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					                      Humanities 210: Introduction to GLBT Studies




                                         Eight Week Project
                                       Assignment Descriptions

Each student will choose one of the following options for the eight-week project. The options are designed to
provide a range of possibilities. Regardless of the option you choose, the project will be worth 30% of the grade and
will include a presentation to the class. (60points/30%)

To choose your option
    1. Read the attached assignment descriptions.
    2. Think about which project you would most enjoy.
    3. Think about the nuances of each option’s requirements: You should have some schedule flexibility if you
       choose a group project; you should have good, independent writing skills if you choose the research paper
       option; you should have taken a few social science classes and/or have some basic Excel or mathematical
       skills if you choose one of the survey options. Choose carefully on the basis of a realistic assessment of your
       own interests, flexibility, and skills or talents.
    4. Have a first and second choice in case the slots for your preferred project are full.
    5. Be prepared to sign up for the project during the second week of class.
                                         Research Paper Option
The Research Paper option is only for those who are currently enrolled in or successfully completed ENGL 102.
Purpose
The purpose of this assignment is to provide students with an independent research and writing opportunity that
allows deeper exploration of a specific glbt issue not addressed in class.
Project Process
   1. Choose one of the topics below.
   2. Begin researching the topic using books, ProQuest articles, or GLBTQ Encyclopedia, or Websites.
   3. Write a 6-7 page, double-spaced research paper with a thesis, meaningful paragraph organization, clear and
        correct sentences, and correct MLA or APA in-text and bibliographic documentation of at least 5 sources.
   4. Give a 5 minute presentation to the class on your research and turn in the paper.

Paper Topics: Pick ONE topic. Notice little words like OR that require additional topic-limiting choices.
 1. Explain the recent history and current status of sex reassignment/confirmation surgery and the insurance
     industry.
 2. Examine the life and cultural contributions of a prominent queer figure: (Walt Whitman, Alfred Kinsey,
     Christine Jorgensen, Barbara Gittings, Robert Mapplethorpe, Keith Haring, Ellen DeGeneres, or suggest one
     not listed).
 3. Examine the social context and political impact of a notable instance of hate violence: (Pick one or suggest one
     not listed: Harvey Milk, Brandon Teena, Matthew Shepard, Gwen Araujo)
 4. Discuss recent research on the effectiveness of GLBT parenting.
 5. Discuss the impact of drag performance on queer and/or straight culture.
 6. Discuss research on the needs of the elderly GLBT population, the current ability of elder care organizations to
     meet these needs, and the changes necessary.
 7. Discuss the current status of same-sex marriage rights outside the U.S. and how the U.S. compares to progress
     in other countries.
 8. Discuss the history, present state, and future of AIDs treatment.
 9. Discuss the issue of intersex and/or transsexual athletes and fair competition in sport.
 10. Discuss the history of the U.S. Military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, recent changes allowing glbt service
     members to serve openly, and the future of the current policy based on early reports of how successfully it is
     being implemented.
Please Note: You must choose one of these topics. Other topics, such as cinema or queer tv, are covered in class, and
the purpose of this paper is to explore an issue not covered by our readings and discussions and share that
information with the class.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice
May 8: In-class Oral Progress Report on project/Goal: Topic chosen, research and drafting underway.
June 12: Research Paper Due
June 7, 12, or 14: Very brief 5 minute class presentation on key “take aways” for your topic.

What Is Due:
June 12: 5-6 page Research Paper

                                           Research Paper Grade Rubric
Criteria      A (18-20)                  B (16-17)              C (14-15)                     D (12-13)
Content       Exceptionally thorough     Good information and      Some gaps in topic         Greatly underdeveloped
20 points     and accurate content       accuracy.                 coverage or accuracy.      and inaccurate
                                                                                              information.
Writing       Exceptionally well         Good writing with only    Problems w/ structure,     Significant problems with
20 points     written w/ no structural   minor structural or       sentence correctness and   structure and correctness.
              or sentence problems.      sentence problems.        proofreading.
Research      Excellent sources and      Good sources, but some    Problems with sources      Plagiarism throughout.
20 points     documentation.             minor documentation       and documentation.
                                         problems.
                                            Service Learning Option
The service learning option is recommended only for students who are 18 or older, have transportation, and do not
work full-time.

Purpose
The purpose of this assignment is to provide students with the experience of contributing to the efforts of an LGBT-
oriented non-profit or political organization by donating time and talents.

Project Process
   1. Choose one of the organizations below.
   2. Contact the organization and to get an orientation time and begin to set up a schedule of hours.
   3. Work for the organization for the contracted hours, recording and validating hours spent.
   4. Write a 1-2 page reflection on the organization, its goals, and your experience and contribution to it.
   5. Give a 5 minute presentation to the class in which you promote the organization and attempt to inspire
        interest in it.

Organizations:
   1. The Q Center: Located in North Portland on Mississippi. Contact Person: Dede Desperate at 503-234-7837
      or email at dede@pdxqcenter.org. All students volunteering at Q Center should contact Dede for a group
      orientation time. You will then be given a regular shift.
   2. Triple Point: Located in Vancouver. Youth group with social, educational, and support roles. Contact
      Person: Spring Dowse available Tuesday and Thursday at (360) 695-1325 x 4217 or email her at
        SpringD@chs-wa.org. Limit of 2-3 students, work will be project-based, not shift-work.
    3. Basic Rights Oregon: Located in downtown Portland. Provides political lobbying and outreach as well as
       educational programs. Contact Person: Lilya Oustinovskaya, Field Organizer at 503-222-6151 ext. 130 or
       email her at lily@basicrights.org to arrange orientation and get a regular shift or schedule of hours.

Please Note: You must choose one of these organizations. Other organizations are certainly doing important work as
well, but these organizations are especially well suited to our class and have agreed to work with us to make sure you
complete your hours.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice.
April 24: Have an orientation with your organization or have a scheduled date to begin orientation.
May 8: Complete contract and be on track for completing all your desired hours. A regular shift weekly works best.
June 7: All time completed (or a schedule to complete before the 12th), contract signed, and reflection written.
June 7, 12, or 14: Very brief but inspirational 5 minute class presentation promoting the organization.

What Is Due:
June 12: 1-2 page reflection and signed contract with documented hours.



                                             Service Learning Grade Rubric
Criteria        A (18-20)                    B (16-17)              C (14-15)                       D (12-13)
Completion      15+ hours and unique         10-14 hours.                 7-9 hours                 Fewer than 7 hours
of Hours        contribution/product.
20 points
Reflection      Exceptional reflection on    Good reflection on the       Lack of reflection on     Missing reflective essay.
20 points       the organization and the     organization and             the organization or the
                experience.                  experience.                  experience.
Presentation    Inspiring promotion of       Good but not detailed or     Significant lack of       Failure to complete the
20 points       the organization and the     inspiring promotion of the   detail in describing      presentation.
                experience.                  experience.                  organization.
                                    Sidewalk Theatre/Skit Option

Purpose
The purpose of this project is to provide a creative option for a group interested in exploring the concept and
experience of sidewalk theatre and its more politically motivated cousin, guerilla theatre.

Project Process
   1. Decide whether you want to use a scene from a published play OR whether you want to compose your own
        brief skit. Regardless, the skit you perform should deal with GLBT issues or situations as a central concern
        and be about 8-10 minutes long.
   2. Provide teacher with a script of the skit you plan to use.
   3. Rehearse the skit enough that you can perform it without looking at the script.
   4. Perform the skit in a visible area on campus during class time the week of June 12-14. (Possible locations
        include the Andersen Grill, Chime Tower, or Foster Hall.)

Suggestions for Writing a Skit
   1. Think about situations relevant to glbt lives and the kinds of situations frequently featured in skits and plays:
       consider a coming out situation, a lover’s quarrel, etc.
   2. Watch television shows and films with a playwright’s eye and notice the kinds of situations and dialog that
       work in short skits about any topic. Also try to take into account the kinds of skits that can be understood by
       an audience in 8-10 minutes or that would immediately grab the attention of passers-by.
   3. Decide whether you want to write a dramatic or a comedic skit.
   4. Try improvising as a group and record or tape the improvisation.
   5. Think about both dialog and “stage direction” elements, and write both into your script.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice
May 8: In-class Oral Progress Report on project/Goal: Skit identified or good draft written, rehearsals underway
June 5: Submit script and details for location and time of performance
June 12 or 14: Performance of skit during class time.

What Is Due:
June 12 or 14: Script and performance

READ THIS: A Special Plea
Please take the assignment seriously and perform a skit that is dramatic or comedic for the “right” reasons. Think
carefully about any stereotypes (of glbt people or of straight people, etc.), and be conscious and thoughtful about
what you are doing and why.



                                             Sidewalk Skit Grade Rubric
Criteria        A (18-20)                  B (16-17)             C (14-15)                          D (12-13)
Creativity      Exceptional choice or      Good choice                 Awkward choice               Inappropriate choice
20 points       original writing

Process         Exceptionally thorough     Good planning and some      Lack of planning and         Lack of contact with group
20 points       planning and rehearsals.   rehearsals.                 attendance. Few if any       & absences on group days.
                                                                       rehearsals.
Performance     Excellent acting, line     Good acting, fairly good    Plays like first rehearsal   Failure to complete the
20 points       memorization, & use of     line memorization and       rather than polished skit.   performance or show up for
                space/props/gestures.      use of space, props, etc.                                performance.
                                     Television Ad Option--Product
Notice that this option requires one or more members of your group to have access to a video camera, be willing to
use it for the project, and be able to upload the commercials to a youtube channel or other website. The camera
owner can be designated as the camera-person and need not let others borrow the camera.

Purpose
The purpose of this project is to provide a creative option for a group interested in both advertising and the issues of
heterosexual assumptions and glbt cultural representation that advertising raises. Although your commercials will be
low-budget, they should look realistic, not like a Saturday Night Live spoof of a commercial.

Process Suggestions
   1. Watch television commercials carefully with an advertising writer’s eye, and notice the kinds of ads that
       typically represent heterosexual assumptions about couples and/or singles. (Commercials typically featuring
       couple include breakfast cereals, toothpastes, retirement planning, buying a house or car, and others that
       typically take place in a bedroom or bathroom; commercials featuring single people include ads for clothing,
       personal hygiene or cosmetic products, and situations involving dating or acknowledgement of attraction.)
   2. Visit the web site <commercialcloset.org> to see examples of glbt ads that have aired in the US and abroad
       and to get familiar with the trajectory of commercial scripts by reading the organization’s ad overviews and
       storyboards.
   3. Describe in a few sentences the rationale for each ad: brand characteristics, typical market, new markets the
       company should appeal to, and how your ad will attract consumers to the company’s product or service.
   4. Write 3 television commercials for commonly advertised products, but replace heterosexual images and
       assumptions with gay, lesbian, bisexual and/or trans images.
   5. Consider issues like props and locations to ensure your skit is doable with the time you have. Be creative
       about film locations. Use campus locations, a group member’s house, apartment, or yard, downtown street
       scenes, etc. Look for ways of re-creating the logos you will need. You may borrow title/logo stamps, but
       not footage from actual commercials. You can also borrow company’s tag lines or slogans (ex. “Don’t
       bother me, I’m eating” or “for everything else, there’s Mastercard,” etc.)
   6. Remember to think about voice-overs, “stage direction,” setting elements, and name-brand graphic images as
       well as dialog. Make sure you write these elements into your scripts and descriptions. Of course, your film
       quality, set, and graphics will not be as flashy, but try to include all the elements of a typical commercial.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice.
May 8: In-class Oral Progress Report on project/Goal: Scripts/rationale written, story boards drafts underway,
rehearsals planned.
May 10: At least one video shot. Be prepared to shoot another video during May 17 class time if necessary.
June 12 or 14: Give 10-15 minute class presentation of the commercials and your rationale. Submit to teacher by
email digital copies of or links to ads and one page report containing the rationale for each commercial.


What Is Due:
June 12 or 14: Digital file or link containing 3 ads and a one page report articulating your rationale for each ad.


                                          Television Ad for Product Grade Rubric
Criteria     A (18-20)                     B (16-17)               C (14-15)                      D (12-13)
Creativity   Exceptional choices of        Good choices for 2 of 3      Awkward choice for 2      Inappropriate choice.
20 points    all 3 products and use of     products and good use of     of the products or lack
             branding elements.            brand elements.              of brand elements.
Process      Exceptional attention to      Good attention to detail     Lack of planning in       No planning or rehearsals.
20 points    detail in rationale,          in rationale, planning,      rationale and shoots.     Lack of contact with group and
             planning, and shoots.         and shoots.                                            absences during group days.
Product      Excellent video and           Good video and sound,        Video is incomplete or    Failure to complete 1or more of
20 points    sound, use of text, and       use of text, and             seems unrehearsed.        the commercials, or failure to
             articulation of rationale.    articulation of rationale.   rather than finished      participate in their creation.
                                           Television Ad Option--PSA
Notice that this option requires one or more members of your group to have access to a video camera, be willing to
use it for the project, and be able to upload the commercials to a youtube channel or other website. The camera
owner can be designated as the camera-person and need not let others borrow the camera.

Purpose
The purpose of this project is to provide a creative option for a group interested in educating the public through a
public service announcement designed to curb homophobia, transphobia, or other glbt problems. Although your
commercials will be low-budget, they should look realistic, not like a Saturday Night Live spoof of a public service
announcement.

Process Suggestions
   1. Notice PSAs on t.v. regarding drinking and driving, second hand smoke, talking to kids about drugs. What
       are some of the characteristics of such PSA’s? How can you replicate those elements?
   2. Begin writing PSA descriptions and dialog or monologues. Think about your rationale. What message do
       you hope to communicate? What will be an effective way of doing that?
   3. Describe in a few sentences the rationale for each ad: what is the social or psychogical issue you want to
       impact? Who is your intended audience? What do they need to learn and/or do? How can you get them to
       watch, listen, and think?
   4. Remember to think about voice-overs, “stage direction,” setting elements, and text labels. Make sure you
       write these elements into your scripts and descriptions. Of course, your film quality, set, and graphics will
       not be as flashy, but try to include all the elements of a typical PSA.
   5. Write 3 public service announcements that address issues relevant to the glbt community.
   6. Provide the teacher with scripts of the PSAs you write, and include a brief (2-3 sentence) rationale for each
       PSA.
   7. Rehearse, perform, and record (in dvd, vhs, or a format convertible to one of these) the three commercials.
       Be strategic about film locations. Use campus locations, a group member’s house, or consider using blue-
       screen background or other “official” looking elements often characteristic of PSA’s (recreate an office or
       medical clinic setting, etc.)
   8. Give a 10-15 minute presentation to the class in which you show your recorded commercials and discuss
       your rationale. Submit to teacher by email digital copies of or links to ads and one page report containing the
       rationale for each PSA.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice.
May 8: In-class Oral Progress Report on project/Goal: Scripts/rationale written, story boards drafted, rehearsals
underway.
May 10: At least one video shot. Be prepared to shoot another video during May 17 class time if necessary.
June 12 or 14: Give 10-15 minute class presentation of the PSAs and your rationale for each one. Email teacher
digital copies of ads and a one page report containing the rationale for each.


What Is Due:
June 12 or 14: Digital file or link to 3 public service announcements and a one page report articulating your rationale
for each PSA.

                                               Television PSA Grade Rubric
Criteria     A (18-20)                     B (16-17)             C (14-15)                         D (12-13)
Creativity   Exceptional choices of        Good choices for 2 of 3      Awkward choices for 2      Inappropriate choice
20 points    all 3 issues and rhetorical   issues and rhetorical        or more of the issues or
             effect of images/text.        effect of images/text.       lack of images/text.
Process      Exceptional attention to      Good attention to detail     Lack of planning in        No planning or rehearsals.
20 points    detail in rationale,          in rationale, planning,      rationale and shoots.      Lack of contact with group and
             planning, and shoots.         and shoots.                                             absences during group days.
Product      Excellent video and           Good video and sound,        Video is incomplete or     Failure to complete 1or more
20 points    sound, use of text, and       use of text, and             seems unrehearsed          of the commercials, or failure
             articulation of rationale     articulation of rationale.   rather than finished       to participate in their creation.
                                           Print Ad Option--Product
Notice that this option requires a member of your group to have access to a digital camera and some basic desktop
publishing software and be willing to use it for the project.

Purpose
The purpose of this project is to provide a creative option for a group interested in print advertising and the issues of
heterosexual assumptions and glbt cultural representation that advertising raises. Although your print ads will be
low-budget, they should look realistic, not like a spoof of a magazine ad.

Process Suggestions
   1. Read magazine and newspaper ads carefully with an advertising writer’s eye, and notice the kinds of ads that
       typically represent heterosexual assumptions about couples and/or singles. (Ads may include a family at the
       dinner table, a couple working on retirement planning, buying a house or car, or others that show singles
       attracted to each other, nightclub scenes, etc.) Visit the web site <commercialcloset.org> to see examples of
       glbt print ads that have been published in the US and abroad. Notice elements like photos, text, brand
       placement, subtlety.
   2. Sketch out 3 print ads for commonly advertised products, but replace heterosexual images and assumptions
       with gay, lesbian, bisexual and/or trans images.
   3. Describe in a few sentences the rationale for each ad: brand characteristics, typical market, new markets the
       company should appeal to, and how your ad will attract consumers to the company’s product or service.
   4. Begin planning the details of your advertisements. Think about things like backgrounds, foregrounds, text
       placement, tag lines/slogans, images, etc.
   5. Try to make your ad as professional looking as possible. Your photographic quality, set, and graphics might
       not be as flashy, but try to include all the elements of a typical print ad.
   6. Create the photographs, artwork, and text for your three ads. You can borrow logos and lettering, but all the
       images must be your own. Be creative about photo locations. Use campus locations, a group member’s
       house, apartment, or yard, downtown street scenes, etc. Use each other as models or get friends to pose for
       photographic shots.
   7. Give a 10-15 minute presentation to the class in which you show your print ads and discuss your rationale.
       Submit to teacher by email digital copies of or links to ads and one page report containing the rationale for
       each PSA.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice.
May 8: In-class Oral Progress Report on project/Goal: Drawings of ads/rationale written, plans for shoot.
May 10: At least one ad created. Be prepared to shoot another ad during May 17 class time if necessary.
June 12 or 14: Give 10-15 minute class presentation of the commercials and your rationale.


What Is Due:
June 12: 3 Print Ads in digital files and a one page report articulating your rationale for each of the three ads.




                                                  Print Ad Grade Rubric
Criteria      A (18-20)                    B (16-17)             C (14-15)                         D (12-13)
Creativity    Exceptional choices of       Good choices for 2 of 3      Awkward choices for 2      Inappropriate choices for all
20 points     all 3 products and use of    products and good use of     or more products or lack   three products.
              brand elements.              brand elements.              of brand elements.
Process       Exceptional attention to     Good attention to detail     Lack of planning and       Lack of contact with group
20 points     detail in rationale,         in rationale, planning,      participation in group     and absences during group
              planning, and shoots.        and shoots.                  work days.                 days.
Product       Excellent photography or     Good photography or          Artwork is incomplete or   Failure to complete 1 or more
20 points     artwork, use of text, and    artwork, use of text, and    rationale is not clear.    of the ads, or failure to
              articulation of rationale.   articulation of rationale.                              participate in their creation.
                    Survey Option 1: Demographic and Opinion Survey
Purpose
For this project you will conduct and analyze a survey on opinions related to glbt issues. While we want to make the
science of the survey as rigorous as possible, we are not aiming for a truly significant sample size nor a
comprehensive study of issues. Limit the questions to 20 and the sample to 100. You will thank me later!

Process Suggestions
   1. Follow survey conventions by having both a Demographic section and an Opinion Survey section.
   2. Decide what model of multiple-choice answer makes the most sense for your survey type. Demographic
       questions use multiple choice with a fill in the blank “other” category, while opinion surveys would likely
       employ a 4-5 point “Likert Scale.” Four and six point scales force respondents to avoid the perfect middle of
       a response, while 5 and 7 encourages fence-sitting. Decide which method you prefer and be aware of it.
   3. Review the college’s policy entitled “Guide to Researchers on the Use of Human Subjects,” which is
       available on the Required Reading Links page. Discuss with me how you will manage the confidentiality
       and informed consent elements of that policy.
   4. Write a 15-20 question survey on glbt issues. The focus should be on opinions, but you should ask 4-5
       demographic questions to correlate demographics with opinions. Limit the survey to 20 questions total to
       ensure it is not cumbersome for respondents or your group.
   5. Provide the teacher with a draft of the survey questions before distributing the survey to get feedback and
       an opportunity to refine the questions. Survey questions must be crafted carefully to avoid bias and achieve
       optimal clarity. The difficulty of doing this makes my review and approval of your questions essential.
   6. Conduct the survey by distributing and collecting it in your classes, in Gaiser Hall, and anywhere else one
       finds a solid cross-section of the Clark student population. Also avoid handing out surveys merely to those
       who are willing to take them. This results in a bad sample. Avoid conducting surveys only in Literature or
       Sociology classes or only in Foster Hall. Try to cover different classes, areas of campus, and/or include a
       class like English 098 or 101 that has a representative sample of the Clark population; however, you should
       avoid over-sampling English 098 and 101 since those classes disproportionately represent first-year students.
       Try to distribute and collect 100 surveys. It is a round number that will make percentages easy to calculate).
   7. Tabulate your results. I will let the group decide whether to do it by hand, enter data into an Excel or Access
       spreadsheet, or use some other kind of program. By limiting the number of questions to 12-15, tabulation
       even by the most pre-historic methods should be easy. Although I want to see your tabulation methods, I
       will be collecting only the survey itself and your report on the results, not the raw data.
   8. Write and submit a brief, 4-6 page report of describing the survey, sampling process, results, and limitations.
   9. Give a 10-15 minute presentation to the class in which you discuss the most interesting results of your study.
       Submit to teacher by email the 4-6 page report on your research.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice
May 8: In-class Oral Progress Report on project/Goal: Survey written and approved by teacher
May 10: Begin conducting survey
May 24: Finish tabulating results and begin writing the report
June 12 or 14: Give 10-15 minute class presentation of the most interesting results of your survey and submit report

What Is Due
June 12 or 14: 4-6 page report with survey, sample process, results, and a few charts used in presentation.

                                              Opinion Survey Grade Criteria
Criteria         A (18-20)                 B (16-17)           C (14-15)                            D (12-13)
Survey           Exceptional               Good articulation of       Some awkward questions        Very awkward and
20 points        articulation of           questions and              & formatting.                 inarticulate questions and
                 questions & format.       formatting.                                              sloppy format.
Process          Exceptionally             Good process, but          Lack of approval or           Lack of contact with group &
20 points        thorough process,         some issues with           notable absences affecting    absences during group days.
                 approval, & sampling.     approvals or sampling.     group.
Report &         Excellent articulation    Good articulation of       Problems in report &          Failure to contribute to final
Presentation     of results in writing,    results in writing,        presentation or little        product and failure to show
20 points        charts, & presentation.   charts, or presentation.   contribution to product.      up for presentation.
       Survey Option 2: Demographic and Knowledge Assessment Survey
Purpose
The purpose of this project is to give a group of students the experience of conducting and analyzing a survey on
public awareness regarding issues. While we want to make the science of the survey as rigorous as possible, we are
not aiming for a truly significant sample size nor a comprehensive study of knowledge.

Process Suggestions
   1. A Demographic Section of a survey usually appears at the beginning or end of a knowledge assessment
       survey and asks respondents about their age, sex, race, religion, and in this case, their sexual orientation and
       number of years attending Clark. A Knowledge Assessment Survey will ask respondents questions to
       determine their familiarity with glbt terminology, history, and legal and political trends.
   2. Decide what model of multiple-choice answer makes the most sense for your survey type. Demographic
       surveys might use multiple choice responses with a fill in the blank “other” category, while a knowledge
       assessment uses a multiple-choice model like a test in a history or social science class or a true/false binary
       model, the latter of which is easier to tabulate.
   3. Review the college’s policy entitled “Guide to Researchers on the Use of Human Subjects,” which is
       available on the Required Reading Links page. Discuss with me how you will manage the confidentiality
       and informed consent elements of that policy.
   4. Write your questions or statements carefully with an eye for clarity and bias.
   5. Provide the teacher with a draft of the survey questions before distributing the survey to get feedback and
       an opportunity to refine the questions.
   6. Conduct the survey by distributing and collecting it in your classes, in Gaiser Hall, and anywhere else one
       finds a solid cross-section of the Clark student population. (Avoid conducting surveys only in Literature or
       Sociology classes or only in Foster Hall. Try to cover different classes, areas of campus, and/or include a
       class like English 098 or 101 that has a representative sample of the Clark population; however, you should
       avoid over-sampling English 098 and 101 since those classes disproportionately represent first-year students.
       Try to distribute and collect 100 surveys. It is a round number that will make percentages easy to calculate.)
   7. Tabulate your results. I will let the group decide whether to do it by hand, enter data into an Excel or Access
       spreadsheet, or use some other kind of program. By limiting the number of questions to 20, tabulation even
       by the most pre-historic methods should be easy. Although I want to see your tabulation methods, I will be
       collecting only the survey itself and your report on the results, not the raw data.
   8. Submit a brief, 4-6 page report discussing the survey, sampling process, results, and limitations.
   9. Give a 10-15 minute presentation to the class in which you discuss the most interesting results of your study.
       Submit to teacher by email the 4-6 page report on your research.

Project Timeline
April 17: Commit to eight-week project choice
May 8: In-class Oral Progress Report on project/Goal: Survey written/approved by teacher
May 10: Begin conducting survey
May 24: Finish tabulating results and begin writing the report
June 12 or 14: Give 15 minute class presentation of the results of your survey

What Is Due
June 12 or 14: 4-6 page report with survey, sample process, results, and a few charts used in presentation.

                                      Knowledge Assessment Survey Grade Criteria
Criteria         A (18-20)               B (16-17)           C (14-15)                              D (12-13)
Survey           Exceptional               Good articulation of       Some awkward questions        Very awkward and
20 points        articulation of           questions and              & formatting.                 inarticulate questions and
                 questions & format.       formatting.                                              sloppy format.
Process          Exceptionally             Good process, but          Lack of approval or           Lack of contact with group &
20 points        thorough process,         some issues with           notable absences affecting    absences during group days.
                 approval, & sampling.     approvals or sampling.     group.
Report &         Excellent articulation    Good articulation of       Problems in report &          Failure to contribute to final
Presentation     of results in writing,    results in writing,        presentation or little        product and failure to show
20 points        charts, & presentation.   charts, or presentation.   contribution to product.      up for presentation.
                        8-Week Project Oral Progress Report Worksheet

1.   Review the Purpose Section of your project. Which elements of the purpose, if any, do you need help
     understanding?




2.   Review the Process Suggestions for project. Which elements of the Process have you completed?




     Which elements of the Process have you overlooked?




     How well are you keeping up with the project timeline?




3.   What are the a) deadlines, b) persons responsible, and c) next steps for your project?




     What can the class do to help you?




     What are your plans for using class time May 24th?

				
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