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Geography 2227 Natural Resource Management

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					Geography 2227 Natural Resource Management
                  Geography 2227
            Natural Resource Management

1)   Syllabus
2)   What are natural resources?
3)   Key themes
4)   “Planning” and “management”
5)   Sustainability and Ecosystem approach
6)   Partnerships and local knowledge
7)   Implementation
8)   Environmental Justice
2) What are natural resources?
2) What are natural resources?
2) What are natural resources?
3) Key themes

   Change
3) Key themes

   Change
3) Key themes

   Change

   Complexity
3) Key themes

   Change

   Complexity

   Uncertainty
       Risk
       Uncertainty
       Ignorance
       Indeterminacy
3) Key themes

   Change

   Complexity

   Uncertainty

   Conflict
       Differences in knowledge or understanding
       Differences in values
       Differences about distribution of benefits and costs
       Differences due to personalities and circumstance of interested
        parties
3) Key themes

   Change

   Complexity

   Uncertainty

   Conflict
3) Key themes
4) “Planning” and “Management”
   Resource planning:
    identification of possible
    desirable future end states,
    and development of courses
    of action to reach such end
    states.

   Resource management:
    actual decisions and action
    concerning policy and practice
    regarding how resources are
    appraised, protected,
    allocated, developed, used,
    rehabilitated, remediate and
    restored, monitored and
    evaluated.
5) Sustainability and Ecosystem approach


   The Brundtland Report, 1987              Ecosystem approach can
   Agenda 21, 1992                           be seen as one means to
   Rio Declaration, 1992
                                              achieve sustainability,
                                              rather than an end
   The concept of sustainable
    development does imply limits –
    not absolute limits but limitations
    imposed by the present state of          Four basic themes:
    technology and social                        Socially defined goals and
    organizations on environmental                objectives
    resources and by the ability of the
    biosphere to absorb the effects of
                                                 Integrated science
    human activities                             Adaptable institutions
   Sustainability is held up as the             Collaborative decision
    vision or an ends to resource                 making
    management
6) Partnerships and local knowledge

   Arnstein’s ladder (1969)
6) Partnerships and local knowledge

   Arnstein’s ladder (1969)

   Government, co-management, community???
7) Implementation

   Obstacles
       Tractability of the problem
       Lack of clarity of goals
       Commitment of those responsible
       Resources (means) available to achieve goals (ends)
       Inadequate access to information
       Inappropriate assumptions about cause-effect
       Dynamics of enforcement
       Conditions specific to developing countries
       Different styles due to cultural variations


   Monitoring and evaluation
8) Environmental Justice

   “The right to a safe, healthy, productive and sustainable
    environment for all, in which ‘environment’ is viewed in
    its totality, and includes ecological (biological), physical
    (natural and built), social, political, aesthetic, and
    economic components.”


   Developing a vision
   Creating a process
   Generating a product
   Ensuring implementation and monitoring
9)Conceptual framework
9)Conceptual framework


                          Society


   Knowledge                               Knowledge



                        Intervention




          Environment                    Economy

                        Physical Flows
The role of geographers

   Evaluate the impact of resource decisions upon the
    landscape (biophysical environment), and upon groups
    and individuals who are using and valuing elements of
    the landscape in relation to their own particular desires
    and preferences.

   In addition, because of our traditional concern with the
    human-environment relationship, the geographer can
    provide valuable insights into the processes by which
    public attitudes towards resources are formed and
    expressed, and how they in turn affect public decision
    and behaviour in a given environmental situation.
Next week

   READ!!!

   Assignment 1: Hand in reading and notes of the
    chapter in Blair’s Lament for a First Nation

				
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