ENGLISH 310/509, PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR by 62Y94iF

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                       ENGLISH 310, PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR
                               A Writing Intensive Course
                       2005 Winter Trimester, Tuesday and Thursday
                                      10:05 to 12:00
                                     Tatum Court 301

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Rebecca Jordan

TELEPHONES: (O) 601.318.6150            (H) 601.545.8370

E-MAIL: rebecca.jordan@wmcarey.edu

OFFICE HOURS: MWF, 8:30 to 11:30; M, 5:00 to 6:00; other times by appointment

TEXTS:
Hodges, John. Hodges Harbrace Handbook, 15th edition. New York: Harcourt, 2003. ISBN:
       083840345.

Weaver, Constance, ed. Lessons to Share on Teaching Grammar in Context. Portsmouth:
       Boynton/ Cook,         1998. ISBN: 0-86709-394-3

Weaver, Constance. Teaching Grammar in Context. Portsmouth: Boynton/Cook, 1996. ISBN:
       0-86709375-7

CLASS PARTICIPATION
   ENG 310 is an interactive class; therefore, you have a responsibility not only to yourself,
     but also to the class members to be at all class meetings on time and prepared for the
     class. Your presence, punctuality, preparation, and participation are crucial to success in
     this class. Be prepared to discuss the chapters and exercises on the day they are due.
     Good participation--pertinent questions, constructive comments, observations, and
     contributions--enhances your grade.

ATTENDANCE
   Attendance will be taken at the beginning of class.
   All absences are counted the same. All absences are unexcused including those classes
     missed for adding the course late and classes missed due to college-related trips.
   Three tardies will count as one absence.
   Two early departures or taking a break during class will count as one absence.
  
CLASS DEMEANOR
   Avoid eating/drinking during class
   Turn off pager and cell phones. Please do not leave class to answer cell phones.
   Avoid intimidating speech to students or faculty.
   Avoid conducting private conversations during class.
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ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
    Consult the college’s policy regarding academic dishonesty in The Lance.
    Students are expected to uphold the Academic Honor Pledge signed on the first day of
     class.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
    Students with disabilities who are protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act of
     1990 and require special accommodations should contact MS Brenda Waldrip at
     601.318.6188

CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION OF COURSE CONTENT:
        A thorough review of descriptive grammar and prescriptive grammar with an emphasis
on how this knowledge can be used in teaching writing, in academic and personal writing, and in
editing manuscripts.

COURSE RATIONALE:
       English 310 provides a thorough review of English grammar fundamentals that English
majors/minors will encounter in teaching language on the secondary level or college level.
However, the course is designed so that any major /minor can improve his or her use of
language--oral or written--through a comprehensive study of grammar.

SPECIFIC COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Examine what aspects of grammar need to be taught to writers, along with the related
      questions of why, when, and how.
    Review traditional or prescriptive grammar related to writing style
    Study and determine your pedagogical philosophy of grammar

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
50 pts. Oral participation/presentation
        10 pts. Collaborative group presentation on Constance’s Weaver’s Teaching Grammar in
                 Context
        10 pts. Individual presentation of an article from Lessons to Share
        10 pts. Individual presentation of an article from English Journal, In the Middle, or
                 Language Arts
        10 pts. Grammar autobiography and biographies presentation
        10 pts. Grammar mini lessons
                  Evidence of group collaboration and planning (Teaching Grammar in
                     Context only)
                  Evidence of individual reading of the chapter(s) and individual
                     understanding (2 pts.)
                  Discussion of the chapter(s) is well organized, clear, understandable;
                     presentation contains a succinct summary, reflection/reaction, and
                     pedagogical application—Teaching Grammar in Context, Lessons to Share,
                     article from English Journal, In the Middle, or Language Arts; grammar
                     lesson explains the grammatical rule and uses examples from the in-class
                     essay to illustrate (3 pts.)
                  Use of audio visual aids enhance the presentation (3 pts.)
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                 Effective oral presentation: eye contact, effective use of body, clear
                  enunciation and pronunciation, volume loud enough, avoidance of just
                  reading presentation (2 pts.)

40 pts. Grammar portfolio
        In-class essay
                  An essay written in class
                  Will be used to determine which grammar mini lessons each person will
                     teach using Harbrace Handbook
        Write-ups
                  Free writings completed in class or outside of class on a focused subject
                      discussed in class
                  Place your name and the date on the unlined, upper left hand corner of the
                      notebook paper.
                  Center the subject of the write-up on the first line.
                  Using a pen, write on the subject for a minimum of one page. Do not skip
                      every other line.
                  Write on the back of the paper if necessary. However, do not use a second
                      sheet of paper.
                  Write-ups are not evaluated as formal writing is. Grammar and organization
                      are not a consideration. I want to see what you have learned. Write-ups are
                      like notes taken in class.
        Grammar autobiography and biographies (self, family member, friend, and teacher)
                  The autobiography or biography traces the person’s grammar development:
                     grammar acquisition as a child; grammar development in school, at home,
                     socially; pedagogical philosophy at present/future (beliefs about how
                     grammar should be taught)
                  The autobiography/biography is well organized and well developed; uses
                     appropriate details to support a thesis or illustrate ideas; shows unity,
                     coherence, and progression; demonstrates syntactic variety; and displays
                     clear facility in the use of language.
                  The autobiography is characteristically substantial in content and mature in
                     style. It demonstrates the ability to use language creatively and effectively.
                     Voice tends to be strong, and there is a clear sense of audience and context.
        Teaching grammar position/argumentative paper
                  A three to five page paper using a minimum of four sources.
                  Considering class readings, class discussions, and
                     autobiography/biographies, the writer establishes what his/her position is
                     regarding teaching grammar.

10 pts. Final exam
                 An essay exam where students will synthesize material covered

GRADING SCALE: Final grades will be assigned according to the following scale:
     93-100 = A
     83-92 = B
     73-82 = C
     63-72 = D
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SCHEDULE: The class schedule is subject to change. If absent, you are responsible for
obtaining knowledge of the changes.

WEEK 1
November 29    Syllabus discussion

December 1    In-class essay
WEEK 2
December 6    Group 1, Teaching Grammar in Context, Chapter 1
              Group 2, Teaching Grammar in Context, Chapter 2

December 8    Group 3, Teaching Grammar in Context, Chapter 3
              Group 4, Teaching Grammar in Context, Chapter 4

WEEK 3
December 13   Group 5, Teaching Grammar in Context, Chapter 5
              Group 6, Teaching Grammar in Context, Chapter 6

December 15   Lessons to Share, Article 1
              Lessons to Share, Article 2
WEEK 4
January 3     Lessons to Share, Article 3
              Lessons to Share, Article 4

January 51    Lessons to Share, Article 5
              Lessons to Share, Article 6

WEEK 5
January 10    Lessons to Share, Article 7
              Lessons to Share, Article 8

January 12    Lessons to Share, Article 9
              Lessons to Share, Article 10

WEEK 6
January 17    Lessons to Share, Article 11
              Lessons to Share, Article 12

January 19    Lessons to Share, Article 13
              Lessons to Share, Article 14

WEEK 7
January 24    Academic journal article from English Journal, In the Middle, or
                            Language Arts 1, 2, 3

January 26    Academic journal article from English Journal, In the Middle, or Language Arts
4,                  5, 6, 7


WEEK 8
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January 31    Academic journal article from English Journal, In the Middle, or Language Arts
8,                  9, 10, 11

February 2    Academic journal article from English Journal, In the Middle, or Language Arts
                    12, 13, 14

WEEK 9
February 7    Grammar autobiography & interviews presentations/discussion 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

February 9    Grammar autobiography & interviews presentations/discussions 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

WEEK 10
February 14   Grammar autobiography & interviews presentations/discussions 11, 12, 13, 14

February 16   Final exam

WEEK 11       Pedagogical Grammar portfolio due
              Teaching grammar position/argumentative paper presentation
              Final exam results
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             ENG 310 Pedagogical Grammar, 2005 Winter Trimester
NAME_______________________________________________________________________
           (Last Name)         (First Name)        (Middle Name)

SOCIAL SECURITY NO.______________________________________________________

MAJOR________________________________________MINOR_____________________

ADDRESS___________________________________________________________________

HOME TELEPHONE NO.______________________________________________________

WORK TELEPHONE NO._____________________________________________________

E-MAIL ADDRESS____________________________________________________________

______Oral presentations (50 pts.)
       __________Grammar mini lesson (10 pts.)
       __________Teaching Grammar in Context (10 pts.)
       __________Lessons to Share (10 pts.)
       __________Journal article from English Journal, In the Middle, or Language Arts (10 pts.)
       __________Grammar autobiography and biographies (10 pts.)
_______Pedagogical grammar portfolio (40 pts.)
_______Final exam (20 pts.)

_______TOTAL ______FINAL GRADE     _______ABSENCES
ABSENCES
Week 1                      Week 6
______Tuesday, November 29  ______Tuesday, January 17
______Thursday, December 1  ______Thursday, January 19
Week 2                      Week 7
______Tuesday, December 6   ______Tuesday, January 24
______Thursday, December 8  ______Thursday, January 26

Week 3                                   Week 8
______Tuesday, December 13               ______Tuesday, January 31
______Thursday, December 15              ______Thursday, February 2

Week 4                                   Week 9
______ Tuesday, January 3                ______Tuesday, February 9
______ Thursday, January 5               ______Thursday, February 11

Week 5                                   Week 10
_______Tuesday, January 10               ______Tuesday, February 14
_______Thursday, January 12              ______Thursday, February 16
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                         ENG 310, ORAL PRESENTATIONS
NAME________________________________________________________SCORE________
  o Teaching Grammar in Context
  o Lessons to Share
  o article from English Journal, In the Middle, or Language Arts
  o grammar autobiography and biographies
  o Grammar mini lesson

_______Evidence of group collaboration and planning (Teaching Grammar in Context only)
_______Evidence of individual reading of the chapter(s) and individual understanding (2 pts.)
_______Discussion of the chapter(s) is well organized, clear, understandable; presentation
       contains a succinct summary, reflection/reaction, and pedagogical application—Teaching
       Grammar in Context, Lessons to Share, article from English Journal, In the Middle, or
       Language Arts; the grammar autobiography or biography traces the person’s grammar
       development or grammar acquisition as a child, grammar development in school, at
home, socially and pedagogical philosophy at present/future (beliefs about how grammar should
       be taught); grammar mini lesson explains the grammatical rule and uses examples from
       the in-class essay to illustrate (3 pts.)
______Use of audio visual aids enhance the presentation (3 pts.)
______Effective oral presentation: eye contact, effective use of body, clear enunciation and
       pronunciation, volume loud enough, avoidance of just reading presentation (2 pts.)




                         ENG 310, ORAL PRESENTATIONS
NAME________________________________________________________SCORE________
  o Teaching Grammar in Context
  o Lessons to Share
  o article from English Journal, In the Middle, or Language Arts
  o grammar autobiography and biographies
  o Grammar mini lesson

_______Evidence of group collaboration and planning (Teaching Grammar in Context only)
_______Evidence of individual reading of the chapter(s) and individual understanding (2 pts.)
_______Discussion of the chapter(s) is well organized, clear, understandable; presentation
       contains a succinct summary, reflection/reaction, and pedagogical application—Teaching
       Grammar in Context, Lessons to Share, article from English Journal, In the Middle, or
       Language Arts; the grammar autobiography or biography traces the person’s grammar
       development or grammar acquisition as a child, grammar development in school, at
home, socially and pedagogical philosophy at present/future (beliefs about how grammar should
       be taught); grammar mini lesson explains the grammatical rule and uses examples from
       the in-class essay to illustrate (3 pts.)
______Use of audio visual aids enhance the presentation (3 pts.)
______Effective oral presentation: eye contact, effective use of body, clear enunciation and
       pronunciation, volume loud enough, avoidance of just reading presentation (2 pts.
NAME_______________________________________________________________________SCORE_____________________
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                                     ENG 310 PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR PORTFOLIO
_________In-class essay (5 pts.)

1                     2                     3                      4                     5

_________Write ups (5 pts.)
    o    The name and the date appear on the unlined, upper left hand corner of the notebook paper.
    o    The subject of the write up is entered on the first line.
    o    The writer wrote on the subject for a minimum of one full page, using the back of the paper if necessary.
    o    Seventeen write ups are included in the portfolio.

1                     2                     3                      4                     5

_________Grammar autobiography/biography (10 pts.)
    o    The autobiography/biography traces the person’s grammar development—grammar acquisition as a childThe
         autobiography/biography also addresses methods used in school to teach or learn grammar.
1                  2                     3                    4                      5

     o     The autobiography/biography is well organized and well developed; uses appropriate details to support a thesis or illustrate
           ideas; shows unity, coherence, and progression; demonstrates syntactic variety; and displays clear facility in the use of
           language. The autobiography is characteristically substantial in content and mature in style. It demonstrates the ability to
           use language creatively and effectively. Voice tends to be strong, and there is a clear sense of audience and context.
1                     2                      3                     4                       5

_________Position Paper (20 pts.)
    o    16-20     The essay is EXCELLENT in overall quality, substantial in content and mature in style.
         _______(1) The essayist attended the writing conference.
         _______(2) The paper is well organized and well developed, following the position/argumentative paper paradigm.
         _______(3) The paper uses excellent details to support a thesis or illustrate ideas. The 3 to 5 page paper uses
                    4 secondary sources. The paper uses MLA correctly.
         _______(4) The paper shows excellent unity, coherence, and progression.
         _______(5) The paper demonstrates excellent and mature syntactic variety and displays clear facility in the use of
                   language.
    o    11-15     The essay is VERY GOOD in overall quality, suggesting the excellence that the 30 essay
                    demonstrated.
         ______(1) The essayist attended the writing conference.
                   ______(2) The paper is well organized and well developed, following the position/argumentative paper
                   paradigm, though it may have fewer details than does a 16-20 paper. The 3 to 5 page paper uses 4 secondary
                   sources. The paper uses MLA correctly.
         ______(4) The paper uses appropriate details to support a thesis or illustrate ideas.
         ______(5) The paper shows unity, coherence, and progression.
         ______(6) The paper demonstrates syntactic variety and displays clear facility in the use of language, though it may not be
                   as fluid as a 16-20 paper.
    o    5-10      The essay is GOOD in overall quality; the writing is competent both in content and style. The essay
                   contains more strengths than weaknesses, but there may be an unevenness of quality or
                   underdevelopment.
         ______(1) The essayist attended the writing conference.
         ______(2) The paper is adequately organized and well developed, following the position/argumentative paper paradigm,
                   though it may have fewer details than does a 11-15 paper. The 3 to 5 page paper uses 4 secondary sources.
         The       paper uses MLA correctly.
         ______(3) The paper is adequately organized and developed, though it may have fewer details than does a 11-15 paper.
         ______(4) The paper uses some details to support a thesis or illustrate ideas.
         ______(5) The paper demonstrates adequate facility with language and may contain occasional grammatical
                   errors, but they will be neither serious nor frequent.
    o    0-5       The essay is POOR TO FAIR in overall quality; weaknesses clearly predominate over strengths. The
                   writing is thin in substance and undistinguished in style.
         ______(1) The essayist attended the writing conference but was not adequately prepared.
         ______(2) The paper is inadequately organized and developed, inadequately following the position/argumentative paper
                   paradigm.
         ______(3) The paper is inadequately organized and developed.
         ______(4) The paper fails to support a thesis or illustrate generalizations with appropriate detail. There are problems and
                   weaknesses in the 3 to 5 page paper’s use of 4 secondary sources. The paper reflects inadequate use of MLA
                   style.
         ______(5) The paper uses limited and inappropriate word choice, sentence style, and structure.
         ______(6) The paper has a pattern or accumulation of errors in mechanics, usage or sentence structure.

                                 Teaching Grammar in Context Oral Presentations
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Chapter 1, “Grammar and the Teaching of Grammar: An Introduction”

1. ___________________________________________________________________________

Chapter 2, “Teaching Grammar: Reasons for, Evidence Against”

1. ___________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________

Chapter 3, “Acquiring Grammatical Competence”

1. ___________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________

Chapter 4, “Toward a Perspective on Error”

1. ___________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________

3. ___________________________________________________________________________

Chapter 5, “Reconceptualizing the Teaching of Grammar”
1. ___________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________

3. ___________________________________________________________________________

Chapter 6, “Learning Theory and the Teaching of Grammar”

1. ___________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________

3.___________________________________________________________________________
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                              Lessons to Share Oral Presentations

Article 1, “How Language Is Learned From Birth Through the Elementary Years And Beyond”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 2, “Teaching Grammar in the Context of Writing”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 3, “Dora Learns to Write and in the Process Encounters Punctuation”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 4, “Teaching Writing and Grammar in Context”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 5, “Facilitating the Use of Description—and Grammar”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 6, “Using Minilessons to Promote Student Revision: Helping Students Realize Their
          Power over Words”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 7, “When Grammar Matters: Guiding Students Through Revision”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 8, “Learning to Use Grammar with Precisions Through Editing Conferences”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 9, “Developing Correctness in Student Writing: Alternatives to the Error Hunt”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 10, “Image Grammar”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 11, “Sentence Composing”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 12, “Breaking the Rules in Style”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 13, “The Power of Dialect: Ebonics Personified”
_____________________________________________________________________________
Article 14, “Meeting the Special Needs of the English as a Second Language (ESL) Students in
            Public Schools”
_____________________________________________________________________________


NAME_________________________________________________________________________SCORE________
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 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE WRITING GUIDELINES (HB refers to Hodges Harbrace Handbook, Revised 15th edition)

PROFICIENT CONTENT: ORGANIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT
                5 pts.   The title attracts attention and gives a forecast of the subject matter of the essay.
      HB32a     5 pts.   The essay demonstrates that the writer understood his/her purpose, audience,
                          and occasion.
      HB32c    10 pts.   The thesis statement asserts one clearly focused idea/opinion.
      HB31c    10 pts.   The essay has adequate details, examples, and/or illustrations to support the
                          thesis sentence.

      HB33b(1) 5pts.     The introduction/lead-in entices readers to read on.

      HB31b     10 pts. Clearly arranged ideas and effective transitions foster the essay's coherence.

      HB31a     10 pts. All sentences and paragraphs develop or add to the thesis sentence? (Unity)

      HB33b(2) 5 pts. The concluding paragraph provides a suitable ending for the essay.

PROFICIENT FACILITY WITH LANGUAGE: WORD CHOICE, SENTENCE STYLE AND STRUCTURE

      HB20     The essay consists of accurate and precise word choice that conveys meaning effectively 2 pts.

      HB21     The essay expresses information in a concise style, avoiding wordiness and needless
                repetition. 2 pts.

      HB30     The sentences reflect variety—simple, compound, complex sentences. The sentences also reflect
                variety by using grammatical constructions other than the subject to begin sentences. 2 pts.

      HB29d The essay contains forceful verbs making sentences more emphatic. The active voice is more
             emphatic than passive voice, and action verbs and forceful linking verbs are more emphatic than
             forms of have or be (be, am, is, are, was, were, been, being). (PASSIVE VOICE: The race was
             won by Sylvia. ACTIVE VOICE: Sylvia won the race. WORDINESS DUE TO BE VERB: Rain
             is symbolic of death in this novel. REVISED: Rain symbolizes death in this novel. 2 pts.

      HB21a(3)The essay avoids the “dummy subjects” it and there. (DUMMY SUBJECT: There are several
               good reasons he dropped out of school. REVISED: He dropped out of school for several good
               reasons. DUMMY SUBJECT: It is important for a student to remember to apply for spring
               graduation. REVISED: A student must remember to apply for spring graduation.) 2 pts.

PROFICIENT FACILITY WITH LANGUAGE: MECHANICS AND USAGE

      HB3      The essay avoids comma splices. (COMMA SPLICE: I ran over some broken glass, it did not
                puncture my tires. COMMA SPLICE CORRECTIONS: (1) I ran over some broken glass; it
                did not puncture my tires. (2) I ran over some broken glass, but it did not puncture my tires.
                (3) I ran over some broken glass. It did not puncture my tires. (4) I ran over some broken glass;
                however, it did not puncture my tires. (5) Although I ran over some broken glass, it did not
                puncture my tires. 2 pts.

       HB3      The essay avoids fused or run-on sentences. (FUSED OR RUN-ON SENTENCE: I ran over some
                glass it did not puncture my tires. FUSED OR RUN-ON SENTENCES CORRECTION: (1) I ran
                over some broken glass; it did not puncture my tires. (2) I ran over some broken glass, but it did
                not puncture my tires. (3) I ran over some broken glass. It did not puncture my tires. (4) I ran
                over some broken glass; however, it did not puncture my tires. (5) Although I ran over some
                broken glass, it did not puncture my tires. 2 pts.

   PROFICIENT FACILITY WITH LANGUAGE: MECHANICS AND USAGE continued
                                                                                                                 12


   HB2      The essay is free of unacceptable fragments. (FRAGMENT: At Liz’s most recent wedding,
             the photographer used an instant camera. Because her marriages break up so fast.
             CORRECTION: Because her marriages break up so fast, the photographer used an instant camera
             at Liz’s most recent wedding.) 2 pts.

   HB6a     Each verb agrees with its subject. (The actions of the new senator hasn’t [should be haven’t] been
             consistent with his campaign promises.) 2 pts.

   HB7a     The essay is free of wrong verb forms. (I seen him yesterday. CORRECTION: I saw him
             yesterday.) 2 pts.

   HB6b     The essay is free of pronoun agreement errors. (To get a temperamental actress to sign a
             contract, the director would lock them [should be her]in their dressing room.) 2 pts.

   HB5      The essay correctly uses pronoun case. (She gave the dinner for Mother and I. CORRECTION:
             She gave the dinner for Mother and me.) 2 pts.

   HB25b The essay avoids dangling modifiers. (Slamming on the brakes, the car skidded. CORRECTION:
          After he slammed on the brakes, the car skidded.) 2 pts.

   HB18     The essay is free of misspelled words. The essay correctly used words such as affect/effect,
             it’s/its, there/their, to/too/two. 2 pts.

   HB12b The essay correctly sets off with a comma an introductory phrase or clause. (After we had finished
          our laundry, we discovered one sock was missing.) 2 pts.

   HB12a    The essay correctly uses a comma to separate two independent clauses joined by a coordinating
             conjunction. (You can bury your savings in the backyard, but don’t expect Mother Nature to pay
             interest. 2 pts.

   HB13     The essay avoids unnecessary, misplaced, or omitted commas or other marks of punctuation. For
             example, a writer should avoid placing a comma between a subject and verb or before a
             coordinating conjunction connecting two verbs, two adjectives, or two nouns. 2 pts.

   HB9      The essay uses capital letters correctly: proper names; their abbreviations and acronyms; titles of
             persons before their names; titles and subtitles of books, plays, essays, and other titled works; the
             pronoun I and the interjection O; the first word of sentences and of directly quoted speech, etc.
             The essay also avoids unnecessary capitals. 2 pts.

   HB15     The essay correctly uses the apostrophe for showing possession for nouns and indefinite pronouns,
             contractions and numbers, and plurals formed with an apostrophe; the essay also avoids the
             misuse of the apostrophe with personal pronouns. 2 pts.

   HB23     The essay is free of any garbled or incoherent or inconsistent sentence of any kind due to the
             combination of unrelated ideas, mixed constructions, faulty predication, or shifts in grammatical
             structure, tone, style, or viewpoint. (Did it ever occur to you of the enormous waste involved in
             our public economy?)
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