Report for Community Services Committee May meeting

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					                                                                    Agenda Item No.: H.1.a.

Recommendations from the Names Advisory Committee.                                            H
                                                                                              1
Recommendation:                                     Report Summary
                                                                                              a
1. That the names ‘Cairns Bay’ and ‘Cairns           The actions recommended above are in
    Place’ not be adopted.                             keeping with the guidelines of the
                                                       Names Advisory Committee.
2. That the name ‘Calderon Crescent’ be
    adopted.                                        Justification of Recommendation
3. That the following names be adopted for          1. The names “Cairns Bay” and “Cairns
    use in Terwillegar Towne                           Place” do not comply with the Names
    Neighbourhood and placed on the                    Advisory Committee ‘Guidelines for
    Names Reserve List: ‘Keith Tailyour’,              Naming’.
    ‘Robert Tegler’, ‘Jean-Baptiste
                                                    2. The name “Calderon Crescent”
    Thibault’, ‘Frederick Todd’, and
                                                       complies with the Names Advisory
    ‘William Tomison’.
                                                       Committee ‘Guidelines for Naming’.
4. That the names ‘Tegler Gate’, ‘Tory
                                                    3. The names “Keith Tailyour”, “Robert
    Road’, and ‘Tory Crescent’ be adopted.
                                                       Tegler”, “Jean-Baptiste Thibault”,
5. That the name ‘Richford                             “Frederick Todd”, and “William
    Neighbourhood’ be adopted.                         Tomison” complies with the Names
6. That the names ‘Wild Rose Way’, ‘Ward               Advisory Committee ‘Guidelines for
    Crescent’, and ‘Wyman Lane’ be                     Naming’.
    adopted.                                        4. The names “Tegler Gate”, “Tory
7. That the names ‘Williams Court’, and                Road”, and “Tory Crescent” complies
    ‘Wiseman Lane’ be adopted.                         with the Names Advisory Committee
8. That the names ‘Tompkins Wynd’,                     ‘Guidelines for Naming’.
    ‘Tompkins Place’, ‘Tompkins Way’,               5. The name “Richford Neighbourhood”
    ‘Tompkins Square’, and ‘Terwillegar                complies with the Names Advisory
    Vista’ be adopted.                                 Committee ‘Guidelines for Naming’.
9. That a portion of Mill Woods Road East           6. The names “Wild Rose Way”, “Ward
    and Mill Woods Road South be                       Crescent”, and “Wyman Lane”
    honourarily named ‘Gurdwara Road’.                 complies with the Names Advisory
10. That the following names be placed on              Committee ‘Guidelines for Naming’.
    the Names Reserve List for future use:          7. The names “Williams Court”, and
    “Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Karl                   “Wiseman Lane” complies with the
    Weidle”.                                           Names Advisory Committee ‘Guidelines
11. That the name ‘Tommy Banks Way’ be                 for Naming’.
    adopted.




Routing:             Community Services Committee
Delegation:          Mark Lawrence, Leanne de Boer
Written By:          Stuart Frunchak
May 6, 1999          Planning and Development Department
File: 99PDP042       (Page 1 of 2)
Recommendations from the Names Advisory Committee




8. The names “Tompkins Wynd”,                           “Tegler Gate”, “Tory Road”, and “Tory
    “Tompkins Place”, “Tompkins Way”,                   Crescent”.
    “Tompkins Square”, and “Terwillegar             5. Request to name an area of land
    Vista” complies with the Names                      “Richford Neighbourhood”; location
    Advisory Committee ‘Guidelines for                  map included.
    Naming’.
                                                    6. Request to rename three roadways in the
9. The name “Gurdwara Road” recognizes                  Wild Rose Neighbourhood. Context and
    the tercentennial of the Sikh community             location maps included showing the
    and their contribution to the City of               location of proposed “Wild Rose Way”,
    Edmonton.                                           “Ward Crescent”, and “Wyman Lane”.
10. The names “Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and            7. Request to name two roadways in the
    “Karl Weidle” complies with the Names               Wild Rose Neighbourhood. Context and
    Advisory Committee ‘Guidelines for                  location maps included showing the
    Naming’.                                            location of proposed “Williams Court”,
11. The name “Tommy Banks Way”                          and “Wiseman Lane”.
    complies with the Names Advisory                8. Request to name five roadways in the
    Committee ‘Guidelines for Naming’.                  Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood.
                                                        Location map included showing the
Background Information Attached
                                                        location of proposed “Tompkins Wynd”,
1. Request to name two roadways in the                  “Tompkins Place”, “Tompkins Way”,
   Carlton Neighbourhood. Context and                   “Tompkins Square”, and “Terwillegar
   location maps included showing the                   Vista”.
   location of proposed “Cairns Bay”, and           9. Request to honourarily name a portion of
   “Cairns Place”.                                      Mill Woods Road South and Mill Woods
2. Request to name a roadway in the                     Road East. Location map included
   Cumberland Neighbourhood. Location                   showing the location of proposed
   map included showing the location of                 “Gurdwara Road”.
   proposed “Calderon Crescent”.                    10. Request to add the following names to
3. Request to add the following names to                the Names Reserve List: Dr. Horst A.
   the Names Reserve List, and reserve                  Schmid, and Mr. Karl Weidle.
   their use for Terwillegar Towne: Keith           11. Request to rename a portion of
   Tailyour, Robert Tegler, Jean-Baptiste               102 Street south of Saskatchewan Drive
   Thibault, Frederick Todd, and William                to 86 Avenue, and a portion of 86
   Tomison.                                             Avenue located between 103 Street and
4. Request to name three roadways in the                102 Street ‘Tommy Banks Way’, location
   Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood.                     map included.
   Context and location maps included
   showing the location of proposed




                                         (Page 2 of 2)
                                                                                    Attachment 1

Request to name two roadways in the Carlton Neighbourhood “Cairns Bay”, and
“Cairns Place”.


The Names Advisory Committee recommends non-support on the request to name two
roadways in the Carlton Neighbourhood “Cairns Bay”, and “Cairns Place”.

History

March 24, 1999
An application was received from IBI Group requesting to name two cul-de-sacs located in the
Carlton Neighbourhood.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:       de Boer/ Baird

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends non-support to name the cul-de-sacs."

       For the Motion:       Mitchell, Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                            Carried Unanimously

Administration

*   The applicant proposes to use one name from the “Names Reserve List” in the following
    manner:
       * Cairns Bay; after James Mitchell Cairns; and
       * Cairns Place; same.

                  CAIRNS,                     (Born 1903) Mr. Justice Cairns arrived in Canada
                  James Mitchell              from Edinburgh, Scotland, with his parents in 1910.
                                              The family settled in Nelson, B.C. and started fruit
                                              farming.

                                              Following his legal training at the University of
                                              Alberta, he moved to Calgary where he joined a law
                                              firm then headed by Premier Peter Lougheed's
                                              father. In 1952, he was appointed a justice of the
                                              Alberta Supreme Court trial division and in 1965,
                                              he was sworn in as judge of the Appellate Division
                                              of the Supreme Court.




                                      Attachment 1 - Page 1 of 3
                                                                         Attachment 1

Context map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Carlton Neighbourhood




                Carlton                                       Oxford
                             Proposed Cairns Bay & Cairns Place




                                 Attachment 1 - Page 2 of 3
                                                                         Attachment 1

Map showing the location of the proposed two roadways in the Carlton Neighbourhood as
“Cairns Bay”, and “Cairns Place”.




                                     Proposed Cairns Bay
                                     Proposed Cairns Place




                                 Attachment 1 - Page 3 of 3
                                                                                  Attachment 2

Request to name a roadway “Calderon Crescent” in the Cumberland Neighbourhood.




The Names Advisory Committee recommends support for the naming of a roadway in the
Cumberland Neighbourhood as “Calderon Crescent”.

History

March 19, 1999
An application was received from IBI Group requesting to name a crescent in the Cumberland
Neighbourhood ‘Calderon Crescent’.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:       Galan/ Baird

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends approval for this located directly opposite
       of another named crescent which share a common access road, 134 Street.”

       For the Motion:      Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                           Carried Unanimously

Administration

 The applicant proposes to use a name from the “Names Reserve List” in the following
  manner:
       Calderon Crescent; named after Capt. Alfred Marigon Calderon

                 CALDERON,                  (1861-1936) Born at London, England, he was a
                 Cap. Alfred Marigon        member of the famous Artist Rifles in London for
                                            over 8 years prior to coming to Canada as a young
                                            man. He married in Ottawa in 1896 and moved to
                                            Edmonton in 1906.

                                            Among his better known architectural achievements
                                            in Edmonton are Rene Le Marchand apartments and
                                            the Edmonton Club.

                                            Despite the fact that he was 55 years old, in 1916 he
                                            joined the First Battalion, Edmonton Regiment and
                                            went to France, then served on the western front
                                            with the 49th Battalion. In all, his military career
                                            covered 18 years in the ranks and 13 years as a
                                            commissioned officer.




                                    Attachment 2 - Page 1 of 2
                                                                          Attachment 2

Map indicating the location of proposed “Calderon Crescent” in the Cumberland
Neighbourhood.




                                     Proposed Calderon Crescent




                                 Attachment 2 - Page 2 of 2
                                                                                  Attachment 3

Request that the following names be placed on the Names Reserve List and reserved for use
in Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood: “Keith Tailyour”, “Robert Tegler”, “Jean-Baptiste
Thibault”, “Frederick Todd”, and “William Tomison”.

The Names Advisory Committee recommends the addition of Keith Tailyour, Robert
Tegler, Jean-Baptiste Thibault, Frederick Todd, and William Tomison to the Names
Reserve List, with preference to be used within the Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood.

History

April 12, 1999
An application was received from Melcor Developments Ltd. requesting to reserve five names
for roadways located in the Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:        de Boer/ Galan

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends approval to place the names Keith
       Tailyour, Robert Tegler, Jean-Baptiste Thibault, Frederick Todd, and William Tomison
       on the Names Reserve List as it complies with the ‘Guidelines for Naming’. The names
       shall be reserved for use the Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood.”

       For the Motion:       Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                          Carried Unanimously

Administration

   The applicant requests that these five names be added to the Names Reserve List and held in
    reserve for use in the Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood.


Biographies

Tailyour, Keith

Keith Tailyour was a World War I war pilot from Edmonton. His fellow war pilots included
George Forman, Roy Brown, “Punch Dickins, Jimmy Bell and “Wop” May who is know for
shooting down the “Red Baron”.

After the war, these pilots were responsible for opening the remote resource-filled north. They
demonstrated a true entrepreneurial spirit by investing their lives and money in airplanes and
facilities. Edmontonians were enthusiastic about the flying. In 1919 Tailyour incorporate the
Edmonton Airplane Company with his partners Jock McNeill, E. Owens, R. L. Green and Peter
McArthur. They erected a rough hangar where the Edmonton Municipal Airport is today. They
purchased an Avro airplane and offered service to Peace River.




                                     Attachment 3 - Page 1 of 4
                                                                                      Attachment 3

Request that the following names be placed on the Names Reserve List and reserved for use
in Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood: “Keith Tailyour”, “Robert Tegler”, “Jean-Baptiste
Thibault”, “Frederick Todd”, and “William Tomison”.

Tegler, Robert (1880-1921)

Robert Tegler, also known as Bob Tegler, was raised on a farm near Walkerton, Ontario. He
graduated in mathematics from the University of Toronto and came west upon graduation. He
began work in 1901 in Edmonton’s elegant Alberta House Hotel as a bookkeeper. The next year,
he opened a real estate office across the street. Tegler was a true entrepreneur. He was the first
to sell fresh fish from Lesser Slave Lake to Chicago. His other endeavours include real estate,
coal, timber, conventional oil drilling projects and early attempts to extract oil from the tar sands.

In 1911, he began construction of Edmonton’s first “skyscraper” – the Tegler Building. It was
an eight-storey office building at the corner of 101 Street and 102 Avenue. It was one of the
earliest reinforced concrete buildings in Alberta and the first fireproof office building in
Edmonton. The Tegler Building was demolished on December 12, 1982.

The Tegler name is closely identified with the history of Edmonton. Robert Tegler died a
millionaire in Edmonton at the age of forty-one. The Robert Tegler trust was established from
his estate. The mandate of the Tegler Trust is to provide funding for charitable purposes solely
in the Province of Alberta. Since 1921, the Tegler Trust has contributed to more than 155
different projects, mostly in the Edmonton area. For example, the Tegler Scholarships have been
running for more than 60 years.

Contributions

       -       member and officer of the Edmonton driving club
       -       sportsman
       -       philanthropist

Thibault, Jean-Baptiste (1810-1879)

Father Jean-Baptiste Thibault was a Catholic missionary who opened up the west and the north
in America. He also defended the interests of the Metis to the government. Father Jean-Baptiste
Thibault received his classical and theological education at the seminary of Quebec and was
admitted to the subdiaconate on March 31, 1833. He departed the same year for the northwest.
His mission was to bring Christianity to the Metis by persuasion.

For ten years he travelled to the meeting-places of the Indians and Metis, from 1842 to 1852. He
was the Catholic priest at Fort Edmonton during this time and in 1844 founded the mission at
Lake St. Anne, the first in Alberta. He then served at Saint-Boniface until 1868 when he
returned to Quebec. He played a minor role in he government negotiations with the Red River
colony to join into confederation.




                                       Attachment 3 - Page 2 of 4
                                                                                    Attachment 3

Request that the following names be placed on the Names Reserve List and reserved for use
in Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood: “Keith Tailyour”, “Robert Tegler”, “Jean-Baptiste
Thibault”, “Frederick Todd”, and “William Tomison”.

Todd, Frederick (1876-1947)

Frederick Todd was the landscape architect who in 1907 recommended to Edmonton City
Council to reserve the city’s river valley and ravines for parks. Edmonton City Council adopted
the proposal in 1915 and eventually dedicated $34 million to the project in 1974. The initial
project consisted of 10 miles of recreational parks along each side of the river valley stretching
from the Parliament Buildings to the eastern edge of the City.
Various elements of an English garden will influence Terwillegar Gardens including: park
landscaping, the proposed park monument, entrance way landscaping, patterned
concrete/cobblestone accents, boulevard trees, wrought iron fencing and hedges, and more.
There is a larger than normal amount of green space, trails and landscaping in the Terwillegar
Gardens neighbourhood. It is particularly fitting that the streets of Terwillegar Gardens should
recognize a prominent landscape architect that through his insight had such a lasting influence on
the City of Edmonton and its residents.
Frederick Todd was born in Concord, New Hampshire in 1876. He received his high school
education in Andover, Massachusetts. He went on to Massachusetts State College in Amherst,
Massachusetts where he graduated in 1895.
He came to Canada in 1900 and began his landscape architecture practice in Montreal the same
year.

Contributions
      -      in 1903, Todd was commissioned by the Federal Government under the Ottawa
             Improvement Commission to review landscape issues in the City of Ottawa. He
             designed a system of drives and parks for the city.
      -      located the Parliament Buildings and designed the surrounding parks for the
             Province of Saskatchewan
      -      located the Parliament Buildings and designed the surrounding parks for the
             Province of Alberta
      -      designed Marine Drive and the town of Point Grey for the B.C. Government
      -      designed the town of Port Mann, British Columbia
      -      Designed the town of Mont Royal, P.Q.
      -      Designed Assiniboine Park in Winnipeg Manitoba, Bowring Park in St. John’s
             Newfoundland, St. Helen’s Island Park in Montreal and the National Battlefields
             Park in Quebec.




                                      Attachment 3 - Page 3 of 4
                                                                               Attachment 3

Request that the following names be placed on the Names Reserve List and reserved for use
in Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood: “Keith Tailyour”, “Robert Tegler”, “Jean-Baptiste
Thibault”, “Frederick Todd”, and “William Tomison”.

Tomison, William (1740-1830)

William Tomison was with the Hudson’s Bay Company in Canada from 1775 to 1811. He drove
the Hudson’s Bay Company across Manitoba and Saskatchewan and far into Alberta. In 1795 he
built the Hudson’s Bay Company trading post called Edmonton House. It was located right next
to the NorthWest Company’s post called Fort Augustus. Edmonton House and Fort Augustus
were built on the west bank of the Saskatchewan River two miles north of the heart of present
day Fort Saskatchewan.

Tomison named Edmonton House in honour of the Deputy-Governor of the Hudson’s Bay
Company. Edmonton was the name of an estate owned by the Deputy-Governor at the time.
Tomison served as commander of Edmonton House for sixteen years before he retired and
returned to Scotland.




                                   Attachment 3 - Page 4 of 4
                                                                                 Attachment 4

Request to name three roadways in Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood “Tegler Gate”,
“Tory Road”, and “Tory Crescent”.


The Names Advisory Committee recommends support the naming of three roadways in the
Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood “Tegler Gate”, ”Tory Road”, and “Tory Crescent”.

History

April 12, 1999
An application was received from Melcor Developments Ltd. requesting to name three roadways
in the eastern portion of Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood after Dr. Henry Marshall Tory.

April 28, 1999
An amendment to the application was made requesting that the entrance to “Tegler Gate” from
the original application of “Tory Boulevard”.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:        Baird/ Galan

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends approval to the naming of three roadways
       in the Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood as:
               1.     Tory Road instead of Tory Drive (as applied for),
               2.     Tory Crescent, and
               3.     Tegler Gate.”

       For the Motion:       Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                          Carried Unanimously

Biography

Tory, Henry Marshall (1864 - 1947)

Henry Marshall Tory was born on the Nova Scotia Homestead Port Shoreham, a pioneer farm.
He grew up and was educated in Nova Scotia and entered McGill University at the age of
twenty-two. He spent twenty-two years at McGill as a student, lecturer, and then Professor of
Mathematics and Physics. In 1905 he went to British Columbia and was fundamental in
founding the McGill University College of British Columbia, now the University of British
Columbia.




                                     Attachment 4 - Page 1 of 4
                                                                                     Attachment 4

Request to name three roadways in Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood “Tegler Gate”,
“Tory Road”, and “Tory Crescent”.


In 1908, Tory became the first president of the University of Alberta and the first classes started
in September of the same year. During a leave of absence from the University of Alberta from
1917 to 1919, Tory founded the Khaki University of Canada to provide educational services for
the troops abroad. In 1928 at the age of sixty-five, Dr. Tory left the University of Alberta.

He served as President of the National Research Council from 1923 to 1935. Tory founded and
was President of Carleton University from 1942 to his death in 1947.

Contributions:

       -       Professor Mathematics and Physics
       -       Founder of the University of British Columbia
       -       Founder and first President of the University of Alberta
       -       Founder and President of Khaki University
       -       President of the National Research Council
       -       President of Carleton University
       -       Served on eight national and international Royal Commissions
       -       President of the Association of Canadian Clubs
       -       President of the League of Nations Society of Canada
       -       President of the Royal Society of Canada

Awards:

       -       academic honours: M.A., B.D., Doctorate in Science
       -       honoured by nine Canadian Universities
       -       a Colonel in the Canadian Army
       -       recognized as a valuable member of numerous volunteer organizations




                                      Attachment 4 - Page 2 of 4
                                                                           Attachment 4
Context map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Terwillegar Towne
Neighbourhood.



                                                                           Leger Neighbourhood




        Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood               Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood
                Developer - Carma                             Developer - Melcor




                                   Attachment 4 - Page 3 of 4
                                                                         Attachment 4

Map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Terwillegar Towne
Neighbourhood: “Tegler Gate”, “Tory Road”, and “Tory Crescent”.




                                 Attachment 4 - Page 4 of 4
                                                                               Attachment 5

Request to name a new neighbourhood as “Richford Neighbourhood”.




The Names Advisory Committee recommends support of the naming of “Richford
Neighbourhood”.

History

April 7, 1999
Application was received from Stantec Consulting Group to name an area located between
111 Street SW and Blackmud Creek, north of Ellerslie Road SW; ‘Richford Neighbourhood’.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:        de Boer/ Galan

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends approval to name the Richford
       Neighbourhood, located between 111 Street SW and Blackmud Creek, north of Ellerslie
       Road SW in Rural South West.”

       For the Motion:       Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                        Carried Unanimously


Administration

   The main roadway currently running through this area is addressed as 5 Avenue SW as well
    as being known as Richford Road. The history behind this name is not known.

   “Richford Road” is not used for municipal addressing.




                                    Attachment 5 - Page 1 of 2
                                                                     Attachment 5
Map showing the location of the proposed “Richford Neighbourhood”.




                                Attachment 5 - Page 2 of 2
                                                                       Attachment 6
Request to rename three roadways in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood “Ward Crescent”,
“Wyman Lane”, and “Wild Rose Way”.


The Names Advisory Committee recommends support the naming of three roadways in the
Wild Rose Neighbourhood “Ward Crescent”, ”Wyman Lane”, and “Wild Rose Way”.

History

April 7, 1999
An application was received from Stantec Consulting Ltd. requesting to rename the roadways of
registered plan 982 5499 (created by subdivision).

May 3, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99 - Supplementary

       Motion:       de Boer/ Galan

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends approval to the renaming of the roadways
       in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood contingent that the applicant name the roadways in the
       following manner:
               1.    Ward Crescent instead of Wild Rose Crescent (as applied for) located west
                     of 23 Street,
               2.    Wild Rose Way instead of Ward Avenue (as applied for) located east of
                     23 Street, and
               3.    Wyman Lane instead of Wyman Close (as applied for) located east of
                     23 Street.”

       For the Motion:      Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                         Carried Unanimously


Administration

   The applicant requests to name a roadway in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood in the following
    manner:
     Wild Rose Way; named after the Neighbourhood.

   Two names have been selected from the Names Reserved List:
     Ward Crescent; named after Maxwell Ward aviator; and
     Wyman Lane; named after Brigadier R. A. Wyman, distinguished serviceman.




                                    Attachment 6 - Page 1 of 4
                                                                       Attachment 6
Request to rename three roadways in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood “Ward Crescent”,
“Wyman Lane”, and “Wild Rose Way”.


Biography

Ward, Maxwell William (1921-)

Maxwell William (Max) Ward, O.C., was born at Edmonton Alberta on November 22, 1921
where he was educated. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1940, received his pilot’s
wings and served as a commissioned flight instructor at various Canadian bases until 1945. At
war’s end, he was hired by Hall Member Jack Moar as a bush pilot for Northern Flights Limited
operating from Peach River, Alberta to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. In 1946 he
organized his own air operation, Polaris Charter Company Limited, based in Yellowknife, with
one single-engine aircraft carrying supplies and passengers through the sub-Arctic.

Advice from Hall Member J. R. Vachon resulted in his enlarging this northern operation through
a partnership with another firm, but after four years he left aviation to enter the home
construction business in Lethbridge, Alberta. Two years later he returned to Yellowknife with a
newly formed company, Wardair Limited, and a licence to operate a domestic charter service
from that location. He acquired a 14 passenger Twin Otter, and gradually expanding his
operation he acquired a new airplane every year. In 1957 he purchased the company’s first
heavy-aircraft, a Bristol Freighter, and he and his pilots pioneered the air transport of heavy
equipment into the far Arctic, on one occasion landing at the geographic North Pole.

In 1962 he introduced four-engine DC-6a freighter aircraft to high latitude operations carrying
14-ton loads of construction equipment into semi-prepared landing strips. Through their use
Max gained an Air Transport Board licence to operate international commercial air charters,
changed the corporate name to Wardair Canada Ltd., and opened offices in Edmonton. Despite
numerous financial setbacks and governmental delays, he expanded his northern operation and
commenced the first international overseas charter flight agency serving western Canada.

His airline became the third major Canadian carrier to operate pure jet aircraft, in 1966, with the
purchase of a Boeing 727. Two years later he added a Boeing 707. In 1969 he acquired another
Boeing 707 and 1973 replaced his first jet aircraft with a Boeing 747, seating 452 passengers.
To keep pace with northern Canada’s growth, he increased his transport fleet to seven large
aircraft. By 1973 his company was serving destinations in England, Europe, The Mediterranean
countries, the Caribbean, the United States, the Orient and the South Pacific Ocean islands, and
had developed into Canada’s largest international air charter carrier.

In 1971 he was presented with the Billy Mitchell award by the Northwest Aviation Council and
was awarded the McKee Trophy in 1973 for his contributions to this nation’s air transport
services. In 1975 he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his outstanding
contribution to aviation and to the development of Canada’s north.

He was named a Member of Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame in 1973 with the following citation:

“His lengthy and continuing efforts to responsibly service this nation’s northern frontier by air,
despite adversity, have been of outstanding benefit to Canadian aviation.”




                                      Attachment 6 - Page 2 of 4
                                                                             Attachment 6
Context map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Wild Rose
Neighbourhood.




                                   Location of proposed named roadways




                                 Attachment 6 - Page 3 of 4
                                                                          Attachment 6
Map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood:
“Ward Crescent”, “Wyman Lane”, and “Wild Rose Way”.




                               Location of proposed named roadways:
                                             Ward Crescent
                                             Wild Rose Way
                                             Wyman Lane




                                 Attachment 6 - Page 4 of 4
                                                                        Attachment 7
Request to name two roadways in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood “Williams Court”, and
“Wiseman Lane”.



The Names Advisory Committee recommends support the naming of two roadways in the
Wild Rose Neighbourhood “Williams Court”, and “Wiseman Lane”.

History

April 7, 1999
An application was received from Dundee Developments Corporation requesting to name two
roadways in Wild Rose Neighbourhood

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:        Galan/ de Boer

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends approval to the naming of the two
       roadways in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood as:
             1.      Williams Court - to the cul-de-sac located west of 23 Street, and
             2.      Wiseman Lane - to the roadway located east of 23 Street, which will
                     connect to what will be known as 21 Street.”

       For the Motion:       Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                         Carried Unanimously


Administration

   The applicant has chosen two names from the Names Reserve List to be used as seen fit by
    the Committee:
     Williams Court; named after Lee Williams - involved with horse racing; and
     Wiseman Lane; named after Dave Wiseman, fur trader.




                                    Attachment 7 - Page 1 of 3
                                                                             Attachment 7
Context map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Wild Rose
Neighbourhood.




                                   Location of proposed named roadways




                                 Attachment 7 - Page 2 of 3
                                                                          Attachment 7
Map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Wild Rose Neighbourhood:
“Williams Court”, and “Wiseman Lane”.




                               Location of proposed named roadways:

                                             Williams Court
                                             Wiseman Lane




                                 Attachment 7 - Page 3 of 3
                                                                                    Attachment 8

Request to name five roadways in the Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood: “Tompkins
Wynd”, ”Tompkins Place”, “Tompkins Way”, “Tompkins Square”, and “Terwillegar Vista”.


The Names Advisory Committee recommends support the naming of five roadways in the
Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood “Tompkins Wynd”, ”Tompkins Place”, “Tompkins
Way”, “Tompkins Square”, and “Terwillegar Vista”.

History

April 8, 1999
An application was received from Stantec Consulting Ltd. to naming five roadways in the
Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood.

April 28, 1999
An amendment to the application was received requesting support from “Tomlinson Vista” to
“Terwillegar Vista”.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:         de Boer/ Galan

       “The Names Advisory Committee support approval to the naming of the five roadways in
       the Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood as Tompkins Wynd, Tompkins Place, Tompkins
       Way, Tompkins Square, and Terwillegar Vista, as they comply to the ‘Guidelines for
       Naming’.”

       For the Motion:        Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                             Carried Unanimously

Administration

   The applicant chose a name from the Names Reserve List in which four roadways in the
    Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood would be named in the following manner:
        Tompkins Wynd; named after Peter Tompkins (1863-1940);
        Tompkins Place; same;
        Tompkins Way; same; and
        Tompkins Square; same.

   In addition, the applicant’s application was to request to name fifth roadway in the
    Terwillegar Towne Neighbourhood in the following manner:
         Terwillegar Vista; named after the neighbourhood.




                                      Attachment 8 - Page 1 of 2
                                                                          Attachment 8
Map showing the location of the proposed roadways in the Terwillegar Towne
Neighbourhood: “Tompkins Wynd, “Tompkins Place”, “Tompkins Way”, “Tompkins
Square”, and “Terwillegar Vista”.




                                 Attachment 8 - Page 2 of 2
                                                                                   Attachment 9

Request that a portion of Mill Woods Road South and Mill Woods Road East be
honourarily named ‘Gurdwara Road’.


The Names Advisory Committee recommends support for the honourary naming of a
portion of Mill Woods Road South located east of 50 Street, and a portion of Mill Woods
Road East located south of 34 Avenue as “Gurdwara Road”.

History

January 20, 1999
An application was received from the Sikh Federation of Edmonton requesting to name a portion
of Mill Woods Road South from 50 Street to 45 Street be renamed Gurdwara Road (Avenue),
Gurdwara Boulevard, or Khalsa Road (Avenue).

April 15, 1999
The applicant verbally modified their application by extending its limits to include the roadway
located between the two Sikh Gurdwara’s in Mill Woods, and agreed that the naming of these
roadways would be honourary with no official status. As well, it was agreed upon that the
applicants would contact the surrounding Community Leagues, and the Mill Woods Presidents
Council to obtain letters of support or non-support for their application.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:        Mitchell/ Baird

       “The Names Advisory Committee support the naming, in honourarium, the portion of
       Mill Woods Road South east of 50 Street, along Mill Woods Road East to 34 Avenue.

       For the Motion:        Baird, de Boer, Galan, Mitchell
                                                                            Carried Unanimously


Administration

   The applicant wishes to mark the tercentennial of the Sikh Community and their participation
    in of Edmonton’s social and economic progress.
   The applicant is prepared to pay all costs incurred by this application.
   The applicant has agreed that the name “Gurdwara Road” would hold no official status.
   The applicant will be in contact with the Transportation and Streets Department to discuss
    the design and implementation of the street blades.




                                     Attachment 9 - Page 1 of 3
                                                                             Attachment 9

Request that a portion of Mill Woods Road South and Mill Woods Road East be
honourarily named ‘Gurdwara Road’.




Correspondence Received

Letters of support:
 Rev. Dr. Don Mayne, President - Edmonton Interfaith Centre for Education and Action;
 David Kilgour, P.C., M.P. - Edmonton Southeast;
 Gene Zwozdesky, MLA - Edmonton Mill Creek;
 Dave Thiele, Councillor Ward 6 - City of Edmonton;
 Millwoods Cultural Society;
 Ridgewood Community League;
 Southwood Community League;
 P. Batth - Pizza 99 Ltd. 1527 Mill Woods Road East
 G. Pickington - Daly Grove Esso
 Seven Mill Woods Residents

Letters of non-support:
 No letters were received.




                                   Attachment 9 - Page 2 of 3
                                                                             Attachment 9

Map indicating the location of the proposed honourary naming of ‘Gurdwara Road’.




                                       WEINLOS
      Neighbourhood
      Boundary

      School Site
                                                                       BISSET

      Gurdwara

      Portions of Mill Woods
      Road South and East
      to be honourarily
      named.

      Other Religious
      Assemblies




                                     POLLARD
                                    MEADOWS
                                                                    DALY GROVE




                                                     CRAWFORD PLAINS




                                     Recommendation: Honourarily name
                                    Mill Woods Road South east of 50 Street
                        along Mill Woods Road East to 34 Avenue - GURDWARA ROAD.




                                    Attachment 9 - Page 3 of 3
                                                                               Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


The Names Advisory Committee recommends that the names of Dr. Horst A. Schmid, and
Mr. Karl Weidle be placed on the Names Reserve List.

History

March 15,1999
An application was received from the German-Canadian Association of Alberta requesting that
two individuals be placed on the Names Reserve List.
    Dr. Horst A. Schmid
    Mr. Karl Weidle

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:       Baird/ Galan

       “The Names Advisory Committee support the addition of Dr. Horst A. Schmid and
       Mr. Karl Weidle to the Names Reserve List, as they comply with the ‘Guidelines for
       Naming’.”

       For the Motion:       Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                         Carried Unanimously


Biographies

Schmid, Horst A. (1933 - )

Dr. Horst A. Schmid was born in Munich, Bavaria. He received his early education in Europe.

Arriving in Canada in 1952, he worked as a Goldminer in Yellowknife leaving for Edmonton,
Alberta, in 1956. His accountant’s training in Edmonton was supplemented by courses in
Business Administration, Psychology, and Business Finance from the University of Toronto.

In the late 1950’s, he established an export company. This company exported Canadian
manufactured goods and commodities such as sulphur and fertilizer to many nations, especially
the Far East.

He is the Honorary Chairman of the Commonwealth Arts Organization, Honorary Patron and
Honorary Director of many other organizations.




                                    Attachment 10 - Page 1 of 9
                                                                                 Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


He is the recipient of numerous Awards from Provincial, National, and International
Organizations and is Honorary Indian Chief “Flying Eagle”. During Alberta’s 75th Anniversary
Celebrations, the City of Edmonton named him with only 15 other persons honoured likewise:
“Builder of the Community”.

From 1960 to 1986, he was active in Civic, Provincial, and Federal political campaigns. He was
Advisor for the Preservation of the Ethno-Cultural Heritage of Alberta from 1965 until 1971 to
Peter Lougheed, then Leader of the Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta.

Dr. Schmid was elected as MLA for Edmonton-Avonmore, August 30, 1971, and appointed as
Minister of Culture, Youth and Recreation on September 10, 1971. During this term he initiated
and guided the development of countless programs such as: The Alberta Games, Heritage
Magazine, The Cultural Heritage Language Support Program, The Matching Grant Program for
Youth Associations such as they Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Airforce – Army – and Navy Cadets,
4H Clubs etc., The Alberta Historical Resources Act, the Major Cultural and Recreational
Facilities Program, Project Co-operation, The International Assistance Program, the Performing
Arts on Tour Program, the Mobile Planetarium, the Percy Page Sports Administration Centre,
The Community Hall Improvement and Recreation Students Summer Employment Program, etc.
He also was the Provincial Delegate to Munich to bring the Commonwealth Games to
Edmonton, and the Commissioner for Alberta during the Spokane World’s Fair.

Dr. Schmid was the first post-war immigrant to be elected as a Member of the Legislative
Assembly of Alberta and the first post-war immigrant to be appointed to a Cabinet in Canada.

Re-elected in March 1975, he was appointed as Minister of Government Services and Minister
Responsible for Culture. During this term he was named “Man of the Year” by the Edmonton
Commonwealth Games Foundation, received the “Special Award” from the National Music
Council for Encouragement to Music in Alberta and Canada, the distinguished Service Award
from the Alberta Motion Picture Industries Association, and many others.

As well, he initiated and guided the development of the Foundation for the Performing Arts, the
Cultural Heritage Foundation, the Historical Resources Foundation, the “Matching Funds”
Program for the Performing Arts, the Acquisition and Development of the Ukrainian Cultural
Heritage Village, the First National Conference for Ministers Responsible for Historical
Resources, to name only a few. With the special permission of the Federal Office for Protocol
he was awarded the Bavarian Order of Merit for his contribution to fostering International
Relations.

Re-elected in March 1979, he was appointed as Minister of State for Economic Development and
International Trade. As Minister responsible for the promotion of International Trade, he
spearheaded the promotion of exports of manufactured goods and services to other countries




                                    Attachment 10 - Page 2 of 9
                                                                                 Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


through numerous trade missions in which countless Alberta Companies successfully
participated. Many communications were received by External Affairs in Ottawa from Canadian
Ambassadors around the world for his “All Canada” approach when being received and
promoting trade with Heads of Nations and Corporations.

Re-elected again in November 1982 as the member for Edmonton-Avonmore, Dr. Schmid was
appointed as Minister of International Trade. With his Department, he was able to help Alberta
Companies sign contracts for the export of goods and services in the amounts of $141 million in
1983, $47 million in 1984, and $899,865,000 in 1985. In February 1986 he was appointed
Minister of Tourism.

In November 1986, Dr. Schmid was appointed Commissioner General for Trade and Tourism for
the Government of Alberta and in the same month, received the highest Award from the City of
Edmonton: The Silver Ribbon Award, “in Recognition of His Outstanding Contributions to
Multiculturalism and International Trade which have Improved the Quality of Life in Alberta.”

As Commissioner General he continued to introduce Alberta Exporters to International Markets
through his invaluable contacts at the highest levels in many Nations of the World. He initiated
numerous investments in Alberta for a number of enterprises. It is estimated that through his
efforts he helped in at least $ 2,000,000,000 of Contracts negotiated between the then USSR and
now Russia and Alberta/Canada (such as Lavalin).

As Commissioner General he was responsible for the Promotion of Tourism to Alberta from
Europe and the South Americas. Under his direction, the number of Travel Wholesalers, Airline
and Government Offices now actively promoting with the private sector, Alberta as a vacation
destination, number of 1,500 alone in the German-speaking countries of Europe. Publications,
Newspapers and other written media have placed pictures and reports about Alberta to a value of
at least $30, 000,000 and numerous Prime Time Television programs about Alberta (The Yukon
and NWT as well) have been shown in those countries at a cost of only the transportation,
lodging and meals for the respective media while in Alberta (the airlines usually paid for the
tickets).

As a reflection of the above success of promoting Alberta in the German Speaking Countries of
Europe only one example: “Downhill (alpine) skiing” by persons from Germany in the
Banff/Jasper area was virtually unheard of in 1988, except for Heli-Skiing. In co-operation with
a number of officials of those areas and the contacts the Office of the Commissioner General had
made in Europe, there was an ever increasing number of skiers which will result in about 20,000
Day Ski Passes to be sold to skiers from Germany alone in the 1994/95 Season.

In 1987, Dr. Schmid was one of the first six persons to be inducted into the City of Edmonton’s
Cultural Hall of Fame.




                                    Attachment 10 - Page 3 of 9
                                                                                 Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


Also in 1987, the University of Alberta granted him the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws, “in
Recognition of His Contributions to Cultural and Economic Advancement in the Province of
Alberta as an Elected Official and Dedicated Citizen.”

In 1989, Dr. Schmid was awarded the Great Canadian Award “for His Outstanding
Accomplishments to Promote Alberta and Canada at the International Level” (Wayne Gretzky
received the same award with him).

Also in 1989 he was awarded the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal
Republic of Germany for “His Outstanding Achievements in Tourism and International Trade,
and for Helping to Preserve the German Cultural Heritage in Alberta and Canada”.

Also in 1990 he was presented with the Edmonton Ambassador’s Award for “His Contributions
in Attracting Major Trade Shows such as the International Ukrainian Trade Show to the Capital
City of Alberta”.

During the 1991 World’s Largest Tourist Convention and Exhibition, ITB Berlin, The Board of
Governors (composed of top international representatives of the tourism sector) presented to Dr.
Schmid the International Award for Tourism “Golden Helm” for “Having Contributed to the
Development of International Tourism with Competence, Dedication and Professionality.” In
1995 he was named again at ITB in Berlin, the Honorary President of the International Jury of
Tourism..

Also in 1991, the Western Fairs Association representing the Fairs Associations of the Western
United States and Western Canada, presented to Dr. Horst A. Schmid the Blue Ribbon Award
“in Recognition and Appreciation for Providing Outstanding Service to the Fair Industry and for
Being One of the Persons Responsible for Having Initiated and Negotiated for the Great Trade
Show of China, Thailand, New Zealand, USSR and Ukrainian Exhibitions.”
In 1992 the Art Fund of the Ukraine awarded Dr. Schmid the Honorary Membership of the Art
Fund of the Ukraine “for His Efforts in Promoting Artists and Business Between the Ukraine and
Alberta”.

In 1993 during a Trade Mission to China, the Art Academy of Jinan, Shandong, China made him
Honourary Principal of the Oilu Art Academy “in Recognition of His Efforts Between China and
Alberta”.

Dr. Schmid resigned as Commissioner General for Trade and Tourism in March of 1995 to
restart his personal International Trade Business which he left in 1971. He is now President and
CEO of Flying Eagle Resources Ltd., a company engaged in International Trade, Investments
and Tourism.




                                    Attachment 10 - Page 4 of 9
                                                                                    Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


Weidle, Karl (1933-)

I was born in Franzfeld Yugoslavia August 12, 1933. My mother moved the family out of
Yugoslavia during the War, October 3, 1944. Our first destination was Austria, then Slovakia,
and then back to Austria before settling in Germany in 1945. I completed my formal schooling
in 1947 and then pursued a trade as a cabinetmaker in 1947 apprenticing for three years. I then
applied my training as a craftsmen in 1951-52 and worked in a coal mine in 1953.

In June of 1953 my parents and I immigrated to Edmonton, Alberta with my two young brothers
aged 4 and 6. We arrived in Quebec by ship and travelled three days by train to Edmonton
arriving at the 109 Street and Jasper Avenue Railroad station to start a new life in a country
where we did not understand or speak the language. We were greeted at the train station by the
farmer who my parents had a contract to work for on his Dairy Farm. We lived in a one-room
shack that he provided us on his property. As he drove us to his farm located on 23 Avenue and
156 Street, I was uncertain if they played the game of soccer in my new country, a game which I
was passionate about. On 76 Avenue and 104 Street I saw my first Soccer Field complete with
Goal posts. I remember that moment as being my first smile in Canada.

The next day the farmer provided me with sobering news that he had no work for me on his
farm and that he would drop me off in the city to look for work. He gave me a ride to Whyte
Avenue and 99 Street. There I stood with everything I owned in a small suitcase and a few
dollars in my pocket. No job, no room and unable to speak English well. I wandered around
Whyte Avenue until I found a place that was renting on 99 Street and 79 Avenue for $40.00
dollars a month, which at that time seemed to be a fortune. The people who owned the room
were very nice people. They spoke Ukrainian and I spoke German so the communication
between us was very difficult. Remembering the soccer field from the day before I was
enthusiastic about finding a team to play for but needed to find a job first. As I looked for work I
was approached by someone who asked me if I could play soccer. I’m sure my face lit up and
my excitement was obvious. I played my first game at Clarke Stadium the next day for the
Victoria Junior Team and two days later was promoted to the Victoria Senior Team.

One of the players worked for the City of Edmonton and based on his recommendation I found
work in the Engineering department. Starting pay was $1.19 an hour. Through dedication and
hard-work I was able to progress from labourer to management and was promoted approximately
every two years holding positions of progressively more responsibility and authority. I
eventually worked my way up to management positions of Sub-forman and
Equipment/Maintenance Foreman in the Tunnel Construction Branch that was responsible for
the Light Rapid Transit (LRT) Project in Edmonton. I am proud to have been a part of this
significant undertaking in Edmonton’s history from the planning stages to its completion.
During my working years with the City I formed many enduring relationships with co-workers
and Management. I retired from the city after 34 years of dedicated service in 1988.




                                      Attachment 10 - Page 5 of 9
                                                                                  Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


I met my wife Johanna in 1955 and we were married in 1957 in Edmonton’s St. John’s Lutheran
Church. Our son Gordon was born in 1959. He left home in 1978 to attend college at Eastern
Illinois University on a Soccer Scholarship and has earned a BA degree in Psychology with
Honours. He is presently completing his Masters Degree in Business from Lake Forest Graduate
School of Management and is presently employed with a High – Technology Computer
Company. Gordon is married to wife Jill, who has completed her Masters Degree and presently
teaches school. They are presently living in Chicago.

My involvement with the Victoria Club started as a player in 1953. The Victoria Soccer Club
was the first German Soccer Club in Edmonton and was started in 1951 by the players who
treasured the camaraderie and the support they were able to provide each other. We formed our
bonds struggling to make a new life far from Europe where we had been raised in a culture that
we were familiar with. In an effort to have a club where the players could meet and call their
own we originally rented a room on 97 Street and 103 Avenue. We enjoyed our time together
here for 6 years and were very successful as a team. We had to close the doors of the club
however in 1957 due to financial reasons. During the two years that followed we shuffled to a
number of places but did not lose faith that one day we would have a place that we could
permanently call our own. It was my personal vision and dream when I was elected President in
1963 to buy land and build a clubhouse and fields that no-body could take away from us.
Despite having on $360 dollars in the bank and no experience in managing a club, I proposed
that we buy property to fulfil our dreams at our first membership meeting at the Mayfair Hotel
on Jasper Avenue. Despite members and players being enthusiastic I received a mixed reaction
as my colleagues were sceptical that we could raise the money to proceed. Everybody realized
the amount of work and commitment my proposal would require and many said that it was
impossible. I remained persistent however and managed to convince some of the other members
that we should move forward and build a place. In 1964, we sold shares and debentures for
$25.00 and had social functions to raise money. As a result of the efforts of a few dedicated
members we were able to make a down payment on a piece of land beside Clarke Stadium to the
City of Edmonton. Our happiness was temporary however as we lost the option on this property
because of a lack of funding to a greedy contractor who would not negotiate. I continued to have
faith and my dream remained important motivating me to continue to search all over the city for
the appropriate piece of real estate. My search ended the day I stood on a farmer’s field in 140th
Avenue and 142 Street. Although the land was very expensive at $19,000 for 12 acres, and
contained a slough in the Northwest corner I felt that we could convert the property from
farmland to recreation. I convinced our members to look beyond the present condition of the
field to what could be, and we purchased the land. We continued to raise money through the sale
of shares and debentures, social events and charter flights to Germany.

In 1965 the manual labour of clearing the land, back-filling the slough and planting several
thousand trees began. Members spent all the free time they had in transforming our pasture into
a Soccer Club that we could all be proud of.




                                     Attachment 10 - Page 6 of 9
                                                                                   Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


In 1966, we drafted the plans to build the first section of our existing Clubhouse. Construction
of the initial 1600 square foot facility began and was completed entirely by using the volunteer
labour of our members. The grand opening was in November. I remember that evening as a
time of smiling faces and tired members. We now had a club that we could call our own, what a
feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment. The future looked extremely bright and filled with
the excitement of what we could continue to achieve. The popularity of our social evenings and
the success of our soccer team drew more people to our facilities and our growing list of
members soon made it necessary to expand our clubhouse. We continued to raise money and
received some financial assistance until we were in a position to start additional construction.

In 1967 we began to build what is now the 4800 ft. main hall utilizing the various talents and
trade skills of supporters and members. Another memorable opening took place that year, and
was attended by 280 members, friends and supporters. The next three years we added to our
schedule of social events and started the tradition of Saturday night dances which still continue
to this day 32 years later.

In 1968 we focused on improving our sports program and started a youth soccer team of 8 and
9 year-olds that were primarily the kids of our members. In addition we added a Senior Men’s
team that competed in the Western League which consisted of teams from Vancouver, Calgary,
Saskatoon, Regina and Winnipeg. We diversified our recreational program by creating bowling,
dance, skate and tennis teams as well to appeal to the interests of our growing numbers of
members. Our Soccer teams enjoyed almost immediate acclaim by winning city and provincial
championships. The Victoria Club established its reputation internationally by hosting touring
teams from Europe. We have since been a cultural ambassador of the City of Edmonton by
hosting teams and social groups from all over the world.

In 1969 we continued to improve our grounds by seeding our soccer fields and building a
caretakers house and garage so that we could have people on site full time to care for and
maintain the grounds and the facilities.

In 1970 we needed to expand once again due to the increasing number of members and
supporters who enjoyed spending their weekends with us and built the first section of our
1600 square foot lounge. This lounge is now a popular meeting place for players to relax after a
game and the walls hold the pictures of teams and awards in the successful and colourful history
of the Victoria Club.

In 1971 our fields were in prime condition to accommodate league play. Through the years we
have taken great pride in the quality of our fields and have spent countless hours in the care and
maintenance of the grounds. As a result we have hosted a number of Canadian Championships
at the senior and youth levels as well as catering to professional teams including the Canadian
National Team who have wanted to use the Victoria Club for their training camps. Over the




                                     Attachment 10 - Page 7 of 9
                                                                                    Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


years we have been proud of the compliments that we have received on the quality of our fields
and facilities and these accolades are a direct result of the efforts of dedicated and loyal members
and supporters.

In 1972 we took a major step in improving the quality of our dressing rooms by moving the
change rooms for the players from the basement of the caretakers house to construction of a
modern 3000 sq. ft. complex with rooms to accommodate 4 teams and referees.

In 1974 we established an over 30 league which we named the “old timer league”. We wanted to
give players beyond their prime the opportunity to continue to enjoy the game and socialize with
friends in a surrounding that they were familiar and comfortable with. This league has been very
successful and has continued to expand with the number of teams participating.

In 1976 we again expanded the main facilities, building an expansion to the lounge which added
another 1800 square feet.

In 1980 we built a stage and storage rooms behind the main bar for inventory.

In 1986 we again found our space limited based on the number of visitors. In an effort to
promote ethnic dining and satisfy the hunger of our guests we completed a modern new kitchen
and dining room which encompassed an additional 2500 sq. ft.

In 1990 we took our dining expansion project one step further by building a concession near the
tennis courts for players and spectators to order food and beverages without going in the club.
This concession continues to be very popular in the summer.

1992 was a busy year in the history of the club as they playing fields were re-seeded and a well
was dug to provide an abundant source of water to keep our fields green and lush. We also made
it more comfortable for spectators to enjoy the games by building bleachers with a seating
capacity of 1000 people. In addition, we added 100 trees to provide the fields with protection
from the winds and improve the aesthetic qualities of the grounds.

In 1993 we set our energies to re-doing the parking lots which was another mammoth
undertaking and required the coordination of a number of volunteers who worked whenever they
had spare time. The roof of the club also had to be re-done and we accomplished a number of
other maintenance projects which included 4 new furnaces, two hot water heaters and an air
conditioner in the Dressing Rooms.

1997 the caretaker’s house was showing wear so we completely renovated it.




                                      Attachment 10 - Page 8 of 9
                                                                                    Attachment 10

Request that two names be placed on the Names Reserve List for future use:
“Dr. Horst A. Schmid”, and “Mr. Karl Weidle”.


In 1998 we enhanced the improvements to the outdoor concession. We added a large patio so
that we could schedule activities outdoors including barbecues. This patio also extended the
dance floor so that guests could enjoy dancing on the patio on warm summer evenings. Our
soccer program was also expanded to include more youth teams and I was extremely pleased that
our membership increased by 30%.

I am extremely proud to have been involved with the Victoria Club since 1953. It is extremely
gratifying to see the fulfilment of your dreams. Having been one of the founding members, a
player, coach and President for the last 30 years, I have had the opportunity to have met
wonderful people from all over the world who have been amazed at what we have been able to
accomplish through volunteer labour. I have spent many enjoyable hours with Government
Premiers, Mayors, Alderman, Coaches and Players from all over Canada and the World. It has
been satisfying and culturally enriching to experience touring teams from numerous countries
and rewarding to have them tell me that we have world-class soccer facilities and that our fields
are as good as any they have played on. I have always attempted to maintain very high-personal
standards and high levels of commitment and loyalty to the Victoria Club. I have attempted to
be a leader with the best interests of the Club in mind with every decision that I have made. I
have attempted to be a visionary constantly thinking about ways to improve our facilities to offer
more social and recreational opportunities for our members and guests. I have worked hard to
establish relationships with Provincial and City Soccer Associations that are built on trust and
mutual respect and I visualize that these relationships will continue to endure and be mutually
beneficial into the future. It has been enriching for me to participate in the athletic lives of the
youth of our province and see these male and female players mature and develop into positive
and productive members of our community. I have been proud to see many of the players obtain
athletic scholarships at universities all over North America and go on to be professional athletes
in a number of different sports. I have seen many others use the positive attributes acquired
through amateur sports to become professionals in a variety of career fields. We now have
second and third generation family members come back to use our facilities and become
members in our organization.

It has been gratifying as well for me to help immigrants coming to this country by finding them
jobs and helping them become established in the community as I was helped in 1953. I
remember clearly what it was like coming to a country that I was unfamiliar with and being
unable to speak the language. Developing relationships with people that had common interest
helped me get my start. My journey while associated with the Victoria Soccer Club over the last
46 years has been incredibly rewarding. Although I have received no financial remuneration for
the countless hours of volunteer work I have performed, my reward has been the people that I
have met and the positive contribution that I have been able to make in their lives as they used
our facilities socially and recreationally. With God’s blessing, I can continue to perform
volunteer work long into the future and continue to see the Victoria Club grow and prosper.




                                      Attachment 10 - Page 9 of 9
                                                                                 Attachment 11

Request to rename a portion of 102 Street south of Saskatchewan Drive to 86 Avenue, and
a portion of 86 Avenue located between 103 Street and 102 Street ‘Tommy Banks Way’.


The Names Advisory Committee recommends support of the renaming of 102 Street south
of Saskatchewan Drive to 86 Avenue, and the renaming of 86 Avenue between 102 Street
and 103 Street in the Strathcona Neighbourhood to Tommy Banks Way.


History

April 14, 1999
An application was received from the Community Services Department to rename a portion of
both 102 Street and 86 Avenue in the Strathcona Neighbourhood ‘Tommy Banks Boulevard’.

April 21, 1999
A revised application was received changing the application from ‘Tommy Banks Boulevard’ to
‘Tommy Banks Way’.

April 28, 1999
Names Advisory Committee Meeting # 03/99

       Motion:        de Boer/ Galan

       “The Names Advisory Committee recommends approval for the renaming of 102 Street
       south of Saskatchewan Drive to 86 Avenue, and the renaming of 86 Avenue between
       102 Street and 103 Street to ‘Tommy Banks Way”.

       For the Motion:       Mitchell, Baird, de Boer, Galan
                                                                   Carried Unanimously


Administration

   The applicant has been in contact with the Transportation and Streets Department to discuss
    sign design and associated costs.

   The applicant intends to make a presentation to the Community Services Committee and to
    ask that the administrative fees ($300.00 +GST - Bylaw No. 9668 The Addressing Bylaw
    (as amended) Schedule ‘B’) for the address change to the Yardbird Suite (10203 - 86
    Avenue) be waived.




                                    Attachment 11 - Page 1 of 4
                                                                                   Attachment 11

Request to rename a portion of 102 Street south of Saskatchewan Drive to 86 Avenue, and
a portion of 86 Avenue located between 103 Street and 102 Street ‘Tommy Banks Way’.


Correspondence Received

Letters of support:
   Ida Banks (wife) - Banks Associated Music Ltd.;
   Strathcona Community League;
   Old Strathcona Foundation;
   Marc Vasey, Producer - Jazz City International;
   Drew D. Shaw, President - Edmonton Jazz Society;
   Luther Haave, Executive Vice President - WIC Premium Television Ltd.;
   Wally Kirk, Executive Vice President - Programming WIC Alberta (ITV);
   Paul J. Byrne, President - Grant MacEwan Community College; and
   R.W. (Bud) Steen - CKUA Radio Network

Letters of non-support:
   No letters were received.


Biography

Tommy Banks, O.C., LL.D. (December 17, 1936- )

In the more than forty years since his professional debut, Tommy Banks has become a part of
almost every facet of Canada’s entertainment scene. It would, in fact, as MacLean’s Magazine
pointed out, “…be easier to list the things he doesn’t do.”

In the presentation of popular music by orchestras of symphonic proportion, virtually no one in
this country can match his experience. He is, in addition, a concert attraction in his own right,
and has conducted most of Canada’s major orchestras.

In his various roles as executive producer, producer, conductor, musical co-ordinator, and
pianist, he has contributed to the success of more than six dozen internationally-syndicated hour-
long television specials, which have been seen in over seventy countries of the world. In 1992
he received the Gemini Award for best performance in a television variety programme.

As conductor/pianist, he has accompanied literally hundreds of star attractions on television (in
more than six hundred TV programmes of which he has been musical director), in theatres, on
recordings, and in clubs. The double album recorded by his big band at the prestigious Montreux
International Festival won the coveted Juno Award and the Grands Prix du Disque-Canada; and
his quintet became in the course of a tour of the Orient, in 1984, the first jazz band to tour China
since the 1949 revolution. Besides its concert appearances, the band has established an
international reputation as one of the best appearing on television today.




                                     Attachment 11 - Page 2 of 4
                                                                                  Attachment 11

Request to rename a portion of 102 Street south of Saskatchewan Drive to 86 Avenue, and
a portion of 86 Avenue located between 103 Street and 102 Street ‘Tommy Banks Way’.


He has provided musical direction for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Commonwealth
Games, the World University Games, EXPO ’86, and the XV Olympic Winter Games.

He has produced and/or conducted command performances and galas presented in honour of Her
Majesty the Queen and the Royal Family, His Holiness Pope John Paul II, The President and
Mrs. Reagan, and the Rt. Hon. Margaret Thatcher.

He is a member of the Canada Council (1989 -), and an Officer of the Order of Canada (1991).

He has received, among many accolades, Achievement Awards from the Province of Alberta (2),
and the City of Edmonton, as well as a “Builder of the City” Award from the City. He is the
recipient of an honourary diploma in music from Grant MacEwan Community College, and an
honourary doctorate of laws from the University of Alberta.

He was founding chairman of the Alberta Foundation for the Performing Arts (1978-86);
chairman of the Edmonton Concert Hall Foundation (1989-91); has served as a juror for the
Canada Council, as a member of the Continuing Advisory Committee to the Faculties of Fine
Arts and General Arts and Sciences of Grant MacEwan Community College; as a member of the
board of governors and chairman of the music committee of Alberta College (1977-79); as
chairman of the music programme of Grant MacEwan College (1983-087); as a member of the
board of the Alberta Heart Foundation; and as honourary campaign chairman of the Alberta
Heart Fund. In 1990 he was recipient of the Sir Frederick Haultain Prize.

Banks is a member of the American Federation of Musicians of the Unites States and Canada;
the Alliance of Canadian Television and Radio Artists; SOCAN; the National Academy of
Recording Arts and Sciences (U.S.); the Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences;
and the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television.

He and his wife Ida live in Edmonton, as do their three children, daughters Toby and Jill, and son
Tom.




                                     Attachment 11 - Page 3 of 4
                                                                             Attachment 11

Map showing the location of the proposed ‘Tommy Banks Way’.




                            Queen Elizabeth
                                Road

                                                          Ritchie
                                                           Mill
                                            End
                                          of Steel
                                           Park




                                                          Strathcona
                                                          Community
                                                           League


                                             Yardbird          King Edward
                                              Suite            Elementary       King Edward
                                                                  School           School




            84 AVE.

                                        Proposed Tommy Banks Way




                                Attachment 11 - Page 4 of 4

				
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