Obliged to Help: Adolphine Fletcher Terry and the Progressive South by ProQuest

VIEWS: 13 PAGES: 20

Terry recognized that the services of well-intentioned elite white women were not required, and the conversations among the multi-racial advisory committee members revealed to her the limitations of white understanding of southern history and society. The most notable example was her role in setting up the public housing authority in Little Rock, although she ruefully came to understand how urban renewal fixed residential segregation in the city.

More Info
									                       Book Reviews
Obliged to Help: Adolphine Fletcher Terry and the Progressive South.
   By Stephanie Bayless. (Little Rock: Butler Center Books, 2011. Pp.
   169. Acknowledgments, illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.
   $22.50, cloth; $14.95, paper.)

     In a striking photograph appearing in the September 29, 1958, issue of
Time magazine, Adolphine Fletcher Terry gazed steadily, unsmiling, at the
photographer who framed the shot with the portrait of her father in a 
								
To top