Expansion and Reform 19th cent

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					                                                                                                HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                      Objective 2.01: Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                  Union.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.
Instructional Strategies                                                                          Materials
1. Review                                                                                         Board Markers
    a. Review with students the words revolution and compromise.                                  Chart Paper
    b. Encourage students to offer their definition of these words.                               Outline map of the United States
    c. Ask students to brainstorm times when they’ve heard these words used.                      Blank Paper
    d. Write these words on the board and emphasize to students that these words are key          Concept Web Organizer
    terms of their lesson.
2. Essential Question
     a. How did the Missouri Compromise contribute to sectionalism?
3. Warm Up
     a. Ask students to create a definition for nationalism and sectionalism based on their
    prior knowledge. Compare the definitions as a class and place the class definition on
    chart paper for the class to see during the lesson.
4. Guided Practice
    a. Explain to students that they are now going to work in groups of four.
    b. Pass out an outline map of the United States to each student and have them place it in
    their notebook for later use.
    c. Pass out one outline map per group.
    d. Instruct students to complete a map showing current boundaries of the United States.
    e. Have students draw the proposed Missouri Compromise.
    f. Have students color code the Free states and Slave states.
    g. After students have drawn the proposed compromise line, as a class, discuss why the
    expansion of slavery was such a compelling issue. Why did Southern states want to
    expand slavery to the west? Why were Northern states against the expansion of slavery?
    h. To further the discussion, ask students why they think the Missouri Compromise was
    not successful in ending the debate over slavery?
    i. Divide the class into groups and assign each group the following topic: Sectionalism.
    Have groups complete the concept web organizer for this topic.

Extension Activities/Technology                                                                   Other Resources
Reaction Paper: Pair students and assign them the following topic: “Slavery was necessary         http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=658
for Southern prosperity.” The reaction may support or oppose the statement, but must explain      http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=22
student’s thinking. When all pairs have prepared their reactions, have student read and discuss   http://www.dese.mo.gov/moheritage/StateisBorn.htm
them. In the discussion, ask students to suggest alternative courses of action that could have    http://nationalhistoryday.org
been presented in their statements.                                                               http://stlcourtrecords.wustl.edu/about-freedom-suits-series.php
                                                                                                  http://www.wethepeople.gov
                                                                                                  http://educate.si.edu
                                                                                                  http://www.ncss.org
                                                                                                  http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/education/aahi/beforedredscott/sites.asp

         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                    Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                                     HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                           Objective 2.01: Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                       Union.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.
Instructional Strategies                                                                                 Materials
1. Emotional Hook: Have the students independently write a journal entry on the affect of                Board Markers
sectionalism on the lives on African Americans.                                                          Poster board
2. Comprehension Check: Write one or more sentences to answer the following question.                    Markers
    a. What issue did the Missouri Compromise hope to resolve?                                           Scissors
3. Center Your Writing: Suppose you were a reporter for a Massachusetts newspaper in 1854.               Glue
You are asked to write an article for the paper describing the case of Anthony Burns. Write              Old Magazines
two drafts of the article. In the first draft, write the article from an abolitionist’s point of view.   Old Newspapers
In the second draft, write the article as a southern plantation owner might view the events.             Internet
4. Students will create posters demonstrating the territorial expansion of the Kansas-Nebraska
Act. Students should consider the following question: “How have American political leaders
dealt with the question of slavery from the time the Constitution was written up until the
Kansas-Nebraska Act? Students will use this question to complete a critical thinking essay
assignment.
5. Using the following websites, students should read background information on the 3/5ths
Compromise, Fugitive Slave Act, and Missouri Compromise. After reading, students should
create picture representations of each topic.
    www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=22 Missouri Compromise
    www.nationaldcenter.org/FugitiveSlaveAct.html Actual Missouri Compromise Document
4. Conclusion: Discuss with students cases the word compromise. Are there times when it is
appropriate to compromise? In what case? Examples to discuss: Nuclear War, Death Penalty,
Proposed Legislation, Murder Cases.

Extension Activities/Technology                                                                          Other Resources
Global Connection: The American Civil War was fought mainly over the issue of African                    Additional lesson plan resources:
enslavement to preserve the Union. Using the internet and other resource materials identify              http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=661
another country that has experienced a civil war. Draw a comparison between the events                   www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon.htm
leading up to the American Civil War and those of the events of the civil war of another                 http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=28#
country. Make sure to note specific similarities as well as differences in your written                  http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USASkansas.htm
comparison.                                                                                              http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=1476
                                                                                                         http://www.civilwarhome.com/kansasnebraska.htm
                                                                                                         http://www.kshs.org/publicat/khq/1943/43_3_barry.htm




          Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                      Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                          HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                    Objective 2.01: Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                Union.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.
Instructional Strategies                                                                      Materials
1. Students should learn how the issue of slavery led to violence between pro-slavery and     Board Markers
anti-slavery groups by examining John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry in 1859.                 Film “John Brown’s Holy War”
2. Students should view the film “John Brown’s Holy War.”                                     Discussion Questions
3. After viewing the film, students should complete the film’s discussion questions and       Harper’s Ferry Headline
activities.                                                                                   Photo of John Brown
3. Students should read the Harper’s Ferry Headline                                           Map
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h1538.html, and discuss why the statement “extensive       John Brown’s Primary Source Documents
negro conspiracy” seems exaggerated.                                                          John Brown’s Address to the Court
4. Students should view the photo of John Brown
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h2954.html and describe what they see in the photo.
5. Map Skills: Students should use “Following John Brown” at
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown/maps/maptxt.html to discuss John Brown’s movement.
6. Lead a class discussion surrounding John Brown’s involvement of his family in the anti-
slavery movement. What does this say about John Brown?
7. Students should interpret John Brown’s primary source documents
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown/filmmore/reference/primary/index.html.
8. Students should read John Brown’s address to the court
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h2943t.html.




Extension Activities/Technology                                                               Other Resources
Students who wish to learn more about John Brown may visit these online sites.                Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown/
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2940.html
http://www.vmi.edu/archives/cwsource.html
http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/




         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                                  HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                        Objective 2.01: Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                    Union.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.
Instructional Strategies                                                                            Materials
1. Students should learn how the issue of slavery led to violence between pro-slavery and           Board Markers
anti-slavery groups by examining John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry in 1859.                       Sentence Strips
2. On one classroom wall create a large timeline extending from 1760 to 1860.                       Timeline
    a. Cut out the dates and events from the Extended Timeline Activity Sheet located in the        Lyrics and music for "John Brown's Body"
materials section and distribute randomly to students.                                              http://www.contemplator.com/america/johnbrown.html
   b. When all students are ready, the student narrator reads the first event and description.      Extended Timeline Activity Sheet (pdf)
   This is followed by the first student walking to the timeline and reading his or her first-      "Historic Character I Am" Poem - John Brown (pdf)
   person account. Continue until all events are finished.                                          Module: "The Coming of the Civil War"
3. Divide your class into mixed-ability groups of four. Provide each group with the following       http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module9/index.html
articles:                                                                                           Guided Readings: "The Impending Crisis 1850s"
                                                                                                    http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module9/intro_pop15.html
Module: "The Coming of the Civil War"                                                               Documents:
http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module9/index.html                                            GLC 05508.051 Address of John Brown to the Virginia Court
                                                                                                    Semi-Annual Report of VMI [Virginia Military Institute] Superintendent Francis H.
Guided Readings: "The Impending Crisis 1850s"                                                       Smith Submitted to the Governor, 1860 January 16, full text online
http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module9/intro_pop15.html                                      http://www.vmi.edu/archives/Civil_War/jbannrpt.html
Each group reads and discusses the articles. On a large sheet of poster paper, a recorder lists     John T. L. Preston letter to his wife describing John Brown's execution, December
the main points of each article.                                                                    2, 1859 http://www.vmi.edu/archives/Civil_War/jbjtlplt.html
                                                                                                    GLC 02454 Letter from John Brown to his son, Owen
The teacher then conducts a whole-class discussion of the articles, recording each group's          Newspaper articles printed at the time of the Harpers Ferry raid
responses on the blackboard. Groups should add any new facts to their lists.                        http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/jbmenu.htm
                                                                                                    "What Shall the South Do?" Wilmington, North Carolina, Daily Herald. 5 December
                                                                                                    1859 http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/ncwhjb59c05a.htm
                                                                                                    "Address" [excerpt from sermon] by J. Sella Martin (December 2, 1859)
                                                                                                    http://chnm.gmu.edu/lostmuseum/martin.html
                                                                                                    "The Fatal Friday" Chicago, Illinois, Press and Tribune, 2 December 1859
                                                                                                    http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/ilcpjb59c02a.htm
Extension Activities/Technology                                                                     Other Resources
                                                                                                    Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
Students should prepare a mock court of John Brown’s Slavery Revolt Trial.




          Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                    Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                                HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                      Objective 2.01: Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                  Union.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.
Instructional Strategies                                                                          Materials
1. Students should learn how the issue of slavery led to violence between pro-slavery and         Board Markers
anti-slavery groups by examining John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry in 1859.                     Written Document-analysis Sheet
2. Divide your class into eight groups. Provide each group with one of the primary-source
documents listed in the materials and a document-analysis sheet. This analysis sheet may be       Documents:
one that your school uses or you may use the Written Document- Analysis sheet found at            GLC 05508.051 Address of John Brown to the Virginia Court
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets/document.html. Each group reads its          Semi-Annual Report of VMI [Virginia Military Institute] Superintendent Francis H.
document, completes a document-analysis sheet, and gives an oral presentation of its findings     Smith Submitted to the Governor, 1860 January 16, full text online
to the whole class.                                                                               http://www.vmi.edu/archives/Civil_War/jbannrpt.html
                                                                                                  John T. L. Preston letter to his wife describing John Brown's execution, December
Whole-class discussion should focus on the different perspectives on John Brown that were         2, 1859 http://www.vmi.edu/archives/Civil_War/jbjtlplt.html
revealed in the document analyses.                                                                GLC 02454 Letter from John Brown to his son, Owen
                                                                                                  Newspaper articles printed at the time of the Harpers Ferry raid
                                                                                                  http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/jbmenu.htm
                                                                                                  "What Shall the South Do?" Wilmington, North Carolina, Daily Herald. 5 December
                                                                                                  1859 http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/ncwhjb59c05a.htm
                                                                                                  "Address" [excerpt from sermon] by J. Sella Martin (December 2, 1859)
                                                                                                  http://chnm.gmu.edu/lostmuseum/martin.html
                                                                                                  "The Fatal Friday" Chicago, Illinois, Press and Tribune, 2 December 1859
                                                                                                  http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/ilcpjb59c02a.htm




Extension Activities/Technology                                                                   Other Resources
Students who wish to learn more about John Brown may visit these online sites.                    http://www.bellbookcamera.com/brown.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown/                                                               "The Legend of John Brown: A Biography and a History," by Richard O.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2940.html                                                     Boyer.
http://www.vmi.edu/archives/cwsource.html                                                         "To Purge This Land With Blood: A Biography of John Brown," by Warren
http://history.furman.edu/~benson/docs/                                                           Oates and Stephen B. Oates.
                                                                                                  "The Secret Six: The True Tale of the Men Who Conspired With John
                                                                                                  Brown," by Edward J. Renehan.
                                                                                                  "John Brown, 1800-1859, A Biography Fifty Years After," by Oswald Garrison
                                                                                                  Villard.
                                                                                                  Harpers Ferry National Historical Park




         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                   Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                            HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                    Objective 2.04: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature,
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                and language.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.
Instructional Strategies                                                                        Materials
1. Warm Up: Ask students to imagine they were running for a student body president. Have        Board Markers
them come up with three different types of campaigns they could run. Then introduce the idea    Chart Paper
of a mudslinging campaign and link in to the election of the 1828.                              Description of Candidates in the 1829 Election
2. Recognizing Biases Activity: Explain to students that biases influence behavior. Political   Construction Paper
campaigns are often structured to influence behavior. Have students read the description of     Scissors
the candidates in the 1824 election. Ask student to find passages that express opinions about   Glue
the candidates. Ask students to vote for one candidate and to explain how their choice was      Old Magazines
made. Did the descriptions influence their decision? Ask students what else they would need     Old Newspapers
to know about the candidate before making an informed decision.                                 Markers
3. Critical Thinking: Who would Andrew Jackson’s “common man” be today? Remind                  Colored Pencils
students that Jackson was elected in part because he represented the “common man.” Have
students define who the “common man” was in 1828. On chart paper, have the class list
qualities in a presidential candidate that would appeal to their modern “common man.” Ask
students to compare their candidate to Andrew Jackson.
4. Students will outline campaign methods used by Andrew Jackson during the 1828
campaign. Use a chart to show the change to the electorate before the 1828 election. Ask
students to analyze how that contributed to Jackson’s victory.
5. Class Discussion: Why do television newscasters spend so much time analyzing the
credibility and voter appeal of third party candidates in presidential elections? How can the
presence of more than two major candidates affect an election?
6. Students should create election ad and slogans of the election of 1828.



Extension Activities/Technology                                                                 Other Resources
Teaching With Documents Lesson Plan:                                                            American Originals Exhibit
Tally of the 1824 Electoral College Vote                                                        ARC
                                                                                                Record Group 233, Records of the House of Representatives
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/electoral-tally/activities.html                       U.S. Constitution in Article II, Section 1, Clauses 2 and 4, and the 12th Amendment.




         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                           Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                              HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                       Objective 2.02: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in are, literature,
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                   and language.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.                             2.03: Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.
                                                                         2.04: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.
Instructional Strategies                                                                           Materials
                                                                                                   Board Markers
1. Students should create a graphic organizer analyzing the role African Americans played in       Graphic Organizers
the political system in the South. Students should create a timeline of the twenty-three African   Contrast Changes in American Art organizer
Americans that served in the House of Representatives from 1868 to 1895. In addition to            Declaration of Sentiments
Hiram and Blanche there were several African American congressmen from several southern            Construction Paper
states. Students should identify the first and second African American Senators.                   Comparison diagram
2. Students should analyze what prompted Frederick Douglas to declare, “Whatever Andrew            Markers
Jackson may be, he is certainly no friend of our race?”                                            Colored Pencils
3. Students should examine the role of the Freedman’s Bureau in the improvement of African         Scissors
American life.                                                                                     Glue
4. Students should compare and contrast the changes in American art, painting, and literature.
5. Students should read the Declaration of Sentiments drafted by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and
others at the first American women's rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York in
1848. What does this declaration seem to achieve?
6. Students should create a picture representation of how they imagine life was like for
African American women in 1848.
7. Students should examine the role of African American women in the Seneca Falls
Convention.
8. Discuss Frederick Douglass’ role in the Seneca Falls Convention.
9. Students should complete a comparison diagram of the abolitionist movement and the
women’s rights movement.
10. Students should complete a graphic organizer entitled “The Early Women’s Rights
Movement.”

Extension Activities/Technology                                                                    Other Resources
Students should research African American education.
    a. Explain the literacy rate among African Americans and how it changed from 1870 to
         1900.
    b. Understand the importance of the establishment of Howard University.




         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                       Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                              HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2(1801-1850) Expansion and Reform                Objective 2.02: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in are, literature,
The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism,           and language.
nationalism, and sectionalism.                                          2.03: Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.
                                                                        2.04: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.
Instructional Strategies                                                                          Materials
1. Review with students the reason (s) Southern states wanted to expand West by completing        Board Markers
a graphic organizer.                                                                              Chart Paper
2. Essential Questions:                                                                           Westward Expansion organizer
    a. How did ‘manifest destiny’ and independence of Texas contribute to the increase of         Westward Expansion Political Cartoon
       sectionalism?                                                                              Scrapbook Materials
    b. What was the significance of the Mexican War?                                              Maps
3. Warm Up: Have students look up the words manifest and destiny in the dictionary.
Discuss the meaning of each word separately and the meaning of the words together in relation
to the expansion of the United States.
4. Divide the class into two groups. Assign one group the Santa Fe Trail and the other the
Oregon Trail. Each group should create a scrapbook of a family traveling on their trail.
Students should create maps, drawing, and diary entries from family members.
5. Using a map, have students study the map and list in chronological order some of the events
that led to the United States achieving Manifest Destiny.
6. Divide the class into four groups---settlers, Native Americans, Mexicans, and Texans.
Have them write about how they felt about expansion of the United States. Combine the
settlers and Native Americans, and the Texans and the Mexicans, and have them blend their
statements into a dialogue between Native Americans and settlers or Mexicans and Texans.
Have groups perform their dialogues.
7. Outline the presidency of James K. Polk and write about his actions.
8. Students should analyze westward expansion by analyzing the westward expansion political
cartoon and discuss American territorial expansion.
9. To help students understand how the annexation of Texas affected the relations between the
United States and Mexico, students should complete a graphic organizer.
Extension Activities/Technology                                                                   Other Resources
Using the internet or other resource materials, try to find an article from the newspaper The     http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/documents/documents_p2.cfm?doc=113
North Star or any other publication from the early 19 th century that promoted resistance among   http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~stephan/48states.html
members of the African community. Did Africans abroad create similar publications?                http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states/exploration_1800.jpg
                                                                                                  Manifest Destiny
                                                                                                  http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/us17.cfm
                                                                                                  Animated map of westward expansion
                                                                                                  http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~stephan/48states.html




         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                      Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                                 HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                      Objective 2.02: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in are, literature,
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                  and language.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.                            2.03: Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.
                                                                        2.04: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.
Instructional Strategies                                                                           Materials
1. Ask students to brainstorm the hardships the pioneers might have endured loving on the          Board Markers
frontier. Does a frontier exist today? Students should write letters home discussing their         Chain of Events Organizer
experience as a new immigrant. What commonalities do the students letters have?                    Two Essential Issues organizer
2. Discussion Question                                                                             Dred Scott Case t-chart
   a. Why did the Mexican government want Americans to move to Texas?                              Lincoln-Douglass Speech
   b. How did the Mexican War help America achieve Manifest Destiny?                               Question Sheet
   c. What did Americans and Mexicans in the Southwest learn from each other?                      Audio of Frederick Douglass’ response to the Dred Scott decision
3. Essay: During the 1800s the boundaries of the United States expanded. Write an essay            Trial of Dred Scott Activities
explaining how the United States gained one of the following: the Oregon Country, Texas, or
the Mexican Cession.
4. Have students explain in writing or discuss the following topics related to Americans
moving west: “Remember the Alamo! 54° 40’ and the Mexican Cession.
5. Using a chain of events organizer, list important battles of the Mexican War.
6. As a warm up activity, write the following words on the board, “We the people of the
United States” on the board.
7. As a class discuss the two essential issues surrounding the Dred Scott case. Students
should complete the Essential Issues organizer.
8. Students should work in pairs to complete the arguments of the Dred Scott case t-chart.
9. Students should work in groups of four to read the Lincoln Douglass speech on the Dred
Scott case and complete the question sheet.
10. Play the audio file of Frederick Douglass’ response to the Dred Scot decision. How does
Douglass respond to the Dred Scott decision? Who does he identity as responsible for the
institution of slavery?
9. Students should listen to Frederick Douglass’ interpretation of “We the people of the
United States.”
10. Separate the class into two groups, one in favor of Frederick Douglass’ interpretation and
the other against. Students should defend their positions.

Extension Activities/Technology                                                                    Other Resources
Trial of Dred Scott on Trial lesson plan and activities                                            www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/documents_p2.cfm?doc=113
Also found at:                                                                                     www.ac.wwu.lib.utexas.edu/maps/unite_states/exploration_1800.jpg
 http://www.oceanside.k12.ny.us/9ms/departments/socialstudies/                                     www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/is17.cfm
pre_ap/keegan/dred_scott.htm#extension                                                             http://www.teachushistory.org/dred-scott-decision
                                                                                                   http://library.wustl.edu/vlib/dredscott/




         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                      Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                               HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                       Objective 2.02: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in are, literature,
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                   and language.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.                             2.03: Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.
                                                                         2.04: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.
Instructional Strategies                                                                           Materials
1. Review with students the history of Native American Indians and colonial settlers.              Board Markers
2. Students should complete a graphic organizer listing the affects of American expansion of       Chart Paper
Native American Indians.                                                                           Affects of American expansion of Native American Indians organizer
3. Post the following questions on the board and have the students discuss                         Map or Westward Movement
What feelings, images and thoughts come to mind when you think of home?                            Worcester v. Georgia
Is the home that you are “envisioning the physical space where you currently reside? Why or
why not?
4. Geography and History: Movement
Have students look at the map of westward expansion movement. Ask: What major rivers did
the Cherokees have to cross to arrive in their assigned Indian Territory? How many different
paths are shown for the Cherokee “Trail of Tears” What group had the farthest to travel to the
new territory? What Indian group had land bordering the Mississippi River before the
removal?
5. Have students read the decision in Worcester v. Georgia (1832) that ruled that Indians were
not subject to the laws of a state. Ask students to write a short essay explaining how President
Jackson could ignore the Supreme Court’s decision in Worchester v. Georgia?
6. Recognizing Ideologies: Students will be able to see examples of how personal
relationships sometimes affect public decisions.
Ask students to imagine that they are a member of the Seminole or Cherokee people. Before
writing a person essay about their reaction to Jackson’s policies for relocating the Indians,
have them free write about the facts of the situation as well as their feeling. They might focus
on battles with U.S. troops, interruptions in their daily lives, or the events of the “Trail of
Tears.” Students should revise their essays for specific detail and logical order. After proof
reading, students can share their essays with a partner.




Extension Activities/Technology                                                                    Other Resources
Worcester v. Georgia                                                                               Additional Resources
Lesson Plan 1                                                                                      http://www.teachushistory.org/indian-removal/resources
Lesson Plan 2




         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                       Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                                HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                        Objective 2.02: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in are, literature,
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                    and language.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.                              2.03: Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.
                                                                          2.04: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.
Instructional Strategies                                                                            Materials
1. Students will read the Biography of Black Hawk 1767-1838.                                        Board Markers
2. Students will complete In Your Own Words Activity:                                               Chart Paper
           How did Black Hawk work to protect the rights of the Sauk and Fox                        Biography of Black Hawk 1767-1838
           Nations? Write you answer in a paragraph of five or more sentences                       Internet
           In your notebook.
3. Homework: Students will examine President Andrew Jackson’s role in this act. Read his
first and second speech to Congress concerning the passing of this act. What do you think were
Jackson’s motives for wanting the Native Americans to be removed from their land? Do you
agree with his reasons? Write down quotations from his speeches to use in your editorial
article. Put yourself in Andrew Jackson’s position. Would you have been for or against
removal?
http://www.synaptic.bc.ca/ejournal/jackson.htm
Identify the tribes that were relocated. More importantly, identify the tribes that resisted
relocation.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2959.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h3083t.html
4. Examine the Trail of Tears. What was it? Who was involved? Why is it important in the
understanding of Indian removal from US territories? Again, examine which tribes were
relocated, which resisted, what happened to them, and statistics relating to the Trail of Tears.
Give details on what happened to these tribes that were forcefully relocated.




Extension Activities/Technology                                                                     Other Resources
Previously, you’ve learned how Europeans robbed Africa of its greatest natural resources. In        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Jackson
this lesson, you discovered how European settlers robbed Native Americans of their resources.       http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2959.html
Write an essay identifying similarities that exist in the oppression of these peoples. Be sure to   Indian Removal site http://www.studyworld.com/indian_removal_act_of_1830.htm
compare the motives for the injustices in your writing.                                             Historical overview http://www.emayzine.com/lectures/chronolo.html
                                                                                                    Chronology of events http://www.synaptic.bc.ca/ejournal/jackson.htm
                                                                                                    Andrew Jackson’s case for removal
                                                                                                    http://hcl.chass.ncsu.edu/garson/dye/docs/removal.htm
                                                                                                    Text of removal act
                                                                                                    http://www.siskiyous.edu/class/hist7/lecsix.htm




          Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                       Kimberly M. Jones
                                                                                             HISTORY

NCSCOS Competency Goal 2 (1801-1850) Expansion and                      Objective 2.02: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in are, literature,
Reform The learner will assess the competing forces of                  and language.
expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.                            2.03: Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.
                                                                        2.04: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.
Instructional Strategies                                                                          Materials
1. Warm Up Activity: Write the word “civilized” on the board. Ask students to give
responses on what it means to be civilized.                                                       Board Markers
2. Have students define the word civilized from the perspective of an American Indian, a          Chart Paper
white settler, a missionary, and an African American.                                             Dictionary
3. After completion of the warm up activity, pass out dictionaries and let each student look up   1830 State of the Union Address
the definition to the word “civilized.” Were any of the responses listed on the board close the   Internet
dictionary definition? Ask students does the definition of “civilized” depend on the              Maps
perspective of the person defining it?                                                            Personal Reflection Essay organizer
4. Student should read Andrew Jackson and Indian Removal in his 1830 State of the Union
Address. What position did he take?
5. Direct students to http://www.teachushistory.org/indian-removal/approaches/what-               Trial of Tears Lesson Plans
happened-along-trail-tears. Students should read this document and complete the activity          http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/118trail/118trail.htm
listed at the bottom of the page.
6. Students should work on map skills by reading maps that show the routes followed by the
Cherokee Nation to reach "Indian Territory," now the state of Oklahoma, in the 1830s.
Students should complete questions for map 2.
7. Students should write a personal reflection essay on the following topic: “What most
strikes you about the history of the Trial of Tears? Students should use the following websites
as sources of information.
http://ngeorgia.com/history/nghisttt.html
http://www.allthingscherokee.com/Articles/hist_050101_trailoftears.html
http://www.cherokee.org/Culture/HistoryPage.asp?ID=2
http://www.powersource.com/cherokee/burnett.html
http://cherokeehistory.com/samuel.html
8. Students should work together in groups to form an action plan to prevent the spread of
slavery to the west.




Extension Activities/Technology                                                                   Other Resources
Students should complete a research or power point project examining why the majority of          Indian reaction to Act http://www.imsa.edu/edu/socsci/jvictory/
Africans traveled the Trail of Tears alongside Native Americans. Students should also analyze     required_sem1/indian_removal_sc.htm
how Seminoles and African maroons alike. What were the connections Africans and Indians           Cherokee Nation v Georgia
had?                                                                                              http://www.catawba.k12.nc.us/techtrac/plus/taylor/who's%20who.htm
                                                                                                  Major players http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h3083t.html
                                                                                                  Cherokee letter related to Indian Removal
                                                                                                  http://www.learnnc.org/media/lessons/aoxendine1142004762/Primary_Sources.doc

         Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008                                                                                                      Kimberly M. Jones
Curriculum Document, Carter G. Woodson School, 2008   Kimberly M. Jones

				
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