GRANGE VALLEY PRIMARY SCHOOL - DOC by wFjZG2m

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 14

									        Great Paxton CE Primary School




            Policy Statement on

                  ICT

Policy agreed:   November 2011

Leader: Nicola Jones

Date for review: Autumn 2014




                        1
                                 Great Paxton CE Primary School
                                           ICT Policy

What is ICT?

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is concerned with the storage, processing,
presentation and communication of information by electronic means. This includes the
measurement, modelling and control of external events. ICT continues to evolve very quickly and
has now become firmly embedded in many aspects of everyday life, both at home and in the
workplace.

As ICT underpins today’s modern lifestyle it is essential that all pupils gain the confidence and
skills that they need in this subject, to prepare them for the challenge of a rapidly developing and
increasingly technological world. The use of ICT at Great Paxton will also enhance and extend
children’s learning across the whole curriculum whilst developing motivation and social skills.

Aims of ICT
At Great Paxton CE Primary School we aim to:

      Develop ICT as an essential and creative process in which children are encouraged to use
       their own initiative, imagination, reasoning and investigative skills;

      Help children to appreciate the relevance and value of ICT in our society and to see it as an
       essential tool for learning, communication, finding information and for controlling and
       understanding their environment;

      Ensure all children receive equal opportunity to develop their ICT capability, with ICT being
       taught as a discrete National Curriculum subject, as well as being embedded across the
       curriculum;

      Provide children with opportunities to work individually and collaboratively;

National Curriculum Programmes of Study:

Foundation Stage:
ICT in the early years is inclusive of everyday technology and aims to develop children’s awareness
of the uses of technology in their environment. Children begin to gain confidence in the use of ICT
from an early age and often before they start attending school. Quite often there are huge
differences in ability between children who have access to an ICT rich home environment and
those who do not. A range of appropriate hardware, software and differentiated activities is
offered to ensure that these differences in ability are catered for.

Key Stages 1 and 2:
Many of the basic skills in ICT are taught in Key Stage 1; children explore ICT and learn to use it
confidently and with purpose to achieve specific outcomes. As children move through KS2, they
learn to apply these skills more independently and creatively, as well as learning new skills. They
use a wider range of ICT tools and information sources to support their work in other subjects.
They develop their research skills and decide what information is appropriate for their work. They
begin to question the plausibility and quality of information. They learn how to amend their work
and present it in a way that suits its audience.




                                                  2
Breadth of study

Children should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through:
      working with a range of information to investigate the different ways it can be presented (
        eg. information about the Sun presented as a poem, picture or sound pattern, collecting
        factual data from the internet and a class survey to compare the findings)

           working with others to explore a variety of information sources and ICT tools


           investigating and comparing the uses of ICT inside and outside school.

Finding things out

Pupils should be taught how to:
    gather information from a variety of sources (eg. Internet, dvds, smartphones, tablets,
       books, online videos)

          enter and store information in a variety of forms (eg. storing information in a prepared
           database, saving work to the server and on their individual learning space on Starz)

          retrieve information that has been stored (eg loading saved work, from the server, from
           Starz)

          prepare information for development using ICT, including selecting suitable sources, finding
           information, classifying it and checking it for accuracy (eg finding information from books
           or newspapers, creating a class database, classifying by characteristics and purposes,
           checking the spelling of names is consistent)

          interpret information, to check it is relevant and reasonable and to think about what might
           happen if there were any errors or omissions.

Developing ideas and making things happen

Pupils should be taught:
    to use text, tables, images and sound to develop their ideas

          how to select from and add to information they have retrieved for particular purposes

          how to plan and give instructions to make things happen (eg. programming ‘Roamer’,
           placing instructions in the right order)

          to try things out and explore what happens in real and imaginary situations (eg trying out
           different colours on an image, using an adventure game or simulation, e.g. Myst/Myths &
           Legends)

          how to develop and refine ideas by bringing together, organising and reorganising text,
           tables, images and sound as appropriate (eg desktop publishing, multimedia presentations)

          how to create, test, improve and refine sequences of instructions to make things happen
           and to monitor events and respond to them (eg monitoring changes in temperature,
           detecting light levels and turning on a light)



                                                      3
       to use simulations and explore models in order to answer 'What if ... ?' questions, to
        investigate and evaluate the effect of changing values and to identify patterns and
        relationships (eg simulation software, spreadsheet models)



Exchanging and sharing information

Pupils should be taught:
   how to share their ideas by presenting information in a variety of forms (eg. text, images,
      tables, sounds)

       how the internet can be used to communicate with other places (e-mail , podcasts,Twitter,
        Skype, chatrooms)

       to present their completed work effectively (eg for public display)

       to be sensitive to the needs of the audience and think carefully about the content and
        quality when communicating information (eg work for presentation to other pupils, writing
        for a purpose, or publishing on the internet or school website)


Reviewing, modifying and evaluating work as it progresses

Pupils should be taught to:
    review what they and others have done to help them develop their ideas

       describe the effects of their actions

       talk about what they might change in future work.

       describe and talk about the effectiveness of their work with ICT, comparing it with other
        methods and considering the effect it has on others (eg the impact made by a desktop
        published newsletter or factfile)


How is ICT taught?
There is regular, planned teaching of ICT as a separate subject, but often within a cross-curricular
context. Specific skills are demonstrated to the children, followed by opportunities for the children
to practise what has been taught. This is achieved sometimes as a whole class activity, with the
laptop computers, and sometimes with the smaller banks of desktop computers located around the
school over a longer period of time. In ICT, as with all subjects, in order to develop the continuity
and progression of teaching and learning, it is the responsibility of the teacher to maintain a
balance between whole class, individual and group work, and direct teaching, pupil investigation
and skills practice.

Analysis of Pupil Skills Tracker records ensures that there is appropriate continuity and progression
during the school year. Where possible, links with other subjects are exploited, to maximise
efficient use of time, and to give more meaningful purpose to activities.

The teaching of ICT is enhanced by teaching with ICT across the curriculum. Much concurrent
learning takes place within other subjects, where the teacher models ICT skills through the use of
the Interactive Whiteboard, or the children use computers to research or communicate
information. Subject leaders are responsible for guiding colleagues in the use of appropriate
software and websites.
                                                  4
Assessment of ICT
Ongoing assessment of children’s skill using Pupil Skills Tracker, enables teachers to adjust their
teaching or expectations according to progress made. The spread of ability in each class will also
be monitored and identified by the class teacher and ICT coordinator during the summer term.
Opportunities for assessment will also arise from cross-curricular work.

Present resource provision
Within each classroom:
Each class has its own Interactive Whiteboard, with laptop computer.
In addition, there are desktop computers in Ash Class and Lime Class. There are banks of desktop
computers in the middle room between Maple and Willow Class.
All have full internet and network connectivity.

Additional resources:
Two mobile ICT suites, consisting of 14 laptop computers and the other with 20 notebooks. All have
wireless network access giving full access to the Internet and school network.
6 desktop computers in the entrance foyer, which can be used independently by up to 6 children.
It is intended that these computers will provide opportunities after school for children who have no
access to computers or the Internet at home, and to allow access to members of the local
community during the day.

There is one colour laser printer in the library, which can be accessed from all classroom and
wireless computers. To avoid printing excessive copies, children should ask their teacher or
teaching assistant if their work needs to be printed off (work can be saved in the child’s individual
folder). There is also an additional colour laser printer in the foyer and the colour photocopier.

In addition to this, there is a variety of other ICT equipment in school including:
6 digital cameras, a Nintendo Wii, webcams, digital microscopes, visualiser, Roamer, Pixie, CD
players, DVD player, TV, headphones, dictaphones and data loggers as well as programmable toys
for use by children in the Foundation Stage.

A variety of software is available for all machines, in addition to online resources such as
www.starz.org and www.educationcity.com for which the school pays an annual subscription.

Continuing Professional Development
Teachers should give each other mutual support with ICT planning and teaching. At least one
professional development meeting each term will provide training and/or sharing of ideas with
colleagues. Outside providers will be brought in from time to time to work alongside class
teachers. Teachers will, in turn, give guidance to teaching assistants and arrange for them to have
time to practise their ICT skills (eg set up and use interactive whiteboard).

Health and Safety
An E-Safety policy has been developed in order to allow the safe and efficient use of the Internet
for pupils and staff. A copy of this can be found in Appendix 2. Part of the school’s annual Safety
Day programme for KS2 involves learning how to use the Internet responsibly. Children in KS1 do
not use the Internet without a teacher or teaching assistant present.
The service provider does filter information but staff are ultimately responsible for information
accessed by pupils. Children should only use a safe search engine in school such as
primaryschoolict.com which is powered by Google but filters any potentially unsuitable websites.

Children should not be responsible for moving heavy equipment around the school. They may load
software but should not be given the responsibility of plugging in machines without a member of
staff present.


                                                  5
Food and drink should not be consumed near ICT equipment.

It is the responsibility of staff to ensure that classroom ICT equipment is stored securely and
cleaned regularly. Laptops should be returned properly to the trolley, and recharged immediately
after use (notebook trolley will have to be manually charged each time the notebooks are used).
A rota is in use for teachers to use the notebooks and laptops when appropriate for their teaching
(kept in the photocopier room).
Staff should ensure that the children are seated at the computers comfortably and be aware of the
dangers of continuous use (e.g. eye/wrist strain etc).

Inclusion
All children should have access to the use of ICT regardless of gender, race, cultural background or
physical or sensory disability. Where use of a school computer proves difficult for a child because
of a disability, the school will endeavour to provide specialist equipment and software to enable
access. Children with learning difficulties can also be given greater access to the whole curriculum
through the use of ICT. Their motivation can be heightened and they are able to improve the
accuracy and presentation of their work. This in turn can raise self-esteem.

See also:
Appendix    1: IT Security Policy
Appendix    2: E-Safety Policy
Appendix    3: Acceptable Use Policy KS2
Appendix    4: Acceptable Use Policy KS1

and The Safer Care Code of Conduct in “Essential Reading For All Adults”




                                                 6
                                            Appendix 1
                                  Great Paxton CE Primary School
                                         IT Security Policy

All members of staff have a duty to ensure the school network and school systems comply with
legal requirements as well as safeguarding the children and ourselves, and looking after our
equipment. These responsibilities should be followed as appropriate.


All adults in the school:

      Read the 3 documents in the “Essential Reading” booklet and sign the register to say you
       have read and understood them
        this policy
        the Safer Care Code of Conduct
        the E-Safety Policy

      Only software that has been purchased through the school should be installed on school
       computers unless agreed with headteacher. Software must only be installed after checking
       that we hold the relevant licence
      Sensitive data should not be transported from the school without permission of the
       headteacher. Teachers should use encrypted memory sticks for transporting any data that
       may include the names of children. Starz and E2BN should not be used to store or transmit
       confidential or sensitive information.
      Each member of staff will have their own user name and password, which should not be
       revealed to anybody else. The password should contain both alpha and numeric characters,
       and should be 6 characters or more. The generic teacher account should have its password
       changed when personnel change, and this password given only to temporary or supply
       teachers.
      Other adults can log in as visitor, with the password visitor. This has restricted access to the
       network.
      Staff laptops not being taken home should be put away in the agreed secure place. The
       laptop trolley should be locked and put in secure place.
      Any illegal activity must be reported to the headteacher at the earliest opportunity.
      Ensure that children know the dangers of deliberately looking into the light of the digital
       projector, and that no children are left unsupervised when using projectors.


Caretaking and cleaning staff:

      Doors to the PE store, library and classrooms should be locked in the evening, at weekends
       and during the school holidays unless access is needed for a valid reason. Digital projectors
       need to be vacuumed at least once a month


Office staff:
    Daily back-up from server. Recent back-up tapes kept off-site.
    Licences stored in office filing cabinet until the software is no longer used.




                                                   7
Staff taking home school laptops:
    Laptops are not covered by school insurance once they have left the building, so will need to
       be covered by your home insurance
    Laptops left in cars are unlikely to be covered by your own insurance, so unless you know for
       certain that they are insured, you should never leave them in your car
    If connecting a school laptop to the internet at home, it is your responsibility to make sure
       the virus checker and firewall tool is up to date.
    Do not install your own software on the laptop unless agreed with headteacher.
    Do not allow it to be used by members of your family.
    Remember that what constitutes acceptable use of your laptop at home is the same as it
       would be in school.


Headteacher:
   Dispose of redundant ICT equipment in environmentally friendly way and ensure all
     computers are securely wiped using software provided by Education ICT technician.
   Authorise teachers and office staff to transport pupil and school data only when necessary
     and as appropriate, ensuring that this is not done using removable media that is not in an
     encrypted form (other than back-up tapes being stored off-site)
   Ensure that adults other than staff do not use removable media on community computers by
     keeping cabinets locked.
   Only allow personnel from Education ICT to make changes on school network and install
     hardware and wireless equipment.
   Ensure the Domain administrator password is only known by the headteacher and school
     administrator.
   Ensure that all staff have signed to say they have read and understood the Safer Care Code
     of Conduct, the IT Security Policy and E-Safety Policy. (This should form part of the
     induction process)
   In the case of any illegal activity follow the procedures outlined in the E-Safety Policy
   Ensure County and electrical regulations are followed when installing IWBs and ceiling-
     mounted projectors.
   Continue to make use of Education ICT service.




                                                8
                                            Appendix 2:

                          Great Paxton CE Primary School E-Safety Policy


At Great Paxton CE Primary school we believe that the use of information and communication
technologies in schools brings great benefits. To live, learn and work successfully in an increasingly
complex and information-rich society, our children must be able to use technology effectively.

The use of these exciting and innovative technology tools in school and at home has been shown to
raise educational standards and promote pupil achievement. Yet at the same time we recognise
that the use of these new technologies can put young people at risk within and outside the school.
Some of the dangers they may face include:
• Access to illegal, harmful or inappropriate images or other content
• Unauthorised access to / loss of / sharing of personal information
• The risk of being subject to grooming by those with whom they make contact on the internet.
• The sharing / distribution of personal images without an individual’s consent or knowledge
• Inappropriate communication / contact with others, including strangers
• Cyber-bullying
• Access to unsuitable video / internet games
• An inability to evaluate the quality, accuracy and relevance of information on the internet
• Plagiarism and copyright infringement
• Illegal downloading of music or video files
• The potential for excessive use which may impact on the social and emotional development and
learning of the young person.

While children and young people need support to keep them safe online, the risks associated with
the use of technology are not restricted to just them. E-Safety issues can also affect adults who
work or are associated with the school. For example school and personal data being entered on
web/social networking sites, fraudulent email traps and cyberbullying. It is impossible to eliminate
risk completely. It is therefore essential, through good educational provision to manage the risk
and deal with any threat to safety.


Teaching and Learning Using Online Technologies

The internet is a part of everyday life for education, business and social interaction.

Benefits of using online technologies in education include:
    Access to world-wide educational resources
    Inclusion in the NEN connecting all UK schools and resources
    Access to experts who would otherwise be unavailable
    Access to anytime, anywhere learning
    Collaboration across schools, networks of schools and services




                                                  9
When using online technologies, it is essential that children understand how to behave in a safe
and responsible manner and also how to react when faced with inappropriate content or situations
which make them feel uncomfortable. At Great Paxton CE Primary School we believe that a
comprehensive programme of e-safety education is vital for developing our children’s ability to use
technologies safely. This is achieved using activities such as Hector’s World for the younger
children, and Cyber-Café for children in Years 4 – 6 as part of our work on “Staying Safe” during
each Summer Term. At the start of each year, children and parents are asked to sign the
agreement which is part of the Acceptable Use Policy. Throughout the year, members of staff
regularly monitor children’s use of the internet and other technologies.

Technology in our School

The school’s ICT infrastructure is designed to minimise the risks associated with adult and pupil use
of technology. This is provided and maintained by both E2BN and the Local Authority’s Education
ICT Service.

E2BN's Protex web filtering system received full Becta accreditation in 2007 by blocking over 90%
of all inappropriate material. E2BN also manage a distributed caching service which is integrated
with the web filtering service.

E2BN’s Website

This helps to ensure that staff and children rarely encounter material which is inappropriate or
offensive.

The school’s network can either be accessed using a wired or wireless connection. However, the
wireless network is encrypted to the standards advised by the Local Authority and the wireless key
is kept securely by the school office. School staff and children are not permitted to connect
personal devices to the school’s wireless network.



Adults:
All adults working with children, whether they are employees or volunteers, are expected to read
the Code of Conduct, which explains in detail the appropriate use of the Internet and images of
children, and to sign to say that this has been read and understood. All members of staff have
individual, password protected logins to the school network, and visitors to the school can access
part of the network using a generic visitor login and password.

Children:
Whilst we recognise the benefits of individual pupil logins to our school network, we prefer to use
year group logins for ease of access. However, each child has their own pupil login and password to
the Starz platform.

Any known or suspicious online misuse or problem will be reported to the headteacher for
investigation/ action/ sanctions. The school will keep evidence and/or contribute to a log of any
‘extreme’ or ‘unusual’ actions that a child has been involved in online. This log will be used to
keep track of the child’s behaviours over the entire time they are at the school and will be stored
alongside other incident logs. These are stored securely by the headteacher.




                                                 10
Responding to Incidents

It is important that all members of staff – teaching and non-teaching – are aware of how to respond
to if an e-safety incident occurs or they suspect a child is at risk through their use of technology.
Responding to an e-safety incident in school is no different to responding to other incidents in
school.

If an e-safety incident occurs, Great Paxton CE Primary School will follow its usual procedures for
dealing with other incidents including internal sanctions and involvement of parents. Where the
school suspects that an incident may constitute a Child Protection issue, the usual Child Protection
procedures will be followed.

Dealing with Incidents and Seeking Help
If a concern is raised, refer immediately to the designated person for child protection. If that is
not possible refer to the headteacher or, if necessary, the Chair of Governors.
It is their responsibility to:

Step 1: Identify who is involved – any combination of child victim, child instigator, staff victim, or
staff instigator
Step 2: Establish the kind of activity involved and whether it is illegal or inappropriate. If you are
in doubt consult the Education Child Protection Service helpline -
Step 3: Ensure that the incident is documented using the standard child protection incident logging
form.

Depending on the judgements made at steps 1 and 2 the following actions should be taken
Staff instigator – follow the standard procedures for Managing Allegations against a member of
staff. If unsure seek advice from the Local Authority Designated Officer or Education Officer.
Staff victim – Seek advice from your HR provider and/or Educational Child Protection Service
Illegal activity involving a child – refer directly to Cambridgeshire Constabulary – 0845 456 4564 –
make clear that it is a child protection issue
Inappropriate activity involving a child – follow standard child protection procedures. If unsure
seek advice from Education Child Protection Service helpline: 01223 712096

                                                       Education Child Protection Service – June 2010


Equally, if the incident involves or leads to an allegation against a member of staff, the school will
follow the usual procedures for dealing with any allegation against a member of staff.




                                                  11
                                           Appendix 3
                                 Great Paxton CE Primary School
                                   Acceptable Use Policy KS2

Pupils are responsible for good behaviour on the internet just as they are in a classroom or
playground. General school rules apply, in particular our golden rule “We are safe”. We use the
internet for children to access education websites such as education.city.com and for research.
Parents/carer’s permission is required before a pupil is granted access. Access is a privilege, not a
right, and that access requires responsibility. Please help us by reinforcing this message at home.

The following are not permitted in school or on the internet:
   1. Sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures.
   2. Using bad language.
   3. Harassing, insulting or attacking others.
   4. Damaging computers, computer systems or computer networks.
   5. Using others’ passwords or accounts.
   6. ‘Hacking’ into others’ folders, work or files for any reason.
   7. Intentionally wasting limited resources, including printer ink and paper

Staff may review files and communication to ensure that users are using the system responsibly.
Users should not expect that files stored in school are always private. During school, teachers will
guide pupils towards appropriate materials. Outside of school, families bear responsibility for such
guidance as they must also exercise with information sources such as television, telephones,
movies, radio and other potentially offensive media.

Children’s Rules for Use of the Internet
          You must have your parents’ or teachers’ permission before using the internet.
          You must have a teacher nearby when using the internet in school.
          Do not disclose any password or login name to anyone, except your teacher or
             parents.
          Do not disclose your address or telephone numbers.
          Only use names or photographs of children with permission from parents.
          Never view, upload or download any material which is likely to be unsuitable for
             children. If you are not sure ask your teacher or parents.
          Always respect the privacy of files of other users.
          Be polite and appreciate that other users might have different views than your own.
             The use of bad language or aggressive behaviour is not allowed.
          Report any incident which breaks these rules to your teacher or the headteacher.

Sanctions
   2. If you break these rules, you may be banned from using the internet.
   3. Parents will be informed.
   4. Serious bullying may mean that the Police are involved.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have read and agree to abide by the rules stated in the ICT Acceptable Use Policy. I give consent
for my child to use the internet under supervision.

Name of child:__________________________ Child’s signature:__________________________

Parent’s/Carer’s Signature:_________________________________

Print name:_________________________ Date:____________________
                                                 12
                                           Appendix 4
                                 Great Paxton CE Primary School
                                   Acceptable Use Policy KS1

Pupils are responsible for good behaviour on the internet just as they are in a classroom or
playground. General school rules apply, in particular our golden rule “We are safe”. We use the
internet for children to access education websites such as education.city.com and for research.
Parents/carer’s permission is required before a pupil is granted access. Access is a privilege, not a
right, and that access requires responsibility. Please help us by reinforcing this message at home.

The following are not permitted in school or on the internet:
   8. Sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures.
   9. Using bad language.
   10. Harassing, insulting or attacking others.
   11. Damaging computers, computer systems or computer networks.
   12. Using others’ passwords or accounts.
   13. ‘Hacking’ into others’ folders, work or files for any reason.
   14. Intentionally wasting limited resources, including printer ink and paper

Staff may review files and communication to ensure that users are using the system responsibly.
Users should not expect that files stored in school are always private. During school, teachers will
guide pupils towards appropriate materials. Outside of school, families bear responsibility for such
guidance as they must also exercise with information sources such as television, telephones,
movies, radio and other potentially offensive media.

Children’s Rules for Use of the Internet
          You must have your parents’ or teachers’ permission before using the internet.
          You must have a teacher nearby when using the internet in school.
          Do not disclose any password or login name to anyone, except your teacher or
             parents.
          Do not disclose your address or telephone numbers.
          Only use names or photographs of children with permission from parents.
          Never view, upload or download any material which is likely to be unsuitable for
             children. If you are not sure ask your teacher or parents.
          Always respect the privacy of files of other users.
          Be polite and appreciate that other users might have different views than your own.
             The use of bad language or aggressive behaviour is not allowed.
          Report any incident which breaks these rules to your teacher or the headteacher.

Sanctions
   5. If you break these rules, you may be banned from using the internet.
   6. Parents will be informed.
   7. Serious bullying may mean that the Police are involved.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have read and agree to abide by the rules stated in the ICT Acceptable Use Policy. I give consent
for my child to use the internet under supervision.

Name of child:__________________________

Parent’s/Carer’s Signature:_________________________________

Print name:_________________________ Date:____________________
                                                 13
                         Great Paxton CE
                          Primary School

                       Keeping safe on the
                      Internet Key Stage 1



I promise:

   I will always ask a grown up before I use the internet
  (They can help me find the best thing to do)
   I won’t tell strangers where I live, or my phone number or where I go
     to school
  (Only my friends and family need to know that)
   I won’t send pictures to people I don’t know
  (I don’t want strangers looking at photos of me, my friends or my
  family)
   I will tell a grown-up if I feel scared or unhappy about anything


Signed:                                      Date:




                         Great Paxton CE
                          Primary School

                       Keeping safe on the
                      Internet Key Stage 1



I promise:

   I will always ask a grown up before I use the internet
  (They can help me find the best thing to do)
   I won’t tell strangers where I live, or my phone number or where I go
     to school
  (Only my friends and family need to know that)
   I won’t send pictures to people I don’t know
  (I don’t want strangers looking at photos of me, my friends or my
  family)
   I will tell a grown-up if I feel scared or unhappy about anything


Signed:                                      Date:

                                    14

								
To top