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					Publishing your Research


       Seven tips for effective writing


                                    David O’Sullivan
                National University of Ireland, Galway

                                         Hari Jagdev
                             University of Manchester
Background

 Creating new Knowledge is central goal of
  top Universities
 Creating new knowledge is adsorbing and
  exciting
 Disseminating new knowledge is time
  consuming and often dull




Publishing Your Research
How is knowledge disseminated?

 Patents and other protections
 Licenses and other commercial activities
 Publications




Publishing Your Research
Welcome

 David O’Sullivan, Ph.D.
      Research Director at NUI Galway
      Associate Editor
           Journal Manufacturing Processes
           Intl. Journal Manufacturing Systems

 Hari Jagdev, Ph.D.
      Research Director at UMIST
       (Manchester)
      Editor
           Journal of Computers in Industry

Publishing Your Research
Outline


    Types of Publications (Hari)
    Seven Tips for Effective Writing (David)
    Mind Mapping
    ‘Correct the Grammar’ Prize!




Publishing Your Research
Exercise

 Why publish?




Publishing Your Research
Why publish?

 Mission e.g.
      “…creation of new knowledge…”
 Validate your Research
 Communicate with others
 Populate your Resume




Publishing Your Research
Publishing Your Research
Types of publications

    Reports
    Conference Papers
    Journal Papers
    Theses
    Magazine Articles
    Book Chapters
    Books




Publishing Your Research
Magazine Articles

    One-sided view or opinion
    Little or no peer review
    Principally used to popularise an idea
    Readers not expected to be expert
    Very little scientific worth




Publishing Your Research
Conference Papers

 Publishing interim results of ongoing
  research
 Value of Paper depends on Conference
      Number of attendees
      Submitted versus selected ratio
           (Top conference: 4 to 1 or more)
 Generally deemed ‘weak’ publications
      Less thorough review
      Short but supplemented by presentation
      Often accepted on ‘extended abstract’


Publishing Your Research
Thesis

 Internal report by one author
 Limited readership
      supervisor, examiners, co-researchers
 Formal academic structure and style
  (similar to journal paper but longer)
 PhD thesis must be ‘publishable’ in whole or
  in part
 Increasingly, PhD students ‘must have’
  published journal papers before submitting


Publishing Your Research
Journal Papers

    Key results of extended research
    Substantial and complete report
    Extensive review and revision
    Journal Hierarchy:
      Top, middle, easy!
      Fundamental versus Applied
 Top notch Journals
      Stringent Reviewing procedures (e.g. IEEE
       Journals have five reviewers per paper)
      Acceptance rate typically 1 in 5
      Leadtime 6-18 months!
Publishing Your Research
Journal Papers – Special Issues

 Fast track approach
 Guest Editor
 Selected sub-set of reviewers active in your
  field
 You or your supervisor may know many of
  them!
 Downside: Infrequent




Publishing Your Research
Books and Book Chapters
 Types
      Professional Reference
      Student Textbook
 Published to gather a number of ideas together
  over number of years
 Comprehensive background and extended
  explanation
 Often less valuable than journal papers
 e.g. Australian Research Measures
         Conference Paper = 0.5
         Book Chapter = 0.5
         Book = 1
         Journal Paper = 2


Publishing Your Research
Publishing Your Research
Seven tips for effective writing

1.   Understand your research goals
2.   Find a focus for your research
3.   Get to know the writing environment
4.   Develop a consistent layout and structure
5.   Develop highly effective writing style
6.   Master the tools of the trade
7.   Understand the publishing process




Publishing Your Research
Correct the Grammar
 I find that confusion often “clouds” the exact meaning of
  the term innovation. Tidd et al. (1997) have excellent
  findings that state that “novelty is very much in the eye
  of the beholder”. In it’s broadest sense, the term
  originates from the Latin innovare, meaning “to make
  something new”. It’s obvious that innovation is a process
  of turning opportunity into new ideas and of putting
  these ideas into widely used practice. According to Tidd
  et al. (1997), innovation is a core process concerned
  with renewing what the organization offers and
  optimising the way it generates and delivers its output.
  We are all aware of the importance of innovation for
  business growth and there are many advantages.
  Howard (2003) discusses 5 disadvantages. Overall there
  is a need for a new paradigm in the way we
  conceptualise and materialise innovation.


Publishing Your Research
1. Understand your research goals
 Obtain a higher degree
 Create new knowledge
 Publish new knowledge

 Set Targets (lead author)

           Publication      Year 1      Year 2       Year 3
           Conf. Papers       1            1            1
           Journal Papers     0            1            1
           Thesis             0            0            1

                             Double or triple if you co-author!



Publishing Your Research
Publish or Perish!

 UK Research Assessment Exercise (RAE)
      Number of top Journal Publications
      …leads to increased funding


 Appointments and Promotions
      Journal papers are a key metric in awarding
       appointments and promotion


 Research Grants
      Lead researchers and importance of ideas often
       defined by publication record

Publishing Your Research
Collaboration with others

 Build relationships with potential co-authors
      Synergy
      Variety
      Or simply “sharing the workload”
 Follow the Leader!
 Lead the Follower!




Publishing Your Research
2. Finding a focus for your research

 Create your own ideas
 Sell and validate your ideas:
      Supervisor/ Director
      Fellow researchers/ Co-authors
      Editors/ Reviewers
 Read then Brainstorm

                            Don’t be afraid to sell an idea
                           - then later change your mind


Publishing Your Research
What makes good research?

 Quantifiable problem
 Clear methodology
      Previous research/solutions, Hypothesis, …
 Innovative solution
      Method, process, model, software, algorithm,
       etc.
 Testing and validation




Publishing Your Research
Creativity
‘Bringing unrelated
things together’




Publishing Your Research
“Stewing Pot”
                            Topic 2      Topic 3
                            (Intranet)   (Teams)
                 Topic 1                           Topic 4
                 (Innovation)                      (Semantics)




                                                   Semantic Innovation
                                                   Management across the
                                                   Extended Enterprise




Publishing Your Research
Creativity Tools           > Mind Mapping




Publishing Your Research
Creativity Tools           > Personal Brain




Publishing Your Research
Exercise

 Create a simple mind-map of your research
  keywords




Publishing Your Research
3. Get to know the writing environment

 What Journals/Books are available?
 Top seven journals in your field?
 Journal affiliations of your
  supervisor/colleagues?

 Create a ‘Journal Boxfile’
      (top 60 papers)


 NB: Jane Mulligan’s presentation


Publishing Your Research
Google Scholar




Publishing Your Research
Seven tips for effective writing

1.   Understand your research goals
2.   Find a focus for your research
3.   Get to know the writing environment
4.   Develop a consistent layout and structure
5.   Develop highly effective writing style
6.   Master the tools of the trade
7.   Understand the publishing process




Publishing Your Research
4. Develop a consistent layout and structure

    Structure versus Content
    Layout and Structure
    Citations and References
    Figures and Tables




Publishing Your Research
Layout and structure

    Title
    Keywords
    Authors
    Abstract
    Introduction
    Literature Survey
    Results
    Conclusions
    Acknowledgements
    References
Publishing Your Research
Online Writing Labs (OWL)




Publishing Your Research
                           http://indeng.nuigalway.ie/owl
5. Develop an effective writing style

 Write objectively
 Eliminate
      immature sentences
      jargon, acronyms
      colloquialisms
 Avoid deviating from main structure




Publishing Your Research
Online Writing Labs (OWL)




Publishing Your Research
                           http://indeng.nuigalway.ie/owl
6. Master the tools of the trade

 MS Word
 EndNote
 Powerpoint and Visio
      For ‘simple’ diagrams and tables
           No more than seven graphic elements!
           No more than 7c x 14r tables!




Publishing Your Research
                           Word™




Publishing Your Research
                           End
                           Note™



Publishing Your Research
                           Visio™




Publishing Your Research
7. Understand the publishing process

    Contact with editor/supervisor
    Prepare and submit manuscript
    Reviewers comments
    Revised manuscript

 Compromise often required
 Remain humble and flexible
      Remember your goal!




Publishing Your Research
Conclusions

    Set clear publishing goals
    Create time and space
    Structure your paper
    Stay on the message
    Maintain the readers ‘good will’
    Anticipate rejection and learn
    Celebrate successes

                           Publications are never completed
                                      – they are abandoned!
Publishing Your Research
                                     Use of “I”
 Correct the Grammar                               Invalid quotes

   I find that confusion often “clouds” the exact meaning of
      the term innovation. Tidd et al. (1997) have excellent
     Misspelling ‘Its’ state that “novelty is very much in the eye
      findings that
      of the beholder”. In it’s broadest sense, the term Subjective
      originates from the Latin innovare, meaning “to make
      something new”. Its obvious that innovation is a Says who?
                                                            process
      of turning opportunity into new ideas and of putting
Misspelling
   andthese ideas into widely used practice [Ref]. According to
      Tidd
Subjective et al. (1997), innovation is a core process Incomplete
      concerned with renewing what the organization offers
      and optimising the way it generates and delivers its
      output. We are all aware of the importance of innovation
      for business growth and there are many advantages.
      Howard (2003) discusses 5 disadvantages. Overall there
 Informal need for a new paradigm in the way we
      is a
      conceptualise and materialise innovation.
                            “five”                              Bull
 Publishing Your Research

				
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posted:5/25/2012
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