Tradesmen Rel by jolinmilioncherie

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									                                          PRESS RELEASE
                                                                         For Immediate Release

                                                                             Press Contact:
                                                                          Steve Thompson
                                                                 Thompson Communications
                                                                             856-942-4434


“THE TRADESMEN: MAKING AN ART OF WORK”
NEW DOCUMENTARY FILM FEATURING THE
ESSENTIAL VALUE AND ARTISTRY OF THE TRADES
SCREENS IN THE 2011 GREAT LABOR ARTS EXCHANGE
SATURDAY JUNE 18, 12:30PM, AT THE
NATIONAL LABOR COLLEGE, SILVER SPRING, MD


The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work --
 These are the people who build the foundations for our lives


June 7, 2011 -- Baltimore, MD -- The Labor Heritage
Foundation, as part of their 2011 Great Labor Arts
Exchange is hosting a screening ofThe Tradesmen: Making
an Art of Work on Saturday June 18 at 12:30pm, at the
National Labor College, 10000 New Hampshire Avenue;
Silver Spring, MD

                                                                    Mike Rowe, creator and host
In June 1979 longtime union singer, songwriter and educator            of Discovery Channel’s
                                                                Dirty Jobs, discusses the value of the
Joe Glazer invited fourteen labor musicians to a three-day       trades in the film, taped at a recent
                                                                EG Conference in Monterey, California
                                 gathering at the George Meany Center for Labor Studies in
                                 Silver Spring, MD (now the National Labor College). Thus
                                 began the annual Great Labor Arts Exchange (GLAE), which
                                 continues to be one of the core engines of their activities.
                                 GLAE has grown to include many different forms of labor arts
                                 and culture. In addition to the many rank-and-filers and union
                                 staff, participants have included singers Utah Phillips, Pete
                                 Seeger, Hazel Dickens, Baldemar Valesquez, and Bernice
                                 Johnson Reagon; artist Ralph Fasanella; cartoonists Gary
                                 Huck and Mike Konopacki; muralists Kathleen Farrell and Mike
                                 Alewitz; photographer Earl Dotter; and poets Chris Llewellyn
                                 and Professor Louie.


The Labor Heritage Foundation (LHF) was founded in 1983, and incorporated in 1984, as a
result of inspiration of the GLAE gatherings, by Joe Glazer, Joe Uehlein, and Saul
Schniderman. They brought together that small
committed group of labor leaders, artists, and activists
to build on a growing network of people sharing a
passion for the labor movement. What began as a
labor arts exchange has grown into a strong and
vibrant national community organization where artists,
activists, and organizers could share music, art, and performance works that speak to their
experiences, vision, and work for and in the labor movement.


LHF works to preserve and promote knowledge of the cultural heritage of the American worker
through the arts, including music, poetry, written works, theatre, and artistic works; and
conducts historical research through written and oral histories. Our mission is to strengthen
the labor movement through the use of music and arts. Using creative organizing methods,
artistic opportunities, and cultural activities we are the “synergy, heart, and soul” that brings the
passion for equality, fair labor standards and practices, and a just society together in the labor
movement.


The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work portrays the real life work, idiosyncrasies, and
personal convictions of a multitude of working professionals, including two plumbers, two
painters, a stone / brick mason, several carpenters, two auto mechanics, and numerous other
craftsmen.


The film recognizes the essential contributions that these tradesmen provide, and shows only
a few of the many challenges they face and the problems they solve in their everyday work.


Their stories are combined with academic analysis of the socioeconomic, intellectual, and
philosophical aspects of modern trade work.


In a recent EG conference in Monterey, California, Baltimore native and creator and host of
Discovery Channel’s Dirty Jobs Mike Rowe discusses the value and innovation found in
today's trade work, which is commonly overlooked in our contemporary high tech society.


The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work will leave you with an understanding of the
personally rewarding opportunities that still exist in America in the trades, and an appreciation
for the work of tradesmen that make every aspect of our modern lives possible.

                                          #    #     #     #


         Writer, director, producer Richard Yeagley is available for interview by appointment.

                                        Please contact:
                         Steve Thompson / Thompson Communications
                           580 Haddon Avenue; Collingswood, NJ 08108
                                        856-942-4434
                                    steve@thomcomm.net


                                      National Labor College
                                     10000 New Hampshire Ave.
                                      Silver Spring, MD 20903
                                          1-301-431-6400
                                          1-800-462-4237


                                    Labor Heritage Foundation
                                       815 16th Street NW
                                      Washington, DC 20006
                                          202-639-6204
                            The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work
                                  is A Dickie Bruce Production

                                       With appearances by:

                                            Mike Rose
                                              UCLA

                                         Judith Lombardi
                                   Ph. D. from the Union Institute
                               in Human Relations and Cybernetics

                                      Joe Lamacchiardi
                                www.bluecollarandproudofit.com

                                             Mike Rowe
              Baltimore native and creator and host of Discovery Channel’s Dirty Jobs
                                    www.mikeroweWORKS.com

                   And several Baltimore area skilled tradesmen and women!




                                      Audience Website:
                              www.thetradesmendocumentary.com


                            The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work
                                      on Facebook at:
                          www.facebook.com/TradesmenDocumentary




V8 6-7-2011
Director’s Statement from Richard Yeagley

                                                 I was raised in a place called “Charm City “ -
                                                 most know it as Baltimore.

                                                 Growing up, I vividly remember the blue-collar
                                                 nature of the individuals and the city itself.

                                                 At this point in my life I no longer have a daily
                                                 connection to the blue-collar worker, and I
                                                 have lost touch with the very essence of my
                                                 upbringing and the people who occupy my
                                                 childhood and adolescent memories.

After graduating from college, moving away from my hometown, and entering the workforce, I
began to notice a pervasive bias against work that required any form of manual labor and
described as blue collar. In principle, this sentiment, without any firsthand experience, was
unfair and disparaging towards tradesmen and their work.

But why are such attitudes ubiquitous within our current cultural landscape? Where does the
current cultural bias come from? Is it influenced by technological advances and novel
opportunities in other occupations? Or opinions of limited financial prosperity in trade-work,
and the potential for higher wages in other fields? Or is it inherent in the current educational
curriculum and paradigm? I wanted to produce a documentary which sets out to explore these
questions, and The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work is that documentary.

								
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