REPORT ON THE STATE OF CZECH CINEMATOGRAPHY IN 2002.pdf by wangnuanzg

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									REPORT ON
THE STATE OF
CZECH CINEMATOGRAPHY
IN 2002



Introduction
State Support of Cinematography
International Organizations
  Eurimages
  Eureka Audiovisuel and the European Audiovisual Observatory
  The ‘Media’ Programs
State Fund for the Support and Development of Czech Cinematography
National Film Archives
Film Clubs and Art Cinemas
Awards Won by Czech Films at Home and Abroad
Domestic Festivals, Shows and Awards
Film Production
Film Distribution
Cinemas
Video Distribution
Television
The Year in Review
List of Institutions, Associations and other Audiovisual Organizations



Ministry of Culture of the Czech Republic
Mass Media Department
May 2003
INTRODUCTION

        For the Czech cinematography, last year was not devilish, as the title of the
most successful new Czech film might suggest, but it was not the opposite, either. 21
new Czech feature-length releases opened in cinemas in 2002, of which only 14,
however, were true feature films. Judging by the number of awards, Zelenka’s Year
of the Devil and Alice Nellis’s Some Secrets were the last year’s champions.
Documentaries were given more space last year and after years of waiting, an
animated feature opened in cinemas. We could see films of a wide array of genres
shot by first-time directors as well as veteran filmmakers, followers of conventions as
well as those favoring experiments. Compared to the fruitful year 2001, however, the
number of people who decided to see a Czech premiere fell last year by two thirds.
Luckily, this year seems much more hopeful.
        Just like the year before, American films conquered cinemas in 2002, with The
Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter fighting for the top spot. The rapid rise in
cinema admissions of the preceding years has slowed down considerably in spite of
the might of multiplex cinemas. There are now fourteen of them in five Czech cities.
Box office revenues grew slightly faster, but the average admission price stagnated.
This, of course, is good news for cinemagoers, as is the fact that older cinemas are
being upgraded and renovated more intensively in order to have a better chance in
competing with multiplexes. Students still show a great deal of interest in film
festivals, shows, seminars and other events that function as a welcome alternative to
the monotony of commercial releases. There are dozens of festivals and similar
events organized every year, and both their number and quality continue to increase.
The cultural and social impact of events such as the International Film Festival
Karlovy Vary, Febiofest, Summer Film School or the International Festival One World
is apparent and reflected in their increased public support.
       In regard to state-sponsored support of cinematography, it has not been
possible thus far to strengthen the stream of revenues flowing into the State Fund for
the Support and Development of Czech Cinematography. However, an amendment
of the respective law is under preparation in order to effect this change. Production of
feature films and especially of documentaries and animated films therefore continues
to depend on the public television broadcaster. Due to the limited size of the
domestic market, the issues of international cooperation and exports are increasingly
pressing. Co-production activities are now developing especially with respect to
Slovakia, but export opportunities are rather limited. New perspectives will open to
the Czech Republic once it fully joins the MEDIA European audiovisual programs, in
which the country participates since 2002. The Czech Film Center, a private
organization established last year, also aims at helping Czech films and the Czech
audiovisual industry as a whole to open new doors to the world. The most successful
segment of the industry so far is the provision of services to film and television
production teams from abroad and production of advertisement spots.
        Czech film is getting younger every year, remarkable individuals are born and
international acclaim won. This year is again likely to see 20 feature-length
premieres. Although it would be an exaggeration to speak about a "new wave", the
Czech cinematography is not doing bad compared to the film industries of other
smaller European countries. Many envy us loyal domestic cinemagoers, who are an
important asset and also a promise that Czech cinematography is not to be written off
in the globalized world of the future.


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       After a respite in the efforts to amend the Act on Certain Conditions of
Production, Dissemination and Archiving of Audiovisual Works and Amendments to
other Acts and Regulations (Audiovisual Act; No. 273/1993) as a result of the
Chamber of Deputies’ returning an amendment of this Act to the Government to be
modified in May 2001, work on amending this Act has started again in order to fulfill
the Government’s legislative action plan. As with the amendment of the Act on the
State Fund for the Support and Development of Czech Cinematography (No.
241/1992), the Minister of Culture decided in 2003 to establish a working group at the
Ministry of Culture to discuss the changes to be implemented in the Audiovisual Act.
The working group recommended to the Minister of Culture not to pursue a partial
amendment to the Audiovisual Act, but rather to focus on preparing a new piece of
roofing audiovisual legislation to be presented by the Ministry of Culture to the
Government in March 2004.
       As a part of the Government’s legislative action plan, the second half of 2002
saw preparations to amend the Act on Czech Television (No. 483/1991) with a view
to strengthen the independence and stability of the Czech Television Council and
make the public broadcaster’s financing more transparent. Simultaneously, an
amendment to the Act on Radio and Television Usage Fees (No. 252/1994) was also
under preparation with the aim of collecting fees more effectively and introducing
means of increasing fees and linking them to the inflation rate. Both proposed
amendments were assessed by relevant institutions in November 2002 and approved
by the Government in March 2003.


STATE SUPPORT OF CINEMATOGRAPHY

        Even without amendments to the existing legal framework, the nominal
volume of state funding provided to Czech cinematography grew by more than one
fourth last year compared to 2001. However, the increase did not help audiovisual
production, but rather film festivals, which received almost CZK 47 million thanks to
changes in the state budget implemented by MPs. If we add to this amount the
funding available through the audiovisual grant program of the Mass Media
Department of the Ministry of Culture, the Czech Republic provided from the state
budget more than CZK 53 million to support cinematography and audiovisual
production. The state subsidy to the International Film Festival Karlovy Vary grew to
CZK 25 million, the International Film Festival for Children and Youth in Zlín received
CZK 7 million, while Febiofest, the international festival of Czech, German and
Jewish culture 9 Gates and the first year of the International Aviation Film Festival
received CZK 4 million each. CZK 3 million went to Finále Plzeň, CZK 400,000 to the
Summer Film School in Uherské Hradiště, CZK 300,000 to Project 100 – 2002, CZK
250,000 to the International Documentary Film Festival in Jihlava and CZK 150,000
to One World, FAMU Festival and seminars of the Association of Czech Film Clubs
each. The Czech Festival of Film Comedy in Nové Město nad Metují received CZK
130,000, while Academia Film Olomouc, Techfilm Hradec Králové, Těrlicko Film
Summer, a showcase of Czech documentary and animated films, a traveling
showcase of European art films and the Czech Day at Artfilm Trenčianské Teplice
received CZK 100,000 each, Days of European Film, the Chidren Film and Television
Festival in Ostrov and the Documentary Film Pitching Forum received CZK 80,000
each, the International Mountaineering Film Festival in Teplice nad Metují, Ekofilm


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Český Krumlov and the International Festival of Student Films in Písek received CZK
70,000 each, a festival of Czech animated film in London was granted CZK 60,000,
the František Filipovský Prize for Dubbing, a showcase of film school students
organized as a part of the International Film Festival in Karlovy Vary, the seminar Go
East organized during the International Television Festival Golden Prague and the
digital film section of the International Festival Datatransfer received CZK 50,000
each, and finally the Czech and Slovak gay and lesbian film festival received CZK
30,000.
        The Mass Media Department of the Ministry of Culture also provided CZK
500,000 to the magazine Film a doba (Film and Time), CZK 200,000 to Cinepur and
CZK 80,000 to Zpravodaj FITES (FITES Newsletter). The Association of Czech Film
Clubs received a subsidy of CZK 1 million to purchase and distribute non-commercial
films in film clubs, the Czech Film and Television Academy received CZK 100,000 to
back the Czech Republic’s Oscar candidate in 2002, Cineart and Jakubiskofilm
received CZK 150,000 each, the Association of Audiovisual Producers received CZK
100,000 to promote Czech films abroad and the Association of Directors and
Screenwriters received a CZK 60,000 grant to cover the membership fee in the
corresponding European professional association.
        As every year, funds from the state budget were used to pay the Czech
Republic’s membership fees in Eurimages (CZK 6.3 million), Eureka Audiovisuel
and the European Audiovisual Observatory (less than CZK 700,000) and for the first
time ever also in the European Union’s Media Plus and Media Training programs
(CZK 11.3 million), which the Czech Republic joined in 2002. The state subsidy to
the National Film Archives, a contributory organization established by the Ministry of
Culture, reached CZK 20.7 million last year. The total of the above subsidies and
grants provided to the Czech cinematography by the state is CZK 113 million, and
this figure does not include contributions of the State Fund for the Support and
Development of Czech Cinematography.


INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

EURIMAGES

       The reason for membership in Eurimages is the opportunity for producers,
writers, directors, distributors and cinema operators to actively participate in
European film production and distribution. European cinematography is specific for its
diversity and ability to express the identity of individual national cultures. This is its
strength, but also its weakness, as film-making is not only a cultural sphere, but also
an industry with commercial requirements. This reality forces the large number of
small and economically vulnerable European cinematographies with only a limited
domestic market potential to cooperate in film co-production, export and distribution.
The Eurimages fund, with 27 member countries in 2002, has contributed during the
14 years of its existence a total of EUR 234 million to production of more than 850
films.
       Just like every year, the Czech Republic paid a membership fee last year in
the amount of EUR 201,000, i.e. approximately CZK 6.3 million. In return, the Czech
Republic received EUR 289,000 for the production of feature films, EUR 103,000 for
film distribution and EUR 57,000 for cinemas, i.e. more than twice as much as it


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invested in the fund. The projects supported by the fund included The Devil Knows
Why, a fairy tale directed by Roman Vávra, and Želary, the psychological story
directed by Ondřej Trojan.
       Eurimages also helped to distribute the following 17 films through Artcam, the
Association of Czech Film Clubs, Cineinvest, Cinemart, SPI International and Spin
Film: Being Light, Cool and Crazy, Ten Minutes Older: The Trumpet, Pismo do
Amerika, L´auberge espagnole, Il fate ignoranti, Pane e tulipani, Idioterne,
Italiensk for begyndere, Halbe Treppe, Trouble Every Day, 8 femmes,
Hundstage, Le peuple migrateur, Lundi matin, Lucía y el sexo, Swing.
       Three Czech cinemas that belong to the Europa Cinemas network have also
received financial help in 2002: Aero and Lucerna in Prague and Scala in Brno. It is
necessary to state, however, that support of distribution and cinema operators from
the fund is available only to countries that are not members of the MEDIA programs.
Because the Czech Republic has joined these programs in 2002, Czech
organizations may obtain funding in the above areas solely through MEDIA.
Nevertheless, Eurimages is still the only international fund providing support to
European co-productions, whose importance lies not only in financial assistance,
but also in networking among producers and film-makers.


EUREKA AUDIOVISUEL AND THE EUROPEAN AUDIOVISUAL OBSERVATORY

        The Czech Republic has been a member of both organizations since 1994 and
pays an annual membership fee of about CZK 310,000 to EA and CZK 360,000 to
EAO. However, the investments "return" to the country in the form of participation of
Czech audiovisual professionals in seminars, lectures and workshops organized by
EA, materials published by EAO, etc. Of the 60 events organized by the two
institutions last year, Czech professionals took for example part in the meeting of
candidate countries before joining the MEDIA Plus program during the International
Film Festival in Berlin, the preliminary meeting about establishing a screenwriting
support fund in Istanbul or the Madrid conference of EU member countries and non-
member countries focusing on film co-production. At the Cannes International Film
Festival, Czech film-makers presented their works at a joint Eureka Audiovisuel stand
and took part in a number of accompanying events. At the Karlovy Vary International
Film Festival, EA organized an information seminar for the candidate countries
covering the possibilities of obtaining support through MEDIA Plus. Other EA-
organized events that were interesting for Czech audiovisual professionals took place
in Rome (Enlargement of Audiovisual Europe), Jihlava (Jihlava Pitching Forum) and
Skopje, Macedonia (fifth screening). Last year’s activities culminated in Warsaw,
which hosted a conference titled “The European cinematographic and audiovisual
policy in the framework of the enlargement of the European Union to the Central
European countries in 2004,” and in Bratislava, which hosted a film festival.
        In 2002, Eureka Audiovisuel focused its attention on getting the Balkan
countries involved in the European audiovisual sector. However, having fulfilled its
major objectives and taking into account the nearing entry of the candidate countries
into the European Union and the MEDIA Plus program, Eureka Audiovisuel decided
to cease its activities as of 30 June 2003, after 14 successful years.
        The European Audiovisual Observatory, a sister organization of EA based in
Strasbourg, specializes in collecting and processing statistical data from the
audiovisual sector and publishing; it also covers issues related to media legislation.


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The organization publishes the EAO Statistical Yearbook, to which as well as to the
IRIS Monthly focusing on legal and legislative issues the Czech Republic contributes.
The EAO website offers access to specialized databases. EAO will continue
providing useful services in 2003 and take over some of the tasks until now carried
out by EA.


THE ‘MEDIA’ PROGRAMS

        After removing all legislative obstacles, i.e. after harmonizing the relevant
Czech regulations with acquis communitaire, the Czech Republic initiated at the
beginning of 2002 the process of joining the European Union’s MEDIA programs. In
July 2002, the Czech Republic signed a memorandum of understanding and paid a
membership fee of CZK 11.3 million, thus becoming a member of the programs
retroactively as of 1 January 2002 (in 2003, half of the Czech Republic’s membership
fee will be covered from the PHARE program).
        The MEDIA programs are designed to support European film and television
production, distribution, promotion and professional training. MEDIA Plus includes
the Development program, which is designed for screenwriters, directors and
producers to help them with preparation and pre-production of film and television
projects; the Distribution program, which focuses on supporting distribution of
European films in cinemas as well as distribution of feature films, documentaries and
animated films made for television; the Promotion program, which provides support
to film festivals and events that help develop cooperation among film professionals
and facilitate access of audiovisual works onto international markets; and the Pilot
projects program, which provides assistance to film and television archives and
supports digitalization. MEDIA Training provides support to schools, seminar and
training organizers, and also helps professionals to obtain education in management,
screenwriting and new technologies.
        As a party to the MEDIA program, the Czech Republic is under obligation to
establish a national MEDIA Desk, which will act as a partner of program
management within the European Commission, help Czech audiovisual professionals
to utilize opportunities offered by the program, and together with the Czech
representative to the program’s steering committee communicate with the MEDIA
headquarters in Brussels. Based on an agreement between the Ministry of Culture
and the European Commission, the Czech Republic’s MEDIA Desk is operated by
the Czech Film Chamber (Česká filmová komora).
        The MEDIA programs represent a long awaited source of funding and know-
how for Czech film professionals and organizations. So far, our brief membership has
brought more than CZK 6 million in assistance to ten Czech projects, mostly in the
areas of distribution and festivals.


STATE FUND FOR THE SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT OF CZECH
CINEMATOGRAPHY

      In 2003, the members of the Council of the State Fund for the Support and
Development of Czech Cinematography (hereinafter the "Fund") included Jiří
Stránský (chairman), Jan Jíra (vice-chairman), Jan Bernard, Michal Bregant, Josef



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Eismann, Jan Joukal, Břetislav Pojar, Marcela Pittermannová, Kristián Suda, Jan
Svoboda, Jiří Šalamoun, Tomáš Škrdlant and Jan Šuster.
       The Fund’s total revenues reached CZK 70.7 million, of which CZK 53.1
million came from commercial utilization of older Czech films (i.e. films made by the
Film Studio Barrandov and the Film Studio Gottwaldov between 1965 and 1990),
from the National Film Archives and from collective administration of copyrights. The
amount includes a deferred payment of CZK 25 million by Ateliéry Bonton Zlín for use
of films in 2000. The cinema ticket surcharge grossed CZK 11.4 million. The
remainder of revenues came from payments on provided financial assistance (CZK
0.2 million), penalty fees (CZK 2.6 million), application fees (CZK 1.2 million), leases
(CZK 0.6 million) and bank interest (CZK 1.6 million). During 2002, the Fund has not
received any subsidies from the state budget.
       The Fund’s total expenditures of CZK 83.2 million again exceeded
revenues. CZK 78.2 million went to non-investment subsidies and loans, CZK 2.7
million to investment subsidies and the remainder covered operating expenses of the
Council as well as consulting, legal and other services.
       In two rounds with deadlines on 31 March and 31 October, the Council
assessed a total of 184 applications requesting CZK 428 million. The Council decided
to distribute CZK 77.2 million among 80 projects and issue 19 certificates. Film
projects that were granted financial assistance in last year’s assessment rounds or in
previous years received a total of CZK 81 million. CZK 490,000 went towards
screenplays: A Hunter’s Odyssey (by Aurel Klimt) received CZK 150,000,
Champions (by Marek Najbrt) CZK 100,000, The Last Summer (by Petra Ušelová)
CZK 90,000, and You must like it for it to be good (by Marko Simič), Walking off
the Road (by Rudolf Král) and Substitute (by Martin Krejčí) CZK 50,000 each.
       As in previous years, the largest amount of money (almost CZK 49 million)
was earmarked to support the production of feature-length films and documentaries.
Angel Face (directed by Zdeněk Troška) received CZK 8 million, The Devil Knows
Why (Roman Vávra) received CZK 7 million, Happiness (Bohdan Sláma) and
Pupendo (Jan Hřebejk) both received CZK 6 million, Želary (Ondřej Trojan) received
CZK 3.5 million, Vegetarian Gnome and Shark in the Head (Maria Procházková)
received CZK 3 million, Brats (Zdeněk Tyc) received CZK 2.2 million, Who will
Guard the Guard…? (Karel Vachek) and Cruel Pleasures (Juraj Nvota) received
CZK 2 million each, Twentieth Century Memory (Helena Třeštíková), An Attempt
of Czech Roma at Emigration (Petr Václav), The True Story of Juraj Jánošík and
Tomáš Uhorčík (Agnieszka Holland) and Power of Love (Lordan Zafranovič)
received CZK 1 million each, Searching for Another Quality (Martin Ryšavý)
received CZK 500,000, The Caucasus in Year One (Jaromír Štětina) and We, the
Children of a Strange Century (Petr Kotek) received CZK 250,000 each, and finally
The History of Samizdat (Andrej Krob) received CZK 240,000.
       Shorter feature films, documentaries, animated films and films made using
combined technology were granted a total of CZK 8.8 million. World of Our World 2
– Peace of their Souls (directed by Pavel Štingl) received CZK 1 million, Audiabac
(Miroslav Janek) received CZK 800,000, One Love - Rastafarianism (Petr
Zahrádka) received CZK 750,000, Pagans from the Borders of Christendom and
Islam (Petr Zrno) received CZK 700,000, Home is Where I Am (Stephen Settele)
and How Did Men and Women Get Together (Radek Růžička) received CZK
500,000 each, Rules of the Game (Vít Janeček) received CZK 430,000, Loner
(Bedřich Glaser), Neighbors Disappeared (Zuzana Dražilová) and Women and
Changes (Erika Hníková) received CZK 400,000 each, Bláža (Barbora Dlouhá),


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Game (Galina Miklínová), New Czech Design (Jordi Niubo) and Faces and Figures
(Hana Munková) received CZK 300,000 each, The Second Life of Lidice (Pavel
Štingl) received CZK 250,000, Automat (Lucie Štamfestová) and Dog on Snow (Vít
Pancíř) received CZK 200,000 each, Village B received CZK 150,000 and
A.B.C.D.T.O.P.O.L. (both directed by Filip Remunda) received CZK 140,000.
        The funding provided to support distribution, promotion and technological
development in 2002 (almost CZK 10.5 million) was twice as higher as the amount
earmarked for the same purpose the year before. Distribution of Year of the Devil
was subsidized with CZK 2 million, Autumn Spring with CZK 1.5 million, Nicholas
Winton – The Power of Good with CZK 1.1 million, Girlie and Dust Games with
CZK 1 million each, Love from Above with CZK 900,000, Late Night Talks with
Mother with CZK 800,000, Jan Werich’s Fimfárum and Who Will Guard the
Guard…? with CZK 750,000 each, A Town Called Šutka with CZK 500,000,
Fabulous Show with CZK 200,000, DVD edition of Otesánek with CZK 250,000 and
the film’s Golden Globe candidature with CZK 150,000. The nationwide Project 100 -
2003 received CZK 500,000.
        The Fund also provided financial assistance towards promotion of festivals
and seminars. Anifest Třeboň was granted a subsidy of CZK 1 million, Finále Plzeň
and the International Documentary Film Festival Jihlava received CZK 800,000
each, the 28th Summer Film School and the Documentary Film Pitching Forum
were granted CZK 600,000 each, Filmák and Fort Film 2002 received CZK 250,000
each and the showcase of animated films PAF Olomouc received CZK 150,000.
The same amount went to help promote the magazine Cinepur. Other periodicals
and books that were granted subsidies include Animation and Time (CZK 60,000),
History of Czech Documentary Film (CZK 50,000), Czech Film in Exile (CZK
20,000) and the Catalogue of Czech Films (CZK 250,000).
        The Fund provided CZK 900,000 towards reconstruction of the cinema
Hvězda in Uherské Hradiště, CZK 600,000 to Oko in Šumperk, CZK 400,000 to
Vesmír in Pelhřimov, CZK 300,000 to Prague’s Illusion and CZK 200,000 to the
Letovice cinema.
        Last year again confirmed that in spite of the limited financial resources
available, the Fund plays a crucial role in supporting domestic cinematography. This
is true not only with regard to the total sum distributed, but also because the Fund’s
subsidy is often the decisive motivation for involvement of other investors and
sponsors. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the Fund’s revenues must
be augmented and diversified. The cinema ticket surcharge has not changed in ten
years, although the average admission charge is now six times higher than ten years
ago. New revenue sources should be covered by the amendment to the Act No.
241/1992, which is in preparation.



NATIONAL FILM ARCHIVES
       Last year, the National Film Archives (NFA) celebrated their tenth anniversary.
The institution is now well established in the historical Konvikt, which also houses the
archive cinema Ponrepo, having resolved the highly unsatisfactory situation of its
predecessor, the Czech Film Institute. Over the years, the NFA has expanded its
audiovisual collection and partially transferred it onto the new premises. It has also
started to build an audio recordings archive, documentary recordings archive and


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amateur film archive. The quality of treatment of archived film items has improved, as
they are being copied onto a safer material. The written history collection and the
library have been significantly enlarged and the basic databases as well as some film
and printed materials digitalized. The NFA continued in assembling a collection of
films of great artistic value, provided distribution services to film clubs and also
participated in the preparation of programs for dozens of domestic and foreign
festivals and showcases. The NFA manages to cover more than two thirds of its
budget with own revenues, without which it would not be able to carry out most of its
current activities. In 2002, the Government contributed towards the operation of the
National Film Archives the amount of CZK 20.7 million.
        Throughout 2002, the NFA continued to take over film materials from the
Czech Academy of Sciences, Krátký film, the former Film Studio Gottwaldov and
other sources. The institution has added to its collections more than 4,000 new film
materials and 800 videocassettes. Almost 70 feature films, documentaries and
animated films as well as 230 videocassettes have been furnished to the NFA based
on legal requirements. 155,000 meters of film have been copied and a record
370,000 meters of film footage cleaned of mould. Almost 3,000 photographs, 380 film
posters, 1,250 promotion materials and 2,300 dialogue books were added to the
written materials depository. Approximately the same number of photographs and
posters has been digitalized and 470 posters restored.

        The institution’s library acquired 610 new books and bound periodicals as well
as more than 400 screenplays. 5,800 bibliographical records and 3,160 authority
records were entered into the NFA’s electronic database. Like every year, the NFA
published the bilingual Czech-English Film Yearbook, twelve hardcopy and electronic
issues of Filmový přehled (Film Review), five issues of the specialist review
Iluminace, A.J. Liehm’s book Closely Watched Trains and the book New New Wave.
        The archive cinema Ponrepo hosted almost 430 screenings attended by
nearly 17,000 people. Ponrepo also showed films as a part of Febiofest and the
International Film Festival One World and hosted a number of thematic film
screenings and series. The NFA purchased 10 films for its art film collection and
added one hundred older Czech films to its collection for film clubs, schools and
cinemas. The NFA also provided films to the Summer Film School in Uherské
Hradiště, International Film Festival in Karlovy Vary, Finále Plzeň, International Film
Festival for Children and Youth in Zlín, study screenings at film schools, etc. The
NFA cooperated with the Czech Television on the series Films for Old-timers,
Remembrance of Things Past, Fateful Moments and provided film footage for many
more programs aired by the Czech Television, Nova and Prima. The NFA carried out
dozens of researches for both domestic and foreign producers and loaned more than
2,500 different films and 560 videocassettes.
        For the Czech Season in France, the NFA prepared a showcase of films by
Karel Zeman as well as the series New New Wave, Pearls of Czech
Cinematography, Czech Film Yesterday and Today, Czech Animated Film, the Arts in
Bohemia and Moravia, and participated in a number of other events. The NFA was
the co-organizer of a Czech films showcase in Taipei, Taiwan and brought Czech
films from the 1960s to Berlinale. The NFA also supplied films to international film
festivals in Venice, Bologna, Pordenone, Frankfurt, Clermont-Ferrand, two festivals in
Paris, international festivals in Houston, Madrid, Tallinn, Hiroshima as well as to the
Alexander Hackenschmied retrospective in Vienna and Graz. In the United Kingdom
alone, the NFA helped to produce five thematic showcases of Czech films in London


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as well as other events organized in Bristol, Nottingham, Edinburgh, Oxford,
Bradford, Norwich and Leeds. In Berlin, the NFA helped to put on a retrospective of
films directed by Pavel Juráček and Jan Němec. It also assisted in producing a
showcase of films by František Vláčil in New York, Chicago, Cleveland, Berkeley,
Santa Fe, Washington, Toronto and Vancouver. In cooperation with the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, the NFA presented Czech films in Wroclaw, Lublana, Riga, Los
Angeles, Dakar, Rabat, Tunis, Bangkok, Bombay, Tashkent, Cairo and many other
cities.


FILM CLUBS AND ART CINEMAS

       Film clubs have a 40-year history in the Czech Republic. Although their
number fell slightly in 2002, their membership base continued to grow. At the end of
2002, there were 113 film clubs with over 24,000 members represented in the
Association of Czech Film Clubs. Children film clubs are experiencing a revival –
their number grew to 13 and they now have almost 1,200 members. Of course, the
largest number of clubs operates in Prague (11), Brno (5) and several regional
capitals with two clubs each. Film clubs are usually doing well in cities with a large
student population, but some of those located in smaller towns are also very active,
including clubs in Boskovice, Rychnov nad Kněžnou, Veselí nad Moravou,
Kopřivnice, Dačice or Nový Bydžov. The stronghold of Czech film club culture is
Prague’s Aero, a part of which is the methodology and information center of the
Association of Czech Film Clubs. The other important stronghold is Uherské
Hradiště, which hosts the Summer Film School and other seminars and also serves
as the base for organizing major nationwide events such as Project 100 or Film and
School. Since 2002, Uherské Hradiště is also the home of film club distribution.
       Over the past few years, the generously produced Summer Film School has
traversed the narrow film club context and become one of the most important events
of the film season. Apart from it, the Association organized seven monothematic
seminars in 2002: Central European film in Prague, British and archival German film
in Uherské Hradiště, Russian and Japanese/Korean film in Veselí nad Moravou,
music in film in Dačice and the traditional Film Laughter in Rychnov nad Kněžnou. A
brand new addition was the traveling seminar on films directed by Lars von Trier,
which took place in Autumn. Apart from that, Aero hosted a large number of thematic
showcases, film series, retrospectives and one-off screenings. The Association of
Czech Film Clubs is also the originator of the long-running Project 100 (10 times 10
great old as well as contemporary films), which last year involved a total of 90
cinemas. A white spot on the map of film education of the youngest generation is
targeted by the gradually developing project Film and School. As a part of Finále
Plzeň, the Association announced the winner of its annual prize for a noteworthy
Czech film. In regard to organization of seminars and other events, it is important for
the Association to work together with the National Film Archives as well as other
partners, such as distributors, foreign cultural centers in the Czech Republic and
other club organizations, especially those from Slovakia and Poland.
       Regular film screenings are at the heart of year-round activities of film clubs. In
2002, there were more than 2,800 of screenings, which attracted 145,000 film lovers.
The repertoire of film clubs includes around 200 films from the film clubs collection,
films provided by the NFA, films provided by other distributors and films from
additional sources. The most popular films were Monty Python’s The Meaning of


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Life with 21,100 viewers, Der Himmel über Berlin with 20,800 viewers and Arizona
Dream with 11,000 viewers.
        Last year, the Association acquired 11 films: Amarcord, Brazil, Dictator,
Pismo do Amerika, Idioterne, Seom and Blowup from abroad and Late Night
Talks with Mother together with the documentaries Nonstop, Old Believers and
The Rite of Spring from home. The special NFA fund designed for civic
associations, i.e. film clubs, acquired Angelus, Céline et Julie vont en bateau, Le
Temps retrouvé, The Four Seasons of the Law, The Navigator: A Medieval
Odyssey, Un été inoubliable, Sous le sable, Slogans, Jamón jamón and Le
Rayon vert.
        Only Aero in Prague, Art in Brno and a few other small club establishments
can be considered art cinemas as such. However, a significant and growing number
of cinemas show art and non-commercial films from Europe, Asia, South America
and other regions on regular basis or at least occasionally, be it in cooperation with
one of the film clubs, as a part of one-off showcases such as Project 100 or at regular
art film screenings. Cinemas may show films from the film clubs fund as well as films
offered by specialized distributors such as Cinemart, Artcam or SPIN Film or suitable
titles distributed by other distributors. Recently, cinemas have been increasingly
tapping into the potential of the vast program reservoir of domestic film festivals, be it
in the form of satellite showcases or individual screenings. The role played by
festivals in alternative distribution is more and more important – with an estimated
audience of almost half a million, festivals account for almost five percent of all
cinemagoers. The share of cinemagoers who prefer artistic values and the alternative
distribution circuit may be smaller than five percent, but they act as a vital
counterbalance to the average cinemagoer, who above all wants to be entertained.



AWARDS WON BY CZECH FILMS AT HOME AND ABROAD

       Among feature films, a torrent of awards fell on Bohdan Sláma’s Wild Bees
from 2001. Apart from a Czech Lion 2001 and a Trilobit 2001 (Tatiana Vilhelmová for
the best actress), the best debut award at Finále Plzeň, two prizes from the Czech
Literary Fund Foundation, the Annual Award of the Association of Czech Film Clubs
and two other awards for Ms. Vilhelmová (Cinema Readers’ Award and the Zdeněk
Podskalský Award from the Nové Město Pot of Laughter), the film also scored at six
festivals abroad. It won the Tiger Award at the 31st Rotterdam International Film
Festival, the best upcoming director award at the 45th San Francisco International
Film Festival, the main award at the 16th Riga International Film Festival and at the
12th Cottbus Film Festival of Young Eastern European Cinema and also a special
mention at the 18th International Film Festival in Warsaw.
       Autumn Spring by Vladimír Michálek fared better at home, winning four
Czech Lions 2001 for best actress and actor (Stella Zázvorková and Vlastimil
Brodský), best supporting actor (Stanislav Zindulka) and best screenplay (Jiří
Hubač), the Golden Kingfisher at Finále Plzeň 2002 and a special jury prize at the
Nové Město Pot of Laughter. The film also succeeded in Lagow, Poland, where it
was awarded the Silver Grape, and in Cleveland, where it received the Roxanne T.
Mueller Best Film Award at the 26th International Film Festival.
       Although Jan and Zdeněk Svěrák’s Dark Blue World won six Czech Lions
2001 for best director, best cinematography (by Vladimír Smutný, who also won a


                                                                                       11
Trilobit and the Association of Czech Cinematographers Award), best music (Ondřej
Soukup), best editing and also the People’s Choice Award and the Film Critics’
Award, as well as the Cinema Readers’ Award and a best actor award from Finále
Plzeň (Ondřej Vetchý), the film managed to bring home just one prize from abroad,
the Golden Aphrodite from the Varna International Film Festival.
        Jan Švankmajer’s Otesánek has so far been collecting awards only at home,
but they include the most valuable ones: two Czech Lions 2001 for best film and best
art direction (Jan and Eva Švankmajer) and also Kristián 2001.
        Year of the Devil, the film directed by Petr Zelenka, won six Czech Lions
2002 for best film, best director, best music (Jaromír Nohavica and Čechomor), best
editing, best sound and the People’s Choice Award, the Crystal Globe at the 37th
Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, the main prize (Golden Prim) at the Nové
Město Pot of Laughter and the Audience Award at Finále Plzeň and the FIPRESCI
Prize in Cottbus, Germany.
        Some Secrets by Alice Nellis won two Czech Lions, for best screenplay (Alice
Nellis) and best actress (Iva Janžurová) as well as the same awards at the Nové
Město Pot of Laughter. The film also received a Kristián and the Film Critics’ Award in
the Czech Republic, while abroad, it won the Best New Director Award at the 50th
San Sebastian International Film Festival and the Grand Prix (l'Arc d'Or) at the
International Film Festival in Paris.
        Milan Šteindler’s Coal Tower won the Main Prize at Filmák Plzeň, Zdeněk
Tyc’s Brats won the Czech Lion for best actor (Ivan Trojan) and the Audience Award
in Karlovy Vary, Ivan Pokorný’s Kidnapped Home won the Crystal Vase as well as
the Golden Hoopoe for best young actor (Vojtěch Kotek) at the Ota Hofman
Children’s Film and Television Festival in Ostrov and the Bonton Award at the
International Film Festival for Children and Youth in Zlín, and Dan Svátek’s The
Damned reached for the Ruby Heart, the main prize at Medicfilm Podbořany.
        A number of films from 2001 or earlier have also been successful abroad
(mainly in the East): Michálek’s Angel Exit won the Daring Digital Award at the
International Film Festival in Jeonju, Korea, The Ring by Věra Šimková-Plívová and
Drahomíra Králová won the Best Director Award at the Golden Knight International
Film Festival in Ryazan, Russia, F.A. Brabec’s Bouquet won the Tiger Award at the
Rotterdam International Film Festival and also the Audience Award at the Torun
International Film Festival in Poland, Václav Vorlíček’s Max, Sally and the Magic
Phone won the Best Young Actress Prize at the Sochi International Film Festival for
Children and Youth in Russia, Andrea Sedláčková’s Victims and Murderers won
four acting awards at the Transylvania International Film Festival in Cluj, Romania,
Filip Renč’s Rebels won the Silver Arrow at the Faces of Love International Film
Festival in Moscow and Zdeněk Troška’s Helluva Good Luck 2 won the main prize
at Unifilm, an international children’s film festival in St. Petersburg, Russia.
        Among shorter feature films, the clear frontrunner was ELFilm, directed by
Jakub Sommer, which won the Best Film Award at the 2001 FAMU Festival and at
the 37th Academia Film Olomouc, and also the FICC Prize at the 10th Artfilm
Trenčianské Teplice, the Ministry of Environment Award at the 28th Ekofilm Český
Krumlov and a prize of honor at Brno Sixteen and Trilobit 2002.
        Czech documentaries won awards only rarely abroad in 2002. The major
exception to the rule was the International Emmy Award in the category of
documentary films for the Czech and Slovak co-production Nicholas Winton – The
Power of Good directed by Matej Mináč; the film also won the Igric Award in
Slovakia and the Film Critics’ Award, Trilobit 2001 and the Crystal Candle Holder at


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the international festival 9 Gates. Jana Ševčíková was successful with Old Believers
at the International Film Festival in Krakow, where the film won the FICC Award,
while Zdeněk Flídr did well with Germans in Hořice Yesterday and Today and
Songs of Ruthenia at the International Television and Film Forum in Yalta, Ukraine,
where his films won the Grand Prix and a special jury prize, respectively. Tomáš
Škrdlant’s Many Voices won the first prize in the ‘A’ category at the International Film
Festival Envirofilm and the publicist category prize at Ekofilm in the Czech Republic.
We will limit the list of domestic awards only to the most important: Who Will Guard
the Guards…? (directed by Karel Vachek) won the Best Czech Documentary Film
Award at the International Documentary Film Festival in Jihlava, Key to Identify
Dwarves … (Martin Šulík) won Trilobit 2002 for best director and Kristián 2002 for
best documentary, Litomyšl (Petr Skala) won the main prize in the ‘D’ category and
the Award of the Lord Mayor of Hradec Králové at the 40th Techfilm, Village B (Filip
Remunda) was the best documentary film under 30 minutes at the Karlovy Vary
International Film Festival as well as the best documentary at the FAMU Festival,
The Rite of Spring (Jana Ševčíková) won the Audience Award at the International
Documentary Film Festival in Jihlava, Entrapped (Helena Třeštíková) won Trilobit
2001 for best screenplay and best director, Tower of Death (Kristina Vlachová) won
Trilobit 2002 for best screenplay and best director and finally Women at the Turn of
New Millennium (also Helena Třeštíková) won Kristián 2001 for best documentary
film.
        Animated films did not have the best of years abroad, with the exception of
Jan Tománek’s film The Frogs, which won the Mandala Media Award for the best
film at the European Film and Television Forum in Barcelona. Pirate (directed by Jan
Bubeníček) won the best animation award at the Karlovy Vary International Film
Festival and also the Best Film Award at the FAMU Festival 2002. Aurel Klimt’s
Fimfárum won Kristián 2001 and was named the best documentary film at the
Filmák Festival, while the 5-episode Jan Werich’s Fimfárum (Klimt and Vlasta
Pospíšilová) won Kristián 2002 for the best animated film. All other awards are from
the first year of Anifest in Třeboň: …Forever and Ever, Words, Words, Words and
Repeat (Michaela Pavlátová) were the best films between 5 and 30 minutes;
Baballoon (Michal Žabka) was the best film under 5 minutes; Eastern – Bloody
Hugo and The Magic Bell (both directed by Aurel Klimt) won the Kodak Vision
Award for the best student film, Magician, Cocktail, Media, My Country and
Pygmalion (Pavel Koutský) won the Main Award of the City of Třeboň; and A Dream
Comes True (Vlasta Pospíšilová) was the best children’s film.
        Of the achievement awards presented last year, we must mention the
posthumous Lifetime Contribution Award with which the Karlovy Vary International
Film Festival honored the late Vlastimil Brodský, the Lifetime Achievement Award
from Artfilm Trenčianské Teplice for Juraj Jakubisko, the award for lifetime
contribution to children’s film presented at the International Film Festival for Children
and Youth in Zlín to Karel Kachyňa, the Ferdinand Peroutka Award for 2001 and
Trilobit 2002 for lifetime contribution to documentary filmmaking for the late Milan
Maryška and the Czech Lion 2001 for lifetime artistic contribution to Czech
cinematography for Otakar Vávra.




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DOMESTIC FESTIVALS, SHOWS AND AWARDS
        The ninth Febiofest (24 January – 17 February), an annual showcase of film,
television and video, is not only the first event in the festival calendar, but also the
biggest in size. In Prague and ten other cities, 33 cinemas (including two multiplexes)
held over 800 screenings of 514 films divided into 49 program sections, attracting a
record-breaking 124,000 cinemagoers. As a part of Febiofest, the Kristián awards
were again awarded for the most remarkable achievements in cinematography based
on voting of film critics and journalists. Febiofest also traveled to Slovakia, but its
program there was somewhat limited. This is also true for the nationwide Project 100
– 2002 (16 January – 31 March), which took place in more cinemas (90 in the Czech
Republic and 35 in Slovakia) and had more screenings (1,500) than in 2001, but
traditionally offered only ten, mostly classic films, attracting 91,000 cinemagoers.
        For the second time, The Association of Czech Cinematographers awarded
its annual prize (24 February), and the 2002 laureate was Vladimír Smutný. As the
year before, next came the Czech Lions, hosted by Jaroslav Dušek live on television
on 2 March. The ninth year of Days of European Film (in Prague from 7 – 17 March
and in Brno from 18 – 26 March) presented 33 feature films from 19 countries and
also a short film program. The eighth year of Filmák, the international festival of
children and youth of Plzeň (23 – 31 March), added a documentary and animated film
sections to its program and expanded to six other cities. The organizers of the
international festival of human rights films One World 2002 (10 – 17 April) should be
praised for not being content with producing showcases in more cities and working
with their films in screenings, forums and debates year-round. An event that should
exist in every country with a rich sporting tradition is Sportfilm Liberec (22 – 25
April). Academia Film Olomouc (22 – 28 April), the 37th international festival of
documentary films and multimedia training programs, enhanced its seminar and
discussion program and concentrated on documentaries from Poland. Finále Plzeň
2002, a review of Czech film which took place at the same time, is gaining more and
more recognition abroad. Just after the Prague Spring music festival, the Czech
capital hosted the 39th International Television Festival Golden Prague (8 – 13
May), which is dedicated to television programs featuring music of all genres.
Probably the smallest festival city of 2002 was Dolní Podluží near Varnsdorf, which
hosted the second year of the international independent film festival Chef d’oeuvre
2002 (9 -11 May).
        Anifest Třeboň, a brand new addition to the festival circuit, aims at looking
back at Czech animated films made during the past decade. The Prague
International Festival of Aviation Films (23 – 26 May) also took place for the first
time, presenting a number of unique feature and documentary films about flying. PAF
Tachov (23 – 26 May), the international festival of films about diving, is a small, yet
respected event with 25 years of tradition. However, it is the Zlín International Film
Festival for Children and Youth (26 May – 1 June), the forty-second year of which
took place in 2002, that has the longest tradition among Czech festivals, featuring
nearly 200 feature and animated films for young audience over seven days. The May
festival cornucopia ended with Medicfilm Podbořany (28 – 31 May), a festival of
films about healthcare. Incidentally, films of the same genre also dominated the next
event in the festival calendar, the international festival Crystal Heart Poděbrady (3 –
6 June). Tour Region Film & Tourpropag (4 – 5 June), which takes place in Písek,
is a national showcase of films, video programs and promotion spots about tourism.
The third new festival of 2002 was the International Festival of Adventure and


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Adrenaline Films (20 – 23 June), which took place in Prague, Brno and Ostrava.
Film is just one of the media explored at the third Prague-based international festival
of Czech, German and Jewish culture 9 Gates 2002 (27 June -3 July).
        The 37th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (4 – 13 July), unique for
its openness to all film lovers, attracted almost 11,000 accredited guests. An amazing
total of 139,000 people came to Karlovy Vary to see one or more of the 534
screenings featuring 292 films divided into 2 competition and 18 non-competition
sections.
        Some of the films were then available at the 28th Summer Film School
Uherské Hradiště (26 July – 4 August). The small town in southern Moravia
accommodated four thousand film enthusiasts who could choose between two main
thematic sections (film and opera, film and mythology) or eight other sections,
together featuring 340 program units with 184 feature films and 220 short films, 7
discussions, 9 theatrical performances, 6 operas and opera recitals, 21 concerts and
8 art exhibitions. Fort Film Terezín, scheduled to take place between 20 and 24
August, had been cancelled due to the terrible floods. The 19th International
Mountaineering Film Festival in Teplice nad Metují had more luck and took place in
its regular end-of-summer time slot. Těrlicko Film Summer (5.-8.9.), the showcase
of Polish, Czech and Slovak feature films by young directors, celebrated its tenth
year in 2002. On 14 September, the František Filipovský Prize for the best
achievement in dubbing had been awarded in Přelouč. As always, the 34th Ota
Hofman Children’s Film and Television Festival took place in Ostrov (17 – 20
September) this time under the motto ‘Magic and Imagination’.
        The thirty-fifth international festival of films about tourism Tourfilm 2002 (25 -
26 September) took place in Karlovy Vary in the span of just two days. The biannual
International Student Film Festival Pisek (2 – 4 October), which is organized by
the local privately-owned film school, took place for the fourth time in 2002. The 28th
Ekofilm Český Krumlov focused not only on the environment, but also on natural
and cultural heritage and its protection. The Czech festival of film and television
comedy Nové Město Pot of Laughter, which takes place in Nové Město nad Metují
(12 – 19 October), has moved to a later time of the year and added television
comedy to its program. The Brno Sixteen (16 – 20 October), whose tradition dates
back to the 1950s, has developed into a selective international competition of non-
commercial feature film and video. The national holiday on 28 October was again the
right time for the Jihlava International Documentary Film Festival (25 – 28
October), which featured an international pitching forum. Techfilm Hradec Králové
(10 – 15 November) – the international festival of films about science and technology
as well as the arts focusing on education, just like Academia Film Olomouc –
celebrated its fortieth anniversary in 2002. The gay and lesbian festival Mezipatra
2002 took place in Brno (15 – 22 November), but also traveled to Prague to show
some of the featured films (23 – 24 November).
        The second year of Datatransfer Prague (25 – 30 November), a festival of
cyber culture, was again a showcase of the youngest audiovisual disciplines such as
video art or digital film. The non-competition showcase of Czech documentary and
animated films organized by FITES (27 – 30 November) had to be relocated from
Písek to Prague’s Mat Cinema because of last year’s floods. The Trilobit Awards
were traditionally presented by FITES just before Christmas in Beroun (14
December).




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        The forty listed events are far from being a complete list. We have omitted
seminars organized by the Association of Czech Film Clubs, at least 30 festivals and
competitions organized by amateur film-makers as well as many regional and local
events. Nevertheless, the festival calendar is rich, diverse and – even more
importantly – new events are constantly cropping up. The quality, scope and
territorial coverage of most events is also on the rise. Of course, this goes hand in
hand with increasing financial demands and the need of financing from public
sources. As a result, the amount of financing from the state budget, Ministry of
Culture grants and the Cinematography Fund supporting film festivals is higher than
the amount earmarked for the support of film production.


FILM PRODUCTION

        If we include the sneak preview of Who Will Guard the Guard…?, the opus
magnum of Karel Vachek, at the International Documentary Film Festival in Jihlava, a
total of 21 Czech feature-length films premiered in cinemas in 2002, including a new
version of an older film by Jakubisko, three low-budget films produced sometimes in
semi-amateur conditions, an animated film and four documentaries. It must not be
overlooked that the Czech Television produced 13 of these films, but only in one
case as the sole producer. 11 films received financial assistance from the
Cinematography Fund in 2002, but no financing came from Eurimages or foreign co-
producers. Of the estimated CZK 300 million invested in feature-length films last
year, the Czech Television provided approximately one fourth, while the
Cinematography Fund approximately 15 percent. The remainder came from dozens
of private investors and sponsors. The films were produced by roughly a dozen
production companies, with Negativ and Bionaut producing two films each. After a
hiatus, Ateliéry Bonton Zlín and Krátký film Prague returned to film production.
        In a competition that was rather weak, the favorite of the year was Year of the
Devil, Zelenka’s mystifying voyage into the world of Czech folk music, which received
six Czech Lions including the two pivotal ones. The film’s strongest competitor was
Some Secrets by Alice Nellis, a psychological probe into the life of family on a
hardship-ridden journey to burry the remains of their deceased father in his Slovak
birthplace. The film won two Czech Lions, Kristián and the Film Critics’ Award.
Problems of parents who are raising two adopted Roma boys and must deal with
negative reactions of those around them are explored in Tyc’s Brats, a film that won
a Czech Lion and two people’s choice awards. The semi-documentary An Ark for
Vojta also deals with a serious issue: it describes the difficult live with a mentally
handicapped child through the eyes of his older sister. Kidnapped Home is a
somewhat melodramatic story of an orphan boy who gives up comfortable life with
his relatives for an emotionally richer environment of a new home.
        Girlie, an uncommonly accomplished debut of Benjamin Tuček, tells the story
of two frustrated characters – 17-year old Ema and her mother – trapped in the
estranged world of a public housing project. The Damned, a criminal drama written
and directed by the first-time director Dan Svátek, is inspired by the story of a young
Czech sentenced to decades in prison for drug trafficking in Thailand. In Coal Tower,
the director Milan Šteindler explores the Czech drug scene, deftly balancing between
a thriller and a black comedy. The Trash, a more uninhibited film of a similar genre
by the first-time director Karel Spěváček produced in Zlín studios, tells the story of
three teenage boys on a trip that turns morbid. The experimental Love from Above


                                                                                    16
by Petr Marek is a capricious portrayal of two of the director’s friends traveling to see
an eclipse of the Sun. Riedgost contains three stories by young directors: Bohdan
Sláma’s sad and grotesque Garden of Eden, Pavel Göbl’s student holiday story
Open Landscape of a Single Man and Tomáš Doruška’s Riedgost, which explores
the real and mythical beauty of Walachia.
        In Seducer, a bittersweet comedy with political undertones, the director
Andrea Sedláčková weaves an intrigue of a husband, who – with the help of his
friend – wants to get rid of his wife, a government minister. Zdeněk Troška’s period
adventure Angel Face is based on the book of the same name and takes place in
romantic French countryside of the eighteenth century. In Vít Olmer’s Waterloo
Czech Style, a five-segment comedy about the hardships of marriage, Jiří Krampol
plays five characters: an overworked businessman, a pensioner pretending to be
deaf, an aged rocker, a jovial grandfather on holiday and finally an underdog
restoration expert. Last year also saw the premiere of a new, modified and shortened
version of Juraj Jakubisko’s decade-old tragicomedy It’s Better to Be Wealthy and
Healthy than Poor and Ill about two women who decide to get rich after the Velvet
Revolution.
        To two older puppet fairy tales written and inimitably read by Jan Werich
(When the Oak Leaves Fall and The Avaricious Barka), Vlasta Pospíšilová and
Aurel Klimt, directors of two different generations, added three more (Franta
Nebojsa, A Dream Comes True and Fimfárum) to make the feature-length Jan
Werich’s Fimfárum.
        In 2002, four documentary films have been released for general distribution.
Martin Mareček’s graduation film Dust Games, awarded at the International
Documentary Film Festival in Jihlava and at the FAMU Festival, wants to be an
impartial testimony of the events connected to the September 2000 IMF and World
Bank meetings in Prague. From his documentary essay Nonstop about people he
met on the Prague-Brno motorway, it is clear that Jan Gogola Jr. is a student of Karel
Vachek. In the five stories included in Way Out, the director Tomáš Vorel talks with
the actors Eva Holubová and Bolek Polívka, the screenwriter Petr Čtvrtníček, the
village coachman Hruška and the habitual camper Kim – all of whom appeared in
Vorel’s earlier film Out of the City – about their feelings for the city, countryside and
people. A more demanding experience awaited those who went to see two spiritually
united documentary films by Jana Ševčíková: Old Believers, with awards from
Mannheim and Krakow, is about a religious community originally from Russia living in
Danube delta, while The Rite of Spring is a contemplation inspired by a workshop
organized by the Japanese dancer Min Tanaka.
        While the story of 15 of the 21 films that opened in 2002 was written for the
screen by their directors, young film-makers were given enough opportunity last year.
Of the new feature films, five were directed by first-time directors and two by
sophomore directors. There are also more and more films by students that find their
way to cinemas. This is the reason for growing number of low-budget films that are
formally, dramatically and technically unconventional.
        The first quarter of 2003 has been full of new Czech films. There were three
premieres in January: Escape to Budín, a costly and technically demanding film
based on a novel by Vladislav Vančura that was seven years in the making and co-
produced by the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary (directed by Miloslav
Luther); Zdeněk Troška’s Kameňák, a popular comedy based on verbal jokes; and
Late Night Talks with Mother, an intimate confession of Jan Němec, a flamboyant
artist and above all a son, transferred onto 35-millimeter film material. February was


                                                                                      17
even richer in premieres: Juraj Nvota’s Cruel Pleasures, a fruit of Czech-Slovak
cooperation, is a sensitive study of family and love relations set in a small Slovak
town before the war. In Forrest Walkers, Ivan Vojnár returns to people living on the
fringes of society – to vagabonds whose children may or may not be able to resist the
legacy of their parents. The satirical comedy Small Town, directorial debut of the
actor Jan Kraus, uses a model of an imaginary town to describe imperfection of times
right after the Velvet Revolution. The Devil Knows Why, a fairy tale adventure for
the whole family directed by Roman Vávra based on a story written by the late Miloš
Macourek, is the third Czech-Slovak co-production among this year’s new releases.
       The key event of March was the opening of Pupendo, another bitter comedy
by the team of Jarchovský-Hřebejk loosely connected to their Cozy Dens. Two
friends, the sculptor Mára and the school headmaster Břečka, are coping with the
bleak and seemingly endless communist normalization of the 1980s in their own way.
The Pied Piper by the director and cinematographer F. A. Brabec is inspired by the
classic German legend and employs music from the musical of the same name by
Daniel Landa. It is a unique achievement as the entire film was shot in the course of
a single day at the end of 2002. This year will not be short of bittersweet comedies,
as evidenced by the April premiere of Bored in Brno (directed by Vladimír Morávek),
a story of two young people and their first erotic experience. Just one film opened in
cinemas in May: Unfaithful Games, feature-length debut of the respected animator
Michaela Pavlátová. The film is about a married couple, a music composer and a
pianist, who find it hard to bring harmony into their relationship because of their
shared profession.
       In the second half of 2003, we are likely to see the premiere of One Hand
Can’t Clap, David Ondříček’s gloomy comedy starring Jiří Macháček and Ivan
Trojan, two of the country’s most popular actors; Želary, Ondřej Trojan’s long-
awaited rugged romance from the Czech border; Never the Same River Twice, a
film about love, jealousy, infidelity and relationship fights by Börkur Gunnarsson;
Golemata voda (Great Water), a Czech-Macedonian psychodrama by Ivo Trajkov;
Sentiment, a film by Tomáš Hejtmánek inspired by meetings with the director
František Vláčil; It Will Stay Between Us, Miro Šindelka’s tragicomedy about a love
triangle; The Farm Manager, a summer holiday story from Český ráj by Martin Duba:
Blood Relations, a Czech and Slovak “fairly black comedy” directed by Oleg
Harencar; and perhaps also Smart Philip, a parody thriller by Václav Marhoul.
       As far as documentary films are concerned, we can only repeat the
information provided in last year’s Report: documentary films are produced in the
Czech Republic by approximately hundred companies and organizations, whose
output it is difficult if not impossible to accurately review. According to the NFA
Yearbook, around 450 documentary films of various genres were made in the country
in 2002, which would mean that their number fell by one fourth year-to-year.
However, it is more likely that a large number of producers simply failed to inform the
Yearbook’s editorial board about their films.
       Based on the data available, Febio is the most productive documentary film
producer with almost 90 new films in 2002. Apart from Travelmania, Febio continued
to work on Gene, a series of portraits of interesting people, and also filmed a number
of made-to-order documentaries. The Czech Television produced a number of
extensive series, such as Czechoslovakia in Special Services about espionage,
Murmuring Towns about architecture, Czech Way about interesting places, Fateful
Moments about catastrophes, Capital Crimes about criminal investigations, or
Diagnosis about health. For the Czech Television, the World Cycle Foundation


                                                                                    18
produces the long-running series Untimely Deaths, while Sedma Praha produces
Soiree with Jan Burian, etc. To the existing shows about film, such as the popular-
minded Kinobox or the more ambitious Filmopolis, Vachler Art Company added
Faces of Czech Film with thirteen episodes.
        That the Czech Republic does not lack distinct and creative documentary
filmmakers is evident from last year’s films made by Josef Císařovský, Miroslav
Janek, Pavel Koutecký, Martin Řezníček, Olga Sommerová, Marie Šandová, Jana
Ševčíková, Tomáš Škrdlant, Pavel Štingl, Helena Třeštíková, Karel Vachek, Kristina
Vlachová, the late Milan Maryška and many others. However, there are young talents
on the horizon, some of them still at school: Vít Janeček, Martin Mareček, Filip
Remunda, Jakub Sommer and others.
        Documentary films about social, psychological or humanitarian issues are
made by the Film and Sociology Association, but also by the Heart of Europe,
Epicentrum and students of FAMU (Film and Television Faculty of the Academy of
Performing arts) and the Film College in Zlín. The more than 30 documentaries made
by students of the country’s five film schools concentrate on many issues and
represent quality that should not be left unnoticed in last year’s documentary
production.
        Politics and history are the domain of K 2 and La Bon, while culture and the
arts are most often covered by AD Film, BVA International, HaD Film, KF Orbis,
DaDa Studio (Masterpieces in Czech Collections) and also many film school
students. Nature and the environment are interesting for Holly, Hugo Habrman, QQ
Studio or Ivan Stříteský‘s Skyfilm. Religion and charity are the domain of Telepace,
while films about healthcare are made by Erasmus or Pluto film a video. Films about
tourism and traveling are produced by Box TV, m-ARK and many other companies,
films about sports by Ages Plus, Studio Jan Kunc, Vera Vista or TVF, and folklore
issues are keenly explored by the J.A. Komenský Museum in Uherský Brod. Many
custom-made advertising and information films covering business, industry or
transport are produced by Fontis, and to a lesser degree also by Holly, La Bon, OK
Vision, TVF and other production companies. Training and educational programs are
produced by the J. A. Komenský Studio attached to Krátký film, video programs
about science and technology are produced by the Audiovisual and Technological
Center of the Czech Technical University, military films are made by the Czech
Army’s AVIS and agriculture training films are produced by the Training and
Education Institute of the Ministry of Agriculture.
        Apart from financing, the most deeply rooted problem of Czech documentary
cinematography is the limited extent of publicity. In 2002, the Czech Television
provided CZK 9 million for documentary production and the Cinematography Fund a
slightly smaller amount. It is important to stress that the Czech Television provides
considerable room on both of its programs to Czech documentaries (in 2002, it aired
almost 3,000 documentaries, including own, made-to-order and independent
productions), often in prime time. However, solitaire documentary films are often lost
in the myriad of other programs, unlike documentary series that air at a regular time.
While festival audiences are more forthcoming in regard to documentaries, there are
more and more of them in general distribution, shown either before feature films or as
the main feature. The Institute of the Documentary Film and especially its pitching
forum should help Czech documentaries to get produced and also to find their way
onto foreign markets.




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        Animated film is clearly undergoing a revival. If we include individual episodes
of animated series and shorter student films, there was a total of 90 animated films
produced in the Czech Republic in 2002. For many years, evening children’s
cartoons have been the foundation of the animated film production, including last
year’s efforts by the AAA Studio (Silent Forest Tales), AniFilm (Bugaboos and
Nixes), Anima (Matylda, Three Music Brothers), the Brothers in Trick Studio
(Magic Fairy Tales) and Via Lucis (Oštrozok). Jiří Trnka’s Studio completed
Fimfárum, a part of a feature-length animated film for general release. To some
extent, Czech animators make their living working for foreign clients, producing
commercials, graphics, titles, etc. After Michaela Pavlátová and Marie Procházková
jumped on the feature film train, we associate animated film-making aimed at adults
mostly with the name of Pavel Koutský and also Aurel Klimt and other young and
upcoming artists. More than one third of last year’s animated films were produced by
art schools, i.e. FAMU, the Film and Television Graphics Studio of the Academy of
Arts, Architecture and Design (VŠUP), the Film College and the Media
Communications Faculty of the Tomáš Baťa University in Zlín and the Film College in
Písek. Compared to documentary film-making, animation is more costly and usually
also more arduous, and that is why the Czech Television invested CZK 27 million in
animated films, while the Cinematography Fund provided about CZK 2 million. With
the new Anifest Třeboň, Czech animation now has a forum for competition and
discussion and a better chance to be seen (and heard) abroad. Let’s hope that
Czech animators will seize the opportunity and that their future will be a bright one.
        Provision of services to foreign film and television crews is the most profitable
venture of the Czech audiovisual industry. Relatively low prices, skilled professionals
and striking locations are a major attraction for renowned production companies and
film stars. They create jobs and, thanks to large budgets, guarantee income that is
many times higher than the amount of money invested in domestic film production.
Data provided by the Association of Audiovisual Producers show that the 2001
revenues from these services were more than CZK 2.5 billion (2002 data are not
available yet). Services are provided by a multitude of companies, the largest of
which are AB Barrandov, Stillking, Milk & Honey, Etic and Patrnership Pictures. Last
year, the Czech Republic was the place of shooting of Children of Dune, Shanghai
Knights, xXx, Bad Company (all US) or Doctor Zhivago (UK) and many other films
are still in the making. The other profitable business is production of advertisements
for Czech as well as foreign clients, which generated revenues of around CZK 0.7
billion last year. Dozens of companies as well as a number of known feature film
directors are working on ads.
        The Barrandov facility is no longer the center of Czech audiovisual production,
but it still retains an important place in the audiovisual industry structure. So far, no
suitable strategic investor has been found for the studios who would be able to
guarantee their future prosperity. The smaller studios in Zlín have been active making
both feature and animated films.


FILM DISTRIBUTION

        According to the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America), the American
film industry is booming. A total of 540 movies were produced and all but 70 released
for general distribution last year. Although the number of cinemas continues to drop
in the United States, their number (35,280) remains unparalleled in the world (with


                                                                                      20
the possible exception of China). However, the number of cinemagoers is on the rise:
there were 10 percent more of them in 2002 compared to the year before. Box office
receipts grew by 13 percent with an average ticket price at $5.8, which is not much
higher than the maximum price in the Czech Republic. Spider-Man, last year’s
blockbuster number one, made $404 million in the United States alone. Apart from
$9.5 billion from domestic theaters, American movie producers earned $9.6 billion
abroad. If in spite of these numbers the situation of the US film industry is not too
rosy, it is because the average production cost per film jumped to an unbelievable
$58.8 million, to which we must add an average of $30.6 million for marketing
expenses.
        In Europe, only the results from EU member countries have been released,
and the situation is far from being as good as the year before. A total of 625 films
were made in the member countries, with France again taking the first place with 163
films. The total number is smaller than in 2001, but greater than the total of films
made in the United States; however, the attractiveness of European films for
audiences is not adequate. On the American market, European films had only a 4-
percent market share, and a mere 1-percent share without British films. It is
interesting to compare film production costs: while an American film costs $58.8
million on average, a British film costs $8.8 million, a French film $4 million, and an
Italian film only $2 million. There are more than 25,000 screens in the European
Union, and the number is rising. Nonetheless, admissions and revenues stagnated in
2002. Only about one fourth of people in the EU went to see European films, while 71
percent of cinemagoers went to see American films, just like in the Czech Republic.
In the EU, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was the most popular film
with 39.7 million cinemagoers, while the best European film, Astérix & Obélix:
Mission Cléopâtre, attracted only half of this number. The average admission price
is EUR 5.7, about the same as in America, but there are major differences between
countries, with prices ranging from EUR 4.4 in Spain to EUR 6.3 in the UK.
        In the UK, the number of cinemagoers grew by 13 percent year-to-year, but
this figure is more of an exception in Europe. The growth in Italy was 2 percent,
France did not grow at all, and admissions in Spain and Germany fell by 4 and 8
percent respectively after a decade of continuous growth. Among the smaller
countries, Finland was the clean winner (+18%), followed by Ireland (+9%) and
Denmark (+8%). Austria (+2%) and Sweden (+1%) did not do very well. Results are
available from only one candidate country, Slovakia, where the number of
cinemagoers grew by 2 percent.
        The average frequency of cinema visits per inhabitant per year gives us a
more comprehensive picture (the data for countries not mentioned above are from
2001): Iceland (7.3), Ireland (4.2), Spain (3.5), Luxembourg (3.2), France (3.1), UK
(2.9), Norway (2.7), Switzerland (2.6), Denmark and Austria (2.4), Belgium (2.2),
Sweden (2.1), Germany and Portugal (2.0), Italy (1.9), Netherlands and Finland (1.5),
Hungary (1.4), Greece and Slovenia (1.2), Czech Republic (1.03), Estonia (0.95),
Poland (0.7), Lithuania (0.65), Slovakia (0.55), Croatia and Latvia (0.5), Russia
(0.45), Turkey (0.4), Romania (0.3) and Bulgaria (0.25). As a point of reference
following are the numbers from various countries outside Europe: United States (5.7),
Australia (4.7), Canada (3.9), India (3.1), South Korea (2.3), Mexico (1.5), Japan
(1.3). The Czech Republic is behind all Western European countries, but – with the
exception of Hungary – ahead of all Eastern European countries. Countries with
small population (Iceland, Luxembourg) have a relative advantage, but Iceland is still
phenomenal. While Ireland is like a bridge between America and Europe, the


                                                                                    21
Spanish number comes as a pleasant surprise. On the other hand, Italy, once a
bastion of cinema, is chronically weak. Post-communist countries are only slowly
recuperating and are not likely to reach the EU average (2.5 cinema visits per year)
any time soon. This holds true for the Czech Republic, too.
        Although the offensive of multiplex cinemas continued in the Czech Republic
throughout 2002, there was no drastic rise in admissions as the year before. The
number of cinemagoers grew only by 3.2 percent to reach 10.693 million, with one
cinema visit per inhabitant per year being well bellow the European average. The
additional 330,000 cinemagoers of course went to multiplexes, which attracted 1.9
million new cinemagoers compared to 2001, accounting for almost half of the total. It
means that other cinemas lost more than one fifth of their patrons. The multiplex
competition is devastating not only in cities with multiplexes, but also around them.
The center of gravity of film distribution seems to have been forever shifted towards
multiplex cinemas, which are given preference by large Czech distributors from the
beginning. Moreover, multiplex operators and distributors are both starting to invest in
each other. It seems that for the original cinema network, a new phase of the struggle
for survival has begun.
        The poor attendance results are connected with the inadequate choice of films
in 2002. The year was especially bad for Czech films, whose market share fell from
30% in 2001 to only 13% in 2002. 2002 Czech premieres alone had a very low 8%
market share. This helped to increase the market share of American films, which
exceeded 71%, while European films retained their 15%. The rest of the world had
less than one percent. The share of French films grew to 6%, followed by British films
(4%), German films (2%) and Spanish films (less than 1%). All other European
countries including Italy had only a minimum market share in the Czech Republic.
Mexico was the most successful exotic country with 0.6%. The figures are only for
orientation, as the majority of European films had been co-produced by two or more
countries.
        American films accounted for 75 percent of all box office receipts, i.e. more
than in 2001. Czech films account for about 10 percent of box office revenues, mainly
due to the fact that the admission price for a Czech film is lower; European films
earned 14 percent of all box office receipts. The total box office receipts in the
Czech Republic grew last year by 15 percent to reach CZK 946 million. This is a
good result considering the low inflation rate, but nonetheless a sharp drop when
compared with the year before (+38%). Cinemagoers could be happy about the
average admission price, which – after culminating around June at CZK 93 –
started to fall. The average admission price for the year was CZK 88.50, which is still
CZK 10 more than the year before. The range of prices is rather wide, from CZK 159
in Prague’s Slovanský dům multiplex to CZK 40 to 50 in smaller cities. The arrival of
multiplexes helped to increase the number of screenings to 306,000, i.e. nearly
twice as much as in 1998. The average attendance per screening continues to
drop: it was 35 people last year.
        Although there are 17 distributors in the Czech Republic, three of them play a
dominant role: Bontonfilm (41 premieres, 31% of cinemagoers and box office
receipts), Warner Bros. (18, 25.5%. 25.5%) and Falcon (27, 21%, 22%). Of the other
distributors, the most successful were the 2001 entrants into the business: Bioscop
(14, 6%, 7%) and SPI International (26, 4.5%, 5%). Next came Intersonic (9, 3%,
2.5%), which was back in business in Autumn, followed by Hollywood (13, 2%, 2%),
Cinemart (10, 2.5%, 2%), Artcam (10, 2%, 1.7 %) and NFA/AČFK (16, 1.3%, 1%).
Last year’s newcomer, SPIN Film, which is affiliated with SPI International, had less


                                                                                     22
than 1 percent market share, just like five other distributors including Space, a
company that was far from being as active as in previous years, distributing only
older films. Art films of predominantly European provenience are distributed by the
National Film Archives together with the Association of Czech Film Clubs, Cinemart,
Artcam and SPIN Film, which together released 44 premieres, attracting only 6% of
cinemagoers and getting 5% of all box office receipts. Quality films are also shown at
film festivals, showcases and seminars, which is not reflected in our statistics.
        The number of first run films grew to 196, circulating in more than 2100
copies. The number of new films produced or co-produced by US companies was
highest in six years: 101 (only 85 US premieres in 2001). There were 26 French
premieres (18 in 2001), i.e. more than the 21 Czech feature-length premieres (18).
British cinematography was strong in the Czech Republic in 2002 with 15 premieres
(13), followed by German films with 4 premieres (5), Spanish films with 3 (0), Italian
films with 3 (4), Swedish, Danish and Canadian films with two premieres and
seventeen other countries with just one film opening in Czech cinemas in 2002,
including Slovakia, Russia, Poland, Norway, Finland, Portugal Mexico, Australia, New
Zealand, Japan and India. Alternative distributors must be credited with the fact that
there were premieres of films from a total of 27 countries. They distribute films in one
or two copies and therefore can hardly compete with mainstream films with up 29
copies backed by a powerful advertising machine. 160 premiering films were subtitled
and 14 dubbed. Of course, cinemas also show older films, so the total number of
films that cinemagoers could choose from was 952 from 44 countries.
        A chart of top 50 films is attached to this report. The dominance of American
films ever since Titanic is overwhelming: the seven most popular films are American
and there are 36 American films in the top 50 and 69 American films in the top 100.
All over the world as well as in the Czech Republic, Tolkien’s magnificent fantasy The
Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring battled with Harry Potter and the
Sorcerer’s Stone over the title of the most popular film. Both films are co-
productions, the former with New Zealand and the latter with the UK, both films are
based on English books and the crews were largely non-American, but the money
invested in making the films came chiefly from the United States. Third came Men in
Black 2, the sequel to the popular sci-fi comedy that beat Ice Age, an underdog that
in turn managed in 10 weeks to beat the favorite space opera Star Wars: Episode II
– Attack of the Clones. Another installment of the Potter wizardry series Harry
Potter and the Chamber of Secrets finished sixth after just two weeks in cinemas
and was followed by the comic-inspired Spider-Man. It was almost a tie between the
two best Czech films, the family comedy from 2001 Max, Sally and the Magic
Phone and Zelenka’s music mystification Year of the Devil. The American sci-fi
Minority Report completes the top ten. Sci-fi and fantasy clearly ruled in 2002. We
should also mention the unexpected success of the German teenager comedy
Mädchen, mädchen (11th) and, considering its subject, also of A Beautiful Mind
(18th). The French film Le Fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain (12th) as well as
Bridget Jones’s Diary (30th) and Moulin Rouge (34th) all remain popular in spite of
having been released in 2001. Of the ‘smaller’ films opening in Autumn, the US-made
My Big Fat Greek Wedding (49th) and the Spanish Hable con ella (59th) were
successful, as was the Mexican film Amores Perros (58th), which circulated only in a
handful of copies.
        Because of the varying number of released film copies, admissions per
screening may provide a better picture of cinemagoers’ preferences. However, the
films marked with an asterisk show better results thanks to organized screenings for


                                                                                     23
schools: 1. The Ring* (Czech Republic) – 121 people, 2. Harry Potter and the
Sorcerer’s Stone* – 110 people, 3. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the
Ring – 96 people, 4. Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life (UK) – 94 people, 5.
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets – 92 people, 6. Bouquet* – 89 people,
7. Royal Promise* – 81 people, 8. Arizona Dream (FR) – 68 people, 9. Gladiator
(US) – 65 people, and 10. Ice Age – 63 people.
       As expected, the success of Czech cinematography in 2001 has not been
repeated last year; however, no one could have anticipated such a disappointment.
There are 9 Czech films in the top 50 and 15 Czech films in the top 80, but half of the
films opened in 2001. Apart from the two Czech films in the top ten, only two other
films attracted more than hundred thousand cinemagoers: Coal Tower (138,000) and
Seducer (108,000). Then came The Damned and Some Secrets (both 91,000) and
the re-released Dark Blue World (65,000), followed by Autumn Summer (64,000).
More had been expected from Angel Face (59,000), and the results of Wild Bees
(43,000) and Brats (41,000) were also only average. In the top 100, there is still a
number of older films: Royal Promise (33,000), Bouquet (30,000) and Rebels
(27,000). The animated Jan Werich’s Fimfárum had a good start (28,000
cinemagoers). Kidnapped Home (14,300), The Trash (13,000) and Waterloo
Czech Style (12,400) were not received warmly by cinemagoers. The highly
esteemed Otesánek (11,900) has probably fallen victim to sluggish distribution, just
like Riedgost (8,300) and An Ark for Vojta (5,600), which is less surprising. While
Girlie had only a few days to attract 5,800 people, the crazy comedy Stealing
Dagmar (5,300), released some time ago, was an utter failure.


CINEMAS

        In 2002, the web of multiplex cinemas in the country grew denser, especially in
Prague. In July, the Anděl multiplex, with 14 screens the Czech Republic’s largest,
opened next to the Nový Smíchov shopping center, which has its own multiplex.
Letňany opened in October and the 10-screen Metropole Zličín multiplex in
December; the two multiplexes are in shopping centers located on the outskirts of
Prague. In March, České Budějovice joined the three regional capitals that boast
multiplex cinemas (Brno, Ostrava and Hradec Králové). At the end of 2002, there
were 14 multiplexes in the country with 128 screens. Their share in admissions (last
year 48%) grows dynamically, as does their share in total box office receipts (63%).
The average admission price in multiplexes is over CZK 100, ranging from CZK 101
in České Budějovice to CZK 135 in Prague’s Slovanský dům. Multiplexes also offer
more screenings than classic cinemas (now 56%), but have a lower average
admissions per screen) – 30.
        Multiplexes rule the chart of most popular cinemas (see attachment). There
are twelve of them at the top, and the other two are lower just because they opened
only a few weeks before the end of the year. Nový Smíchov is the clear champion as
it combines the advantage of being located in a shopping center, good accessibility
and proximity to the city center. It is likely that Anděl, which is only 100 meters away,
wanted to make use of the same advantages, but to no avail, as evidenced by the
average admission per screening of 13. This indicator is highest in Ostrava, where
the local community embraced multiplex screens, exterminating almost all of the
city’s smaller cinemas in the process. CineStar in Hradec is also doing well, as is
Brno’s Olympia, although it is retreating. Fall in admissions is most striking in


                                                                                      24
Slovanský dům, which is located in the very center of Prague. The peripheral
multiplexes Černý Most, Park Hostivař and Galaxie also attracted less people in 2002
than in 2001. With the tenth multiplex in Prague having opened in Vinohrady’s Flora
shopping center recently, it is clear that the Czech capital is more than saturated by
multiplexes. New multiplexes will appear almost exclusively outside of Prague – in
Olomouc, Zlín, Plzeň, Ústí nad Labem and perhaps also in Mladá Boleslav.
        Film distribution is more and more divided into two spheres: multiplexes and
the others. In places where it is possible to choose, cinemagoers can be
distinguished by whether they prefer the former or the latter. The charm of a novelty,
which multiplexes in the Czech Republic have, is certainly ephemeral. However,
there are indisputable advantages on the part of multiplex cinemas: combination with
shopping and entertainment centers, which is attractive especially for visitors from
out of town, selection of 15 or more films and up to 60 screenings per day, luxurious
interior, air conditioning, superb picture and sound and the availability of
refreshments. On the other hand, multiplexes have more expensive tickets, show a
limited variety of films chiefly of American provenience or popular Czech films, and
also have a negative impact on good and formerly prosperous cinemas in their
neighborhood. To compete with multiplexes is an unfair business, as they are given a
preferential treatment by distributors. Distributors prefer multiplexes to show the
latest blockbusters and provide them with film rental discounts as well as other
bonuses. There were cases when a small cinema did not have a film to screen
because a multiplex had held too long onto a film that was selling a lot of tickets.
Sometimes, cinemas are pressured to increase the price of admission so that they
would give up the only weapon they have left against multiplex cinemas. To rely on
diverse and alternative repertoire means success only rarely, for example in the case
of Prague’s Aero or Brno’s Art. In the near future, classic cinemas will not have an
easy life, even if they are far from the nearest multiplex.
        This is evident from the results of individual cinemas. Prague has a dominant
position on the market, with one third of the total number of cinemagoers and almost
half of the total box office receipts in 2002. The number of cinemas is not declining,
as cinemas that close down are replaced by new ones. At the end of 2002, there
were 33 cinemas in Prague with a record 108 screens. Atlas was damaged by floods
and the cinema U hradeb closed down. On the other hand, Illusion and Morava
reopened and three new multiplexes opened. Classic cinemas, which account for
only one sixth of Prague’s admissions, continued to lose audiences, and the trend
was most apparent in the city center. The only exception is Aero, the most popular
single-screen cinema in Prague. Small cinemas with distinct art repertoire, such as
Evald or Mat, have also done fairly well in 2002.
        With the exception of Špalíček, Brno cinemas have also seen their admissions
decline. In the past five years, the city lost half of its cinemas and in the city center,
the only cinema left apart from one multiplex is Scala. Ostrava is an example of how
things should not be done: the city had lost three of its best cinemas even before the
local multiplex opened. Thanks to the multiplex, however, the total number of
cinemagoers in Ostrava jumped up by 80 percent. Hradec Králové and České
Budějovice are faring better, as cinemas in the two cities are supported by
municipality in spite of losing almost 50 percent of patrons. Thanks to multiplexes,
both cities saw the total cinema attendance soar, in Hradec by 110 percent. Plzeň is
at the same level as last year, while attendance declined in Pardubice, Olomouc,
Zlín, Liberec, Ústí nad Labem, Opava, Havířov as well as the majority of medium-size
cities. While the decline in attendance in Pardubice, Kladno, Opava, Havířov,


                                                                                       25
Bohumín, Orlová or Frýdek-Místek may be attributed to the new multiplexes in
vicinity, the poor results in Písek or Strakonice to the floods, it is difficult to account
for the sharp decline in attendance in other cities, such as the always well-performing
Jablonec nad Nisou, Kolín or Mladá Boleslav. In a handful of cities, cinemas attracted
more people than the year before, for example in Pelhřimov, Čáslav, Klatovy or
Litvínov.
        The average frequency of cinema visits per person per year varies drastically
between the individual cities. Among large cities, Hradec Králové was best in 2002
with a record-breaking 4.6. České Budějovice, with 3.2, was followed by Brno, the
only other city with more than three visits per year. Following are the values from
other cities: Prague (2.9), Ostrava (1.8), Olomouc (1.4), Zlín (1.2), Plzeň (1.0),
Liberec and Ústí nad Labem (0.9), Pardubice (0.8) and Havířov (0.7). Among
medium-size cities, Šumperk (2.0) is closely followed by Kolín (1.9), which is followed
by Jablonec nad Nisou (1.4), Prostějov, Vsetín and Znojmo (1.3) and Mladá Boleslav
with Tábor (1.2). Přerov, Teplice and Hodonín (1.15) are also above the national
average. Nový Bor (2.45), Kralupy (2.4), Jindřichův Hradec (2.0), Náchod (1.9) and
Krnov (1.8) are the best of smaller cities. Among the smallest cities, Čáslav, Jičín,
Český Krumlov, Litomyšl, Boskovice and Jilemnice all boast a good frequency of
cinema visits. Nový Knín, an open-air cinema located in a recreational area with only
a few permanent residents, should be mentioned as it is the second best among one
hundred others. In places with a limited number of potential cinemagoers, it is always
very clear which cinema is managed right and which cinema is not.
        According to year-end data from the Union of Film Distributors, the Czech
Republic has 604 classic cinemas with 620 screens and almost 150,000 seats, and
these are still decent numbers when compared with other European countries. There
are also 14 multiplex cinemas with 128 screens and 26,000 seats in the country. 37
screens and over 4,000 seats are available at cinema cafés, video cinemas and other
unusual establishments. There are also 50 screens with irregular screenings or
inaccessible to the general public. The number of open-air cinemas, Czech
Republic’s specialty, has risen to 112. They offer 82,000 seats, which more than
amply satisfies demand. A total of 77 towns host film screenings organized by
traveling cinemas, the most active of which is the Brothers Čadík Cinematograph.
        The competition of multiplexes, last year’s revival of cinema after years of
stagnation, growing admission prices and profits and also poor or critical condition
are the factors behind partial or complete reconstruction of many a cinema. In Písek,
Strakonice, Modřany in Prague and several other places, reconstruction begun to
redress the damage caused by flooding. More than one hundred cinemas and a
quarter of screens have a multi-channel sound system, and cinemas are gradually
investing in comfortable chairs and technical facilities. About 15 cinemas closed
down in 2002, but some of them are scheduled to reopen and there are even brand
new cinemas (Velešín and Volyně).
        The market trend-setters are multiplex cinemas, especially Palace Cinemas,
the Czech daughter company of the US-based UCI, which purchased a network of
cinemas from Ster Century last year. CineStar, Village Cinemas and Cinema City, the
other operators of multiplexes, are also owned by foreign investors. Most of single-
screen cinemas in larger cities are also privately owned. In medium-size and smaller
cities, cinemas are often operated and subsidized by municipalities. Even though
there are 150 of them, small town cinemas are a rarity of sorts, because thanks to a
small number of screenings and program full of sure-fire hits, they are often more
profitable than city cinemas.


                                                                                        26
       The escalating competition is forcing classic cinemas to think more carefully
about their repertoire and to try harder to attract cinemagoers, be it through one-off
events like festivals or through better promotion, sweepstakes or season tickets.
Their main attraction is low price of admission, sometimes lower than CZK 50. But
multiplexes are also starting to utilize time-limited offers or discounts and offering
atypical alternative films: two of them co-hosted this year’s Febiofest. Given the
breakneck speed of technological development, it is difficult to predict future
developments. Nevertheless, one thing is certain: even the most state-of-the-art
cinemas will have to struggle harder and harder to attract cinemagoers.


VIDEO DISTRIBUTION

       With the advancement of digital technology, VHS video is increasingly
marginalized. The body of VHS video users is not growing, video recorders are only
replaced by existing users with new models featuring more functions. However,
because two thirds of Czech households own a VCR, the medium is still far from
extinct. Up to 85 percent of VCR owners record television programs (needless to say,
mostly films) and use their VCR to play back home videos, but there is a large group
of people who purchase pre-recorded videocassettes or rent films from their local
video rental outlet. Compared to 2001, the number of pre-recorded VHS cassettes
sold in 2002 grew to approximately 1.5 million units with a total value of around CZK
450 million, slightly less than the year before due to a lower average unit price.
Rental outlets rented about 16.5 million cassettes and had a turnover of CZK 350
million in 2002. For the first time ever, box office receipts were higher than the
combined revenue from video sales and rentals.
       Video rental fees are still between CZK 15 and 30 per day, which is much less
than the price of a cinema ticket. Pre-recorded cassettes are sold for CZK 200 to
500. The number of films released for rental fell slightly to 560 with 150 to 6,000
copies (Pearl Harbor). Theoretically, rental outlets can offer up to 8,000 films, but the
number is usually closer to 3,000 films on average. According to Warner Bros., the
Czech Republic has more than 1,300 VHS and DVD rental outlets, which are owned
by 850 different proprietors. 900 new films were released for sale with the number of
copies ranging from 250 to 150,000 (Harry Potter). There are up to 12,000 different
video programs available on the market, but the average store has less than 600 of
them. The breadth of repertoire gives a clear advantage to video distribution over
cinemas, but unfortunately, there is only a handful of art and independent films that
are profitable for distributors to release on video.
       With some delay, the Czech Republic is catching with the United States and
Europe in the area of DVD. The number of standalone DVD players doubled
compared to the previous year, reaching 125,000, and there are also about 150,000
computers with a DVD drive. 600,000 DVDs were sold last year (of which 540,000
contained films), generating revenues of CZK 490 million, i.e. twice as much as the
year before and more than the revenues from VHS sales. Prices of DVDs are falling,
but they are still twice as expensive as classic videocassettes (CZK 400 to 1000). In
2002, 460 feature-length programs were released on DVD in 50 do 30,000 copies
(The Lord of the Rings), bringing the total number in distribution to almost 1,400.
DVDs can be rented for CZK 35 to 75 per day. It should be noted that DVDs have
better picture and sound quality than VHS cassettes, more storage capacity that can
be used for extra bonuses, possibility to manipulate with the recording, and also


                                                                                      27
longer life. The advent of DVD recorders will enable consumers to record their own
programs or use rewritable disks. The rapid spreading of the DVD format is facilitated
by falling prices of DVD players and home theater systems, which cost from CZK
20,000 to over half a million for the best models. The relatively easy and inexpensive
way of making high-quality copies using the DVD technology and the distribution of
illegal copies over the Internet are the worst nightmare of the entire audiovisual
industry, because there is a growing threat of highly effective mass piracy that would
be very difficult to eradicate.
        According to data provided by Dispro for 2002, Bonton Home Video was again
the strongest video distributor with a 44% market share in cassettes and a 47% share
in DVDs. Second is Warner Home Video with 18% in both sectors, followed by
Hollywood CE (12% and 11%), Magic Box (10% and 8 %), SPI International (6% and
6.5%), Intersonic (4% and 5%) and the Center of Czech Video (4.5% and 4%). The
newcomers Magic Box and SPI had a good year, while Intersonic’s market share fell.
        The most popular films in rental outlets included Bridget Jones’s Diary (first
on VHS and third on DVD) and Pearl Harbor (fifth and first), The Fast and the
Furious (third and second) and American Pie 2 (second and sixth). Among the top
50 rentals, there are 43 American films on VHS and 45 on DVD. The only Czech film
in the top 50 for both media was Dark Blue World (fourth on DVD). Four French
films made it to the top 50 on VHS. Comedies were traditionally in greatest demand,
followed by thrillers, and war dramas on DVD. As in previous years, Czech films
fared well in the children’s film category, with 12 of them in the VHS top 50, chiefly
older evening cartoon series. The same is true for DVD, although there is a smaller
number of children’s titles available on the new medium. People who rent videos are
different from people who go to the cinema and DVD is still perceived by some as a
luxury. Let’s hope that with falling prices, the range of films available on DVD will
grow not only in numbers, but also include films with not only commercial ambitions.
It is possible however, that DVD will be replaced by another new and improved
incompatible system which will require new hardware and a new medium.



TELEVISION

       The number of households with a TV set is not changing. In 2002, there were
almost 3.8 million such households in the Czech Republic, with over 800,000 of them
owning two or more TV sets. In contrast, just 720,000 of Czech households had a
personal computer and about 180,000 of them had an Internet connection in 2002.
The average adult Czech spent 225 minutes (3 3/4 hours) watching television every
day in 2002, which is slightly more than in 2001. Women are more avid TV watchers
(239 minutes) than men (209 minutes). Children up to 14 years of age watched TV
135 minutes per day. If one fourth of this time is devoted to watching films, the
average Czech sees 200 of them on TV annually, i.e. 200 times more than in cinema.
       Most popular programs include sitcoms, feature series and feature films, which
are aired usually in prime time, on weekends or holidays. Each year, broadcasters air
thousands of feature films as well as animated and documentary films. Last year, ČT
1 (Czech Television 1) aired 840 feature-length films (not including films made for
TV), i.e. approximately the same number as the year before. The number of Czech
films fell to 310, while the number of American films grew to 260, the number of
European films grew to 230 and the number of films from other countries was 40. The


                                                                                   28
rating charts are dominated by Czech films: 1. Rebels (2.2 million viewers), 2.
Autumn Spring, 3. Cozy Dens, 4. The Princess from the Mill, 5. Dante’s Peak
(US). Films are the most popular format on ČT 1 – the top ten programs include
seven films. The most popular documentary films included several episodes of
Travelmania as well as the feature-length documentary In Sickness and in Health
– Vlastimil Brodský.
        ČT 2 does not air as many feature films as ČT 1: it aired 390 of them in 2002,
less than in 2001. Most of these films were European (160), followed by American
films (100, less than in 2001), the same number of Czech films as in 2001 (90) and a
higher number of films from other countries (40). The ratings chart is interesting: 1.
Romulus and Remus (Italy) with about 900,000 viewers, 2. The Medusa Touch, 3.
Ivanhoe (both UK), 4. Jane Eyre (France), 5. Two Rode Together (US). However,
films only follow after a multitude of live sports broadcasts. The most popular
documentary films included several foreign series such as Blue Planet or episodes
of Secrets of War or Supernatural Science. Unlike commercial broadcasters,
Czech Television airs many Czech as well as foreign documentaries (last year, ČT 1
aired more than 1,400 of documentaries in 590 hours, while ČT 2 aired almost 1,560
documentaries in 775 hours). Czech Television also airs many animated films (ČT 1
aired almost 750 animated films lasting more than 100 hours, while ČT 2 aired 200 of
them in 27.5 hours).
        Nova aired the record number of films in 2002: it aired an unbelievable ten of
them during one single day. In 2002, Nova aired more films than the year before
(1,330), with less American (800) and more Czech films (310). It aired only 170
European films and also 50 films from other countries. Also Nova’s greatest success
in ratings came with Czech films, some of them rather dated: 1. Helluva Good Luck
2 (2.9 million viewers), 2. The World is Good With You, 3. Raiders of the Lost Ark
(US), 4. Three Nuts for Cinderella, 5. Sun, Hay, Erotica.
        On Prima, the most successful program was the Czech fairy tale Once Upon
a Time There Was a King, followed by two less known films, House on the Coast
(Germany) and At Midnight (Canada). The country’s second largest private
broadcaster is also very film-oriented, airing about 1,080 of them in 2002: more
American (530), a little more Czech films (300), a lot less European films (200) and
less than 50 from other countries.
        Czech TV viewers are very conservative and prefer Czech films, if possible
those that are time-tested, and this is true both for prime time and all other times.
Czech Television, as the guarantor of the often difficult public service, supports
Czech feature, animated and documentary films.




                                                                                   29
THE YEAR IN REVIEW

CZECH FEATURE-LENGTH FILM PREMIERES IN 2002

Feature films

ANGEL FACE (ANDĚLSKÁ TVÁŘ)
Produced by: Fronda Film
Story: based on the novel of the same name by Hana Marie Körnerová
Written and directed by: Zdeněk Troška
Cast: Michaela Kuklová, Filip Blažek, Jiří Pomeje, Josef Vinklář, Emília Vášáryová
and others

AN ARK FOR VOJTA (ARCHA PRO VOJTU)
Produced by: Česká televize/Monika Elšíková-Vadasová with a grant from the State
Fund for the Support and Development of Czech Cinematography
Story: based on the novel Home for Martians by Martina Drijverová
Written and directed by: Monika Elšíková
Cast: Anna Štíchová, Vojtěch Orel, Zuzana Bydžovská, Bohumil Klepl and others

BRATS (SMRADI)
Produced by: Bionaut/Česká televize with a grant from the State Fund for the Support
and Development of Czech Cinematography
Written by: Tereza Boučková
Directed by: Zdeněk Tyc
Cast: Ivan Trojan, Petra Špalková, Lukáš Rejsek, Jan Cina, Tomáš Klouda and
others

COAL TOWER (PERNÍKOVÁ VĚŽ)
Produced by: S Pro Alfa Film - František Janda / Česká televize
Written by: Martin Němec
Directed by: Milan Šteindler
Cast: Jan Dolanský, Radek Kuchař, Michal Dočolomanský, Sylva Legnerová and
others

THE DAMNED (ZATRACENÍ)
Produced by: Whisconti/Česká televize/Holiday Films
Story, written and directed by: Dan Svátek
Cast: Jan Plouhar, Jan Révai, Isabela Bencová, Dana Vávrová and others

GIRLIE (DĚVČÁTKO)
Produced by: Golden Dawn/Česká televize with a grant from the State Fund for the
Support and Development of Czech Cinematography
Written and directed by: Benjamin Tuček
Cast: Dorota Nvotová, Jana Hubinská, Ondřej Vetchý, Mário Kubaš, Dana Batulková
and others




                                                                                 30
IT’S BETTER TO BE WEALTHY AND HEALTHY THAN POOR AND ILL (LEPŠÍ JE
BÝT BOHATÝ A ZDRAVÝ NEŽ CHUDÝ A NEMOCNÝ) – director´s cut
Produced by: Jakubisko Film / Mirofilm
Story, written and directed by: Juraj Jakubisko
Cast: Deana Horváthová, Dagmar Veškrnová, Juraj Kukura, Vilma Jamnická and
others

KIDNAPPED HOME (ÚNOS DOMŮ)
Produced by: Mediarex Movie/Česká televize with a grant from the State Fund for the
Support and Development of Czech Cinematography
Story: based on the novel of the same name by Iva Procházková
Written by: Iva Procházková
Directed by: Ivan Pokorný
Cast: Vojtěch Kotek, Matěj Nechvátal, Nela Výborná, Barbora Hrzánová and others

LOVE FROM ABOVE (LÁSKA SHORA)
Produced by: Unarfilm/Negativ with a grant from the State Fund for the Support and
Development of Czech Cinematography
Story, written and directed by: Petr Marek
Cast: Magdalena Hrubá, Prokop Holoubek, Bohdan Karásek and others

RIEDGOST (RADHOŠŤ)
(Garden of Eden/Open Landscape of a Single Man/Riedgost)
Produced by: FAMU/Česká televize with a grant from the State Fund for the Support
and Development of Czech Cinematography
Written by: Bohdan Sláma (I), Pavel Göbl (II), Marek Epstein (III)
Directed by: Bohdan Sláma (I), Pavel Göbl (II), Tomáš Doruška (III)
Cast: Jaromír Dulava, Marie Mazurová, Monika Šeligová/Jiří Vymětal, Zdeněk
Marek/Luboš Oravec, Petr Fiala, Milan Kolmačka and others

SEDUCER (MUSÍM TĚ SVÉST)
Produced by: Česká televize / Vision Production
Written and directed by: Andrea Sedláčková
Cast: Ivana Chýlková, Jan Kraus, Ivan Trojan, Jiří Wohanka, Michaela Pavlátová and
others

SOME SECRETS (VÝLET)
Produced by: Filmia – Pavel Šolc
Written and directed by: Alice Nellis
Cast: Iva Janžurová, Theodora Remundová, Igor Bareš, Sabina Remundová and
others

THE TRASH (BRAK)
Produced by: Ateliéry Bonton Zlín
Story, written and directed by: Karel Spěváček
Cast: Vladimír Škultéty, Jan Plouhar, Ondřej Nosálek, Paula Wild, Jiří Korn and
others




                                                                                31
WATERLOO CZECH STYLE (WATERLOO PO ČESKU)
(The French Three/Glory/Drum Solo/Island of Love/Waterloo Czech Style)
Produced by: Diamant Film
Story, written and directed by: Vít Olmer
Cast: Jiří Krampol, Simona Chytrová, Eva Holubová, Emília Vášáryová, Oldřich
Vízner, Jana Paulová, Naďa Konvalinková and others

YEAR OF THE DEVIL (ROK ĎÁBLA)
Produced by: Negativ/Česká televize with a grant from the State Fund for the Support
and Development of Czech Cinematography
Written and directed by: Petr Zelenka
Cast: Jaromír Nohavica, Karel Plíhal, Jan Prent, Karel Holas, František Černý and
others


Animated films

JAN WERICH’S FIMFÁRUM (FIMFÁRUM JANA WERICHA)
(When the Oak Leaves Fall/Franta Nebojsa/The Avaricious Barka/A Dream
Comes True/ Fimfárum)
Produced by: Krátký film Praha - Studio Jiřího Trnky/Česká televize/Aurel
Klimt/Martin Vandas with a grant from the State Fund for the Support and
Development of Czech Cinematography
Story and voice: Jan Werich reads from his book Fimfárum
Written by: Jiří Kubíček (I,III,IV), Aurel Klimt (II,V)
Directed by: Vlasta Pospíšilová (I, III, IV), Aurel Klimt (II, V)
Designers: Petr Poš (I, II, IV), Martin Velíšek (II, V)


Documentary films

DUST GAMES (HRY PRACHU)
Produced by: Bionaut/FAMU/Česká televize with a grant from the State Fund for the
Support and Development of Czech Cinematography
Written and directed by: Martin Mareček

NONSTOP
Produced by: Česká televize/FAMU with a grant from the State Fund for the Support
and Development of Czech Cinematography
Story, written and directed by: Jan Gogola Jr.

OLD BELIEVERS/THE RITE OF SPRING (STAROVĚRCI/SVĚCENÍ JARA)
Produced by: Jana Ševčíková (I,II), LS Productions (II) with a grant from the State
Fund for the Support and Development of Czech Cinematography (I, II)
Written and directed by: Jana Ševčíková

WAY OUT (Z MĚSTA CESTA)
Produced by: Vorelfilm/Česká televize
Story and directed by: Tomáš Vorel



                                                                                 32
CZECH FILM PRODUCTION

                   1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
Feature films 1      13    9   14   19   23   20   21   14   17   14   16   15
Documentaries 2     230 215 160 185 160 250 260 630+ 640+ 550+ 590+ 550+
Animated films 2     70   80   60   65   80   50   60   80 120    70   75   90

1
 Films opening in cinemas
2
 Estimate
+ Including certain TV documentary series



CZECH FILM DISTRIBUTION

                                 1991    1992    1993    1994    1995    1996
Number of premieres              251     145     165     151     131     167
Number of screenings (1000s)     363     353     301     250     188     172
Admissions (1000s)               36361   29898   21898   12870   9253    8999
Box office receipts              323     430     433     303     254     304
(CZK million)
Average attendance per           73      89      73      52      50      52
screening
Average admission price (CZK)    7.9     15      18,8  23.5  27.5        34.3
Number of cinemas1               1330    1346    1200* 1070* 800*        750*
Total number of screens          1335    1350    1205 1075 810           758
  Multiplex cinemas                                                      1
  Screens in multiplexes                                                 8

                                 1997    1998    1999    2000    2001    2002
Number of premieres              173     150     158     164     173     196
Number of screenings (1000s)     168     164     181     197     253     306
Admissions (1000s)               9815    9252    8371    8719    10363   10693
Box office receipts              437     509     496     593     818     946
(CZK million)
Average attendance per           58      56      46      44      41      35
screening
Average admission price (CZK)    44.5    55      59      68      79      88.5
Number of cinemas1               720*    720*    710*    690*    665*    655
Total number of screens          728     728     718     700     734     765
  Multiplex cinemas              1       1       2       5       10      14
  Screens in multiplexes         8       8       22      50      94      128


1
  Including cinema cafés
* Estimate




                                                                                 33
TOP 50 FILMS IN 2002

   Film                                    Country Distributor Opening      Admissions
                                                               month        (in 1000s)
 1 The Lord of the Rings: The              US      Warner      January               957
   Fellowship of the Ring
 2 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone   US      Warner       February            766
 3 Men in Black 2                          US      Falcon       July                315
 4 Ice Age                                 US      Bontonfilm   October             315
 5 Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the   US      Bontonfilm   May                 278
   Clones
 6 Harry Potter and the Chamber of         US      Warner       December            262
   Secrets
 7 Spiderman                               US      Falcon       June                233
 8 Max, Sally and the Magic Phone          CZ      Bontonfilm   Dec. 2001           208
 9 Year of the Devil                       CZ      Falcon       March               205
10 Minority Report                         US      Bontonfilm   September           198
11 Mädchen, mädchen                        GER     Bioscop      October             187
12 Le Fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain     FRA     Intersonic   Sep. 2001           171
13 Blade II                                US      Warner       July                169
14 American Pie 2                          US      Bontonfilm   Nov. 2001           158
15 xXx                                     US      Falcon       October             156
16 Monsters, Inc.                          US      Falcon       January             155
17 40 Days and 40 Nights                   US      Bontonfilm   July                153
18 A Beautiful Mind                        US      Bontonfilm   February            150
19 Signs                                   US      Falcon       September           140
20 Stuart Little                           US      Falcon       September           139
21 Coal Tower                              CZ      Bontonfilm   March               138
22 About a boy                             UK      Bontonfilm   August              121
23 Ocean’s Eleven                          US      Warner       March               116
24 The Sweetest Thing                      US      Falcon       August              113
25 Red Dragon                              US      Bontonfilm   October             110
26 Astérix & Obélix: Mission Cléopâtre     FR      Bontonfilm   June                110
27 The Scorpion King                       US      Bontonfilm   April               109
28 Seducer                                 CZ      Warner       August              108
29 The Original Sin                        US      Bioscop      May                 104
30 Bridget Jones’s Diary                   UK      Bontonfilm   Aug. 2001            94
31 Vanilla Sky                             US      Bontonfilm   January              93
32 The Damned                              CZ      Falcon       February             91
33 Some Secrets                            CZ      Cinemart     March                91
34 Moulin Rouge                            US      Bontonfilm   Nov. 2001            83
35 From Hell                               US      Bontonfilm   January              76
36 Black Hawk Down                         US      Falcon       February             75
37 The Road to Perdition                   US      Bontonfilm   November             75
38 Vidocq                                  FRA     Bioscop      August               75


                                                                                  34
39 Resident Evil                      UK      SPI          August           71
40 Dark Blue World                    CZ      Cinemart     May              65
41 Autumn Spring                      CZ      Falcon       Sep. 2001        64
42 Rat Race                           US      Bioscop      April            61
43 Angel Face                         CZ      Bontonfilm   March            59
44 Not Another Teen Movie             US      Falcon       March            56
45 Unfaithful                         US      Bontonfilm   July             55
46 Spy Game                           US      Bontonfilm   March            55
47 We Were Soldiers                   US      Bontonfilm   August           54
48 Bandits                            US      Bioscop      January          51
49 My Big Fat Greek Wedding           US      Intersonic   November         50
50 Traffic                            US      SPI          January          49


TOP CINEMAS IN 2002

   Name                Screens City                 Admissions
                                                    (1000s)
  1 Nový Smíchov              12 Praha 5                    802
  2 Olympia                   10 Brno-Modřice               637
  3 Slovanský dům             10 Praha 1                    567
  4 CineStar                   8 Ostrava                    512
  5 Park Hostivař             10 Praha 10                   461
  6 Černý Most                 8 Praha 9-Černý Most         412
  7 CineStar                   8 Hradec Králové             399
  8 Velký Špalíček             7 Brno                       364
  9 Galaxie                    9 Praha 4                    289
 10 CineStar                   8 České Budějovice           227
 11 Ládví                      6 Praha 8                    183
 12 Anděl City                14 Praha 5                    143
 13 Elektra                    2 Plzeň                      137
 14 Metropol                     Olomouc                    112
 15 Aero                         Praha 3                    112
 16 Velké                        Zlín                      99,5
 17 Světozor                   2 Praha 1                     87
 18 Hraničář                     Ústí nad Labem            70,4
 19 Letňany                    8 Praha 9                   70,1
 20 Metro                        Prostějov                 69,7
 21 Oko                          Šumperk                   64,1
 22 Kino 99                    2 Kolín                     63,8
 23 Scala                        Brno                      62,1
 24 Hvězda                       Přerov                    61,3
 25 Forum                        Mladá Boleslav            57,1
 26 Radnice                      Jablonec Nad Nisou        53,8
 27 Květen                       Teplice                   50,9
 28 Kosmos                     3 Most                      49,2
 29 Sněžník                      Děčín                     48,7
 30 Lucerna                      Praha 1                   48,2


                                                                       35
31 Hvězda                Uherské Hradiště      47,2
32 Dukla                 Pardubice             46,7
33 Lípa                  Liberec               46,7
34 Mír                   Krnov                 46,1
35 Varšava               Liberec               44,8
36 Střelnice             Jindřichův Hradec     44,2
37 Svět                  Valašské Meziříčí     43,8
38 Kotva                 České Budějovice      43,7
39 Centrál               Hradec Králové        43,6
40 Svět                  Tábor                 43,4
41 Květen                Nový Jičín            43,4
42 Vltava                Kralupy nad Vltavou   43,4
43 Vesmír                České Budějovice        43
44 Kapitol               Brno                  42,7
45 Vatra                 Vsetín                41,9
46 Centrum               Havířov               41,1
47 Blaník                Praha 1               40,5
48 Art                   Brno                  40,4
49 Vesmír                Náchod                40,2
50 Evald                 Praha 1                 40
51 Máj                   Litoměřice            37,4
52 Eden                  Plzeň                 36,9
53 Mír                   Příbram               36,5
54 Svět                  Hodonín               36,4
55 Evropa              2 Praha 6               35,1
56 Moravia               Třebíč                34,8
57 Biograf Český ráj     Jičín                   34
58 Hutník                Kladno                33,2
59 Mír                   Opava                 32,8
60 Koruna                Břeclav               32,7
61 Hvězda                Praha 1               32,5
62 Městské               Nový Bor              32,1
63 Centrum               Karviná-Mizerov       31,9
64 Vesmír                Trutnov               31,5
65 Jas                   Pardubice             31,4
66 Luna                  Ostrava-Výškovice     31,2
67 Sokol                 Kladno                30,3
68 Vesmír                Ostrava 1             30,1
69 Petr Bezruč           Frýdek-Místek         29,8
70 Perštýn               Praha 1               28,8
71 Městské               Turnov                28,3
72 Svět                  Cheb                  27,8
73 Ostrov                Havlíčkův Brod        27,7
74 Sokolský dům          Vyškov                  27
75 Sokol                 Jihlava               26,1
76 Nadsklepí             Kroměříž                26
77 Central               Olomouc                 26
78 Mír                   Beroun                25,9


                                                      36
 79 Šumava                    Klatovy                    25
 80 Máj                       Uherský Brod             24,9
 81 Kosmos                    Třinec                   24,5
 82 Vesmír                    Orlová-Lutyně            24,4
 83 Portyč                    Písek                    23,5
 84 Kino Miloše               Čáslav                   23,5
    Formana
 85 J&K                        Český Krumlov             23
 86 Bio Oko                    Praha 7                 22,5
 87 Puls                       Kopřivnice              22,4
 88 Multikino Modřany        4 Praha 4-Modřany         22,2
 89 Svět                       Kutná Hora              21,8
 90 Vesmír                     Pelhřimov               21,6
 91                            Blansko                 20,7
 92 MKZ                        Uničov                    20
 93 Panorama                   Boskovice               19,5
 94 Klub Magnet                Brno                    19,1
 95 Slavia                     Mariánské Lázně         18,2
 96 Oko                        Litomyšl                17,8
 97 Lípa                       Olomouc                 17,8
 98 Alfa                       Sokolov                 17,7
 99 Eden                       Praha 10                17,5
100 Dukla                      Jihlava                 17,1
128 Zličín                  10 Praha 5-Zličín          13,4




LIST OF INSTITUTIONS, ASSOCIATIONS AND OTHER
AUDIOVISUAL ORGANIZATIONS
INSTITUTIONS

THE SENATE OF THE PARLIAMENT OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC
COMMITTEE FOR EDUCATION, SCIENCE, CULTURE, HUMAN RIGHTS AND
PETITIONS
Valdštejnské nám. 4, 118 01 Praha 1, tel. (420) 257072716, fax 257534480
E-mail: hubovam@senat.cz / Internet: www.senat.cz
Chairman: František Mezihorák

THE CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES OF THE PARLIAMENT OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC
COMMITTEE FOR SCIENCE, EDUCATION, CULTURE, YOUTH AND SPORTS
Sněmovní 4, 118 26 Praha 1, tel. (420) 257175250, fax 257534425


                                                                      37
E-mail: voborova@psp.cz / Internet: www.psp.cz
Chairman: Walter Bartoš
 SUBCOMMITTEE FOR CULTURE
 tel. (420) 257175581
 Chairman: Kateřina Dostálová

THE MINISTRY OF CULTURE OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC – MASS MEDIA
DEPARTMENT
Milady Horákové 139, 160 41 Praha 6, tel. (420) 257085315, fax 224322558
E-mail: petra.pecharova@mkcr.cz / Internet: www.mkcr.cz
Director: Edita Novotná; Deputy Director: Petra Pecharová

 EUREKA AUDIOVISUEL AND THE EUROPEAN AUDIOVISUAL OBSERVATORY
 NATIONAL COORDINATOR
 Milady Horákové 139, 160 41 Praha 6, tel. (420) 257085310, fax 224322558
 E-mail: hana.vachalova@mkcr.cz / Internet: www.mkcr.cz
 Coordinator: Hana Váchalová

 EURIMAGES – NATIONAL COORDINATOR
 Milady Horákové 139, 160 41 Praha 6, tel. (420) 267072289, fax 267072273
 E-mail: uldrichova@iol.cz
 Coordinator: Helena Uldrichová

 THE MEDIA PROGRAM
 Milady Horákové 139, 160 41 Praha 6, tel. (420) 257085310, fax 224322558
 E-mail: petra.pecharova@mkcr.cz, hana.vachalova@mkcr.cz /
 Internet: www.mkcr.cz
 Steering committee members: Petra Pecharová, Hana Váchalová

 MEDIA DESK
 The MEDIA program office in the Czech Republic
 Národní 28, 110 00 Praha 1, (420) 221105209 –10, fax 221105303
 E-mail: info@mediadesk.cz / Internet: www.mediadesk.cz
 Director: Daniela Kučmášová

CZECH FILM CENTER
Národní 28, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221105321, fax 221105303
E-mail: info@filmcenter.cz / Internet: www.filmcenter.cz
Director: Jana Černík

THE COUNCIL FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING
Krátká 10, 100 00 Praha 10, tel. (420) 274811826, 274813830, fax 274810885
E-mail: info@rrtv.cz / Internet: www.rrtv.cz
Chairman: Petr Pospíchal; Head of the Council Office: Miloslav Kučera

THE STATE FUND FOR THE SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT OF CZECH
CINEMATOGRAPHY
Milady Horákové 139, 160 41 Praha 6, tel. (420) 257085247, fax 224321053
E-mail: hana.tomaskova@mkcr.cz / Internet: www.mkcr.cz
Chairman of the Fund’s Council: Jiří Stránský


                                                                             38
NATIONAL FILM ARCHIVES
Malešická 12, 130 00 Praha 3, tel. (420) 271770500, fax 271770501
E-mail: nfa@nfa.cz / Internet: www.nfa.cz
Director: Vladimír Opěla


PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
ASSOCIATION OF AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCERS (APA)
Národní 28, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221105302, fax 221105303
E-mail: apa@iol.cz, Internet: www.apa.iol.cz
Statutory representative: Pavel Strnad

ASSOCIATION OF MAKERS OF ANIMATED FILMS (APD)
Na Doubkové 8, 150 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 251563200, fax 251565203
E-mail: apd@animation.cz
Statutory representative: Ivan Vít

ASSOCIATION OF FILM DIRECTORS AND SCREENWRITERS
Karlovo nám. 19, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 737800900
E-mail: info@aras.cz
Statutory representative: Helena Třeštíková

ASSOCIATION OF CZECH CAMERAMEN
Senovážné nám. 23, 112 82 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224142010
Statutory representative: Josef Hanuš

ASSOCIATION OF CINEMA OPERATORS
kancelář Národní 28, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221105301, fax 221105303
E-mail: prokopova@cinemart.cz
Secretary: Irena Prokopová

CZECH FILM AND TELEVISION ACADEMY
Na Žertvách 40, 180 00 Praha 8, tel./fax (420) 284823442, 284821346
E-mail: vac@vac.cz / Internet: www.cfta.cz
Statutory representatives: Miroslav Ondříček, Petr Vachler

CZECH FILM CHAMBER
Národní 28, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221105301, fax 21105303
E-mail: prokopova@cinemart.cz
Statutory representative: Pavel Strnad

CZECH FILM AND TELEVISION UNION (FITES)
Pod Nuselskými schody 3, 120 00 Praha 2, tel./fax (420) 222562331
E-mail: fites@quick.cz
Chairman: Martin Skyba




                                                                           39
ACTORS ASSOCIATION
Senovážné nám. 23, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224142672, fax 224142690
E-mail: hereckaa@volny.cz
President: Jan Teplý

UNION OF FILM DISTRIBUTORS
U Rajské zahrady 14, 130 00 Praha 3, tel./fax (420) 222713001
E-mail: ufd@atlas.cz
Secretary: Anna Černá

TRADE UNIONS
CONFEDERATION OF THE ARTS AND CULTURE (KUK)
Senovážné nám. 23, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224142555, fax 224142512
E-mail: odborykuk@volny.cz
President: Adriena Jirková

INTERNATIONAL TRADE UNION OF EMPLOYEES IN FILM (KINOS)
Senovážné nám. 23, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224142670, fax 224142512
E-mail: odborykuk@volny.cz
Chairman: Adriena Jirková

FOUNDATIONS

CZECH LITERARY FUND FOUNDATION
Pod Nuselskými schody 3, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 222560081-2, fax 222560083
E-mail: nclf@vol.cz / Internet: www.nclf.cz
Director: Michal Novotný

KARLOVY VARY FILM FESTIVAL FOUNDATION
Moskevská 21, 361 20 Karlovy Vary, tel. (420) 353118380, fax 353222913
President: Zdeněk Roubínek; Secretary: Jiří Jeřábek

SPECIAL INTEREST ASSOCIATIONS
ASSOCIATION OF CZECH FILM CLUBS
Erbenova 5, 736 01 Havířov, tel./fax (420) 558736211
E-mail: hafi5@volny.cz / Internet: www.artfilm.cz
Chairman: Rudolf Fiedler
Center for Methodology and Information
Biskupcova 31, 130 00 Praha 3, tel. (420) 271771349, fax 222585345
E-mail: mic@volny.cz
Director: Pavel Rajčan
Programming: Kino Hvězda Uherské Hradiště
Nám. Míru 951, 686 01 Uherské Hradiště, tel. (420) 632553617, 553790
E-mail: kino@hawaii.cz




                                                                                 40
PRAGUE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY – CINEMATOGRAPHY
BRANCH
Chmelová 2812, 106 00 Praha 10, tel. (420) 723454477, tel./fax 272651030
Statutory representative: Ivo Vítek

COPYRIGHT ORGANIZATIONS
CZECH ANTI-PIRACY UNION
Pobřežní 22, 186 00 Praha 8, tel. (420) 222328767, 222328778, fax 222320983
E-mail: cpufilm@cpufilm.cz / Internet: www.cpufilm.cz
Director: Markéta Prchalová

DILIA – THEATRICAL AND LITERARY AGENCY
Krátkého 1, 190 03 Praha 9, tel. (420) 283893603, fax 283893599
E-mail: kraupnerova@dilia.cz / Internet: www.dilia.cz
Director: Jiří Srstka

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF PHONOGRAPHIC INDUSTRY (IFPI CZECH
REPUBLIC)
Na Kozačce 7, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 221507624, fax 221507673
E-mail: ifpicr@ifpicr.cz / Internet: www.ifpi.cz
Director: Karel Kučera

INTERGRAM
Na poříčí 27, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 222320268, fax 222323341
E-mail: intergram@intergram.cz / Internet: www.intergram.cz
Director: Martin Mařan

OSA – UNION FOR THE PROTECTION OF AUTHORS
Čs. armády 20, 160 56 Praha 6, tel. (420) 220315111, fax 233343073
E-mail: osa@osa.cz / Internet: www.osa.cz
Director: Alexandra Wünschová

OOA – S
Organization for the Protection of Authors – Association of Fine Artists, Architects
and Audiovisual Artists
Masarykovo nábřeží 250, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 24934406, fax 24930322
E-mail: stepankova@ooas.cz
Director: Eva Štěpánková

TECHNOLOGY

KINOTECHNIKA PRAHA
U průhonu 36, 170 00 Praha 7, tel. (420) 20876550, fax 20809846
E-mail: kinotechnika@iol.cz / Internet: www.kinotechnika.cz
Executive director: Richard Novák




                                                                                       41
FILM SCHOOLS
FILM AND TELEVISION FACULTY OF THE ACADEMY OF PERFORMING ARTS
(FAMU)
Smetanovo nábřeží 2, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221715401, fax 224230285
E-mail: nemanska@famu.cz / Internet: www.famu.cz
Dean: Michal Bregant

FACULTY OF ARTS OF THE CHARLES UNIVERSITY – FILM STUDIES
DEPARTMENT
Nám. Jana Palacha 2, 116 38 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221619227
E-mail: jiri.cieslar@ff.cuni.cz
Head of department: Jiří Cieslar

PRIVATE FILM COLLEGE
Lipová alej 2068, 397 01 Písek, tel/fax (420) 382264212
E-mail: svosf@razdva.cz / Internet: svosf.webpark.cz
Headmaster: Miloň Terč

SCHOOL OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND BROADCASTING TECHNOLOGY
Panská 3, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221002111, fax 221002666
E-mail: sekretariat@panska.cz / Internet: www.panska.cz
Headmaster: Marie Plocková

TOMÁŠ BAŤA UNIVERSITY
MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATION FACULTY
Štefánikova 2431, 760 01 Zlín, tel. (420) 577544205, fax 577544215
E-mail: fmk@utb.cz / Internet: www.fmk.utb.cz
Dean: Pavel Škarka

ACADEMY OF APPLIED ARTS -
FILM AND TELEVISION GRAPHICS STUDIO
Nám. Jana Palacha 80, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 251098270, fax 251098289
E-mail: film@vsup.cz / Internet: www.vsup.cz
Head of studio: Jiří Barta

ZLÍN FILM COLLEGE
Filmová 174, 761 79 Zlín, tel. 577592379, tel/fax (420) 577592404
E-mail: vosfz@mbox.vol.cz / Internet: www.vosfz.cz
Headmaster: Pavel Škarka

FILM PERIODICALS
CINEMA
Uruguayská 17, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 221589105, fax 222522648
E-mail: cinema.milackova@burda.cz / Internet: www.cinema.cz
Editor-in-chief: Iva Hejlíčková

CINEPUR
Rytířská 18, 110 00 Praha 1, tel/fax (420) 224213021, 603251004


                                                                            42
E-mail: cinepur@email.cz / Internet: www.cinepur.cz
Editor-in-chief: Helena Bendová

FILM A DOBA (Film and Time)
P.O. Box 248, 152 50 Praha 5, tel. (420) 251815703
E-mail: film.doba@seznam.cz
Editor-in-chief: Stanislav Ulver

FILMOVÝ PŘEHLED (Film Review)
Bartolomějská 11, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224237233/21, 22, fax 224237233
E-mail: prehled@nfa.cz / Internet: www.nfa.cz
Editor-in-chief: Tomáš Bartošek

ILUMINACE
Bartolomějská 11, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224231988, fax 224231948
E-mail: vaclav.kofron@nfa.cz / Internet: www.nfa.cz
Editor-in-chief: Václav Kofroň

PREMIERE
Na Zátorce 3, 160 00 Praha 6, tel. (420) 233023990, fax 233023101
E-mail: all@premiere.cz
Editor-in-chief: Lada Hesová


FILM FESTIVALS AND SHOWS
ACADEMIA FILM OLOMOUC
International festival of audiovisual didactic programs
Contact: Rostislav Hladký, Univerzita Palackého Olomouc, Křížkovského 8,
771 47 Olomouc, tel. (420) 585631053, fax 585222802
E-mail: info@afo.cz, Internet: www.afo.cz

ANIFEST TŘEBOŇ
International festival of animated films
Contact: Corona s.r.o., Jindřicha Plachty 28, 150 00 Praha 5
tel. (420) 257324507, 257325688, fax 257324508
E-mail: info@anifest.cz, Internet: www.anifest.cz

BRNO SIXTEEN (BRNĚNSKÁ ŠESTNÁCTKA)
International competition of non-commercial films and video programs
Contact: Šárka Tryhuková, Kulturní a informační centrum města Brna, Radnická 4,
658 78 Brno, tel/fax (420) 542214625
E-mail: kicbrno16@volny.cz, Internet: www.welcome.to/b16

THE FRANTIŠEK FILIPOVSKÝ PRIZE FOR DUBBING (CENA FRANTIŠKA
FILIPOVSKÉHO ZA DABING)
Contact: Jaroslav Paďour, Městský úřad v Přelouči, Masarykovo nám. 23,
535 33 Přelouč, tel. (420) 466952144, E-mail: meu_prelouc@hrk.tv.cz




                                                                                  43
CZECH LION (ČESKÝ LEV)
Annual film awards
Contact: Martin Šprinc, Vachler Art Company, Na Žertvách 40, 180 00 Praha 8
tel. (420) 284821346, tel/fax 284821341, E-mail: vac@vac.cz
Internet: www.ceskylev.cz

DATATRANSFER
International cyber culture festival
Contact: Jana Semerádová, Profil Media s.r.o., Francouzská 76, 101 00 Praha 10
tel. (420) 267990544, fax 267990542, E-mail: info@profilmedia.cz
Internet: www.datatransfer.cz

OTA HOFMAN CHILDREN’S FILM AND TELEVISION FESTIVAL (DĚTSKÝ
FILMOVÝ A TELEVIZNÍ FESTIVAL OTY HOFMANA)
kontakt: Marek Poledníček, Dům kultury, Mírové nám. 733, 363 01 Ostrov
tel. (420) 353612931, fax 353842921, E-mail: polednicek@dk-ostrov.cz
Internet: www.festivalostrov.cz

9 GATES (9 BRAN)
International festival of Czech-German-Jewish culture
Contact: CAT International s.r.o., Pavel Chalupa, Patočkova 3, 169 00 Praha 6,
tel. (420) 233355082, fax 233350367, E-mail: 9bran@9bran.cz
Internet: www.9bran.cz

DAYS OF EUROPEAN FILM (DNY EVROPSKÉHO FILMU)
Contact: Eva Kačerová, Rakouské kulturní fórum, Jungmannovo nám. 18
110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224215538, fax 24232649, E-mail: austroki@vol.cz
Internet: www.eurofilmfest.cz

EKOFILM ČESKÝ KRUMLOV
International festival of films and video programs about the environment and natural
and cultural heritage
Contact: Auviex s.r.o., Perlitová 1820, 140 00 Praha 4,
tel. (420) 241445404, fax 241445584, E-mail: auviex@login.cz
Internet: www.ckrumlov.cz

FEBIOFEST
International showcase of film, television and video
Contact: Febio s.r.o., Růžová 13, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224213933
fax 224214254
E-mail: febiofest@febio.cz, Internet: www.febiofest.cz

FAMU FESTIVAL
Contact: FAMU, katedra produkce, Smetanovo nábřeží 2, 110 00 Praha 1
tel. (420) 221197232, E-mail: famu@f.amu.cz, Internet: www.famufest.cz

FILMÁK
International film festival of children from Plzeň
Contact: Radek Uhlíř, Manětínská 69, 323 31 Plzeň
tel/fax (420) 377457556, E-mail: uhlir-filmak@seznam.cz


                                                                                   44
Internet: www.festivalfilmak.cz

CHEF D’OEUVRE FILM FESTIVAL (FILMOVÝ FESTIVAL ŠEDÉVR)
Dolní Podluží international festival of independent films
Contact: Muzeum Varnsdorf, Festival Šedévr, Poštovní 415, 407 47 Varnsdorf
tel. (420) 412372193, E-mail: petrasek@wo.cz, Internet: www.sedevr.cz

FINÁLE PLZEŇ
Festival of Czech films
Contact: Ivan Jáchim, Finále Plzeň, Dominikánská 3, 301 12 Plzeň,
tel. (420) 377995211, fax 377995210, E-mail: festival@finaleplzen.cz
Internet: www.finaleplzen.cz

FORT FILM TEREZÍN
International festival of young filmmakers and students
Contact: Jan Liška, Středoevropská kolonie současného umění, nám. ČSA 85,
411 55 Terezín, tel/fax (420) 416782299, E-mail: mecca@ecn.cz
Internet: www.fortfilm.cz

CRYSTAL HEART PODĚBRADY (KŘIŠŤÁLOVÉ SRDCE PODĚBRADY)
International television festival of documentary films about health and healthcare
CDG s.r.o., nám. T.G. Masaryka 1130, 290 01 Poděbrady, tel. (420) 325613420
fax 325601341, E-mail: cdg@cdg.cz

UHERSKÉ HRADIŠTĚ SUMMER FILM SCHOOL (LETNÍ FILMOVÁ ŠKOLA
UHERSKÉ HRADIŠTĚ)
Contact: Jiří Králík, Městská kina, Nám. Míru 951, 686 01 Uherské Hradiště,
tel. (420) 572553617, 572556670, fax 572553790, E-mail: kino@hawaii.cz
Internet: www.lfs.cz

INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL IN LITOMĚŘICE
Contact: Občanské sdružení Kinoklub Ostrov Litoměřice, Alšova 21,
412 00 Litoměřice, tel/fax (420) 416731037, E-mail: kinoklub.ltm@seznam.cz
Internet: www.revita.cz/festival

MEDICFILM PODBOŘANY
Festival of films about health and healthcare
Contact: Stanislava Čapková, Kulturní dům, Masarykovo nám. 922
441 01 Podbořany, tel/fax (420) 415214111, E-mail: stanacapkova@seznam.cz
Internet: www. podborany.net

INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL IN JIHLAVA
Contact: Marek Hovorka, Na kopci 23, 586 01 Jihlava, tel. (420) 776012369
E-mail: office@dokument-festival.cz, Internet: www.dokument-festival.cz

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF FILMS FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH IN ZLÍN
Contact: Irena Skaunicová, Filmfest s.r.o., Filmová 174, 761 79 Zlín
tel. (420) 577592381, 577592401, fax 577592442, E-mail: festival@zlinfest.cz,
Internet: www.zlinfest.cz



                                                                                     45
INTERNATIONAL AVIATION FILM FESTIVAL
Contact: Mezinárodní festival leteckých filmů, Vinařská 3, 170 00 Praha 7
tel. (420) 233354656, E-mail: info@leteckefilmy.cz, Internet: www.leteckefilmy.cz

INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL IN KARLOVY VARY
Contact: Film Servis Festival Karlovy Vary a.s., Panská 1, 110 00 Praha 1
tel. (420) 221411011, 221411022, fax 221411033, E-mail: festival@kviff.com
Internet: www.iffkv.cz

INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAINEERING FILM FESTIVAL
Contact: Městský úřad, Rooseveltova 15, 549 57 Teplice nad Metují
tel. (420) 491581207, fax 491581191, E-mail: mhff@teplicenadmetuji.cz
Internet: www.teplicenadmetuji.cz

MEZIPATRA
Gay a lesbian film festival taking place in Brno and Prague
Contact: STUD Brno, Šmejkalova 75, 616 00 Brno
tel/fax (420) 549212728, E-mail: info@gayfilmfest.cz, Internet: www.gayfilmfest.cz

ONE WORLD - INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ON HUMAN RIGHTS
Contact: Igor Blaževič, Člověk v tísni o.p.s., Sokolská 18, 120 00 Praha 2
tel. (420) 226200430, E-mail: mail@oneworld.cz, Internet: www.jedensvet.cz

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF STUDENT FILMS IN PÍSEK (biennale)
kontakt: Miloň Terč, Soukromá vyšší odborná škola filmová, Lipová alej 2068
397 01 Písek, tel/fax (420) 382264212, E-mail: svosf@razdva.cz
Internet: www.svosf.webpark.cz

NOVÉ MĚSTO POT OF LAUGHTER (NOVOMĚSTSKÝ HRNEC SMÍCHU)
Czech festival of film comedy
Contact: Ilona Daňková, Městský klub, Nerudova 142, 549 01 Nové Město nad Metují
tel. (420) 491474158, fax 491470358, E-mail: mestsky.klub@novemestonm.cz

PAF TACHOV
International scuba-diving festival
Contact: Festival PAF, Nám. Republiky 119, 347 01 Tachov
tel. (420) 374722210, fax 374722161, E-mail: festival@paftachov.cz
Internet: www.paftachov.cz

PROJEKT 100
Contact: Jiří Králík, Městská kina Uherské Hradiště, nám. Míru 951 686 01 Uherské
Hradiště, tel. (420) 572553617, fax 572553790, E-mail: kino@hawaii.cz
Internet: www.artfilm.cz

FESTIVAL OF CZECH DOCUMENTARY AND ANIMATED FILMS
Contact: Martin Skyba, Český filmový a televizní svaz FITES
Pod Nuselskými schody 3, 120 00 Praha 2, tel/fax (420) 222562331
E-mail: fites@quick.cz, Internet: www.fites.cz




                                                                                     46
SPORTFILM LIBEREC
Festival of documentary films and program about sports
Contact: Liberecká sportovní a tělovýchovná organizace, Jablonecká 18
460 01 Liberec 1, tel. (420) 485114113, fax 485101176, E-mail: v.bohac@lb-sto.cz,
Internet: www.lb-sto.cz

THE BOOKWORLD IN FILM
Film show organized as a part of Bookworld, an international book fair
Contact: Fügnerovo nám. 3, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 224498234, fax 224498464
E-mail: info@svetknihy.cz, Internet: www.svetknihy.cz

TECHFILM
International festival of films and video programs about science, technology and the
arts
Contact: Krátký Film Praha a.s. - Inforfilmservis, Kříženeckého nám. 1079, 152 53
Praha 5, tel. (420) 267091313, fax 267091315, E-mail: prochazka@kratkyfilm.com
Mylada Balounová, ČVUT Centrum podpory výuky, Thákurova 1, 160 00 Praha 6
tel. (420) 233051125, E-mail: balouno@vc.cvut.cz, Internet: www.techfilm.cz

TĚRLICKO FILM SUMMER (TĚRLICKÉ FILMOVÉ LÉTO)
Festival of Czech, Polish and Slovak feature films
Contact: Tadeusz Wantula, Klub kultury o.p.s., Prvního máje 493, 739 61 Třinec,
tel. (420) 558330105, fax 558326105, E-mail: klub_kultury@iol.cz
Internet: www.tfl.webpark.cz

TOURFILM KARLOVY VARY
International festival of films and video programs about tourism
Contct: Avant Promotion, Americká 42, 120 00 Praha 2
tel/fax (420) 224250334, E-mail: info@tourfilm.cz, Internet: www.tourfilm.cz

GOLDEN PRAGUE (ZLATÁ PRAHA)
International festival of television programs
Contact: Gabriela Dousková, Česká televize, Kavčí hory, 140 70 Praha 4,
tel. (420) 261134133, E-mail: gabriela.douskova@czech-tv.cz
Internet: www.czech-tv.cz/goldenprague


FILM PRODUCTION COMPANIES
ARMADA FILMS
Na Zderaze 15, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 221904444, fax 221904300
E-mail: info@armadafilms.cz
Statutory representative: Filip Sirový

ATELIÉRY BONTON ZLÍN
Filmová 174, 761 79 Zlín, tel. (420) 577592200, fax 577592444
E-mail: ateliery@ateliery.cz
Director: Zdeněk Skaunic




                                                                                   47
ATHANOR
U 5. baterie 21, 162 00 Praha 6, tel. (420) 224313382, fax 224313383
E-mail: athanor@nextra.cz
Statutory representatives: Jaromír Kallista, Jan Švankmajer

BALZER INTERNATIONAL FILM
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073641, 267073841,
fax 267073845, E-mail: bif@login.cz
Director: Jan Balzer

BÄR
Na Borovém 6, 142 00 Praha 4, tel/fax (420) 271740408, 271742548
E-mail: bar@bar-sro.com
Director: Zbyněk Bartoš

BARRANDOV STUDIO
Film and TV production
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267072074, fax 2251816256
E-mail: production@barrandov.cz, Internet: www.barrandov.com
Director general: Radomír Dočekal

BELTFILM
Sekaninova 52, 128 00 Praha 2
tel. (420) 224936887, fax 224936860, E-mail: beltfilm@iol.cz
Statutory representative: Miloš Remeň

BIONAUT
U Zvonařky 14, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 224251699, fax 224252375
E-mail: bionaut@bionaut.cz
Statutory representative: Vratislav Šlajer

BUC FILM
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267072125, fax 267073516
E-mail: buc-film@wo.cz
Director: Jaroslav Bouček

CINEART PRODUCTIONS
Vzdušná 1017/2, 142 00 Praha 4, tel/fax (420) 261711044, 261711046
E-mail: cineart.schwarcz@tiscali.cz
Statutory representative: Viktor Schwarcz

CZECH ANGLO PRODUCTION
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073288, tel/fax 267073623
E-mail: czang.prod@mbox.vol.cz
Statutory representative: Pavel Nový

DAWSON PRODUCTION
Pštrossova 21, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224999911, fax 224999923
E-mail: dawson@dawson.cz
Statutory representative: Monika Kristlová


                                                                                 48
EIS PRODUCTION
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073607, fax 267073826
E-mail: eisproduction@mbox.vol.cz
Director: Václav Eisenhammer

ETAMP FILM PRODUCTION
Struhařovská 9, 141 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 272019111, fax 272772258
E-mail: etamp@etamp.cz
Director: Jan Bílek

ETIC
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073171, fax 267073818
E-mail: etic@comp.cz
Director: Petr Moravec

FILMOVÉ STUDIO OLOMOUC
Dvořákova 34, 779 00 Olomouc, tel. (420) 602943261, E-mail: filmstudio@quick.cz
Executive director: Jan Bartoň

FILMSERVICE PRODUCTIONS
Ostrovní 30, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221969111, fax 221969100
E-mail: mail@filmservice.cz
Statutory representatives: Martin Zaradička, Jakub Kolín

FRONDA FILM
Písecká 19, 130 00 Praha 3, tel. (420) 272736285, E-mail: frondafilm@volny.cz
Director: Jiří Pomeje

GOLDEN DAWN
Šaldova 7, 180 00 Praha 8, tel/fax (420) 224826701, E-mail: info@goldendawn.biz
Statutory representative: Daniel Tuček

HAPPY CELLULOID
Hellichova 20, 118 00 Praha 5, tel/fax (420) 257315087
E-mail: celluloid@bohem-net.cz
Executive director: Milan Cieslar

IN FILM PRAHA
Jilská 20, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224228289, fax 224227339
E-mail: infilm@mbox.vol.cz
Statutory representative: Rudolf Biermann

JAKUBISKO FILM
Vodičkova 36, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 296236353, tel. 296236353, fax 296236383
E-mail: info@jakubiskofilm.com
Statutory representative: Deana Jakubisková




                                                                                  49
JMB FILM & TV PRODUCTION
Malá 2, 162 00 Praha 6, tel/fax (420) 224311355, E-mail: jmbcz@mbox.vol.cz
Statutory representatives: Boris Valčák, Jiří Chlumský

KRÁTKÝ FILM PRAHA
Kříženeckého nám. 1079/5b, 152 53 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267091111, fax 267091200
E-mail: beck@kratkyfilm.com
Director general: Karel Hájek

LUCKY MAN FILMS
Perlova 1, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221667302, fax 221667521
E-mail: production@luckymanfilms.com
Statutory representative: David Ondříček

LUMAR PRODUCTION
Pod Habrovou 7, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 251814494, fax 251813907
E-mail: lumar.film@traveller.cz
Statutory representatives: Štefan Voržáček, Ludvík Němec

LUXOR
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073615, fax 251816454
E-mail: info@luxorfilm.cz
Directors: Přemysl Pražský, Antonín Vomáčka

MEDIAREX MOVIE
Na Bělidle 27, 150 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 257311287, fax 257311296
E-mail: mediarex@ms.anet.cz
Director: Roman Bartoníček

MILK & HONEY FILMS
Josefská 6, 118 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 257533534, fax 257315294
E-mail: milkhony@aol.com
Statutory representative: Tomáš Krejčí

NEGATIV
Ostrovní 30, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224933755, fax 224933472
E-mail: office@negativ.cz
Statutory representatives: Petr Oukropec, Pavel Strnad

NORTH AMERICAN PICTURES
Geologická 2, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 251117911-2, fax 251117913
E-mail: nap@terminal.cz
Statutory representative: Lloyd Simandl

NOVÝ OCEÁN
P.O.Box 142, 100 31 Praha 10, tel. (420) 602260926, E-mail: novy.ocean@tiscali.cz
Statutory representative: Jaroslav Soukup




                                                                                50
PARTNERSHIP FILMS
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267072117, fax 267075181
E-mail: office@ppictures.cz
Statutory representative: Petr Keller

PRAGUE INTERNATIONAL FILMS
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073625, fax 267073603
E-mail: oldamach@mbox.vol.cz
Director: Oldřich Mach

PROART PRODUCTION
V Jirchářích 8, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 296334810, fax 296334819
E-mail: contact@proart.cz
Director: Daniel Závorka

QQQ
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 602278387, fax 267073353
E-mail: jara.vaculik@quick.cz
Statutory representative: Jaroslav Vaculík

SILVER SCREEN
Vodičkova 36, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 296236491-2, fax 296236493
E-mail: silverscreen@oasanet.cz
Director: Václav Marhoul

SIRENA FILM
Rašínovo nábřeží 6, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 221411610, fax 224919969
E-mail: info@sirenafilm.com
Statutory representative: Artemio Benki

SPACE FILMS
Prokopská 8, 118 00 Praha 1, tel/fax (420) 257535107
E-mail: spacfilms@attglobal.net
Director: Jiří Ježek

S PRO ALFA FILM
Pod Hájkem 1, 180 00 Praha 8, tel. (420) 296587711, fax 296587712
E-mail: franci@sproalfafilm.cz
Statutory representative: František Janda

STILLKING FILMS
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073741, fax 267073742
E-mail: general@stillking.com
Statutory representatives: Matthew Stillman, Pavla Burgetová

STUDIO FÁMA 92
Jungmannova 5, 118 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224949557, fax 224215234
E-mail: famaja@bohem-net.cz
Statutory representatives: Jana Tomsová, Ivana Kačírková



                                                                             51
STUDIO FAMU
Klimentská 4, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224810329, tel./fax 222310692
E-mail: machova@studiof.amu.cz
Director: Josef Boháč

TARGET PICTURES
Masarykovo nábřeží 1, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224932000, fax 224932004
E-mail: production@target.cz
Statutory representative: Daniel Netušil

TMAVOMODRÝ SVĚT
Pod svahem 7, 147 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 244468099, fax 244467094
E-mail: darkblue@mbox.vol.cz
Statutory representative: Jan Svěrák

TOSARA FILM
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073540, fax 267073075
E-mail: cerna.k@pha.inecnet.cz
Statutory representatives: Kateřina Černá, Petr Václav

TOTAL HELPART T.H.A.
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 267073007, fax 267073836
E-mail: total@tha.cz
Statutory representative: Ondřej Trojan

VAC - VACHLER ART COMPANY
Na Žertvách 40, 180 00 Praha 8, tel. (420) 284821346, fax 284821341
E-mail: vac@vac.cz / Internet: www.vac.cz
Director: Petr Vachler

VERBASCUM
Černá 6, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224930077, fax 224930384
E-mail: verbascum@email.cz
Statutory representative: Richard Němec

WHISCONTI
Odborů 4, 120 00 Praha 2, tel/fax (420) 224922856, E-mail: whisconti@login.cz
Statutory representatives: Pavel Melounek, David Prudký

WORLD CIRCLE FOUNDATION
Roháčova 101, 130 00 Praha 3, tel/fax (420) 222581358, E-mail: wcf@login.cz
Statutory representatives: Vladimír Chrenovský, Ivo Trajkov

Documentary films

AD LIBITUM
Svobodova 4, 128 00 Praha 2, tel/fax (420) 224920601
Statutory representative: Petr Ruttner




                                                                                52
ASOCIACE FILM & SOCIOLOGIE
Pod Zvonařkou 10, 120 00 Praha 2, tel/fax (420) 222564061, E-mail: fas@login.cz
Statutory representative: Jarmila Poláková

AUDIOVIZUÁLNÍ A TECHNICKÉ CENTRUM ČESKÉHO VYSOKÉHO UČENÍ
TECHNICKÉHO
Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 224922747, fax 224922822
E-mail: avt.zochova@km1.fjfi.cvut.cz
Director: Zdena Zochová

AUDIOVIZUÁLNÍ CENTRUM UNIVERZITY PALACKÉHO V OLOMOUCI
Biskupské nám. 1, 771 47 Olomouc, tel. (420) 585631718
E-mail: pilatova@risc.upol.cz
Statutory representative: Hana Pilátová

AVIS
Agency of military information and services
Rooseveltova 23, 160 01 Praha 6, tel. (420) 973215520, fax 973215523
E-mail: melikanm@army.cz
Director: Miroslav Melikant

DADA
Gorazdova 16, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 224917114-6, fax 224916131
E-mail: produkce@dada.cz
Director: Jitka Přerovská

FEBIO
Růžová 13, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224213933, tel/fax 224214254
E-mail: febio@febio.cz
Director: Fero Fenič

FONTIS
Pod strašnickou vinicí 13, 100 00 Praha 10, tel. (420) 274771116, fax 274774379
E-mail: praha@fontis.cz
Statutory representative: Vladimír Mocek

HOLLY - STANISLAV ČERV
Nepravidelná 18, 102 00 Praha 10 - Štěrboholy, tel. (420) 272705757, 272705770,
fax 272706483, E-mail: sekretariat@holly.cz
Statutory representatives: Zdeněk Navara, Stanislav Červ

CHRONOS FILM
Mánesova 22, 120 00 Praha 2, tel/fax (420) 222250856, 603267955
E-mail: chronosfilm@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Šimon Pánek

IQ MEDIA
Krajní 16/87, 635 00 Brno, tel. (420) 546211724, E-mail: iqm@iqmedia.cz
Statutory representative: Josef Strubl



                                                                                  53
JOSEF CÍSAŘOVSKÝ
Xaveriova 118, 150 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 251564446
Statutory representative: Josef Císařovský

K2
Na Folimance 5, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 222560132, fax 222560133
E-mail: k2stingl@mbox.vol.cz
Statutory representative: Pavel Štingl

KF ORBIS FILM PLZEŇ
Tomanova 5, 301 00 Plzeň, tel. (420) 3777459039, fax 377421163
E-mail: info@orbis-film.cz
Statutory representatives: Josef Pešek, Petr Pešek

KOHAK FILM
Studio Mánes, Masarykovo nábřeží 25, 110 00 Praha 1, tel/fax (420) 224930222
E-mail: kohakfilm@email.cz
Director: Jaroslav Kohak

MARTIN ŠTOLL
Plamínkové 11, 140 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 777866048, E-mail: martinstoll@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Martin Štoll

MARTIN VADAS, PRODUKCE AUDIOVIZUÁLNÍCH DĚL
Říčanova 34, 169 00 Praha 6, tel. (420) 233350145, fax 257313776
E-mail: martin.vadas@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Martin Vadas

MEDIA GROUP BOHEMIA
Rozšířená 11, 182 00 Praha 8, tel/fax (420) 284690950, E-mail: mgb@mbox.vol.cz
Statutory representative: Martin Chlupáč

NIKÉ TV PRODUCTION
České družiny 35, 160 00 Praha 6, tel/fax (420) 224319632, 274772727
E-mail: niketv@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Martin Slunečko

OK VISION
Lucemburská 26, 130 00 Praha 3, tel. (420) 222720488, fax 222714069
E-mail: studio@okvision.cz
Statutory representative: Jindřich Honzík

ORIGINÁLNÍ VIDEOJOURNAL
Štěpánská 61, 110 00 Praha 1, tel/fax (420) 224215234
E-mail: j.konirova@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Pavel Kačírek

PDMEDIA
K rybníčkům 26, 100 00 Praha 10, tel. (420) 274782727, fax 274811716
E-mail: pdmedia@penizevip.cz


                                                                                 54
Statutory representative: Pavel Doležal

PLUTO FILM & VIDEO
Jabloňová 2929/30, 106 00 Praha 10, tel. (420) 272650336, fax 272650481
E-mail: pluto@iol.cz
Statutory representatives: Miloslav Šmídmajer, Mária Dufková

SKYFILM – IVAN STŘÍTESKÝ
Mozartova 25, 796 01 Prostějov, tel. (420) 582346537, E-mail: skyfilm@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Ivan Stříteský

SKYTVILM
Vondroušova 1170, 163 00 Praha 6, tel. (420) 235319189
E-mail: martinskyba@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Martin Skyba

SYNERGIA FILM
Konšelská 12, 180 00 Praha 8, tel/fax (420) 283841867
E-mail: aleshudsky@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Aleš Hudský

TV METROPOL PRODUCTION
Senovážné nám. 3, 370 01 České Budějovice, tel/fax (420) 387311788
E-mail: tvmetropol@mybox.cz
Statutory representative: Ivan Sytař

VERA VISTA
Bořivojova 91, 130 00 Praha 3, tel/fax (420) 222715496, tel. 601234283
E-mail: veravista@iol.cz
Statutory representative: Věra Laštuvková

Animated films

AAA - ART AND ANIMATION STUDIO
Zdíkovská 49, 150 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 257211934, fax 257218231
E-mail: tomanek@aaa-studio.cz
Statutory representatives: Dagmar Doubková, Jan Tománek

ANIFILM
P.O. Box 119, 118 01 Praha 1, tel. (420) 271743730, tel/fax 271741336
E-mail: anifilm@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Milan Rychecký

ANIMA
Vyšehradská 27, 128 00 Praha 2, tel/fax (420) 224918829
E-mail: animace@volny.cz
Statutory representative: Marcela Halousková




                                                                                 55
ANIMATION PEOPLE
Na Doubkové 8, 150 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 251563200, fax 251565203
E-mail: people@animation.cz
Executive director: Miroslav Kačor

CINE ANIMA
Rooseveltova 49, 160 00 Praha 6, tel/fax (420) 233340265
Statutory representative: Jiří Vojta

HAFAN FILM PRAHA
Veleňská 722, 182 00 Praha 8, tel/fax (420) 222724162
Statutory representatives: Jan Balej, Miloslav Špála

PAJ-TASH
Mariánské nám. 4, 709 00 Ostrava - Mariánské Hory, tel. (420) 596633220
E-mail: novak2@osu.cz
Statutory representative: Ilja Novák

QQ STUDIO OSTRAVA
Nám. Msgre. Šrámka 4, 702 00 Ostrava 1, tel. (420) 596114516, fax 596124645
E-mail: qq@qq.cz
Statutory representative: Vladimír Mráz

STUDIA ANIMOVANÉHO FILMU
Kříženeckého nám. 1079/5b, 152 00 Praha 5
STUDIO BRATŘI V TRIKU
tel. (420) 251818619, fax 267091212, E-mail: deitch@kratkyfilm.com
Director: Zdenka Deitchová

STUDIO JIŘÍHO TRNKY
tel. (420) 267091309, fax 267091377, E-mail: havlik@kratkyfilm.com
Director: Michal Havlík

STUDIO MIRAGE
Smolenská 22, 1201 00 Praha 10, tel. (420) 271742040
E-mail: petr_kral@mirage.cz
Statutory representative: Petr Král

UNIVERSAL PRODUCTIONS PARTNERS
Computer animation studio
Žitomírská 7-9, 101 00 Praha 10, tel. (420) 271722121, fax 271720330
E-mail: info@upp.cz
Statutory representative: Vít Komrzý

VIA LUCIS
Janáčkovo nábřeží 43, 150 00 Praha 5, tel/fax (420) 257322188
Statutory representative: Jiří Petr Miška




                                                                              56
DISTRIBUTORS
ATLANTIS ENTERTAINMENT / CINEINVEST
Celetná 19, 116 22 Praha 1, tel/fax (420) 222319687
President: David Matouš

BIOSCOP
Kunětická 2, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 222254461, fax 222254462
E-mail: info@bioscop.cz
Director: Tomáš Hoffman

BONTONFILM
Národní 28, 111 21 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224947343, 221105236, fax 224948823
E-mail: zdena.komorousova@bonton.cz
Director: Aleš Danielis

CINEMART
Národní 28, 111 21 Praha 1, tel. (420) 224949110, fax 221105220
E-mail: info@cinemart.cz
Director: Jan Jíra

FALCON
U Nikolajky 5, 150 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 224422244, fax 224422240
E-mail: falcon@falcon.cz
Director: Jan Bradáč

FILM DISTRIBUTION ARTCAM
Rašínovo nábřeží 6, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 224918833, fax 224919969
E-mail: artcam@artcam.cz
Statutory representative: Eliška Fuchsová

HOLLYWOOD CLASSIC ENTERTAINMENT
Mezivrší 28, 147 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 244464135, fax 244464395
E-mail: hce@hce.cz
Director: Igor Konyoukov

INTERSONIC TAUNUS PRODUCTION
Nám. T.G. Masaryka 13, 690 02 Břeclav, tel/fax (420) 519322310
E-mail: intersonic@cmail.cz
Statutory representative: Marie Hutterová

NÁRODNÍ FILMOVÝ ARCHIV
Malešická 12, 130 00 Praha 3, tel. (420) 271770500, fax 271770501
E-mail: nfa@nfa.cz
Statutory representative: Vladimír Opěla

NOVÝ OCEÁN
P.O.Box 142, 100 31 Praha 10, tel. (420) 281914173, fax 281913659
Statutory representative: Jaroslav Soukup



                                                                             57
REMAKE
V Jámě 1, 110 00 Praha 1, tel/fax (420) 224162335, E-mail: remakecz@hotmail.com
Statutory representatives: Miroslav Brocko, Peter Kot

SPACE FILMS
Prokopská 8, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 257535107, tel./fax 257535108
E-mail: pzenkl@space-films.cz
Director for distribution: Petr Zenkl

SPI INTERNATIONAL
Nad Ondřejovem 12, 140 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 261221366, fax 261221375
E-mail: spi@spi-film.cz
Director: Ivana Vrbíková

WARNER BROS.
Na poříčí 30, 111 21 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221732401, fax 221732501
E-mail: martin_malik@warnerbros.cz
Director for distribution: Martin Malík

VIDEO DISTRIBUTORS

BONTON HOME VIDEO
Konviktská 5, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 222092214, fax 224228979
E-mail: video@bonton.cz
Director: Ladislav Hrabě

CENTRUM ČESKÉHO VIDEA
Konviktská 5, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 222092402, fax 222092401
E-mail: ccv.distribuce@bonton.cz
Director: Pavel Karoch

DAVAY
Pražská 16, 102 21 Praha 10, tel. (420) 281017607, fax 271751515
E-mail: pavel.hlavac@pha.davay.cz
Director: Pavel Hlaváč

FILMEXPORT HOME VIDEO
Kaplická 14, 140 00 Praha 4, tel/fax (420) 261213661, E-mail:info@filmexport.cz
Director: Karel Kabát

HOLLYWOOD CLASSIC ENTERTAINMENT
Mezivrší 28, 147 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 244464135, fax 44464395
E-mail: hce@hce.cz
Director: Igor Konyoukov

INTERSONIC TAUNUS PRODUCTION
Nám. T.G. Masaryka 13, 690 02 Břeclav, tel. (420) 519374218
Executive director: Marie Hutterová




                                                                                  58
JAKS PRODUCTION
Na Neklance 21, 150 00 Praha 5, tel/fax (420) 251555147, E-mail: james@cmail.cz
Director: Věra Sýkorová

MAGIC BOX
Kunětická 2, 120 00 Praha 2, tel. (420) 222254201, fax 222264202
E-mail: magicbox@magicbox.cz
Director: Martin Papoušek

VAPET PRODUCTION
U družstva Repo 7/1061, 140 00 Praha 4, tel/fax (420) 261213086, 261221975,
E-mail: vapet.office@volny.cz
Director: Petr Vašenda

WARNER BROS.
Na poříčí 30, 110 00 Praha 1, tel. (420) 221732402, fax 221732410
E-mail: production@warnerbros.cz
Director: Ladislav Šťastný

COMMERCIAL COMPANIES

FILMEXPORT PRAGUE DISTRIBUTION
Marie Cibulkové 34, 140 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 244014216-7, fax 244014218
E-mail: filmexport@volny.cz
Statutory representatives: Marta Körnerová, Jitka Slavíková


TELEVISION COMPANIES
CZECH TELEVISION (ČESKÁ TELEVIZE)
Kavčí hory, 140 70 Praha 4, tel. (420) 261131111, fax 261218351
Internet: www.czech-tv.cz
Acting director general: Petr Klimeš
Office of the director general: tel. (420) 261134002, fax 261218351
E-mail: sekretariat.gr@czech-tv.cz
Director for programming: Markéta Luhanová, tel. 261211621, 261134023,
fax 61216628, E-mail: marketa.luhanova@czech-tv.cz
Acting news director: Jiří Janeček, tel. (420) 261135501, fax 261135565
E-mail: jiri.janecek@czech-tv.cz
Production director: Petr Erben, tel. (420) 261211571, fax 261218588
E-mail: petr.erben@czech-tv.cz
Financial director: Petr Klimeš, tel. (420) 261134024, fax 261212883
E-mail: petr.klimes@czech-tv.cz
Centre for Drama (director: Jan Otčenášek; chief producer: Jaroslav Kučera) tel.
(420) 261137010, fax 261137163
Centre for Entertainment (director: Richard Medek; chief producer: Martin Kopřiva)
tel. (420) 261137018, fax 261137154
Centre for Theatre and Music (director: Tomáš Šimerda; chief producer: Petr Nezval)
tel. (420) 261137014, fax 261137124



                                                                                 59
Centre for Children´s Programmes (director: Miroslava Kaňková; chief producer:
Magdalena Sedláková), tel. (420) 261137041, fax 261137188
Centre for Factual Programmes (director: Rudolf Růžička; chief producer: Damián
Kaušitz) tel. (420) 261137000, fax 261137200
Centre for Acquisitions (chief producer: Jan Rubeš)
tel. (420) 261137043, fax 261137308
Telexport (head: Jarmila Švorcová), tel. (420) 261137047, fax 261213041
E-mail: telexport@czech-tv.cz

TV NOVA
Kříženeckého nám. 322, 152 00 Praha 5, tel. (420) 233100111, fax 233100388
E-mail: @novatv.cz, Internet: www.novatv.cz
Director general: Petr Dvořák
Executive director: Libuše Šmuclerová

FTV PREMIÉRA (PRIMA TV)
Na Žertvách 24, 180 00 Praha 8, tel. (420) 266700111, fax 266700201
E-mail: petra.fickerova@prima-televize.cz, Internet: www.prima-televize.cz
Director general: Martin Dvořák
Programming director: Miloš Zahradník, tel. (420) 266700338, fax 266700122

HBO CZECH REPUBLIC
Pod Višňovkou 23, 140 00 Praha 4, tel. (420) 261094444, fax 261094455
E-mail: reception@hbo.cz, Internet: www.hbo.cz
Director general: Luboš Jetmar




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