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									ICT Strategic Plan 2010 - 2013




Learning Today to Improve Tomorrow
                         Table of Contents

       1) Evergreen Foundation Statements                     Page 3

       2) Priority Areas & Strategic Outcomes (2010 – 2013)   Page 4

       3) Purpose and Definitions                             Page 5

       4) S.W.O.T. Analysis                                   Page 10

       5) Baseline Infrastructure                             Page 13

       6) ICT Innovative Projects Initiative                  Page 15

       7) The Role of LwICT facilitators                      Page 16

       8) Professional Development                            Page 17

       9) Policy Revision                                     Page 18

      10) Implementation Plan                                 Page 19

      11) Appendix 1: Project Guidelines                      Page 20

      12) Evergreen ICT Team                                  Page 23




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                       Page 2
                      Foundation Statements
                                           Vision
                           Learning Today to Improve Tomorrow

                                          Mission
               Evergreen School Division will engage students in learning
                to become contributing citizens of a democratic society

                                Core Values and Beliefs

     1.   Students Come First
          a) success for every student is the goal of our work
          b) every student is capable of learning
          c) every student has individual strengths and learns in a unique way
          d) every student is respected and in turn respects others
          e) the diversity of our students will be acknowledged, recognized and celebrated
          f) student learning is the basis for all school system decision making and
             leadership
          g) resources will be used effectively and responsibly to meet students’ learning
             needs

     2.   Learning is Our Core Purpose
          a) learning empowers people to achieve their potential
          b) learning requires relevance and engagement
          c) learning requires a safe and caring environment
          d) positive relationships are critical to the learning process
          e) every person has responsibility for his/her own learning
          f) learning requires a balance between social, academic and intellectual
             engagement
          g) learning requires clean, well maintained and aesthetically pleasing physical
             environments

     3.   Public Education Serves the Common Good
          a) public education is essential for a vibrant democracy and a sustainable future
          b) public education develops citizens who work toward the betterment of their
             family, community and the world
          c) public education is a shared responsibility of the home, school, and
             community
          d) public education requires a balance between academic, personal/social and
             physical development
          e) public education provides a foundation for life-long learning and responsible
             citizenship
          f) public education must be responsive to the changing needs of society



ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                           Page 3
          Priorities and Strategic Outcomes
                      2010 - 2013
        Priority Area                   Strategic Outcomes
                        1. Students will become informed and responsible
                           decision-makers, playing active roles as citizens of
                           Canada and the world, and will contribute to social,
        Citizenship        environmental, and economic well-being and an
                           equitable quality of life for all, now and in the future.

                        2. Participatory / Social Justice Citizenship is a key
                           element of curriculum and pedagogy and students have
                           opportunities to demonstrate their learning of what it
                           means to be a contributing citizen in a democratic
                           society.

                        1. Students will be engaged in relevant learning
                           experiences.
          Student
        Engagement      2. Schools provide students with in and out-of-school
                           learning experiences and to develop their
                           understanding and demonstrate examples of
                           citizenship.

                        1. Students will acquire and demonstrate the knowledge,
                           skills, attitudes and life practices that contribute to a
       Sustainable         sustainable future.
       Development
                        2. Operations, activities, programs and facilities will be
                           sustainable. Design, construction, renewal of buildings
                           for management, procurement, resource use and
                           transportation will be informed by sustainability
                           principles.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                      Page 4
     3. Purpose and Definitions

     What is information and communication technology (ICT)?

     Information and communication technologies include computers, laptops, digital
     cameras, video cameras, digital microscopes, scanners, cell phones, electronic games,
     digital audio devices, global positioning systems, electronic whiteboards, the Internet, et
     cetera. ICTs in the classroom will continue to evolve as new technologies emerge over
     time.

     What is Literacy with ICT?

     Literacy with ICT means choosing and using ICT, responsibly and ethically, to support
     critical and creative thinking about information and about communication as citizens of
     the global community. Literacy with ICT consists of critical and creative thinking, ethics
     and responsibility, and ICT literacy.




     This representation shows the relationship between ICT literacy (i.e., demonstrating
     ICT skills) and literacy with ICT (i.e., choosing and using ICT, responsibly and
     ethically, to support critical and creative thinking about information and about
     communication across the curriculum). ICT literacy is a critical component of literacy
     with ICT, but it is not sufficient in itself.


     How do students develop their literacy with ICT?

     Literate students choose and use ICT, responsibly and ethically, to support their critical
     and creative thinking about textual, numerical, visual, and aural information as citizens
     of the global community. They develop this literacy through a process of inquiry across
     the curriculum as they

                     plan and question
                     gather and make sense
                     produce to show understanding
                     communicate
                     reflect on their learning



ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                             Page 5
     Teaching in a Knowledge Based Society

            Traditional education’s focus on facts, memorization, basic skills, and test
            taking has not been good for the development of creativity and innovation.
            This is changing in the 21st century, and education systems from Finland to
            Singapore are beginning to put creativity and innovation as a high priority in
            their desired outcomes for student learning. (Sir Ken Robinson)


     Building a Knowledge-Based Society

     In the knowledge-based society of today the sheer volume of accessible information is
     greater than ever before and is increasing exponentially.

     The fabric of a knowledge-based society is built around individuals with the ability to use
     information and continuously adapt to a rapidly changing globe. To remain competitive, we
     must have an education system that ensures everyone, regardless of socio-economic
     background, is able to participate in such an increasingly demanding, knowledge-based
     society. Although some steps have been taken in this direction, we need to address the
     issue with greater urgency to create change that is truly transformational.

     A vision for an education system that prepares students to function in a knowledge-based
     society must first identify what a student needs to learn in order to function in such a soci-
     ety. There are skills and attributes that were important in the past that remain important
     today. These include literacy, numeracy, and critical thinking. However, the combination of
     technology and access to information that underpins a knowledge-based society means that
     these skills need to be applied in different ways and supplemented with new skills in order
     for students to become full participants in a knowledge-based society.

     Needs of the Knowledge-Based Society

     In addition to acquiring certain skills, we also believe individuals need to acquire particular
     attributes so they can apply these skills to their best effect. Students must be able to apply
     their skills both to secure their own future in the knowledge-based society and to take on the
     responsibility of contributing to our society.


                      Skills and Attributes for a Knowledge-Based Society
                                   Functional Numeracy and Literacy
                                  Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
                                         Creativity and Innovation
                                           Technological Literacy
                                  Communications and Media Literacy
                                       Collaboration and Teamwork
                                           Personal Organization
                              Motivation, Self-Regulation and Adaptability
                         Ethics, Civic Responsibility, Cross-Cultural Awareness




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                                 Page 6
     Vision of Education for the 21st Century

     The vision of a 21st century K-12 education system is rooted in personalised learning. It
     focuses on providing all students, regardless of their economic, geographic, or ethnic
     background, the skills they need to participate in a knowledge-based society, while also
     allowing them to explore an educational path that is best suited to their interests, their
     capabilities, and their chosen future. Such a vision has been advocated before and steps
     have been taken towards it. The advancement of technology however, and the move toward
     a knowledge-based society makes such a vision both more achievable and more important.

                                Transformation for Education in a
                                    Knowledge-Based Society
                            From Learning Information to Learning to Learn
                                      From Data to Discovery
                              From One Size Fits All to Tailored Learning
                            From Testing to Assess to Assessing to Learn
                            From Classroom Learning to Lifelong Learning


     How Would The System Function?

     When discussing a systemic change as transformative as the one being considered here, it
     is important to ensure there is some understanding of how it would function. Although some
     components of the vision are already present, we have really only just begun the kind of
     transformation envisioned.

                           Components of a Knowledge-Based System
                 A flexible educational path with project-based or integrated learning
                       A blended system that uses classrooms and technology
                      Technology to access learning objects and teaching tools
                 Open access to information systems for content and decision making
                  Constant feedback and assessment to allow students, parents and
                   teachers to adjust to meet challenges or accommodate progress

     Shifting Roles

     The net result of this new model of education is that it will be more collaborative and
     inclusive, changing the roles of the student, the teacher, and the parent. Some of this shift
     has already taken place, as the relationship between teachers and students has slowly
     evolved. However, we believe a more complete transformation of the education system is
     required and within that context it is important to clearly illustrate what the new roles should
     be.

                         Shifting Roles in the Knowledge-Based System
                               From Passive Student to Active Learner
                         From Parent as Supporter to Parent as Participant
                          From Teacher as Lecturer to Teacher as Guide



ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                                   Page 7
     Teaching for Today’s World

     Preparing teachers for the 21st century requires a close look at what it means to teach and
     learn in increasingly networked, technology-rich, digital classrooms. Schools and teachers
     need to thoughtfully and intentionally design learning environments and tasks in which
     teachers can explore issues that are relevant and develop pedagogies that are effective for
     a knowledge era. They need to develop new images and acquire new expertise to design
     and facilitate meaningful learning with technology. Given this shift in our world, and the new
     research from the learning sciences, one can see the complexity that teachers face in
     working with learners in the 21st century.

     Five core principles provide a foundation for an effective teaching practices framework:

            1. Effective teaching practice begins with the thoughtful and intentional design of
               learning that engages students intellectually and academically.
            2. The work that students are asked to undertake is worthy of their time and
               attention, is personally relevant, and deeply connected to the world in which they
               live.
            3. Assessment practices are clearly focused on improving student learning and
               guiding teaching decisions and actions.
            4. Teachers foster a variety of interdependent relationships in classrooms that
               promote learning and create a strong culture around learning.
            5. Teachers improve their practice in the company of peers.


     Surrounding these five core principles, and infused into each of them, is the effective use of
     the technologies of our time for both teaching and learning.

     A Flexible Path to Education




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                                Page 8
     Conclusion

     The intent of this section has been to lay out a vision for education in a knowledge-
     based society. The rate at which our knowledge-base is expanding and the impact this
     is having on the pace of change within our world demands a system that teaches
     students to thrive in such a world. Such a system is one that individualizes learning so
     students engage in issues important to them while learning the skills critical to
     participating in a knowledge-based society. While engaging the student in charting their
     own path, it would demand greater involvement of the parents and a shift in the role of
     the teacher from one of lecturer to one of guide.




     References

     Premier’s Technology Council (2010). A Vision for 21st Century Education.
           Obtained from: http://www.gov.bc.ca/prem/popt/technology_council/

     Manitoba Education (2010). Literacy With ICT: A Developmental Continuum.
           Obtained from: http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/tech/lict/index.html

     Friesen, S. (2009). What did you do in school today? Teaching Effectiveness: A
           Framework and Rubric. Toronto: Canadian Education Association.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                           Page 9
     4. S.W.O.T. Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats):

                                     Early Years (April, 2011)

                       Strengths                                       Weaknesses
         Continuation of LwICT Facilitator time           Not all schools have functioning SMART
         High number of teachers with strong ICT           Boards
          skills                                           Hardware is aging fast
                                                           Varying level of teacher comfort and
                                                            capability; need specific PD at school
                                                            level
                                                           Infrastructure – speed, wifi, etc.
                                                           Not all schools know what budgets to
                                                            access to make things happen
                     Opportunities                                        Threats
         ICT reserve fund is available to establish       Some hardware under-utilized due to
          baseline                                          lack of
         Positive attitude for technology – always         leadership/direction/support/pressure
          valued                                           Buying hardware doesn’t mean it gets
         Better PD: BYTE Conference, Riding the            used effectively
          Wave Conference

                                   Middle Years (April, 2011)

                       Strengths                                       Weaknesses
         Increase of hardware in classrooms               Many students do not have internet
         Higher degree of infusion of ICT into             access at home
          curriculum                                       Inequity/Not enough time allotted to
         Focus on ICT within PLC groups at the             facilitators
          school level                                     Many students/families cannot afford to
                                                            obtain their own personal devices
                                                           Very high demand for inventory of
                                                            central hardware (divisional kits)
                     Opportunities                                        Threats

         Students with access to personal                 Inequity of providing to some and not
          devices                                           providing to others (hardware for
         High level of skill/aptitude among                students)
          students in terms of ICT usage                   Inequity among schools, re:
         Central server, central access for                Hardware…the gap remains.
          ‘troubleshooting’                                Age of equipment
         Potential of ‘web-based’ access to               Loss of labs
          student accounts/files, i.e. Work
          anywhere
         Access potential ‘pilot’ or ‘demo’ projects
         Access to divisional kits (enhancement
          needed)




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                                     Page 10
     4. S.W.O.T. Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats):

                                   Senior Years (April, 2011)

                      Strengths                                     Weaknesses
         Support of Leadership, Admin, Board           Bandwidth
         Infusion in many classes/schools              Physical setup (electrical outlets)
         High level of capacity among staff            Disparity between schools
         Ongoing PD and collaboration                  Old equipment
         Digital-Age learners now entering the         Lag-time between discussion and action
          teaching profession

                    Opportunities                                      Threats
         Focus on SY LwICT                             Changing technology
         School-based LwICT Facilitators               Ownership/Management of devices
         PLCs                                          Ethical/Responsible use of ICT by staff
         Many students have personal devices            and students
         SY students are very tech-savvy               Gap between ‘coalition of the willing’ and
                                                         those uncomfortable with ICT pedagogy

                                     Divisional (April, 2011)

                      Strengths                                     Weaknesses
         PD Opportunities (Summer Institute and        Disparity in ICT equipment and access
          Riding the Wave)                               between schools
         ICT Facilitator at each school                Insufficient bandwidth
         Wi-Fi in Senior Years Schools                 Limited effective use of ICT for
         Vision for Instructional Practice              instruction (inquiry)
          (Effective Teaching Practices                 Lack of a wide area network
          Framework, LwICT)                             Aging workstations
         ICT Committee and inclusive planning          Wi-Fi not yet addressed in Early/Middle
          process                                        Schools
         Some schools are well equipped
         Significant teacher capacity for ICT
         Students have strong ICT skills

                    Opportunities                                      Threats
         Redefine the role of ICT Facilitator          Limited financial resources
         Creation of a dark fiber WAN                   (sustainability)
         Change instructional practice to align        Willingness of some to change
          with ETPF using ICT resources                  instructional practice
         Funds available in reserve                    Rapid pace of change
         Digital resources more readily available      Parent perceptions of what schools
          and at more affordable costs                   should be
          More current research in effective use
          of ICT in learning




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                                  Page 11
     4. S.W.O.T. Analysis: Long Term Plan (Recommendations)

     ICT Committee Recommendations:

     1. Support the installation and operation of a dark-fiber wide area network (WAN).

           Rationale: A division-wide dark fiber network provides a fast, reliable, secure,
           scalable, long-term solution responsive to the demands of providing a
           knowledge-based education for all students in all communities. Sites will be
           linked together with a minimum of 1-gbps, providing sufficient bandwidth for the
           next several years and easy upgrade to higher speeds. The WAN will be ESD’s
           core communications infrastructure and will enable a plethora of voice, video and
           data applications. The network will be 100% owned by ESD at a projected cost
           of $1 460 200.00 (including taxes). To support the operation of the WAN, it is
           necessary to invest in appropriate network infrastructure including a central
           server and related management software. A cumulative sum of $100 000.00 has
           been committed to address the network infrastructure in ESD.

     2. Provide central funds at a rate of $150.00 per student to pursue the attainment of
        baseline infrastructure in all classrooms (See Section 5).

           Rationale: All students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 should be provided with a
           learning environment that best prepares them for learning to become contributing
           citizens in a democratic society. Establishing a definition of baseline
           infrastructure and acting in ways that support its attainment ensure equitable
           deployment of resources and equal opportunities for student success regardless
           of school or community. Accessing the voices of current teachers and students to
           define baseline infrastructure ensures sustainable practice designed to meet the
           needs of all stakeholders.

           Note: All funds must be expended on baseline infrastructure items until baseline
           has been achieved.

     3. Provide central funds at a rate of $30 000.00 to support an ICT Innovative Projects
        Initiative (See Section 6).

           Rationale: The emergent nature of ICT prevents the ability to conclusively state
           the most efficient/effective expenditure of ICT budgets system-wide. The
           purpose of the ICT Innovative Projects Initiative is to provide opportunities for
           students and staff to explore the feasibility of a variety of hardware/software
           rollouts and make informed decisions for future implementation of systemic
           strategies related to the infusion of ICT into teaching and learning. Another
           significant objective of the ICT Innovative Projects Initiative is to support
           innovative strategies for teaching and learning which may extend beyond the
           realm of the baseline infrastructure identified for all classrooms.



ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                            Page 12
     5. Baseline Infrastructure
     All students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 should be provided with a learning
     environment that best prepares them for learning to become contributing citizens in a
     democratic society. Establishing a definition of baseline infrastructure and acting in
     ways that support its attainment ensure equitable deployment of resources and equal
     opportunities for student success regardless of school or community.




                       What is the model we want Divisionally?


                     Evergreen School Division strives to:
                         Ensure all divisional/school-based expenditures related to ICT
                           will support the Divisional vision for ICT
                         Provide reliable, school-wide wireless access in all sites
                         Replace site-based servers with central server
                         Install/Operate dark-fiber Wide Area Network (WAN)
                         Balance equity and autonomy between schools and communities
                           in terms of access to hardware/software
     June, 2011          Establish baseline hardware and software infrastructure at EY,
                           MY, and SY
                         Infuse the principles of the Effective Teaching Practice
                           Framework and Literacy with ICT
                         Provide exceptional professional learning supports
                         Clearly define the role of school-based ICT Facilitators
                         Develop policies and procedures congruent with our vision for
                           ICT
                         Ensure all students have access to technology in the classroom
                           and support use of personal mobile devices where appropriate.


     The voices of staff have been accessed to define baseline infrastructure at Early Years,
     Middle Years, and Senior Years to align with the Divisional model outlined above and to
     ensure sustainable practice designed to meet the needs of all stakeholders.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                         Page 13
     5. Baseline Infrastructure

                                           Early Years

                     The baseline ICT infrastructure in the Early Years classroom includes:
                         Laptop computer for teacher use
                         Mounted data projector and SMART board
                         Sound amplification system
     June, 2011
                         Netbooks for student use (ratio of 4 students :1 netbook)
                         Document camera
                         Digital Camera
                         Access to a cart of netbooks (ratio of 4 classrooms :1 cart of 25)
                         Colour laser printer (ratio of 100 students : 1 printer)



                                          Middle Years

                     The baseline ICT infrastructure in the Middle Years classroom includes:
                         Laptop computer for teacher use
                         Mounted data projector and SMART board
     June, 2011          Netbooks for student use (ratio of 4 students :1 netbook)
                         Document camera
                         Digital Camera
                         Access to a cart of netbooks (ratio of 3 classrooms :1 cart of 25)
                         Colour laser printer (ratio of 100 students : 1 printer)


                                          Senior Years

                     The baseline ICT infrastructure in the Senior Years classroom includes:
                         Laptop computer for teacher use
                         Mounted data projector
     June, 2011
                         Document camera
                         Digital Camera
                         Access to a cart of netbooks (ratio of 3 classrooms : 1 cart of 25)
                         Colour laser printer (ratio of 100 students : 1 printer)

     Note: In order to achieve our desired vision, as stated in Section 4, all central and
     school-based expenditures must support the attainment of baseline infrastructure.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                            Page 14
     6. ICT Innovative Projects Initiative
     Purpose:

     The mandate of the ICT Committee is to provide recommendations related to the
     infusion of ICT into teaching and learning practices in our schools. More specifically:

        1. Provide recommendations related to Professional Development for staff.

        2. Provide recommendations related to the implementation of the LwICT continuum.

        3. Provide recommendations related to the purchase of hardware and software.

     The purpose of the ICT Innovative Projects Initiative is to address the mandate of the
     committee through a comprehensive strategy, which aligns with the foundation
     statements of Evergreen School Division.

     Rationale:

     A series of recommendations have been shared within this paper and a number of them
     can be addressed through a comprehensive ICT Innovative Projects Initiative as
     described and further outlined in Appendix 1.

     The initiative is designed to invite individual teachers, groups of teachers, or entire
     school communities to engage in the exploration of a variety of dynamic learning
     environments characterized by the presence of ICT across the curriculum.

     Staff will be invited to submit proposals which will be implemented in September, 2011.
     The specific requirements associated with proposals are outlined in Appendix 1: ‘ICT
     Innovative Projects Initiative: Project Guidelines’.


     Vision:

     The ICT Innovative Projects Initiative will yield significant data in 2011 – 2012, which will
     inform the decision-making process for subsequent years. Data may indicate a desire
     to pursue a specific platform of technology at a 1:1 ratio, or it may indicate suitability for
     ongoing diversity between students, teachers, and school communities.

     The emergent nature of a knowledge-based society is evident in a reflection on
     Evergreen’s recommendations from June, 2009. Many of the technologies that have
     become integral tools for teaching and learning were not even on the market in 2009,
     emphasizing the importance of prudent planning and decision-making in support of
     teaching and learning across the school division.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                              Page 15
     7. The Role of ‘LwICT Facilitators’:

     LwICT facilitators are charged with preparing teachers for a knowledge-based society
     by taking a close look at what it means to teach and learn in increasingly networked,
     technology-rich, digital classrooms.

     LwICT facilitators, in collaboration with teachers, need to thoughtfully and intentionally
     design learning environments and tasks in which teachers can explore issues that are
     relevant and develop pedagogies that are effective for a knowledge era. They need to
     develop new images and acquire new expertise to design and facilitate meaningful
     learning with technology.

     Five core principles provide a foundation for an effective teaching practices framework:

       1. Effective teaching practice begins with the thoughtful and intentional design of
          learning that engages students intellectually and academically.
       2. The work that students are asked to undertake is worthy of their time and attention,
          is personally relevant, and deeply connected to the world in which they live.
       3. Assessment practices are clearly focused on improving student learning and
          guiding teaching decisions and actions.
       4. Teachers foster a variety of interdependent relationships in classrooms that
          promote learning and create a strong culture around learning.
       5. Teachers improve their practice in the company of peers.

     Surrounding these five core principles, and infused into each of them, is the effective
     use of the technologies of our time for both teaching and learning.


     ICT Committee Recommendations:

     There is a need to consider the development/structure of a ‘School-Based ICT
     Management Team’ to address general troubleshooting needs at the school level.

     Rationale: The staffing allotment for LwICT Facilitators is intended for the purposes
     stated above, but in technology-rich learning environments there remains a need for ‘in-
     house’ troubleshooting to support teachers and students with technical issues.
     Examples of issues currently addressed by LwICT Facilitators include: Managing
     student accounts, set-up of classroom-based hardware, StudentsAchieve reporting, etc.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                              Page 16
     8. Professional Development Considerations:
     The following existing structures can be accessed by staff to develop a foundation for
     effective teaching practices related to ICT:

           Divisional PLCs
           Summer Institute
           Teacher Action Research Teams
           In-School Collaboration
           Divisional ICT Committee
           School-Based and/or Personal PD Funds
           Student Engagement Grants
           Divisional PD (Riding the Wave, LwICT)
           External PD (BYTE, MadLat, M.E.)



     ICT Committee Recommendations:

     Continue to provide ongoing professional learning opportunities for teachers.

     Rationale: Teachers require ongoing collaborative professional learning opportunities to
     develop capacity for teaching and learning in technology-rich environments.

     Suggested strategies for consideration include:

        a. Summer Institute sessions on ‘Divisional Software’ including StudentsAchieve,
           FirstClass, Microsoft Office Suite
        b. Promoting cross-school PLCs through Early Dismissals, and PDAC’s PLC
           Proposal initiative
        c. Seeking out additional PD opportunities for LwICT facilitators on the topics of
           Inquiry Learning, Project-Based Learning
        d. Continuation of ICT Committee in 2011 – 2012. Potential collaboration among
           EY/MY/SY Facilitators to discuss the evolving role of school-based leaders.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                         Page 17
     9. Policy Revision Considerations:

     9.40         Employee ICT Acceptable Use
     9.240        Student ICT Acceptable Use Agreement
     1.A.90       Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Use
     1.B.145      Personal Audio & Video Devices
     1.B.195      Student Use of Cell Phones and Electronic Communication Devices


     ICT Committee Recommendations:

     1. Revisit all existing Policies and Administrative Procedures related to Information and
     Communication Technologies.

     Rationale: Although the Policies and Administrative Procedures have been revised
     within the last few years, the emerging world of ICT requires an ongoing review of
     Divisional documentation.

     2. Network with other school divisions to engage in conversation related to how they are
     addressing Policy and/or Procedure issues within their divisions.

     Rationale: Many divisions are in the ‘same place’ regarding the infusion of LwICT at
     Senior Years. Because we are a small division, we can access the capacity/resources
     of other divisions to support our process.




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                          Page 18
     10. Implementation Plan
     In order to achieve our vision for baseline infrastructure, it is essential to plan with
     purpose and sustainability in mind. The proposed implementation plan has been
     included in the table below and will need to be revisited annually to reflect on areas of
     success, challenge, and opportunity.




                                   Implementation Plan

                        Development of the 2010 – 2013 ICT Strategic Plan
     2010 – 2011        Plan and develop architecture for a dark fiber wide area network
                        Establish Wi-Fi environments in all schools


                        Provide reliable, school-wide Wi-Fi access in all schools
                        Install/Operate dark-fiber Wide Area Network (WAN)
                        Replace site-based servers with central server
                        Establish baseline hardware and software infrastructure at EY, MY,
                         SY
                        Provide funding to schools using a formula of $150.00 per student to
                         address deficiencies related to baseline infrastructure requirements
                        Provide a cumulative total of $30 000.00 to support innovative
     2011 – 2012
                         school-based projects through the ICT Renewal Initiative
                        Transition the role of LwICT Facilitator to Learning Facilitator and
                         establish a school-based ICT Management Team
                        Provide ongoing professional learning opportunities for teachers to
                         develop capacity for teaching and learning in technology-rich
                         environments
                        Review all Policies and Administrative Procedures related to ICT
                        Investigate strategies which support the use of student-owned
                         devices in schools

     2012 – 2013


     2013 – 2014




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                           Page 19
                                       Appendix 1:
                             ICT Innovative Projects Initiative
                                    Project Guidelines
                                        2011-2012
     Background:

     The fabric of a knowledge-based society is built around individuals with the ability to use
     information and continuously adapt to a rapidly changing globe. To remain competitive,
     we must have an education system that ensures everyone, regardless of socio-
     economic background, is able to participate in such an increasingly demanding,
     knowledge-based society. Such a vision has been advocated before and steps have
     been taken towards it. The advancement of technology however, and the move toward
     a knowledge-based society makes such a vision both more achievable and more
     important.

     As part of the ICT budget planning process for 2011 - 2012, $30 000.00 has been
     allocated to support innovative projects which infuse the foundations of Literacy with
     ICT (LwICT) in our schools. The grant will also be used to support students and staff in
     the achievement of the Evergreen School Division mission, vision and strategic
     outcomes for 2010-2013 in the three priority areas of citizenship, education for
     sustainable development and student engagement (see below).

     Please note: The maximum funding allocated to any single project will be $10 000.00.
     The goal is to fund as many projects as possible; therefore, project submissions under
     $10 000.00 are welcomed. All project proposals, regardless of funds requested, will be
     assessed based on alignment with the project requirements identified in this document.
     Efforts will be made to ensure equitable access to support for Early Years, Middle
     Years, and Senior Years projects.

     Purpose:
          1.       Enhance effective teaching practices through relevant learning activities or
                   projects which infuse ICT across the curriculum and link to the three
                   division priorities (i.e. education for sustainable development, student
                   engagement, citizenship) in support of the Evergreen School Division
                   mission and vision.
            2.     Enable individual teachers, groups of teachers, or school communities to
                   develop innovative projects or initiatives that support strategic outcomes
                   for 2010-2013 and contribute to student engagement, education for
                   sustainable development and citizenship.
            3.     Provide information through action research to inform other schools based
                   on the outcome of the project or initiative.



ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                           Page 20
     Evergreen School Division’s Vision - Learning Today to Improve Tomorrow

     Evergreen School Division’s Mission - Evergreen School Division will engage
     students in learning to become contributing citizens of a democratic society

     Evergreen School Division’s 2010-2013 Strategic Outcomes:

        1. Students will become informed and responsible decision-makers, playing active
           roles as citizens of Canada and the world, and will contribute to social,
           environmental, and economic well-being and an equitable quality of life for all,
           now and in the future.
        2. Students will be engaged in relevant learning experiences.
        3. Students will acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes and life
           practices that contribute to a sustainable future.
        4. Participatory/Social Justice citizenship is a key element of curriculum and
           pedagogy and students have the opportunities to demonstrate their learning of
           what it means to be a contributing citizen in a democratic society.
        5. Schools provide students with in and out of school learning experiences and to
           develop their understanding and demonstrate examples of citizenship.
        6. Operations, activities, programs and facilities will be sustainable. Design,
           construction, renewal of buildings for management, procurement, resource use
           and transportation will be informed by sustainability principles.

     Proposal Requirements:

     Projects should enhance the infusion of LwICT across the curriculum and generate data
     which can be the basis for case studies of effective teaching and learning experiences
     involving innovative hardware and software applications.

     Projects should:

           Make direct links to ESD’s strategic outcomes and the LwICT continuum
           Demonstrate effective teaching practices across a broad range of curricula
           Provide a structure for collaboration within the school and at the divisional level
           Be focused on sustainability and capacity building among students and staff

     Schools and/or individuals must submit project proposals electronically for consideration
     by the Evergreen ICT Committee by June 27, 2011. Please submit all proposals via
     email to Lloyd Roche, ICT Consultant: lroche@esd.mb.ca

     Proposals will be evaluated on the basis of their alignment with initiative goals and
     criteria as well as a clear evaluation and sharing plan. It will be the responsibility of each
     participant (individual, group, or school), upon approval, to track the program’s progress
     and report back to the ICT Advisory Committee on a semi-annual basis (December and
     May). Projects are single year initiatives, but may be extended to subsequent years




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                              Page 21
     depending on the direction of Evergreen’s ICT plan. Extensions must be approved by
     the ICT Committee.

     Applications should involve students, parents, external consultants and community
     where applicable to the project. An external consultant may be an educator in another
     school or district, a university professor, or an individual in some related field of
     endeavor who can provide the researcher(s) with an external perspective relevant to the
     focus of the project.

     The submission should provide evidence of a well developed action research plan
     which includes the following elements:
           i.   Rationale for the project – purpose;
          ii.   How students are involved within the different project phases;
         iii.   Anticipated student outcomes;
         iv.    Data collection and analysis;
          v.    Participants and responsibilities / roles;
         vi.    Timeline – duration of study, anticipated start and completion dates;
        vii.    Budget;
        viii.   Evaluation and showcase plan




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                                       Page 22
                       Evergreen ICT Team

           Georgia Sigvaldason      Arborg Collegiate

           Craig Sagan              Arborg Collegiate

           Brad Harding             Arborg Early Middle School

           Cheryl Johnston          Arborg Early Middle School

           Tanya Harding            Arborg Early Middle School

           Jim Gibbs                Dr. George Johnson Middle School

           Paul Bailey              Dr. George Johnson Middle School

           Lisa Pidwinski           Gimli High School

           Dan Pona                 Gimli High School

           Tammy Einarson           Riverton Collegiate

           Kris Peterson            Riverton Collegiate

           Leanne Hibbert           Riverton Early Middle School

           Nadine Trumbley          Riverton Early Middle School

           Rosanna Cuthbert         Sigurbjorg Stefansson Early School

           Larry Moore              Winnipeg Beach School

           Shawna Rudd              Winnipeg Beach School

           Paul Cuthbert            Superintendent & CEO

           Charlie Marks            Manager of ICT

           Lloyd Roche              ICT Consultant

           Tyler Moran              Curriculum Consultant




ICT Discussion Paper - June, 2011                                   Page 23

								
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