they're doing, particularly in math and English. We've made the same effort
in our state, actually before No Child Left Behind was passed.
     We test our kids; we have high standards. We teach them in English, English immersion. We say, to be successful
in America, you've got to speak the language of America.
      We also put in place incentives for kids to do well. For those that take the graduation exam, which you have to
take to get out of high school, we say that you're going to get, if you score in the top 25 percent on the test, a four-year
tuition-free scholarship to a Massachusetts institution of higher learning.
      MS. WASHBURN: But what about the role of the federal government?
      MR. ROMNEY: And the federal government insists on those tests and those standards, and it's key, and let me
continue. I think we also have to have higher pay for better teachers. And people who are not good teachers ought to
find a different career.
      And finally we need more parental involvement. And we've tested our kids in Massachusetts, along with all the
other kids in the nation. 50 states get tested every two years in English and math, in 4th and 8th grade. My 8th graders
came out number one in English. They came out number one in math. My 4th graders: number one in English, number
one in math.
     First time in history: one state, number one in all four measures. School choice, better pay for better teachers, high
standards, scholarships for the best kids, English immersion: These principles work.
      MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee.
     MR. HUCKABEE: First of all, the whole role of education is a state issue. It's not really a federal issue. And the
worst thing that we can do is to shift more burden, more responsibility, more authority to the federal government when
more of it needs to go to the states.
       But I think the federal government can play a pivotal role in -- primarily in helping to make sure that the best prac-
tices that are working in the states are shared with states who are struggling. Let me give you a couple of examples of
what has to happen in all the states, and the federal government can at least share the data and the information.
     One, personalize the learning for the student. We have 6,000 kids every day drop out in this country. They don't
drop out because they're dumb; they drop out because they're bored to death. They're in a 19th-century education system
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


in a 21st-century world. If we really are serious, then first of all we make sure that we build a curriculum around their
interests rather than just push them into something they don't care.
     Second thing, unleash weapons of mass instruction. I'm a passionate, ardent supporter of having music and art in
every school for every student at every grade level -- (applause) --
     MS. WASHBURN: Time.
      MR. HUCKABEE: -- because -- let me just make sure you understand why -- it's not frivolous. It's because if we
don't develop the right side of the brain with the same level of attention as we do the left, which is the logical side, we
end up with an unbalanced, bored student, which is exactly what we've done, and we're dropping students out of our
system because of it.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Paul, what's the biggest obstacle standing in the way of improving education?
     MR. KEYES: (Off mike.) Do I have to raise my hand to get a question? I'd like to address that question.
     MS. WASHBURN: I'm getting to you.
        MR. KEYES: I would like -- no, you're not. You haven't since several go-arounds so I have to make an issue out
of it. I would like to address the question of education.
     MS. WASHBURN: Go ahead.
     MR. KEYES: I don't wish it to --
     MS. WASHBURN: Go ahead. You have 30 seconds.
     MR. KEYES: They had a minute. Why do I get 30 seconds? (Laughter.) See your unfairness is now becoming so
apparent that the voters in Iowa must understand there's a reason for it, and the reason for it is what I'm about to say.
      Governor Huckabee just addressed the question of education. He has stood before values voters and moral con-
servative claiming that he is their spokesman. You know the major problem in American education today? We allowed
the judges to drive God out of our schools. We allowed the moral foundation of this republic, which is that we are creat-
ed equal and endowed by our Creator, not by our Constitution or our leaders with our rights. If we don't teach our chil-
dren that heritage and the moral culture that goes along with it, we cannot remain free. They will not be disciplined to
learn science, to learn math, to learn history, to learn anything, and they don't want to talk about this except when
they're squabbling about their own personal faith and forgetting that we have a national creed. And that national creed
needs to be taught to our children so that whether they are scientists or businessmen or lawyers, they will stand on the
solid ground of a moral education that gives them the discipline they need to serve the right, to exercise their freedom
with dignity, and to defend the justice because they understand it is our heritage.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Paul, what's the biggest obstacle standing in the way of improving education in
the United States, and how would you address it?
      REP. PAUL: Probably the federal government. We've been involved at the federal level for our 50 years. We've
had a Department of Education. It used to be the policy of the Republican Party to get rid of the Department of Educa-
tion.
     We finally get in charge and a chance to do something, so we doubled the size of the Department of Education and
we have No Child Left Behind. The teachers don't like it, the students don't like it, and the quality of education hasn't
gone up; the cost of education has gone up.
      So we need to look to our local resources, we need to release the creative energy of the teachers at the local level.
But we can do immediately is to give tax credits -- I have a bill that would give tax credits to the teachers to raise their
salaries. At the same time, we should encourage homeschooling and private schooling and let the individuals write that
off. The parents have to get control of the education. It used to be parents had control of education through local school
boards. Today it's the judicial system and the executive branch of government, the bureaucracy, that controls things, and
it would be predictable that the quality would go down. The money goes to the bureaucrats and not to the educational
system at home.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     Senator Thompson, how would you answer that?
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      MR. THOMPSON: The question was what's the biggest impediment to education?
      MS. WASHBURN: What is the biggest obstacle standing in the way, and how would you address it?
      MR. THOMPSON: The biggest obstacle, in my opinion, is the National Education Association, the NEA. I read
time and time again -- every time someone wants to inject a little choice into the equation for the benefit of the kids,
inject a little freedom, inject a little competition because we're not exactly doing that well because of the things that you
pointed out earlier, the NEA is there to oppose it, and bring in millions and millions of dollars to go on television and
work and scare people and misrepresent the situation on the ground.
      I think that that just goes against everything that we know, that can make progress in this country.
     We're a nation of freedom and innovation and choice, and well-to- do people are out in the suburbs. They don't
seem to care that much. Inner city people need a chance to enjoy the choice that the mayor's talking about for colleges
and universities.
      Other people have choice too. If they're wealthy enough to move into a neighborhood because they want their kid
to go to school there, that's choice too. Let's give it to everybody else and let's stop people from standing in the way of
that.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      Congressman Tancredo, what's your take on all that?
      REP. TANCREDO: Yeah, the -- I had the opportunity to serve under Ronald Reagan as the regional director for
the U.S. Department of Education. Our task was to try to narrow it down, because we knew we couldn't legislatively get
rid of it although we wanted to. And so I went -- in my region, we went from about 222 people. It took us about four or
five years to get down to about 60 people.
      I used to always say, we've gotten rid of 80 percent of the people in this department; has anybody been able to tell
the difference? And you know what? Not a single soul said they had.
       And something else: If we had gone to 0, you'd never know the difference. That's because we don't need the de-
partment. It's an encumbrance on our attempt to actually teach children in this country, as is the federal government and
its intervention and its rules.
      But you can't, I don't think, Governor, with all due respect, you can't say on one hand, you're against having gov-
ernment intervention and on the other hand, tell us that you want music and art and everything else in the school. That's
not the job of a president. It is the job of a governor. That's what you should run for if you want to dictate curriculum.
(Applause.)
      MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee, would you like a rebuttal? You have 30 seconds.
     MR. HUCKABEE: Well, I made very clear to the congressman that what I suggested was that the federal gov-
ernment become the clearinghouse. It chose the best ideas. I was a governor 10-and-a- half years.
      I had executive experience longer than anyone on this stage running a government. And I had also the most, I
think, impressive education record. And you know what? I looked for what other states were doing that worked. I was
looking for all the ideas. We raised standards, we measured, and we held people accountable for the results.
    Any time you give governors the opportunity to know what will work, they'll use it, because it means jobs, it
means economic development. That's exactly the only role.
      But if anyone doubts that the president ought not to use the bully pulpit to encourage the best practices, I would
say the secondmost job of importance to the president, second to being commander in chief, is to be the communicator
in chief.
     And we're losing a lot of kids in this country. A third don't graduate. For a president to say, ''That's none of my
business,'' is recklessly irresponsible. A president needs to say it's unacceptable that that many kids leave our schools
every single day.
      MS. WASHBURN: Okay. Governor Romney.
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      MR. ROMNEY: Just one small adjustment to what Governor Huckabee had to say. And I don't believe you had
the finest record of any governor in America on education. (Laughter.) And -- because there's another one on the stand
who -- who -- whose kids outperform me. The -- the kids in our state, as I indicated, scored number one in all four
measures on the national exams, and they did that because of Republican principles, free market principles, applied --
and there was a partnership.
       You see, education is not just the teachers' union. I agree with -- with Senator Thompson on that. Boy, they've
been the biggest obstacle to change in education and -- and choice. It's not just that the -- one side of this; it's teachers,
it's parents, it's the state, it's the federal government, it's all levels coming together and working together for the benefit
of our kids.
     And we face right now an education challenge that's really unusual. We're behind. America's behind in education.
Our kids score in the bottom 10 or 25 percent in exams around the world among major industrial nations.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. ROMNEY: And we've got to have the kind of change that requires all of us working together, not just poking
and saying it's someone else's job.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      In light of the big needs and the financial realities we've just discussed up to this point, realistically, what do you
believe you could accomplish in your first year as president?
      We're going to go down the line, starting with Mr. Giuliani. And so that everyone gets a chance to talk, I need you
to keep your remarks to 30 seconds.
       MR. GIULIANI: We can make sure that the country is secure against Islamic terrorism and on the road to winning
the war against Islamic terrorists. We could end illegal immigration by beginning a border stat system. It might take two
or three years, but we could begin it. We could do a major tax reduction, the ones that I indicated earlier, to stimulate
the economy. I would immediately begin to reduce the size of the federal government the way I did when I was mayor
of New York. And I would move toward energy independence as a goal similar to putting a man on the moon, the Man-
hattan Project. You can use a lot of ways to describe the imperative nature of it, but I would make sure that we accom-
plish energy independence. We would do things that we hadn't done before and that we previously thought were impos-
sible. And you need bold leadership to accomplish that, and I think I can do that.
      MS. WASHBURN: Congressman.
     REP. HUNTER: First, you got to strengthen the U.S. military. You know, we have to look at the horizon past Iraq
and Afghanistan and see the emergence of a North Korea with nuclear capability, Iran proceeding on that path despite
what the NIE says, and also the emergence of communist China as a new superpower stepping in the shoes of the Soviet
Union.
      So strengthening the military and meeting those horizon threats, and also strengthening our border, enforcing the
U.S. border -- that means building the border fence and making sure that we know who is coming into this country,
what they're bringing with them -- lastly, bringing back the industrial base of the United States that right now is frag-
menting and being sent off to China and to other places around the world, which also is a security threat; bringing back
high-paying manufacturing jobs to this country that will serve this next generation well.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you. That's a tall order for a year.
      Congressman Paul, what about you?
      REP. PAUL: Well, there's a limit of what you can do in one year, and at home it's more difficult. You would have
to work with the Congress, but a commander in chief could end the war. We could bring our troops home. That would
be a major event; it would be very valuable. We could be diplomatically -- we could become diplomatically credible
once again around the world. Right now, today, we're not. Even our allies resent what we do.
     We wouldn't have no more preemptive war. We would threaten nobody. We would not threaten Iran. Now it is
proven once again Iraq didn't have the nuclear weapon, had nothing to do with 9/11. The Iranians have no nuclear
weapon, according to our CIA. There's no need for us to threaten the Iranians. We could immediately turn the Navy
around and bring them home, and I think this would be a major step toward peace.
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you. Thank you.
      Congressman?
      REP. TANCREDO: The first five minutes after taking office I would free Ramos and Compean, and that's for
sure. Then the second thing I would do is to make sure that we begin the process of securing those borders and enforc-
ing the law inside the United States against hiring people who are here illegally. Then I would use that bully pulpit that
the governor talked about and is absolutely accurate in terms of the importance of it for a president of the United States
for this reason, to explain that it is in fact a war -- a war is not going on in Iraq; that's a battle. We are fighting a war
against radical Islam.
      It is a threat to our existence as a nation. It's a threat to Western civilization. It will take someone who's willing to
say that --
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      REP. TANCREDO: -- and lead Western civilization in this clash.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      Senator Thompson, your first year.
       MR. THOMPSON: Well, it wouldn't take me a year. I'd go before the American people and tell them the truth and
try to establish my credibility, and tell them that we haven't come to terms yet with the nature of the threat that we're
facing or what we're going to have to do to defend ourselves over the years.
      I'd tell them that if they didn't already know it, we're bankrupting the next generation and nobody even wants to
talk about it, much less do anything about it. I'd tell them that judges are setting our social policy now in this country
and that's going to stop. And then I'd bring in members of Congress and say, look, I just got a mandate. We can work
and cooperate together or I'll go over your head to the American people.
      MS. WASHBURN: Governor Romney?
       MR. ROMNEY: I want to do more than talk in my first year. There are a lot of things I want to get done. First of
all, I want to establish a strategy to help us overwhelm global jihad and keep the world safe. I want to end illegal immi-
gration. We can get that done. I want to end the growth -- the expansion growth of entitlements, rein them in. I want to
end the extraordinary growth in federal spending and I want to keep our tax burden down and reduce our tax burden on
middle-income families.
       I want to get us on a track to become energy-independent. I want to get our schools on a track so they can become
competitive globally, and I want to get health insurance for every citizen in America. It's going to take four years for
that to happen, but I'll get us on track in that. We'll have a stronger military, a stronger economy and stronger values,
with stronger families, after my first year in office.
      MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee.
      MR. HUCKABEE: Well, I like the laundry list that everybody's had, and I would agree that every one of those
things is important. Reality is, none of that's going to happen till we bring this country back together.
      I think the first priority of the next president is to be a president of all the United States. We are, right now, a very
polarized country, and that polarized country has led to a paralyzed government. We've got Democrats who fight Re-
publicans, liberals fighting conservatives. The left fights the right.
      Who's fighting for this country again? And somehow, we've got to quit even fighting among ourselves as con-
servatives and as Republicans, and start putting the better interest of our nation. If that doesn't happen, we'll get none of
these things done. We've got to be the united people of the United States, and a president has got to somehow remind us
that we are a great, resilient nation that has to stick together to solve all of these problems.
      MS. WASHBURN: Senator McCain.
      SEN. MCCAIN: Our first obligation, and my qualifications lend to making America safe. We must make America
safe. This is a military, diplomatic, intelligence and cyberspace challenge. And I have the credentials and the knowledge
and the background and the judgment to do that.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      The second most important thing, if we're going to complete that laundry list, is restore trust and confidence in
government. There is none today. We have to fix Medicare. We have to stop this wasteful pork-barrel spending that has
led to corruption in Washington.
      Of course we have to fix our borders. We have to sit down together and fix Medicare and Social Security. But I
can lead. I can inspire confidence and restore trust and confidence in their government again. That's the key to any suc-
cess we want to achieve.
     MS. WASHBURN: Ambassador.
      MR. KEYES: Well, what I would concentrate on is restoring the sovereignty of the people of this country. I would
restore their moral sovereignty, which is something I think I can do very simply as president by declaring that no action
taken by the executive branch would support, aid or abet anyone who is destroying the constitutional rights of those
who are in the womb. I would sign an executive order to that effect day one, and we would reestablish this government's
commitment to the constitutional rights of our posterity. These folks talk about our posterity, but you can't really respect
them if you're killing them in the womb. It doesn't make any sense.
      And I would also want to abolish the income tax. And you say, well, it can't be done in a day. We need to start
talking about it and talking about actually implementing the fair tax proposal that will end the wasteful spending by
putting them under the discipline of a people who can actually withhold their taxes by changing their patterns of spend-
ing.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. KEYES: And finally, I would establish a national border guard. I would seal the borders of the United States
so that only those would cross our borders who are subject to our laws and the terms of those laws.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     MR. KEYES: And I would encourage, through this national border guard, a real respect for the security that must
be maintained along that border if we're serious about the war on terror.
     MS. WASHBURN: We're going to move to the last three candidate statements. Governor Romney has 30 se-
conds, followed by Mr. Keyes and finally Mayor Giuliani.
      MR. ROMNEY: I want to begin by saying thank you to the people of Iowa. Over the last year my wife and I have
visited many, many homes, many places, over 70 town meetings, 67 counties. Josh, my son, has visited all 99 counties.
People here have warm hearts. They've welcomed us, and it's something that's made me feel very good about America.
Anybody who's worried about the future of this great land just needs to come to Iowa, meet the people with the kind of
heartland values that you have here.
     People here also recognize we face real challenges, and they want somebody who will strengthen America. I know
how to keep America strong. I know a lot about the economy. I'll make sure we keep good jobs.
      I learned a lot about education and health care. I'll improve our schools, get our health care system working for all
Americans. And I'll make sure that we have the kind of values that we can be proud of that are so essential to the great
strength of this nation.
     And finally, I want to say to the people of Iowa: I need your help. I'd like your vote. I want you to get -- get out
and participate in that caucus.
     Thank you.
     MS. WASHBURN: Mr. Keyes?
      MR. KEYES: I think that the critical thing here is what you need to do. If you really want to see a change in gov-
ernment, then we need to restore the credibility of the Republican Party, a credibility that has been destroyed by the
betrayal of promises to keep government limited that resulted in outrageously high budget deficits at a historic level in
this country; the betrayal along the border, with the president telling us that he suddenly discovered we didn't have a
secure border six years into his term.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      And if you want to accomplish that, join the political army of America's Revival at AlanKeyes.com, and make
sure you become part of that change. We're not going to restore self-government until you become an active people not
willing to take the inadequate choices you have, but lifting up the choice that this country needs.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you. Thank you.
      Mayor Giuliani?
     MR. GIULIANI: I've been tested by having to provide leadership through crisis, through difficult crises, not just
September 11 but in my time as United States attorney, associate attorney general, mayor of New York City.
      And America needs bold leadership. We have big problems. We have problems that we haven't faced in the past
and solve; problems about how to deal with terrorism effectively, problems about our border, problems about our eco-
nomic security that we've talked about. And to do that, we need bold leadership, we need the kind of ideas that I've put
forward in the 12 commitments to the American people, but most importantly, we need an optimistic leader who can
bring us these kinds of solutions.
      I've gotten results in the past. I would like the opportunity to do that for my country.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     We're going to shift gears a bit. Voters have told us that character and leadership qualities matter as much or more
than many issues. Over the past few months, we asked candidates who have spent time in Iowa about some of their core
values, and we videotaped the answers. Since we're pitching websites, you can see all the insights videos at
desmoinesregister.com, but today we're going to see a few of them and then expand the conversation.
      Let's watch the first one.
      (From videotape.)
       MR. GIULIANI: And I would do this as president. When I was mayor of New York, I would go get people's opin-
ions. I'd go walk the street, sit down at a restaurant and I'd ask people what they think, and I'd go on radio, have them do
a call-in show. I did 96 town hall meetings. It was all for the purpose of hearing what people had to say because maybe,
even with multiple sources of advice within government, maybe if you don't hear from the people every once and
awhile, you get wrong perspectives.
     REP. HUNTER: Legislation is a function of compromise, and when you put together a budget -- for example, a
budget to increase Defense spending and that budget which increases Defense spending may have also pork barrel pro-
grams that you don't like, and you promised your constituents you'll fight against pork barrel programs -- in the end, if
you vote for the budget of the United States, you vote for a lot of things.
       REP. PAUL: The Internet is delightful. It is just delightful for finding the information, and if there's a question
that I need asked, you can find it.
     So I spend a lot of time getting information that was -- at one time in my life was very difficult to find. There
should be no excuse in this country anymore for not finding correct answers and analyzing the problems that we face,
because the correct answers are out there and judgments should be made to the best of one's ability.
      (End videotape.)
      MS. WASHBURN: So this next set of questions is entirely about character and leadership.
      Mayor Giuliani, your administration in New York has been accused of handling your security expenses in a way
that obscured public disclosure. What specifically will you promise to do to ensure that a Giuliani White House is open
with information that might be inconvenient to explain to the public?
      MR. GIULIANI: The reality is that all that information --
      MS. WASHBURN: Thirty seconds, please.
      MR. GIULIANI: The reality is that all that information was available and known to people, known six years ago.
And I would make sure that government was transparent. My government in New York City was so transparent that
they knew every single thing I did almost every time I did it. (Chuckles.) So I would be extremely -- (laughter) -- I
would be extremely open.
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      I'm used to it. I'm used to being analyzed. I haven't had a perfect life. I wish I had. And I do the best that I can to
learn from my mistakes. But as far as, you know, open, transparent government, I think I've had both an open, transpar-
ent government and an open, transparent life, and it allows you to lead, then, with honesty and truth.
      MS. WASHBURN: So are there things you could have done in this situation that would have been more open and
not raise these concerns about obscuring public --
      MR. GIULIANI: No. the reality is that this was a bookkeeping practice.
       The way it was done actually made it more available to Freedom of Information Act requests. Had it been done
just in the police department, nobody would have ever found it. And everything that was laid out a few weeks ago had
been laid out six years ago, very well known. Some of the things that I wish, if I had lead a perfect life, would had hap-
pened differently, but it was all very well known.
      And on the issue of transparency, I can't think of a public figure that's had a more transparent life than I've had.
      MS. WASHBURN: Mr. Keyes, how would you guarantee an open White House?
       MR. KEYES: I think the most important thing is to be absolutely authentic about who you are, not to say things
today that contradict what you were two years ago, like, sadly, Governor Romney. Not to take a stand on the most im-
portant principle that faces our nation today, the question of whether we are all created equal and endowed by our crea-
tor -- not the Constitution, but our God -- with our unalienable rights from the womb to the tomb, and not to abandon
the heritage of the Republican Party as Rudy Giuliani would do and as I could not follow him in doing, so I would not
support him if he were nominated.
     And finally, I think it would be important to do what I'm doing in my campaign. We have three phone calls every
week. People from all over the country gather online to talk to me, to interact --
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. KEYES: -- state their views. We have technologies now that allow people directly to communicate to their
leadership --
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. KEYES: -- and I would make creative use of those technologies.
      MS. WASHBURN: Governor Romney, would you like to respond?
      MR. ROMNEY: I'm not sure. (Laughs, laughter.)
      MS. WASHBURN: It's entirely up to you. (Laughter, applause.)
      MR. ROMNEY: This audience and the whole nation has heard time and time again the fact that I was effectively
pro-choice when I ran for office. When I became governor of Massachusetts, the first time a bill came to my life that
dealt with life, I simply could not side with -- with taking a life, and I came on the side of life. Every bill that came to
my desk, every issue that related to protecting the sanctity of life, I came down on the side of life. I'm pro-life. I'm not
going to apologize for becoming pro-life. Ronald Reagan followed the same course, as did Henry Hyde and George
Herbert Walker Bush. And I'm proud to be pro-life.
      Thank you.
      MS. WASHBURN: Mayor Giuliani, would you like to respond?
      MR. GIULIANI: I think I've explained my position on abortion, which is that I oppose it, but I believe that ulti-
mately the government should leave that decision to a woman and her conscience. I would like to see limitations on
abortion. I brought those about in New York City. We reduced abortions. We increased adoptions by 135 percent. But
ultimately, it's a position that I thought out a long time ago. For me it's a position on conscience, and it's a position that,
in spite of the fact that Alan wouldn't vote for me, I'm not going to change. (Laughter.)
      MS. WASHBURN: Senator Thompson -- (applause) -- Senator Thompson, you've expressed doubts that the re-
cent report on Iran's nuclear capabilities is accurate. As president, how would you decide when to disagree with availa-
ble intelligence, and then what would you do?
      MR. THOMPSON: Well, that's probably the most important question that's been asked today.
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


       We have a real problem with our intelligence community. It, along with certain parts of our military, were ne-
glected for a long, long time in this country, and we're paying the price for it now. The fact is that nobody has any real
confidence in the result that they're getting. The result you're talking about was directly contradicted by their strong be-
liefs just two years ago. So you've got to rebuild from the bottom up.
      I think that, in the meantime, we have to rely on other people. The British are helpful to us. The Israelis sometimes
are helpful to us.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. THOMPSON: In many respects, they have advancements that we don't have in terms of our intelligence ca-
pabilities. But the president cannot let --
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. THOMPSON: -- a piece of paper by a bureaucrat determine -- solely determine what his actions must be.
      MS. WASHBURN: Okay, thank you.
      We're going to have to move on. Let's watch the next videos.
       MR. HUCKABEE: (From videotape.) If a person says, I'm a person of faith, but I don't let it influence me and I
don't talk about it, what they just told me is that their faith is so immaterial, insignificant and inconsequential that it real-
ly isn't a faith at all.
      If it's a faith, it will drive their judgment, it will drive their value system, and therefore, it'll help define them. It's
ludicrous to say that I have faith, but it doesn't impact me at all.
      SEN. MCCAIN: (From videotape.) I think the hardest thing in this age of struggle against radical Islamic extrem-
ism is balancing the rights of everyone's privacy plus our ability to combat this great evil of radical Islamic extremism,
and that's why I think that there has to be the participation of the courts, the legislature, the executive branch and the
American people to what measures we take.
       MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee, you are distinguishing yourself from other candidates by focusing on
faith. You say your faith doesn't just influence you, that it defines you. A person who chooses you for president, then,
would expect that to translate to public policy. So give me two examples you've not previously given -- one in health
care and one in education -- where your faith would define change you want to see in policy.
      MR. HUCKABEE: The two overriding principles are you treat others as you wish to be treated. As it relates in
health care, that means that we recognize that a person who is sick shouldn't be treated differently because they're in
poverty than a person who has extraordinary wealth; that we have some sense of balance in how we approach that.
That's the essence of what America is about.
      The second basic principle is that inasmuch as you've done it to the least of these, my brethren, you've done it unto
me. As it relates to both health, education or any policy, what it really means is that you go back to what the Founding
Fathers said, all of us are created equal, endowed by our Creator with those rights -- life, liberty and the pursuit of hap-
piness.
      MS. WASHBURN: But two specific changes in policy.
      MR. HUCKABEE: Well, I think I just tried to give them to you, both in education -- that everyone has an oppor-
tunity -- you give education and health care, that you don't have some that are more equal than others.
      So there has to be a sense in which you have opportunity, whether it's through choice in charter schools, in the ed-
ucation field, you have a curriculum that touches every child, not just a few; and in health care you don't have a health
care system, like Congress has, that is incredibly almost platinum, but there are a lot of Americans who can't even go to
the doctor and find out if they're critically ill --
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. HUCKABEE: -- or if they have (a terminal disease ?).
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
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                  Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


      Governor Romney, as you look at the most pressing problems facing our country and the best opportunities to ef-
fect change in the next four years, do you think it's more important for the next president to be a fiscal conservative or a
social conservative?
      MR. ROMNEY: I think it's incredibly important that he be a conservative. And I'm going to build on the same
foundation Ronald Reagan built. We're not going to get the White House nor strengthen America unless we can pull
together the coalition of conservatives and conservative thought that has made us successful as a party. And that's social
conservatives, it's also economic conservatives, and foreign policy and defense conservatives. Those three together form
the three legs of the Republican stool that allowed Ronald Reagan to get elected and allowed our party to have strength
over the last several decades.
      And I'm going to continue to draw, as many of the states try and do, upon those strengths and to build America by
virtue of those conservative principles.
      MS. WASHBURN: Okay.
      MR. ROMNEY: Whether in health care, education, defense, spending, entitlement reform, you name it, conserva-
tive principles work.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      MR. ROMNEY: They've been tested time and again, and they'll keep working.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      Congressman Hunter, same question.
      REP. HUNTER: Repeat the question. I was lost in Governor Romney's explanation.
      MS. WASHBURN: Do you think it --
      REP. HUNTER: I thought it was quite good, though. (Laughter.)
     MS. WASHBURN: Do you think it's more important for the next president to be a fiscal conservative or a social
conservative?
      REP. HUNTER: I think -- I think they both go to the core of this country, because you have to keep the economy
running, you've got to keep the wheels turning, and of course the -- the heart of our country is -- is this idea that -- that --
that human beings have value, that they are given these inalienable rights that have been described by my friend. So
those are two very important things.
       But one thing that's extremely important that Governor Romney didn't touch on is this: we also, in being conserva-
tive, having a conservative leader -- part of that means not sending technology to our adversaries. And that's going to be
the big threat of this next 15, 20 years.
      Governor Romney's corporation that he founded, the Bain Capital Corporation --
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      REP. HUNTER: -- has joined up with a -- with a Chinese corporation to -- to buy an American defense contractor.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     REP. HUNTER: I think that is a mistake, and that's a defense contractor that did business with Saddam Hussein
and with the Taliban.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you, Congressman.
      REP. HUNTER: So that, I think, is a very important part of conservative leadership.
      MS. WASHBURN: Thank you, Congressman.
      REP. HUNTER: And thank you.
      MS. WASHBURN: We're going to look at the last video.
      MR. : Okay.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


       MR. ROMNEY: (From videotape.) I think we're better off by strictly following the Constitution as it existed and it
was brought forward, and if we think there's a need for a new right, then going to the people or their elected representa-
tives to establish that right, rather than having judges from their own heart or their own mind establishing new rights
and new laws. It's not for judges to legislate or to create a new Constitution. That's something that only the people and
their elected representatives should be able to do.
       REP. TANCREDO: (From videotape.) There are two sides to your human component, you know. One is the God-
filled side. One is the human side. And there are things that feed either side, you know? And whichever you feed the
most becomes the dominant side. And so you have to kind of concentrate on feeding the good side, or else you will lose
control over it.
       MR. THOMPSON: (From videotape.) The least we can do is look at our social policies, and not just be concerned
about the consuming of what's before us in the short view but what's best for the overall country, what's best for the
future generations of this nation. And are we going to leave this place a better place than when we came into it? To me,
that's real patriotism.
      MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Tancredo, your foreign policy positions, on your campaign website, consist of
five sentences on Iraq. What assures Americans you're ready to lead our foreign policy?
      REP. TANCREDO: Because the issue, of course, as I mentioned earlier, it's just a battle going on in Iraq. The ma-
jor battle is, of course, this clash of civilizations. I believe that the whole idea and the whole debate can be narrowed to
a relatively small area, on my website or anyplace else, and that is this.
     We cannot leave Iraq.
      We are committed there and will be for a long time, and that doesn't -- I don't care who's elected president. That's
the reality of the situation.
      We can, however, stop, in fact, being the police force in Iraq. We are doing it; we are moving in exactly the direc-
tion that my website, the statement, anticipates.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     REP. TANCREDO: What more do I have to say? We're getting it done.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      Congressman Paul, your -- you call your campaign a revolution, and I think it's safe to say that your brand of
change is one of the most sweeping proposed by any candidate of either party. But getting your agenda through Con-
gress would likely require a revolution of an entirely different sort.
     So how would you adjust your plan in light of political reality in Washington?
      REP. PAUL: Well, the secret is is the term ''revolution'' wasn't my word, and it didn't come up on our web page. It
was coined by the supporters. But in a way, it is revolutionary to go back to the Constitution, and we'd like to continue
the old revolution. And believe me, freedom is unifying; we bring a lot of people together. People then are free to
choose what they would like to do with their lives, free to choose how they would spend their money, and all of a sud-
den, we would be telling other countries how to live.
      MS. WASHBURN: So getting through Congress -- REP. PAUL: This brings people together. And I think it's ap-
pealing to both left and right and middle, and our campaign really has that appeal. So therefore, we would bring the
Congress together.
     MS. WASHBURN: Okay. Thank you.
      Senator McCain, your reputation as a maverick has put you at odds with your own party leadership from time to
time. Give us an example of a time you wished you had compromised to get something done instead of holding firm on
your ideals.
      SEN. MCCAIN: I cannot think of a time, and I hope that I could never think of a time, because I came to Wash-
ington because I had a set of principles and ideals. But at the same time, I have more legislative achievements than any-
body on this -- on this stage by far.
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                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


     I have joined together across the aisle on a number of pieces of legislation, many of them very important. I'm
proud of my legislative record, of conserving my ideals and my conservative principles and getting things done in
Washington. And I am proud of that and I will continue to hold to those ideals, but I will reach across the aisle to the
Democrats, who --
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     SEN. MCCAIN: -- I have worked with, who know me, and we know we can work together for the good of this
country.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
      We're going to talk about New Year's resolutions. You have 15 seconds. We're going to start with Mr. Keyes and
go this way. Please suggest a New Year's resolution for one of your opponents here today. (Laughter.)
      MR. KEYES: I think the most important New Year's resolution is the one I suggest to the American people: Re-
solve to return to your respect for the principle that makes us free, that we are all created equal and endowed by God
with our unalienable rights.
     MS. WASHBURN: Fifteen seconds, please. Senator McCain?
      SEN. MCCAIN: Let's raise the level of dialogue and discussion and debate in this campaign. Let's not accuse each
other of a lack of patriotism or a lack of character. There are differing views on differing issues. There are difference in
qualifications. There are difference in experience.
     MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee?
     SEN. MCCAIN: But I think we should all be respectful of one another, and the American people, I think, will
benefit from it.
     MS. WASHBURN: Governor Huckabee?
      MR. HUCKABEE: I'm going to be a lot more careful about everything I say, because I find that it gets amplified
to a new level. So that's my resolution.
     MS. WASHBURN: (Inaudible) -- resolution for an opponent.
     MR. HUCKABEE: Well, I would make it of them, too. (Laughter, applause.)
     MS. WASHBURN: Governor Romney.
      MR. ROMNEY: Let's have a resolution amongst all of us that we'll have a spirited campaign, as we have, but
we'll come together, come together real soon when this is resolved, and we will fight to make sure that one of the people
on this stage is the next president of the United States -- not one of the people on that Democratic stage you've had more
than once.
     MS. WASHBURN: Senator Thompson.
      MR. THOMPSON: Yeah, well, it would be for myself, to try to be a better man, be strong, have faith, try to be a
better husband and father.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman.
      REP. TANCREDO: All sounds good, but you asked what we would do, what somebody else, we think, should do
in terms of a resolution.
      I have to say it, because you're leading the pack now, and congratulations to you, Governor. But I have to ask you,
no, no, no, pointing right over there, right over there. (Laughter.)
     MS. WASHBURN: Okay.
     REP. TANCREDO: No, just a minute, you know, laughter does not count.
     MS. WASHBURN: Okay, I've got to --
     REP. TANCREDO: I have to ask you a question.
                                                                                                                  Page 169
                 Republican Presidential Debate The New York Times December 12, 2007 Wednesday


     MS. WASHBURN: I have to keep moving.
     REP. TANCREDO: And the question is, how are you going to convince America that you in fact changed your
mind, on the issue of immigration, from when you were a governor? That's all I want to know.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Paul.
     REP. PAUL: My advice would be to reread the oath of office, take it seriously, obey the constitution. We can --
we are well defended against all enemies foreign. We should be much more careful about defending against the enemies
domestic.
     MS. WASHBURN: Congressman Hunter.
      REP. HUNTER: Yeah, to all my colleagues and, I think, to the American people, we've got lots of folks coming
back from the Afghan and Iraqi theaters, lots of young people who need jobs. One thing we could do here, just a couple
of weeks before Christmas, is buy American goods. And if we buy American goods, we may save the job of our neigh-
bor or provide a job for that young serviceperson.
      MR. GIULIANI: I would resolve to -- all of us to take a better look at America and realize how lucky we are, how
fortunate we are, not to have this kind of pessimistic feeling that some have abroad in this land. America has accom-
plished great things. We've faced crises like this before.
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     MR. GIULIANI: We've always overcome them. A sense of optimism --
     MS. WASHBURN: Thank you.
     MR. GIULIANI: -- is the thing I would wish for.
     MS. WASHBURN: And we're out -- and we're out of time.
     You can find out more about this debate at pbs.org and at DesMoinesRegister.com. And tomorrow at 1:00 we'll
have our debate with the Democratic presidential candidates.
      I want to thank all of the candidates for being here today, as well as our broadcast partner, Iowa Public Television,
our studio audience, and everyone at home and at work. Happy holidays, everyone. (Applause.)

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: US PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES 2008 (96%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (90%); POLITICAL DE-
BATES (90%); US REPUBLICAN PARTY (90%); NATIONAL SECURITY (89%); PUBLIC POLICY (89%); PUB-
LIC FINANCE (88%); TAXES & TAXATION (86%); ECONOMIC POLICY (85%); ECONOMIC NEWS (85%);
POLITICAL CANDIDATES (79%); US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS (79%); GOVERNMENT CONTROLLERS &
AUDITORS (75%); US FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (74%); ESTATE TAX (71%); BANKING & FINANCE (71%);
TAX RELIEF (70%); MONETARY POLICY (60%)

PERSON: RUDY GIULIANI (95%); RON PAUL (91%); DUNCAN HUNTER (91%); MICHAEL HUCKABEE
(91%); JOHN MCCAIN (91%); MITT ROMNEY (91%); FRED THOMPSON (58%); THOMAS G TANCREDO
(91%); MICHAEL MCMAHON (94%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (91%) ARKANSAS, USA (92%); IOWA, USA (92%);
MASSACHUSETTS, USA (92%); NEW YORK, USA (91%) UNITED STATES (92%)

LOAD-DATE: December 13, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Text

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper
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                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                63 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                               December 11, 2007 Tuesday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Following a Mosaic Path to Chart a Neighborhood's History
BYLINE: By COLIN MOYNIHAN

SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; EAST VILLAGE JOURNAL; Pg. 6

LENGTH: 800 words

     When Jim Power created his first mosaic on a lamppost on Astor Pace in 1987, a concrete band shell still stood in-
side Tompkins Square Park, admission to the CBGB club cost $5, and about the same amount could buy a night's lodg-
ing in the Bowery.
      Plenty in the East Village has changed in 20 years, and, some say, that is one good reason the dozens of pieces of
public art created in the neighborhood by Mr. Power ought to be preserved.
    ''The mosaics have became landmarks,'' said Clayton Patterson, a photographer who has documented the area in
Manhattan for 25 years. ''They're some of the only things left that give a feeling of familiarity to the neighborhood.''
       In the late 1980s, Mr. Power decided to create 80 mosaics that would mark the neighborhood's boundaries and
some significant sites within its borders. The mosaic trail, as Mr. Power refers to the project, has proceeded in fits and
starts as the artist's fortunes have ebbed and flowed.
       Now a group of local residents have started an effort to call attention to Mr. Power's work and help finish the pro-
ject. Close to 70 mosaics have been created over the years using bits of glass, tile and ceramic. But some of them have
been destroyed or are in need of restoration. ''I wanted to define the neighborhood as an art colony,'' Mr. Power, 60, said
on a recent afternoon after a stroll along Avenue A, where he pointed to some of his creations. ''I want to take the anxie-
ty out of the world with beauty.''
      Many of the mosaics in the trail commemorate events or groups of people. There are mosaics that refer to the his-
tory of the Great Hall at Cooper Union and the city's blackout in 2003. Others honor the police, firefighters, ambulance
paramedics, sanitation workers and war veterans. One mosaic on East Sixth Street, near the former site of the Fillmore
East, was inspired by the renowned rock 'n' roll club. Names of musicians who performed there are spelled out on the
pole, and one of the pieces that makes up the mosaic is a fragment from a guitar smashed by the Who's Pete Towns-
hend, Mr. Power said.
      Throughout most of his 20 years of living in the East Village, Mr. Power found ways to survive on little money,
sleeping on couches and living in basements. For a while he squatted in an abandoned tenement on St. Marks Place.
After that he camped on the streets. His health declined, and so did his mosaic efforts.
       But recently, Mr. Power moved into a small apartment by himself in East Williamsburg, Brooklyn, using money
he earned from selling the domain name for a Web site he had developed called eastvillage.com. With that bit of sta-
bility, Mr. Power turned his attention again to completing the project he began long ago.
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    Following a Mosaic Path to Chart a Neighborhood's History The New York Times December 11, 2007 Tuesday


     Last fall, Bob Holman, a poet and the founder of the Bowery Poetry Club, invited Mr. Power to visit a class he
teaches at New York University. Afterward, a group of students made a map showing the site of several mosaics, and
in November, a walking tour of them was organized.
      The students also made a Web site, empowerjimpower.com, which urges viewers to support Mr. Power's project
with donations and asks that the city officially recognize the mosaic trail.
       ''His work exists for free for everyone,'' Mr. Holman said. ''It makes New York a city of neighborhoods and not
just a city of consumers and advertisers.''
      Mr. Power, with his thick mane of white hair, is a familiar figure in the East Village, usually accompanied by his
dog, Jesse Jane, a Weimaraner, Labrador and pit bull mix.
      Despite his physical difficulties, Mr. Power is brimming with ambitious ideas. One involves plans for a movie
called ''Web Fellas,'' based on his experiences as an Internet entrepreneur. Mr. Power also said he wanted to help de-
sign and install mosaics in the tunnels of the planned Second Avenue subway line.
     Although he is best known for his mosaics, he has also created other works of art. In the late 1980s, for instance,
he built a tall wooden structure resembling Noah's Ark in an empty lot on East 11th Street and Avenue B.
      In the late 1990s, disturbed by the prevalence of narcotics in the neighborhood, he took to the streets wearing a
brightly striped poncho and a World War I-era infantry helmet covered with a glittering mosaic, then stenciled the
words ''No Heroin'' on the sidewalks surrounding Tompkins Square. A few years later, Mr. Power -- along with Bernard
Goetz, the subway gunman -- helped build wooden squirrel houses that were installed on tree branches in the park.
       Mr. Power said he wanted to raise enough money so that he could buy supplies and afford to pay other artists to
assist him in making the remaining mosaics on the trail, a goal that at times has seemed remote.
     ''I want to see it through,'' he said. ''I almost let the essence of my life slip by me.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: HISTORY (90%); POP & ROCK (78%); HISTORIC SITES (78%); MUSIC (78%); MUSICAL IN-
STRUMENTS (78%); ARTISTS & PERFORMERS (76%); PARAMEDICS (67%); VETERANS (62%); DOMAIN
NAMES (60%); SINGERS & MUSICIANS (78%)

COMPANY: AQUANTIVE INC (54%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (57%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (92%) NEW YORK, USA (92%) UNITED STATES (92%)

LOAD-DATE: December 11, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO: The East Village has about 70 mosaics created by Jim Power to define the area as an art colony.
Now some need restoration. (PHOTOGRAPH BY LIBRADO ROMERO/THE NEW YORK TIMES)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                      Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                  64 of 1258 DOCUMENTS
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          Paid Notice: Deaths FRISCHLING, LOUIS B The New York Times December 11, 2007 Tuesday


                                                The New York Times

                                            December 11, 2007 Tuesday
                                                Late Edition - Final

Paid Notice: Deaths FRISCHLING, LOUIS B
SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Classified; Pg. 12

LENGTH: 150 words

      FRISCHLING--Louis B. On December 9, 2007. Beloved husband of Marilyn. Cherished father of Melissa, Elisa,
Craig and father-in-law of Janet. Father-in-law to be to Marvin. Loving grandfather of Dani, Robbie, Ariel, Julia and
Elana. Brother of Reggie and Saul. Brother-in-law of Joan and Christine. Adored uncle, nephew, cousin and friend.
Leader, visionary and co-founer of Lipo Chemicals, Inc. and affiliated companies worldwide. Lou was an innovator and
respected entrepreneur who touched the lives of many with his creativity and passion. Services were held Monday at
Temple Sinai of Long Island. In Lou's memory contributions may be made to the Multiple Myeloma Research Founda-
tion. www.multiplemyeloma.org
     FRISCHLING--Louis. We mourn the loss of our beloved member, devoted supporter, and pillar of strength. Tem-
ple Sinai of L.I. Carole Neely, Steven Blaustein, Co-Presidents Rabbi Paula Winnig

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: DEATHS & OBITUARIES (92%); CLERGY & RELIGIOUS (73%)

COMPANY: LIPO CHEMICALS INC (69%)

LOAD-DATE: December 11, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Paid Death Notice

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                             65 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                The New York Times

                                            December 10, 2007 Monday
                                          The New York Times on the Web

Finding the Money to Move Out and Up
BYLINE: By MARCI ALBOHER

SECTION: Section ; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; SHIFTING CAREERS; Pg.
                                                                                                                   Page 173
              Finding the Money to Move Out and Up The New York Times December 10, 2007 Monday




LENGTH: 1222 words

    Whenever I write about successful career changers or those who fled corporate life to start businesses, readers write
to me asking about the financial circumstances of the people I've profiled.
     In fact, one reader has become a regular presence in my in-box with some variant of the question, ''Is a career
change possible for those of us without a trust fund, a supportive partner, rich family?''
     Spurred on by this question, and by other people who have been asking for tips on the money side of entrepre-
neurship and careers, I have been making an effort to get people to talk about their finances as much as possible.
       I decided to contact Jean Chatzky, the financial writer and adviser who always leaves me feeling that money stuff
is a lot simpler than I thought. Below are excerpts from our conversation:
     Q.Whenever I write about career change, people ask me about the financial side. Is it possible to make a career
change only when you have no dependents, family money, a supportive partner or a trust fund, as some of my readers
suggest? Or should anyone be able to change careers with proper planning?
      A. Of the list of things you gave, if you don't have a supportive partner, it's very hard. A partner against a change
can stand in your way. But with good financial planning, anyone should be able to do this. The fear of not having
enough money is what keeps people from shifting
     Q.It sounds like living more leanly is part of the prep. Is that the key?
     A. If you can live more leanly in advance, you make your life a hundred times easier. It's the same advice I give to
someone who is having a baby and wants to stay home after the birth. If you spend your pregnancy living like you're not
going to have that salary, you'll learn not only that you can do it, but you'll also have banked that other salary for nine
months.
     Q.Any other tips for anyone going through a career transition or a bout of unemployment?
      A. Having a stash of cash in the bank is having freedom. It's why I'm such a big proponent of active habitual sav-
ing. When you're not dependent on your paycheck, you have the ability to make the choices you really want to make
because you have some financial freedom. Saving through your life provides that for you. It's not just for retirement and
college. It's also for being able to do the kind of work that satisfies you.
      The other thing to think about is health insurance. Far too many people -- especially young people and entrepre-
neurs -- are making the choice to go without coverage. Why spend $150 a month on a cellphone bill when you're not
willing to save the same amount on an indemnity policy (a high-deductible health insurance policy) that can save you
from financial ruin? People say, ''I'm healthy now. I don't need to spend money on this.'' The problem is that then some-
thing happens and you haven't paid to have hospitalization coverage. If you're young and healthy, you may not want the
same level of coverage, but you have to provide for emergencies.
      Q.You write a lot about overcoming debt in our personal lives, but what about when debt follows us into our ca-
reers? What are the options for entrepreneurs who have a less than stellar credit history?
      A. Unfortunately, we're in a time when credit is harder to establish and harder to get when you don't have a decent
credit score. A lot of entrepreneurs get financing from friends and family, but it can leave them wondering if they will
ever get paid back.
      There are also some new options, like a company called CircleLending (now Virgin Money), which provides a
structure you can use if friends and family want to lend you money. There is also Prosper, a site that lets you borrow
money not from friends and family but from others.
       Q.Are there any best practices for borrowing money from friends? Do you recommend a written agreement, and if
so, at minimum, what should that cover? Does it pay to get lawyers involved?
      A. I do recommend a written agreement. The tendency is to approach it as if there are no restrictions. But the per-
son lending money can be a little more strapped than the borrower realizes. And an agreement can provide peace of
mind for the giver. Having a piece of paper makes people on both sides of the transition feel like it should be eventually
                                                                                                                       Page 174
                Finding the Money to Move Out and Up The New York Times December 10, 2007 Monday


paid back. If the loan is forgiven, there is a good way to deal with that through Virgin Money. You could get lawyers
involved, but you don't have to. It really depends on the amount of money.
      Q.Many businesses can be started with very little capital these days, and I've talked to lots entrepreneurs who say
they are not interested in outside investors or taking on debt. How do you know when it is wise to take that approach
and when the only way to really grow a business is to take on debt or an infusion of capital?
      A. Some people know these things innately. If you don't, get some outside advice. And if you can't afford that
help, I love the folks at Score [an organization of volunteer professionals who offer free advice to fledgling entrepre-
neurs]. They provide a lot of great advice and counseling for no money at all.
        Q.Do you find that people's personal finance habits usually mirror their money habits in their career or business?
      A. I find that people, especially entrepreneurs who feel strongly about their businesses, often sabotage their per-
sonal finance for the sake of a business or career. It's a mistake. The tendency is to throw it all back into the business.
The reality is that even if you are working for yourself, especially if you are, no one will be there to take care of your
retirement, so you need to make sure that you have a retirement plan as part of your business plan.
    Q.You focus a lot on women and money. How do you think gender issues show up around our relationships to
money?
      A. Gender issues come about in two ways. Women have a greater need for money at the end of their lives, yet
amass less money over the course of their lives because we take breaks for babies, we're traditional caregivers for our
aging parents and we live an average of seven years longer than men. The other place it shows up -- and it's changing,
but not changing fast enough for me -- is that we have been unwilling to ask for as much in the work force as we de-
serve. As a result, if your starting salary start outs smaller, and the raises pile on incrementally, you amass less over time
because you're building on a smaller base.
      Q.With the holiday season approaching, can you share any advice on holiday gifts for colleagues, clients and other
professional contacts?
      A. Set the budget and then figure out what you can afford in light of what you're making this year. Cast the net
and divvy it up. I like equality. Come up with a gift and give it to anyone who is making a difference in your profes-
sional life. It's also a lot easier to order 20 of something. If your pie gets so small, or once you divide it, it doesn't seem
to be enough, make a contribution to a charity on behalf of your clients, send out cards and call it a day.
        Jean Chatzky gives career advice on the ''Today'' show on NBC and Oprah & Friends on XM Radio.
        She is also the author of several books on personal finance, the most recent of which is ''Make Money Not Excus-
es.''
        For more articles and tips, visit www.jeanchatzky.com.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: ENTREPRENEURSHIP (89%); WAGES & SALARIES (85%); FINANCIAL PLANNING (78%);
TRUST ARRANGEMENTS (78%); WEALTHY PEOPLE (71%); PREGNANCY & CHILDBIRTH (67%); HEALTH
INSURANCE (60%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (65%)

LOAD-DATE: December 10, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Question

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper
                                                                                                             Page 175
             Finding the Money to Move Out and Up The New York Times December 10, 2007 Monday


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                             66 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                The New York Times

                                            December 10, 2007 Monday
                                                Late Edition - Final

Paid Notice: Deaths OLIAN, HOWARD
SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Classified; Pg. 7

LENGTH: 250 words

   OLIAN--Howard, North Shore Country Club records with deep sorrow the passing of our esteemed member,
Howard Olian. We extend our deepest condolences to his family. N. Barry Ross, President Jeffrey Levy, Secretary
    OLIAN--Howard. We mourn the passing of our very dear friend, Howard -yet want to honor his wonderful but
productive life. He was a man of many parts -truly loved by us and our families. Joan and Richard Bernhard Willa and
Robert Bernhard Cecile and Jerry Shore
      OLIAN--Howard, of Sands Point, NY, died on December 7, 2007. Devoted husband of JoAnne, loving father of
Jane and Pat, father-in-law and dear friend of Jerry Weintraub, adoring grandfather of Amy Rose Olian Weintraub; he is
also survived by his loving sister, Evelyn Mollet and a close group of nieces and nephews. A graduate of Johns Hopkins
University and Harvard College, he served honorably in the U.S. Navy during WWII in the Pacific attaining the rank of
Lieutenant J. G. An enthusiastic entrepreneur, he established Westwood, Inc., an international textile concern. He was
an avid fly fisherman, top-notch bridge player and championship golfer. Tough and crusty by nature, with an incisive
mind, he was also the most generous and charitable of men. He will be dearly missed by all those fortunate enough to
have known him. Funeral services will be held on Monday December 10 at 11:30am at Frank E. Campbell, 1076 Madi-
son Ave., at 81st Street. Contributions may be made to the Olian Foundation in memory of Howard Olian.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: DEATHS & OBITUARIES (91%); FAMILY (77%); CHARITIES (70%); WORLD WAR II (67%)

ORGANIZATION: JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY (55%); US NAVY (55%)

PERSON: JERRY WEINTRAUB (70%)

GEOGRAPHIC: UNITED STATES (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 10, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Paid Death Notice

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                                  Page 176




                                                67 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                  The New York Times

                                                December 9, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

The 7th Annual Year in Ideas
SECTION: Section 6; Column 0; Magazine; Pg. 68

LENGTH: 2819 words

     EDIBLE COCKTAIL, THE Dave Arnold, the head of culinary technology at the French Culinary Institute in Man-
hattan, is by training not a chef but a sculptor. He worked with metals and machinery as an art student and once battled
a fire-breathing dragon. (It was a modified air blower that spit flaming kerosene; he wore a welding jacket and carried a
lance.)
     These days Arnold's fits of ingenuity, though tame in comparison, are no less creative. Consider a recent offering
from his kitchen laboratory: The edible cocktail.
      The premise is simple: Make a ''pickle'' with alcohol instead of salt and brine. The execution is more complicated.
Arnold cuts peeled cucumbers into spears and puts them in a Mason jar filled with an 8-to-1 mixture of gin and ver-
mouth. He also adds a touch of simple syrup to counteract the cucumbers' inherent bitterness. The Mason jar is then
placed into a vacuum machine, which removes the air, collapsing the cucumbers' air pockets. This is a process similar to
that used in sous-vide cooking, in which food is vacuum-sealed in a pouch and heated. Thanks to the Mason jar, the
cucumbers keep their consistency. (If they were sealed in the usual plastic bag, they would lose their crunchiness.)
      When the vacuum seal is broken, the martini mixture rushes in to fill the spaces in the cucumber where the air
used to be. The resulting spears have the smooth, crisp texture of pickles. Arnold calls this kind of cucumber a ''flash
pickle,'' as the changes in texture and flavor that can take days to produce with salt and brine take about two minutes in
the vacuum machine. Each spear has roughly the same amount of alcohol as a standard martini. To serve, he sprinkles
the spears with celery seed, grated lime zest and flaky Maldon sea salt. JON FASMAN
      ELECTRIC HOCKEY SKATE, THE [17] When Tory Weber, a hockey enthusiast from Calgary, went to fetch the
paper one frigid day in 1985, the soles of his warm running shoes melted the ice on his steps, sending him tumbling
backward. He wondered, ''What if I could get this reduced-friction scenario going in the right direction?'' Later, while
working at a lumberyard, he began devoting free time to the idea of a heated ice-skate blade that would yield a better
glide with less effort. The skate he devised finally goes on sale this month.
        Weber was still ''poor as a church mouse'' when, in 2001, he read about the development of a battery small enough
to fit inside the molded plastic that holds a hockey skate's blade. He and a partner, Jeremy Furzer, began running tests
and soon found that heated blades, which melt more ice and thus glide on a slightly thicker layer of water, can produce
50 to 75 percent less resistance to motion. ''I thought, Gee whiz, if we had a 5 or 10 percent difference we'd be in good
shape,'' Weber says.
      When they made their pitch to large skate manufacturers, the companies liked the idea but said to come back when
it was fully commercialized. That happened again and again. Their fortunes improved in 2004, when Wayne Gretzky
[18] signed on as an investor and endorser. Already, several unidentified N.H.L. players are using Thermablades during
games as part of a league-approved trial. EVAN HUGHES
                                                                                                                       Page 177
                      The 7th Annual Year in Ideas The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


       FACES DECIDE ELECTIONS Here's something to keep in mind as election time approaches: Study the politi-
cians. Not their dossiers or their domestic policies, but their faces. Because according to new research by Anthony Lit-
tle, a psychologist at the University of Stirling in Scotland, faces may decide elections.
       During the last United States presidential election, Little created two computer-generated composite faces that re-
flected the differences between George W. Bush and John Kerry (but were unrecognizable as them): Kerry's face is
longer and narrower; Bush's jaw is wider, his brow lower. Little and several collaborators surveyed people online and
on the streets of Liverpool. The Bush face rated more ''masculine'' and ''dominant,'' while the Kerry face was more
''forgiving'' and ''likable.'' Though the Kerry face was ranked most ''intelligent,'' most participants said they'd choose the
Bush face to run their country. ''The percentages were similar to how people actually voted in the election,'' Little says.
      People were then asked whom they'd elect during a time of war versus a time of peace: Kerry won the most ''face
votes'' during peacetime, Bush during wartime.
      Of course, faces don't sway everyone. ''Die-hard Republicans or Democrats will vote for whoever's leading their
party,'' Little says. But uncommitted voters are another story: ''Those are the voters more likely to be swayed by visual
appearance,'' he says. ''They're also the ones who really swing elections.''
      How reliable are predictions of character based on facial interpretations? Not very. Earlier this year, Little pub-
lished a paper describing ''personality inventories'' he'd taken of 191 people that determined whether they were extro-
verts or introverts. He then created two composite faces, blending the most extroverted subjects' faces into one and the
most introverted subjects' faces into the other. He asked other people to rank those composite faces as extroverted or
introverted. Their judgments were right only a bit more than half of the time. ''That's not terribly good,'' Little says. ''It's
only slightly better than chance.''
      What does all this mean for this year's Democratic candidates? Hillary Clinton and John Edwards -- like Bush --
have faces rounder than Kerry's, while Barack Obama's is more Kerry-like: long, slender, with a similarly high brow.
Does that mean Clinton and Edwards are more likely to win, since we're at war, while Obama would likely win during
peacetime? Little isn't sure. ''Sex and race do make the predictions more complicated,'' he says. REBECCA SKLOOT
      FAKE TILT-SHIFT PHOTOGRAPHY Tilt-shift photography may be destined to become a visual cliche. But for
the moment, this playful technique -- which can make shots of cityscapes, train stations and loading docks appear to be
photos of obsessively detailed scale models -- is flourishing on photo-sharing sites like Flickr. This year it even inspired
the sincerest form of flattery: fakery.
      Tilt-shift lenses permit an unusual degree of control over a picture's depth of field, allowing for more variation in
what is in focus and what is not. In recent years, Olivo Barbieri and a handful of other adventurous art photographers
found a novel application for the lenses. By radically skewing the gradient of focus in a landscape image, the photogra-
pher can make us feel disoriented, as if we're looking close-up at a miniature. Barbieri's aerial shots of Las Vegas make
you wonder, What kind of person would bother to construct a perfect replica of the Luxor casino? No kind, of course,
and that's the point.
      Making real tilt-shift pictures requires expensive photo equipment. But that has not deterred the multitudes who
this year submitted their photos to Flickr's Tilt-Shift Miniature Fakes pool. These are conventional digital photographs
that have been manipulated in Photoshop to mimic Barbieri's focal tricks [19]. There's a forlorn municipal golf course,
an Ikea parking lot, an Auburn-L.S.U. football game -- all cast in the same tiny unreality.
       In principle, it's not hard to make a fake: essentially, pick an area in a photo that you want to sharpen, then blur the
rest. (Unnatural color saturation, one helpful fake-tilt-shift tutorial offers, ''makes it look more as if it's built from poly-
styrene and lichen.'') In practice, it's harder. ''Mini Portsmouth'' may have started out as just another charming quayside
snapshot, but somebody spent an hour or two getting the level of Gaussian blur perfect enough to make you wonder, if
only for a second, whether it was a model. WM. FERGUSON
      FISH-FLAVORED FISH [20] As stocks of ocean-caught fish dwindle in the face of overfishing and environmen-
tal changes, farmed fish has flooded the market, helping to meet our growing appetite for seafood. But one sector of the
seafood industry has remained elusive. Fast-food restaurants, which serve hundreds of millions of deep-fried-fish sand-
wiches every year, have always chosen wild species over farmed ones, because the flavor is better.
     But now even these piscean purists may start buying from the farm. This spring, after 10 months of testing, the
aquaculture company HQ Sustainable Maritime Industries created what it calls ''sea-flavored'' tilapia, the first farmed
                                                                                                                    Page 178
                     The 7th Annual Year in Ideas The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


fish manipulated to taste like a wild fish. ''It met 10 out of our 10 taste parameters,'' says HQ's president and C.E.O.,
Norbert Sporns. The company, which is negotiating distribution deals with several fast-food chains, employs good old-
fashioned food-processing technology to imitate the industry standard. It uses flavoring compounds to replicate the mild
taste of Alaska pollock, a northern Pacific whitefish that holds a near-monopoly over products like fish sticks, imitation
crabmeat and frozen fish fillets. HQ has even found a way to replicate the mushy texture of cooked pollock.
       Can imitation pollock help conserve the real thing? Finding an alternative whitefish, ecologists say, could curb
market demand for wild pollock if rising temperatures in the Bering Sea cause their numbers to decline. In other words,
the trend in farming seafood could help the wild species endure another trend: global warming. CHARLIE FOSTER
      GOD EFFECT, THE Some anthropologists argue that the idea of God first arose in larger societies, for the pur-
pose of curbing selfishness and promoting cooperation. Outside a tightly knit group, the reasoning goes, nobody can
keep an eye on everyone's behavior, so these cultures invented a supernatural agent who could. But does thinking of an
omniscient God actually promote altruism? The University of British Columbia psychologist Ara Norenzayan wanted to
find out.
      In a pair of studies published in Psychological Science, Norenzayan and his student Azim F. Shariff had partici-
pants play the so-called ''dictator game,'' a common way of measuring generosity toward strangers. The game is simple:
you're offered 10 $1 coins and told to take as many as you want and leave the rest for the player in the other room (who
is, unbeknown to you, a research confederate). The fair split, of course, is 50-50, but most anonymous ''dictators'' play
selfishly, leaving little or nothing for the other player.
      In the control group of Norenzayan's study, the vast majority of participants kept everything or nearly everything -
- whether or not they said they were religious. ''Religious leaders always complain that people don't internalize religion,
and they're right,'' Norenzayan observes.
      But is there a way to induce generosity? In the experimental condition, the researchers prompted thoughts of God
using a well-established ''priming'' technique: participants, who again included both theists and atheists, first had to un-
scramble sentences containing words such as God, divine and sacred. That way, going into the dictator game, players
had God on their minds without being consciously aware of it. Sure enough, the ''God prime'' worked like a charm, lead-
ing to fairer splits. Without the God prime, only 12 percent of the participants split the money evenly, but when primed
with the religious words, 52 percent did [21].
      When news of these findings made headlines, some atheists were appalled by the implication that altruism de-
pends heavily on religion. Apparently, they hadn't heard the whole story. In a second study, the researchers had partici-
pants unscramble sentences containing words like civic, contract and police -- meant to evoke secular moral institutions.
This prime also increased generosity. And unlike the religious prime, it did so consistently for both believers and nonbe-
lievers. Until he conducts further research, Norenzayan can only speculate about the significance: ''We need that com-
mon denominator that works for everyone.'' MARINA KRAKOVSKY
     HANDSHAKE SEX APPEAL Gordon Gallup, an evolutionary psychologist at the University of Albany, has a
suggestion for women going on first dates: Bring a handgrip dynamometer. It's a small, purse-size device they can use
to measure their date's grip strength. Why? Gallup's new research suggests that handgrip strength in men is directly
connected with reproductive fitness.
       People with high grip-strength scores are usually healthier than those with weak grips. ''They live longer and re-
cover faster from injury,'' Gallup says. ''They have reduced disability, higher bone density and greater fat-free body
mass.'' And in a study published this year, Gallup and his son Andrew -- at the time an undergraduate psychology major
-- found that males with high grip-strength scores reported being more aggressive and dominant and had more mascu-
line body types (broader shoulders, narrower hips). They also had ''increased sexual opportunities,'' which resulted in an
increased number of sexual partners, and younger ages of first sexual encounter. (For women, handgrip may be more
about sexual protection than prowess: Gallup has found that women's hand strength increases when they're most fertile,
a trait he says may have evolved to prevent forced impregnation by unwanted mates.)
      A logical response to the news that handgrip relates to sexual fitness would be to buy hand-exercising equipment.
But that won't get you far. Grip strength, Gallup says, is largely genetic -- certain genes increase testosterone levels,
which increase muscle mass. Evolutionarily speaking, its genetic basis may relate to the fact that our primate ancestors
traveled by swinging through trees. ''Clearly, grip strength is important under those conditions,'' Gallup says. ''I mean, if
you lose your grip on one of those branches, you're at risk of falling. And falling out of the canopy does not bode well
for your future genetic stability.''
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                     The 7th Annual Year in Ideas The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


      In general, Gallup says, what people find attractive are traits that signal the ability to pass along genes to future
generations. So female primates evolved an attraction for mates less likely to fall from trees. It's also possible that males
with strong hands were better hunters and protectors.
     Gallup's research leads to another question: Knowing all this, does he worry about his handshake, which he has
presumably passed on to his son? No, he says: ''It's pretty substantial.'' He measured it. REBECCA SKLOOT
       HEIGHT TAX, THE Should we tax tall workers at a higher rate than their shorter peers? The answer -- yes --
''follows inexorably'' from reigning academic theories of taxation, argues Greg Mankiw, an economics professor at Har-
vard (and former chairman of President George W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisers), in a working paper first cir-
culated in April.
      Optimal-tax theory is an area of economics that deals with such questions as whether the I.R.S. should treat capital
gains and wages the same. Its larger aim is to design ways to raise money for public use without distorting economic
choices. A key insight in the field is that an optimal taxer seeks to avoid penalizing effort. Therefore, any moneymaking
quality that can be clearly set apart from effort is of special interest.
       Height is a prime example, according to Mankiw and his graduate student Matthew Weinzierl, because of its sur-
prisingly strong correlation with income. According to one study they cite, the typical 6-foot American earned $5,525
more than a 5-foot-5-inch worker, after correcting for sex, age and weight. One possible explanation for the height-
income correlation is that height breeds self-esteem from the teenage years onward; another is that tall people were, on
average, better nourished as infants and so tote around a few extra I.Q. points in their craniums. In either case, their
money bonus does not derive from their own effort, so taxing it would cause no economic distortions. Using optimal-
taxation formulas, Mankiw and Weinzierl crunch the numbers and come up with a ''tall tax'' amounting to 7 percent of a
tall person's income. Short people would receive a 13 percent rebate.
      Do Mankiw and Weinzierl actually endorse such a system? Far from it. Rather, they argue, the proposed tax clari-
fies our thinking about taxation in general. They say that height is a ''justly acquired endowment'': it is not unfairly
wrested from anyone else, so the state has no right to seize its fruits. By the same logic, they imply (though they do not
state outright) that the government has no right to force someone with the ''justly acquired endowment'' of entrepre-
neurial genius to pay a higher tax rate.
       Peter Diamond, an economist at M.I.T., says the paper's basic mistake is the notion ''that if you can draw a silly in-
ference from an approach, then that discredits a model.'' He comments: ''I think there is probably no model that passes
that test.'' CHRISTOPHER SHEA

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES (90%); FIRES (72%); ICE SKATING (66%)

GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (73%) NEW YORK, USA (73%) UNITED STATES (73%)

LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: CHART: THE GOD EFFECT (CHART BY CYBU RICHLI)
PHOTOS: FAKE-TILT-SHIFT PHOTOGRAPHY
THE ELECTRIC HOCKEY SKATE (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENS MORTENSEN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
FAKE TILT-SHIFT PHOTOGRAPH: GERGELY CSIKY
GRETZKY: FERNANDO BRYCE
REINHARD HUNGER)
DRAWING: FISH-FLAVORED FISH (DRAWING BY ABBY CLAWSON LOW)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                                     Page 180




                                                 68 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                    The New York Times

                                                 December 9, 2007 Sunday
                                                    Late Edition - Final

A Shore Thing
BYLINE: By WENDY WILLIAMS.
    Wendy Williams is the co-author of ''Cape Wind: Money, Celebrity, Class, Politics and the Battle for America's
Energy Future on Nantucket Sound.''

SECTION: Section 14LI; Column 0; Long Island Weekly Desk; OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; Pg. 17

LENGTH: 867 words

DATELINE: Mashpee, Mass.

      THIS fall, a new-energy project six years in the making was scrapped because of high construction costs. Partly
financed by the Long Island Power Authority, the 40-turbine offshore wind project proposed for three miles off Jones
Beach would have produced, at full capacity, about 140 megawatts. It would have cost nearly $1 billion to build. That's
pretty expensive.
      The public utility had agreed to sign a long-term contract with the project's private developer, the Florida-based
FPL Energy. The contract would have carried an escalating-cost provision, which would have been paid by customers
who have no choice from whom they get their electricity. This would have helped guarantee financial security for FPL
by passing on the risk to the public, which could well have been committed to a per-kilowatt-hour price that could have
escalated over the years to become perhaps double that of coal-powered electricity. That's a big commitment.
      Officials rightly decided that signing up its roughly 1.1 million customers to such a risky deal was unwise. It's one
thing to ask the public to voluntarily pay for innovative energy technologies, and quite another to force them to ensure
very high profits for a private entity.
       Meanwhile, on Cape Cod, there's another offshore wind project also six years in the making. This 468-megawatt
project, which could cost as much as $1.7 billion to build and is proposed entirely by a private developer without any
such public guarantees, has weathered an onslaught of political storms. Nevertheless, Cape Wind Associates and its
parent company Energy Management just keep on going. By now, the company has invested about $30 million of its
own private capital in support of its idea, letting the public know that it believes in its idea, in its economic plan and in
its technology.
      What makes the two offshore wind projects, superficially similar, in fact so different?
      On the most basic level, the issue boils down to location. Wind turbines and their support structures are not off-
the-shelf products. Engineers must design them to meet the specific stresses expected. Offshore wind turbines must be
able to withstand the worst storms and highest wave heights expected over a century.
      At the Jones Beach site, chosen by the public utility and not by the private developer, the extreme wave heights
required costly installation. The Cape Wind project avoids this design burden because it is nestled in the Nantucket
Sound, protected by Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket to the south and Cape Cod to the north. Thus, installation costs
are substantially lower. Megawatt for megawatt, the LIPA project would have been from two to three times as expen-
sive.
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                             A Shore Thing The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


     Why did the private entity rather than the public utility choose the technically better site? The utility's choice was
based partly on political expediency. Safer and cheaper sites exist on Long Island but LIPA officials feared opposition
from wealthy and well-connected property owners.
     On Cape Cod, because Cape Wind investors are spending their own money, developers settled on the more com-
mercially viable site from the outset. They chose technical excellence rather than political expediency.
      Another important difference between the Long Island and the Cape Cod endeavors is the context within which
both projects would have operated.
      Massachusetts no longer has a traditional public utility like LIPA. Instead, customers choose among various pri-
vate companies to get their power. This means that the developer -- and not customers -- will be absorbing the risk of a
project that, while interesting and perhaps even commendable, involves the use of technology that isn't tried and true.
      Experts say that Cape Wind's power will probably lower rather than raise New England customers' monthly bills,
even though the power it produces will most likely be more expensive on a per-kilowatt-hour basis than more conven-
tional sources. This may seem counterintuitive, but it's actually a case of simple market competition.
       Electric power in New England comes from about 350 privately owned generating plants spread throughout the
six-state regional grid. Much of this power is sold on a competitive spot market. The more independent power produc-
ers, the lower the ultimate cost of that power.
      Critics complain that Cape Wind investors will make huge profits through an array of tax advantages. That may be
true. But the innovative project will be built at no financial risk to the public. If the project fails, customers won't have
to bail the developer out. And if the electricity is too expensive, they won't sign up.
     This public-versus-private power debate has raged for years. Recently, many commentators have been speaking
about a return to the old utility system, often citing the Enron-style fiascos of the last few years. But in the case of de-
veloping new technology, private entrepreneurship enjoys important advantages. We need risk-takers, and private
power offers an opportunity for innovation.
      The Long Island project forced an unfair burden on a public that lacks freedom of choice. Perhaps next time Long
Island should look to private risk-taking entities like Cape Wind.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: WIND POWER PLANTS (91%); ENERGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS (90%); NATURAL GAS &
ELECTRIC UTILITIES (90%); ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION (90%); ELECTRIC POWER
PLANTS (90%); ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY (90%); UTILITIES INDUSTRY (89%); ENERGY & UTILITY
SECTOR PERFORMANCE (89%); WIND ENERGY (89%); CONSTRUCTION (78%); ENERGY & UTILITY LAW
(78%); CONSTRUCTION COSTS (78%); HOLDING COMPANIES (68%)

COMPANY: LONG ISLAND POWER AUTHORITY (58%)

GEOGRAPHIC: FLORIDA, USA (79%); MASSACHUSETTS, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Op-Ed

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
                                                                                                     Page 182
     When a Luxury Vacation Cultivates Philanthropy The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday Correction
                                                    Appended

                                                 69 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                 December 9, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Correction Appended
                                                    Late Edition - Final

When a Luxury Vacation Cultivates Philanthropy
BYLINE: By JENNIFER ALSEVER

SECTION: Section 3; Column 0; Money and Business/Financial Desk; SPENDING; Pg. 6

LENGTH: 943 words

     DOING charity work while on vacation no longer has to mean backbreaking labor and dorm-like accommodations.
A new kind of philanthropic travel lets wealthy vacationers do good works while still enjoying plush hotel suites and
fine restaurants.
       More luxury tour operators now offer philanthropic-minded trips to places like Kenya, Cambodia and Vietnam
that incorporate visits to local schools, hospitals or wildlife centers. Travelers also go on traditional sightseeing tours
and safaris that may cost $300 to $1,000 a day, not including airfare.
      Even in remote African plains, tour operators pamper guests, who may stay in deluxe cottages with all the ameni-
ties. Travelers may leave those accommodations for part of their stay to visit charitable operations and get a first-hand
look at how financial donations can be put to work.
     The idea is that travelers who meet the people and see how they live can become long-term, passionate donors
and proponents for change.
      ''Just one person can make a world of difference for a community,'' said David Chamberlain, owner of Exquisite
Safaris, a tour operator based in San Francisco that offers top-of-the-line services while incorporating visits to schools,
health clinics and neighborhoods with hopes that clients will make a donation or become more involved.
     At the luxury tour operator Artisans of Leisure, requests by wealthy travelers for philanthropic trips have grown
15 percent over the past two years, said Ashley Isaacs Ganz, president of the company.
      Ms. Ganz attributes the increase to more media attention to international causes and to the awareness generated
by celebrities like Angelina Jolie and Bono. (Ms. Jolie advocates on behalf of Afghan refugees and the people of Dar-
fur, while Bono lobbies to end third-world poverty.) Ms. Ganz's company now automatically includes information on
local orphanages, health projects and aid groups along with each client's trip confirmation.
      Artisans of Leisure, based in New York, organized a seven-day trip to Paris and Morocco for the end of this
month for Rhonda Wolfond and her teenage daughter Alexandra that will cost $50,000. For three days, the two will
travel to local orphanages to interact with the children and to deliver needed supplies.
       Ms. Wolfond, who lives in Toronto, takes three or four such trips each year with her daughter. Ultimately, she
said, she spends several thousand dollars per trip on supplies for local orphanages and centers for people with disabili-
ties.
       ''My daughter needs to see more than the luxury side of the world,'' Ms. Wolfond said. ''I want her to experience
life as it really is and see that she can make a difference.''
      Chuck Ebeling, a retired vice president of the McDonald's Corporation, had a similar goal when he took a nine-
day tour of Tanzania in the spring of 2006. He paid $500 a day to stay in a tented camp where a chef prepared dinners
and staff members delivered coffee at dawn. His trip inspired him to become involved in the country's wildlife conser-
                                                                                                     Page 183
     When a Luxury Vacation Cultivates Philanthropy The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday Correction
                                                    Appended

vation efforts and led him to pay $500 to help a conservation group raise a bongo, a rare mountain antelope, with the
goal of reintroducing it into the wild.
       Some travelers who work charity into their trips prefer to rough it alongside the people they are helping. However,
''I don't just travel to help others,'' said Mr. Ebeling, 64. ''I enjoy some of the comforts and luxuries. I enjoy seeing the
world. And the experience in east Africa was eye-opening.''
     Not surprisingly, nonprofits are lining up to become part of such tours, with the hope that wealthy vacationers
may be more willing to make long-term financial commitments long after the trip is over.
     For many years, international aid groups organized their own tours for big supporters.
      ''Those people who have actually been in the field are our biggest donors,'' said Lisa Giaretto, managing director
of the Village Enterprise Fund, a group based in San Carlos, Calif., that offers entrepreneurship training to people in
Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.
     Next July, the Village Enterprise Fund will be part of Exquisite Safaris tours of Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.
Guests will visit farmers, tailors and bike-repair workers who have benefited from training by Village Enterprise.
      The strategy has paid off for other groups. Travelers who toured Botswana with the luxury tour operator Aber-
crombie & Kent recently contributed $100,000 over two years to the Living with Elephants Educational Outreach Pro-
gram, a group that protects local elephant herds. Abercrombie & Kent also encourages guests to buy seeds to plant trees
on trips in Kenya and to financially support the Gijedabung primary school while visiting Tanzania.
      John Kay, the lead singer of the band Steppenwolf, came home from a luxury 2003 vacation to Cambodia so in-
spired that he started his own charity, the Maue Kay Foundation.
      Mr. Kay, who lives in West Vancouver, British Columbia, was struck by the lingering devastation from Cambo-
dia's Khmer Rouge regime, which left 1.7 million people dead in the late 1970s. He donated $50,000 to build a prima-
ry school there with its own water well and vegetable garden, and he also paid for teacher salaries, books and computers
with satellite e-mail access.
      Later, Mr. Kay and his wife, Jutta Maue Kay, gave thousands of dollars more to support the Gijedabung school,
to protect African wildlife and to support food banks in Puerto Rico.
       ''The old cliche that travel broadens the mind is very true,'' Mr. Kay said. ''We were able to have a glimpse of cer-
tain things that go beyond staying in a hotel and a day excursion.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: PHILANTHROPY (91%); LEISURE TRAVEL (90%); CHARITIES (90%); TRAVEL HOSPITALITY &
TOURISM (90%); SIGHTSEEING TRANSPORTATION SERVICES (90%); RESTAURANTS (72%); CLINICS &
OUTPATIENT SERVICES (71%); REFUGEES (65%); WILDLIFE CONSERVATION (56%); WILDLIFE (56%);
AIR FARES (55%); ORPHANS (85%)

COMPANY: MCDONALD'S CORP (60%)

TICKER: MCD (NYSE) (60%); MCD (LSE) (60%); MCD (SWX) (60%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS722211 LIMITED-SERVICE RESTAURANTS (60%); SIC5812 EATING PLACES (60%)

PERSON: BONO (82%); ANGELINA JOLIE (54%)

GEOGRAPHIC: HO CHI MINH CITY, VIETNAM (79%) NEW YORK, USA (79%); CALIFORNIA, USA (77%)
KENYA (92%); TANZANIA (92%); VIETNAM (90%); UNITED STATES (79%); BOTSWANA (79%); MOROCCO
(57%)

LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
                                                                                                     Page 184
     When a Luxury Vacation Cultivates Philanthropy The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday Correction
                                                    Appended


CORRECTION-DATE: December 16, 2007


CORRECTION: An article last Sunday about incorporating philanthropy into vacations referred incorrectly to a trip
planned by Rhonda Wolfond. The part of the trip that involves philanthropy, organized by Artisans of Leisure, includes
only Morocco, not Morocco and Paris. It will last nine days, not seven, and cost $20,000 plus air fare, not $50,000.
     The article also referred incorrectly to donations to orphanages and centers for people with disabilities during Ms.
Wolfond's past trips. She has arranged for donations to come from Sandylion Sticker Designs and has donated food and
school supplies; she has not donated thousands of dollars to these places, though she has donated money to residents of
remote villages for food and clothing.
      The article also misattributed part of a comment about the causes of growth in philanthropic travel. While Ashley
Isaacs Ganz, president of Artisans of Leisure, did cite media attention as a cause, she did not cite celebrities. It was John
Kay, a philanthropic traveler, who referred to work by the actress Angelina Jolie and Stacy Palmer, editor of The
Chronicle of Philanthropy, who referred to work by Bono.

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Alexandra Wolfond at a center for disabled children in Ho Chi Minh City. She and her mother,
Rhonda, brought supplies to the center as part of their trip.
John Kay, lead singer of Steppenwolf, and his wife, Jutta Maue Kay, center at rear, have made donations to the
Gijedabung school in Tanzania.(PHOTOGRAPH BY RHONDA WOLFOND)
 In the Okavango Delta in Botswana, luxury accommodations offered by Exquisite Safaris. The company also offers
visits to local schools and clinics.(PHOTOGRAPH BY EXQUISITE SAFARIS)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



                                                70 of 1258 DOCUMENTS


                                                   The New York Times

                                                December 9, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Mogul's New Role: Novice Producer
BYLINE: By DAVE ITZKOFF

SECTION: Section 2; Column 0; Arts and Leisure Desk; Pg. 19

LENGTH: 1486 words

     IT was the kind of publicity event that most first-time filmmakers could only dream of. An invitation-only screen-
ing of the documentary ''Nanking,'' held in late October at the Tribeca Grand Hotel, conjured up an eclectic mix of at-
tendees, including the ''60 Minutes'' correspondent Bob Simon, the real estate scion Ivanka Trump and the gossip col-
umnist Cindy Adams, not to mention its official hostess, Wendi Murdoch, the wife of Rupert Murdoch, chairman of the
News Corporation.
     But perhaps the most distinctive guest that night was the goateed, rotund man in the crisp gray suit. Ms. Murdoch
shepherded him past a cluster of photographers and into the screening room, reminding him to look at the cameras.
                                                                                                                     Page 185
                 Mogul's New Role: Novice Producer The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


      ''This is Ted,'' Ms. Murdoch announced to the paparazzi. ''He's the producer.''
      Ted is Theodore J. Leonsis, the gregarious and sometimes polarizing Web entrepreneur and sports-franchise
mogul who, early this year, traded away his day-to-day responsibilities as vice chairman of AOL to devote more time to
the decidedly less lucrative field of documentary filmmaking.
      Even more surprising than Mr. Leonsis's career shift is the film with which he has made his producing debut.
''Nanking'' is a documentary about a 70-year-old episode of Asian history, largely unknown to American audiences, told
primarily by Chinese-speaking subjects and financed entirely out of Mr. Leonsis's own pocket.
     ''If your metrics of success are return on investment or risk-to-reward ratio, you wouldn't make a film like this,''
Mr. Leonsis, 51, said. ''I have enough investments where if I put in $2 million, I expect $20 million back. This one is all
about the psychic and goodness returns.''
      Mr. Leonsis seems sincere in his aspirations that ''Nanking'' will raise consciousnesses and effect social changes.
But it wouldn't be a Ted Leonsis production if it were not underpinned by a business goal: the hope that ''Nanking'' will
pave the way for a new model of making and distributing nonfiction films.
      ''Nanking,'' directed by Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman and scheduled for release on Wednesday, recounts the
Nanking massacre, or the Rape of Nanking, a months-long siege on the former Chinese capital by the Japanese Army
that began in December 1937. Despite the efforts of a handful of Americans and Germans to create a safety zone for the
protection of Nanking's civilian population, the Japanese soldiers showed scant mercy. By the end of the occupation in
March 1938, it is estimated that some 300,000 civilians and prisoners of war were killed and more than 20,000 women
raped.
      Like many Americans Mr. Leonsis was unaware of these events for much of his life. Three years ago he read an
obituary of Iris Chang, author of ''The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II,'' who committed
suicide in November 2004. Haunted by the account, Mr. Leonsis bought her book, as well as two others about the West-
erners who attempted to protect the citizens of Nanking, and set out to make a film about the events.
     ''At a time when Americans are not looked at fondly around the world,'' he said, ''here's people that are called gods
and goddesses. But their memories haven't echoed through history, and I wanted to tell that story.''
      In most professional arenas Mr. Leonsis is used to getting what he wants and rarely shy about expressing his opin-
ions. A popular leader among the rank-and-file at AOL, he survived a series of high-level bloodlettings that followed
the troubled AOL-Time Warner merger, despite a tendency to annoy his new fellow executives with his outspoken
ways.
      Mr. Leonsis has hardly remained a silent partner in his sports franchises either. (Thanks to the profits from the sale
of his AOL stock he is a principal partner in the holding company that owns the Washington Capitals hockey team and
the Washington Mystics women's basketball team, as well as minority stakes in the Washington Wizards basketball
team and the Verizon Center in Washington.) He spent much of the ''Nanking'' screening trading text messages with his
son, Zachary, who was updating him on the score of a game between the Capitals and the Toronto Maple Leafs. (The
Caps won, 7-1.) And he often exhorts (and chastises) his teams in public and on his blog, Ted's Take (ted.aol.com).
      Yet when he had previously tried to pitch media projects -- for example an inspirational life-makeover reality tel-
evision show -- through traditional Hollywood channels, his efforts were routinely frustrated. He was determined not to
repeat these experiences in making ''Nanking.''
       ''He suddenly wrote me this e-mail after coming back from a Caribbean vacation, saying he really wanted to do a
documentary,'' recalled Michael Jacobs, a producer of ''Nanking'' and a friend since their days at Georgetown Universi-
ty. ''He said enough with trying to set meetings and wait for other people.''
      With his own money -- Mr. Leonsis declined to say how much but said, ''It wasn't so much money it would change
my lifestyle'' -- he hired Mr. Guttentag, an Oscar winner for the documentary short ''Twin Towers,'' and Mr. Sturman to
direct the film. Mr. Leonsis also financed a team of more than a dozen producers and researchers who scoured the globe
for original documents related to the massacre, and for survivors who would provide firsthand accounts.
      Despite his lack of producing experience, his ''Nanking'' colleagues said his entrepreneurial skills were well suit-
ed to the world of nonfiction film. ''The reality,'' Mr. Sturman said, ''is that every film you make is basically like a start-
up company.''
                                                                                                                   Page 186
                 Mogul's New Role: Novice Producer The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


      Mr. Guttentag and Mr. Sturman provided ''Nanking'' with its central cinematic conceit. Inspired by films like
''Vanya on 42nd Street'' and ''The Laramie Project,'' they juxtaposed interviews and archival footage with a stage per-
formance at which a group of actors, including Woody Harrelson, read from diaries and letters written by Westerners
who observed the massacre.
       Mr. Leonsis's business acumen, they said, became particularly invaluable when it came time to find theatrical dis-
tribution for ''Nanking.'' Through his business contacts he located a Chinese production partner -- a requirement man-
dated by the government of China for any film produced there -- and forged a deal for the movie to be shown in Chinese
theaters over the summer. ''Nanking'' has earned $2 million in China alone, according to the filmmakers, making it the
year's second-highest-grossing documentary worldwide, after Michael Moore's ''Sicko.''
      It was also shown at the Sundance Film Festival, acquired for American theatrical distribution by ThinkFilm and
cable television broadcast by HBO, and shortlisted for an Academy Award nomination. (A second documentary pro-
duced by Mr. Leonsis, ''Kicking It,'' about an annual soccer tournament called the Homeless World Cup, is scheduled to
have its premiere at Sundance next year.)
       Still, Mr. Leonsis seemed dissatisfied with the current distribution models for documentary films, and sobered by
his experience with Sundance. Of the 3,287 films submitted to the festival in 2007, he noted, only 64 were accepted for
competition, and only 16 were American-made documentaries, roughly a dozen of which would receive any kind of
theatrical release. Yet, he said, there are dozens of theatrical distributors, cable channels and DVD companies looking
for nonfiction films and a potential audience of millions to watch them on the Internet. ''When you see a bottleneck like
that,'' he said, ''you see a real opportunity.''
      Mr. Leonsis declined to elaborate on his own plans, but suggested that a confluence of Internet technology and
advertising dollars might soon allow for documentaries to be seen by wider audiences outside traditional theaters and
DVDs. ''There's $30 billion of advertising in search revenue, and they want to put it into YouTube videos, so you know
there's going to be some breakout things here,'' he said.
     But he is realistic in his expectations that in the current movie environment ''Nanking'' is unlikely to turn a profit.
As he embarks on his latest line of work (while working on an e-commerce start-up, Revolution Money), there are other
benchmarks Mr. Leonsis would like to meet or surpass. In reverent tones he cited the example of Jeff Skoll, the former
eBay executive who used his windfall to found Participant Productions, the independent film company that has been a
producer of socially conscious movies like ''Good Night, and Good Luck.''
      Though Participant's overall box-office success has been mixed, and Hollywood's history has not been kind to do-
gooder newcomers, Mr. Skoll's role in producing the global-warming documentary ''An Inconvenient Truth'' is most
tantalizing to Mr. Leonsis. ''If it cost him a million dollars or two million dollars to change a mind-set of a population,''
he said. ''What better way to spend your money?''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: MOVIE INDUSTRY (90%); DOCUMENTARY FILMS (90%); PHOTOJOURNALISM (78%); NEW
CAR MODELS (76%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (72%); RETURN ON INVESTMENT (69%); ARMIES (69%);
WAR & CONFLICT (66%); LANGUAGE & LANGUAGES (64%); ARMED FORCES (60%); FILM DIRECTORS
(78%); MOVIE RELEASE DATES (78%)

COMPANY: NEWS CORP (71%)

TICKER: NWS (NYSE) (83%); NCRA (LSE) (83%); NWS (ASX) (71%); NWS (NASDAQ) (71%)

PERSON: KEITH RUPERT MURDOCH (71%); BOB SIMON (58%)

GEOGRAPHIC: UNITED STATES (90%); JAPAN (79%); CHINA (79%)

LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
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                 Mogul's New Role: Novice Producer The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Theodore J. Leonsis gave up his day-to-day responsibilities as the vice chairman of AOL to
produce documentary films. ''Nanking,'' about an event in Asian history, largely unknown to Westerners, is his first ef-
fort.(PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHEN CROWLEY/THE NEW YORK TIMES)
 A scene from Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman's documentary ''Nanking,'' the first film produced by Theodore J.
Leonsis.(PHOTOGRAPH BY THINKFILM)(pg. AR25)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



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                                                December 9, 2007 Sunday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

The Web Users' Campaign
BYLINE: By MATT BAI.
      Matt Bai, who covers politics for the magazine, is the author of ''The Argument: Billionaires, Bloggers and the Bat-
tle to Remake Democratic Politics.''

SECTION: Section 6; Column 0; Magazine; THE WAY WE LIVE NOW; Pg. 29

LENGTH: 995 words

     Before they chartered planes and opened teeming offices in Des Moines or Manchester, even before they an-
nounced their lofty ambitions to the world, the current field of presidential candidates set about absorbing the lessons of
Howard Dean's 2004 campaign. Dean lost, of course, and in a fairly ignominious way, but his campaign was the first to
harness the fund-raising and organizing power of the Internet, and both parties' 2008 hopefuls had visions of replicating
his model -- minus the meltdown. One of the first things they did was to sign on a new class of online organizers and
fund-raisers. The Web was the new frontier of American politics, and the candidates intended to exploit it.
      Now, as we come to the end of a tumultuous political year, it seems clear that the candidates and their advisers ab-
sorbed the wrong lessons from Dean's moment, or at least they failed to grasp an essential truth of it, which is that these
things can't really be orchestrated. Dean's campaign didn't explode online because he somehow figured out a way to
channel online politics; he managed this feat because his campaign, almost by accident, became channeled by people he
had never met. Dean for America was branded from its core antiwar message down to the design of some of its bumper
stickers and buttons by laptop-laden volunteers, and these strangers, it could be argued, both made and unmade the can-
didate. In the new and evolving online world, the greatest momentum goes not to the candidate with the most detailed
plan for conquering the Web but to the candidate who surrenders his own image to the clicking masses, the same way a
rock guitarist might fall backward off the stage into the hands of an adoring crowd.
      How else to explain the notable online surge of support for Ron Paul, the onetime standard-bearer of the Libertari-
an Party? Unlike his main opponents, Paul himself didn't have the resources to build a sophisticated Web campaign, but
antiwar and antispending Republicans were happy to do it for him. Last month, Paul supporters who had nothing to do
with the campaign organized an online fund-raiser on Guy Fawkes Day, a British holiday named for the rebel who tried
to assassinate King James I. Paul's stunned campaign brought in more than $4 million and 21,000 new contributors in a
single day -- the largest 24-hour haul of any Republican candidate to date.
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                      The Web Users' Campaign The New York Times December 9, 2007 Sunday


      Meanwhile, those candidates who have amassed roomfuls of well-paid online experts have frequently found them-
selves buffeted or embarrassed (or sometimes both at once) by mysterious forces outside their grasp. Take, for instance,
the much-forwarded ''Obama Girl'' music video, written by a 21-year-old undergraduate at Temple University.
(''Universal healthcare reform/It makes me warm,'' mouths the model in the video.) Fairly or not, that video probably
had more to do with shaping Obama's complicated public image -- young and exciting but maybe a bit shallow -- than
any Internet appeal devised by the candidate's own aides.
      Such developments probably came as no surprise to many in the business world, who understood years ago that
the Web represented not simply another mass medium to be gamed but also a fundamental shift in the once static rela-
tionship between producer and consumer. It is by nature a participatory medium, in which customers demand a more
personal stake in the products they consume. This is why Ford asked online drivers to help decide which options should
appear on last year's Fusion, and how much it should cost, and why Mountain Dew has a Web site that invites consum-
ers to invent the next great soft drink. Companies have realized that since they can no longer expect to unilaterally de-
fine the market the way they once did, they might as well let the market have some control over designing and branding
the product.
      Perhaps only in Washington, where so few people have dominated so much for so long, is this trend viewed as in-
herently negative. That's because, for decades, presidential campaigns have been the exclusive province of a small bevy
of ad makers and strategists who profited from the illusion that they, and only they, could foresee the electorate's every
reaction to everything. The results of that period are now in: a marked decline in voter participation, an uptick in cyni-
cism toward public service and a heap of critical policy challenges that have gone unaddressed. So why should we fear a
new day when ordinary voters, through their own creativity and passion, can suddenly influence the direction of a cam-
paign with a Web site or a video? These are, after all, our campaigns, for too long dominated by the professionals who
made of them a gray and tepid industry. And if ''Obama Girl'' didn't deepen anyone's understanding of employer man-
dates or carbon caps, then at least she enticed a lot of ordinary people -- more than four million, at last count -- to laugh
and sing about a would-be president the way a less-jaded generation of voters sang ''I'm Just Wild About Harry.''
       Of course, the leading candidates still aren't ready to entrust their message to the masses. (Look no further than
Hillary Clinton's campaign, which has apparently planted questions in public forums in an effort to control the dia-
logue.) Whichever candidates get their parties' nominations next year, they will probably try valiantly to insulate their
campaigns from the kind of Internet entrepreneurs and amateur videographers who would distract voters from their
predetermined message. But this is a losing proposition; about the only thing we can reasonably know for sure about the
general election campaign is that it will be profoundly affected by outside actors we can't yet conjure, voters sitting in
basements and coffee shops dreaming up their own kind of self-expression. Neither party's candidate will escape the
impulses, best or worst, of a newly empowered citizenry. The best they can do is to fall backward and hope to be carried
aloft.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: POLITICS (90%); INTERNET & WWW (90%); POLITICAL CANDIDATES (90%); US PRESIDEN-
TIAL CANDIDATES 2008 (89%); US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS (89%); FUNDRAISING (89%); POLITICAL
PARTIES (89%); US LIBERTARIAN PARTY (74%); POP & ROCK (63%); MUSIC (63%); ASSASSINATION
(62%); BRITISH MONARCHS (64%); SINGERS & MUSICIANS (63%)

PERSON: RON PAUL (53%)

GEOGRAPHIC: MANCHESTER, ENGLAND (73%) UNITED STATES (92%); ENGLAND (73%); UNITED
KINGDOM (73%)

LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTO (PHOTOGRAPH BY DANNY WILCOX FRAZIER)
CHART: YOUTUBE PRIMARY: Presidential candidates with the most YouTube subscribers: (Source: YouTube, Nov.
29, 2007
 Chart by Charles M. Blow)
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                                                Late Edition - Final

Paid Notice: Deaths OLIAN, HOWARD
SECTION: Section 1; Column 0; Classified; Pg. 41

LENGTH: 171 words

      OLIAN--Howard, of Sands Point, NY, died on December 7, 2007. Devoted husband of JoAnne, loving father of
Jane and Pat, father-in-law and dear friend of Jerry Weintraub, adoring grandfather of Amy Rose Olian Weintraub; he is
also survived by his loving sister, Evelyn Mollet and a close group of nieces and nephews. A graduate of Johns Hopkins
University and Harvard College, he served honorably in the U.S. Navy during WWII in the Pacific attaining the rank of
Lieutenant J. G. An enthusiastic entrepreneur, he established Westwood, Inc., an international textile concern. He was
an avid fly fisherman, top-notch bridge player and championship golfer. Tough and crusty by nature, with an incisive
mind, he was also the most generous and charitable of men. He will be dearly missed by all those fortunate enough to
have known him. Funeral services will be held on Monday December 10 at 11:30am at Frank E. Campbell, 1076 Madi-
son Ave., at 81st Street. Contributions may be made to the Olian Foundation in memory of Howard Olian.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: DEATHS & OBITUARIES (91%); CHARITIES (85%); WORLD WAR II (70%)

ORGANIZATION: JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY (57%); US NAVY (57%)

PERSON: JERRY WEINTRAUB (73%)

GEOGRAPHIC: UNITED STATES (90%)

LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Paid Death Notice

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                   Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
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                         Success Without Ads The New York Times December 8, 2007 Saturday




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                                                December 8, 2007 Saturday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Success Without Ads
BYLINE: By RICHARD PEREZ-PENA

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1625 words

DATELINE: YONKERS

    It makes no sense for publications to charge readers on the Web -- at least, that's the conventional wisdom. But
conventional wisdom does not carry much weight at Consumer Reports, that detailed guide to buying everything from
prescription drugs to pickup trucks.
      Consumer Reports, a monthly, refuses to publish ads, which are the primary source of revenue for most maga-
zines, yet it makes a healthy profit. And it not only charges for access to most of its Web site, it has three million paying
subscribers online -- up about 60 percent in the last 18 months -- which experts say may be the largest number in the
industry.
      Very few big publications have tried charging Web readers, and almost all of them have had second thoughts. The
Wall Street Journal has most of its content behind a pay barrier, but its owner-to-be, the News Corporation, is reconsid-
ering that policy. The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times tried charging for some online content, then aban-
doned the practice.
      For a decade, however, Consumer Reports has charged Internet readers the same price as print subscribers, cur-
rently $26 a year (or $5.99 for a month's online access or $45 a year to get the magazine both in print and on the Web).
While the rest of the industry sees print readers as more valuable -- because advertisers do -- Consumer Reports actually
makes more money from readers on its Web site, because it avoids printing, trucking and mailing costs.
      ''It's not like we're a stroke of brilliance,'' said John Sateja, senior vice president for information products at Con-
sumers Union, the nonprofit group that publishes Consumer Reports. ''We had no choice. We have no advertising, so we
had to survive on what readers pay.''
      The organization does more than just survive. Consumers Union reports that its publications -- Consumer Reports
and a few much smaller ones -- generated $208 million in revenue in the year ended May 31, with an operating margin
of about $28 million.
      ''We had to become more entrepreneurial,'' said Jim Guest, president of Consumers Union.
     This success subsidizes the organization's consumer advocacy work, helping to reshape a group that early in this
decade was losing $7 million a year. In recent years, Consumers Union has set up shop in dozens of state capitals, has
signed up more than half a million activists who send e-mail messages to lawmakers and corporations and has taken on
causes like forcing drug companies to disclose the results of clinical trials.
      Given Consumers Union's self-appointed mission of protecting the public from corporate misdeeds, and given the
type of people such a mission attracts, the group has a liberal, though nonpartisan, bent. The work histories of some
staff members suggest as much; Mr. Guest used to work for groups that advocate abortion rights and gun control.
                                                                                                                    Page 191
                         Success Without Ads The New York Times December 8, 2007 Saturday


       ''They're like Ralph Nader without the politics,'' said Victor Navasky, former publisher and editor of The Nation.
''So it's amusing that what they do comes across in conventional, capitalist terms -- helping people who want to spend
their money to spend it and get value for it, and pushing corporations to perform better.''
      Mr. Guest sees no incongruity in any of this. ''We have to think and act like a business,'' he said, seeing readers as
the shareholders.
      That meant, among other things, more aggressive placement of the magazine in checkout aisles and newsstands,
and buying a long list of sponsored search terms on Google and Yahoo. Fierce competition for terms like ''S.U.V.'' puts
those words out of Consumer Reports' price range, but there is substantially less clamor for the rights to, say, ''toaster.''
       Subscriptions to the magazine still produce the vast majority of Consumers Union's revenue: the dead-tree version
of Consumer Reports has a paid circulation of 4.5 million, more than all but a handful of American magazines. There is
relatively little overlap between the print and Web subscribers -- about 600,000 -- which allows the magazine to reach
two large, distinct audiences.
      More than 60 percent of the print magazine's readers are men, but the Web site, where readers are split almost
evenly by sex, has helped Consumer Reports draw more women. Online readers average 50 years old, a decade younger
than print readers, and are better off financially.
      A reader of the printed magazine might be ''someone who generally wants to be a well-informed consumer,'' said
Giselle Benatar, editor in chief of online media. ''But on the Web site, we're attracting very transaction-minded consum-
ers. They are shoppers. They're looking for a product, they want ratings, they want recommendations, and they want it
now, not once a month.''
      The site has been steadily built up, with additions like, this year, crash test videos -- front and side impact -- on
nearly every vehicle sold in the United States. One of the site's primary attractions is its deep well of product ratings --
not only more data on some products than will fit in the magazine, but also ratings published months or years ago. It can
also produce reviews of new products like the iPhone much faster than the magazine, as well as safety warnings on
things like lead paint in toys, which are always available on the free portion of the site.
      And the magazine's most consistent message may just be, as the editor in chief, Kimberly Kleman, said, that ''a lot
of the highfalutin brands are rock-bottom in our ratings,'' while the cheap, plain products can fare quite well.
      Consumer Reports' own brand has come under attack from time to time, its credibility questioned by companies
whose products get low ratings. There were two protracted lawsuits brought by automakers in the 1990s, after the mag-
azine called their S.U.V.'s too prone to rolling over; neither case ended with a clear result.
     The worst blow came last January, when Consumer Reports reported that most of the child car seats it had tested
were unsafe in side-impact crashes.
      Within days it said publicly that its conclusions were wrong. Consumers Union quickly sent letters of apology to
all subscribers and removed the article from the Web site. The magazine published a long article explaining how the
mistake was made.
      The erroneous report involved a kind of crash test the magazine had never tried before, conducted by an outside
testing company it had never used, leading to misinterpretation of the data.
      Others in the magazine industry -- and even some of the car seat makers -- were impressed by how Consumer Re-
ports dealt with the affair. Circulation kept rising and, perhaps as important, the news media continued to quote Con-
sumer Reports as an authoritative source of product ratings.
      ''I think the way they handled it increased their credibility,'' said Kent Brownridge, who heads the Alpha Media
Group, publisher of Maxim and Blender. It would take more than one such misstep, he said, to dent the magazine's
reputation.
       Consumer Reports' relationship with product makers is often awkward. Despite many requests, it does not allow
companies to trumpet high ratings from the magazine in ads. Companies that fare poorly rarely make much noise about
it -- executives at several such companies said that doing so just draws attention to bad reviews -- and the complaints
they do voice are usually muted, objecting to the magazine's conclusions, but not its motives.
                                                                                                                   Page 192
                        Success Without Ads The New York Times December 8, 2007 Saturday


      The magazine tries to keep manufacturers at arms' length, while occasionally consulting them about how to test
their products, and giving them a chance to respond to serious allegations before publication. After the car seat debacle,
the magazine said it would shift the balance toward more communication, especially when working in unfamiliar ter-
rain. Consumer Reports has a large staff, more than 300 people; about 150, many of them engineers, do nothing but test
products.
      Enter one room in the headquarters north of New York City, and find a long table with hundreds of dishes arrayed
in rows, each carefully smeared with the same pasta sauce, chili, mustard and other stain-makers, before being loaded
into dozens of dishwashers. Down the hall is a room furnished to simulate a suburban den, where audio components
play for a mannequin whose electronic ears funnel the results to a computer. The magazine even has its own vehicle test
track in Connecticut.
     (After testing, all the products are auctioned off to employees.)
     Consumer Reports also has survey researchers and statisticians who analyze responses to product-performance
surveys from more than a million readers annually. And there is a team of people who fan out around the country to buy
products incognito in every region, from every sort of retailer.
      But those costs are offset by economic advantages Consumer Reports has over many other magazines. Its head-
quarters, in the parent group's low, nondescript building, sits off a highway in Yonkers, a mostly blue-collar town, a few
miles from the Midtown Manhattan hive of the magazine swarm, but much farther away in mind-set and in dollars.
     Consumer Reports prints on cheap paper, unlike magazines whose high-quality stock is dictated by glossy ads,
and as a nonprofit group, it pays much lower postage. Consumer Reports spends about $17 million a year on paper and
postage; commercial magazines of similar size can spend $40 million.
     Magazine industry executives voice admiration for what Consumer Reports has achieved, but they are skeptical
about applying its experience to other magazines. For starters, after seven decades, it has no direct competition.
      None of it would work if it were not for the fact that ''what they do is useful, practical, needed,'' Mr. Brownridge
said, and that the magazine ''has credibility, an authoritative voice.''

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: INTERNET & WWW (90%); PHARMACEUTICALS INDUSTRY (89%); CONSUMER LAW (89%);
LEGISLATORS (73%); PRESCRIPTION DRUGS (72%); CLINICAL TRIALS (72%); WEB SITES (71%); CORPO-
RATE WRONGDOING (68%); NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (64%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (60%); MOTOR
VEHICLES (57%); MOBILE & CELLULAR TELEPHONES (59%)

COMPANY: LOS ANGELES TIMES (69%); NEWS CORP (69%); WALL STREET JOURNAL (56%)

TICKER: NWS (NYSE) (69%); NCRA (LSE) (69%); NWS (ASX) (69%); NWS (NASDAQ) (69%)

PERSON: MICHAEL MCMAHON (54%)

LOAD-DATE: December 8, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: About 150 people at Consumer Reports do the testing. Top, Jim Langehennig checked cell-
phone headsets. Below, Caroline Somera tested TVs.(PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOYCE DOPKEEN/THE NEW YORK
TIMES)(pg. C1)
 The resolution of a camera lens was tested, above, at the group's office. Left, Jim Guest, president of Consumers Un-
ion.(PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOYCE DOPKEEN/THE NEW YORK TIMES)(pg. C4)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                     Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
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                                                December 8, 2007 Saturday
                                                   Late Edition - Final

Growing Big, Staying Fresh
BYLINE: By PAUL B. BROWN, 53

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 5

LENGTH: 605 words

    THE law of large numbers is frustrating for big companies.
    A $100 million company whose sales climb by $50 million has increased revenue by 50 percent. A $10 billion
company, with the same $50 million gain, has bumped up sales only one half of one percent.
     As a result, argues Andrew S. Grove, the former chief executive of Intel, huge companies end up paying for their
success.
      ''The reward is that they get big,'' he writes in Portfolio magazine. ''The punishment is that when they get big, it
gets harder and harder for them to grow. And then their investors pile on the abuse.''
     Mr. Grove, now a lecturer at Stanford's business school and a senior adviser at Intel, suggests an antidote: large,
successful firms can engage in what he calls ''cross-boundary disruption.''
     ''Under certain conditions a firm can create a new growth spurt for itself by entering an entirely different industry,''
he writes. ''The target industry must be stagnant and populated with companies that cling to doing business the way they
always have.''
     MANAGEMENT MODELS Is there a formal model that companies can follow to grow internally? Robert C.
Wolcott and Michael J. Lippitz, both associated with Northwestern University's business school, list in an article in the
M.I.T.Sloan Management Review the following four models:
      Opportunist. The company provides no formal process to follow. Various departments and individuals work on
their own ideas and then seek corporate financing. This is what happens at Zimmer Holdings, a medical device compa-
ny with more than $3 billion in sales.
       Enabler. The company provides clear criteria for the sorts of things it would like developed, application guidelines
for financing and support from senior management, then leaves it to employees to come up with new ideas. This, the
authors say, is the model Google employs.
       Producer. ''A few companies such as I.B.M., Motorola and Cargill pursue corporate entrepreneurship by estab-
lishing and supporting formal organizations with significant dedicated funds or active influence over business unit fund-
ing.''
      Advocate. A company ''strongly evangelizes'' for corporate entrepreneurship but, as is the case at DuPont,
leaves it up to the individual business units to provide financing and manage the process.
     CHANGED FOR GOOD Radical transformation efforts inside big companies fail for any number of reasons,
among them insufficient resources devoted to the task, a loss of interest by the chief executive or naysayers who are
allowed to stay in place.
                                                                                                                   Page 194
                     Growing Big, Staying Fresh The New York Times December 8, 2007 Saturday


      Two McKinsey consultants argue that focusing on two areas can improve the chances that a company will change
for the better.
     The chief executive should set ''an appropriate and inspiring aspiration'' and then help mobilize ''the flow of ener-
gy and ideas needed to drive the organization forward,'' argue Josep Isern and Caroline Pung, writing in The McKinsey
Quarterly.
     Leaders must define the objective at the outset, delineating clear initiatives and painting a vivid picture of what
success will look like, they contend.
      ''A good transformation story bridges the gap between top management and the rest of the organization,'' they
write. ''Typically, using metaphor and analogies to explain what is at stake, it addresses three key aspects: the case for
change, the challenges and opportunities ahead and the impact of change on the individuals.''
      FINAL TAKE Marketers take note: Some 77 percent of Americans ages 49 to 55, Prevention writes -- citing re-
search from the McNeil Consumer Healthcare division of Johnson & Johnson -- believe that ''50 is the new 40.'' PAUL
B. BROWN, 53

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: EDUCATION (88%); HOLDING COMPANIES (78%); CONSULTING SERVICES (78%); ENTRE-
PRENEURSHIP (78%); MEDICAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES MFG (64%); COMMERCIAL LENDING (50%);
MEDICAL DEVICES (50%); BUSINESS EDUCATION (90%)

COMPANY: GOOGLE INC (53%); MOTOROLA INC (52%); ZIMMER HOLDINGS INC (54%); INTEL CORP
(57%)

ORGANIZATION: NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY (54%)

TICKER: GOOG (NASDAQ) (53%); GGEA (LSE) (53%); MOT (NYSE) (52%); ZMH (SWX) (54%); ZMH (NYSE)
(54%); INTC (NASDAQ) (57%); INTC (SWX) (57%)

INDUSTRY: NAICS518112 WEB SEARCH PORTALS (53%); SIC8999 SERVICES, NEC (53%); SIC7375 IN-
FORMATION RETRIEVAL SERVICES (53%); NAICS334220 RADIO & TELEVISION BROADCASTING &
WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING (52%); SIC3663 RADIO & TELEVISION
BROADCASTING & COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT (52%); NAICS334413 SEMICONDUCTOR & RELAT-
ED DEVICE MANUFACTURING (57%); NAICS519130 INTERNET PUBLISHING & BROADCASTING & WEB
SEARCH PORTALS (53%)

LOAD-DATE: December 8, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


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           Paid Notice: Deaths ANDERSON, ROBERT O The New York Times December 8, 2007 Saturday




Paid Notice: Deaths ANDERSON, ROBERT O
SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Classified; Pg. 8

LENGTH: 91 words

     ANDERSON--Robert O. The Board of Trustees and staff of the Aspen Institute mourn the loss of Lifetime Trustee
and longtime leader Robert O. Anderson, who presided over the Institute for three decades. He was an entrepreneur,
visionary, environmentalist, and humanist whose ideas remain an indelible part of the Institute's mission of fostering
enlightened leadership and open-minded dialogue. Our deepest condolences go to his wife, Barbara, and his family.
William E. Mayer, Chairman, and Walter Isaacson, President and CEO, The Aspen Institute

URL: http://www.nytimes.com

SUBJECT: DEATHS & OBITUARIES (90%)

ORGANIZATION: THE ASPEN INSTITUTE (91%)

LOAD-DATE: December 8, 2007

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DOCUMENT-TYPE: Paid Death Notice

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


                                    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company



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                                              December 8, 2007 Saturday
                                                 Late Edition - Final

Gold's Quirk: It's Volatile, but Holders Feel Secure
BYLINE: By JANE BIRNBAUM

SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; YOUR MONEY; Pg. 1

LENGTH: 1254 words

    On Nov. 7, the market price of a troy ounce of gold bullion briefly touched $845.50, the top so far in gold's current
eight-year bull market and a 28-year high in New York trading. The news made headlines and became a hot topic on
radio talk shows.
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         Gold's Quirk: It's Volatile, but Holders Feel Secure The New York Times December 8, 2007 Saturday


      At Lexington Coin, a shop in affluent Lexington, Mass., the number of customers seeking to do business in gold
coins spiked, the owner, Eric Carlson, said. Some customers were there to lock in profits, selling bullion coins contain-
ing an ounce of gold that they had bought five years earlier when gold traded under $350. Some were selling just one
coin, telling Mr. Carlson they needed money to pay property taxes or car repair bills.
      And some were buying, saying that they thought gold's price would continue to climb. ''The ones purchasing 10
coins at a time told me they were taking the money out of stocks and bank accounts,'' Mr. Carlson said. ''A woman buy-
ing three American Eagles told me she was buying them as a hedge against the price of her home heating oil shooting
up this winter.''
    Gold has a long history of waxing and waning in allure. At the moment, it holds a particular attraction, given
Americans' worries about inflation, the risks in the financial market and the falling value of the dollar.
      ''People understand gold's intrinsic value,'' said Katherine M. Porter, an associate professor of law and a bankrupt-
cy specialist at the University of Iowa. ''But because it's beautiful and they can hold it in their hands, they may not per-
ceive how volatile, like all traded commodities, gold is.''
     It closed yesterday at $800.20, down $6.90.
     Trading and owning gold have never been easier, thanks to the Internet.
       ''There's been a democratization of gold ownership and new ways to acquire it,'' said Jon Nadler, a senior analyst
for Kitco Inc., a bullion dealer based in Montreal. (Kitco makes money when consumers buy or sell gold, and the profit
of its scrap operation is tied to the price of gold.)
     ''While gold coins or bars remain popular, investors no longer have to worry about storing their gold when they
can buy gold certificates or digital ounces,'' Mr. Nadler said. ''And with exchange-traded funds, the metal can be traded
much like shares of stock.''
       Gold investors tend to buy on bad financial news. Rich Checkan, vice president of Asset Strategies International
Inc., a precious metals and currency broker in Rockville, Md., said purchases at his company started picking up substan-
tially after the subprime mortgage turmoil began in August. Most of his buyers were acquiring Perth Mint Certificates
entitling them to gold held in a government-owned vault in Australia.
      James K. Galbraith, an economist and public policy professor at the University of Texas, however, cautioned that
investors who are considering a gold purchase now, either to hold or trade, should ''be prepared to take a bath.'' They
should know, he said, what happened to those who waited in long lines outside shops on Jan. 21, 1980, eager to pay
more than $900 apiece for coins containing an ounce of gold.
      While gold is a hot commodity now, the demand by average investors is still far from what it was then. That was
the top of the previous gold bull market, which had begun in January 1975, after President Gerald R.