Brad A. Clemmons by NM2H955

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									                              PARTIAL LIST AT THIS TIME

                                                2006
                  Sr. Airman Alecia S. Good




                  Hometown: Broadview Heights, Ohio, U.S.

                  Age: 23 years old

                  Died: February 17, 2006 in Operation Enduring Freedom.

                  Unit: Air Force, 92nd Communications Squadron, Fairchild Air Force Base,Wash.

                  Incident: Killed when two CH-53 helicopters crashed near Ras Siyyan, northern
                  Djibouti, while flying a training mission in the Godoria Range area.


SrA. Good was deployed to Djibouti as part of the Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. She died
on a training mission in the Godoria Range area, when the CH-53 helicopter she was aboard crashed into
the Gulf of Aden, in the vicinity of Ras Siyyan in northern Djibouti.

Alecia Sabrina Good

GOOD ALECIA SABRINA GOOD, 23, Senior Airman, U.S. Air Force, pass-ed away this past Friday, Feb. 17,
2006, from injuries sustained in a helicopter collision while on assignment off the Red Sea in the Gulf of
Adan. Alecia enlisted Oct. 11, 2001 in Bedford, and was assigned to bases in San Antonio, TX, Biloxi, MS
and most recently Fairchild AFB in Spokane, WA. She was an avid snowboarder. Survivors include her
loving daughter, Tabatha Jordyn Good of Dixon, CA.; loving parents, Paul and Claire of Dixon, CA.; twin
sister, Ashley Priscilla Good of Pacifica, CA.; brother Paul Steven Good of Dixon, CA.; paternal
grandmother Gatha B. Good of Brook Park; maternal grandmother and step grandfather, Patricia and
Richard Strauss of Middleburg Hts.; aunts, Liz Geith of Berea, and Rita Weinber-ger of Tucson, AZ.; uncle
Paul Baluch of Brooklyn, OH.; cousins Michelle Bal-uch of Brunswick, Allison Weinberger of Cleveland,
and Benjamin Weinberger of Tucson, AZ. Predeceas-ed by her grandfathers, Paul E. Good Sr. in 1993 and
Paul Baluch in 1978. Friends are invited FOR VISITATION SUN-DAY, FEB. 26 FROM 12 NOON-6 P.M. AND
MONDAY FROM 3-8 P.M. IN NADEAU FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 180 E. MONTE VISTA AVE., VACAVILLE,
CA., 707-455-7700. Funeral services will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 1 p.m. at Crossroads Christian
Church in Vacaville, CA., with Pastor Bruce Gallaher officiating. Burial with full military honors to follow
in Silveyville Cemetery, Dixon, CA.

A Trust Fund has been set up for Alecia's daughter and donations may be forwarded to Anheiser-Busch
Employee Credit Union, 2351 N. Watney Way, Suite A, Fairfield, CA 94533 or call 707-429-0105.
www.cleveland.com/obits




Published in The Plain Dealer from February 23 to February 25, 2006




 Airman laid to rest


 Members of the Travis Air Force Base Honor Guard performs a military flag folding in honor of Senior

 Airman Alecia Sabrina Good. Airman Good was buried with full military honors in Dixon California, on

 Feb. 28. The 23-year-old Air Force radio operator died in helicopter crash in the Arden Sea off the

 coast of Djibouti on Feb. 17. (US Air Force photo by Nan Wylie)
Airman laid to rest


Senior Airman Alecia Sabrina Good's flag-draped coffin is saluted by the Travis Air Force Base Color

Guard at the Silveyville Cemetary in Dixon, Calif. Airman Good was buried with full military honors on

Feb. 28. The 23-year-old Air Force radio operator died in helicopter crash in the Arden Sea off the

coast of Djibouti on Feb. 17. (US Air Force photo by Nan Wylie)




                 Master Sgt. Brad A. Clemmons




                 Hometown: Chillicothe, Ohio, U.S.

                 Age: 37 years old

                 Died: August 21, 2006 in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
               Unit: Air Force, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

               Incident: Killed when a makeshift bomb struck his vehicle in Taji.




             Brad Allen Clemmons
            Master Sergeant, United States Air Force

 NEWS RELEASES from the United States Department of Defense
          No. 801-06 IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                    August 23, 2006
         Media Contact: (703) 697-5131/697-5132
             Public/Industry(703) 428-0711

                 DoD Identifies Air Force Casualty

The Department of Defense announced today the death of an airman
         who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Master Sergeant Brad A. Clemmons, 37, of Chillicothe, Ohio, died
 August 21, 2006, when an improvised explosive device struck his
vehicle. The vehicle was part of a transportation convoy enroute to
  Taji, Iraq. Clemmons was assigned to the 354th Civil Engineer
            Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.

   Media with questions related to this release should contact the
   Eielson Air Force Base public affairs office at (907) 377-2116.



                          1 September 2006:

 Words were hard to find for friends and family of Brad Clemmons
Thursday afternoon as the Air Force Master Sergeant made his final
                            trip home.

    Clemmons, 37, was killed August 21, 2006, in Iraq after an
   improvised explosive device destroyed the Humvee he was in.

Brad's wife, Rebecca, smiled as she remembered her husband prior
   to Thursday's funeral services, during which Clemmons was
            awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star.

 "He was a great man. He loved people, he loved kids, he loved this
    country and he loved working for the Air Force," she said.

Rebecca said she and her husband had returned to Chillicothe every
 year of their four-year marriage, usually in December. She laughed
thinking of the times Brad would drive her onto Ross County's back
                 roads - roads she now knows by heart.

 John Stubbs, of Waverly, greeted Rebecca prior to the beginning of
 the services. He fumbled his words slightly, not knowing quite what
to say. Stubbs is a member of the Patriot Guard Riders, a motorcycle
    group dedicated to protecting grieving families from anti-war
                protesters through non-violent means.

       "I'm just glad the other side wasn't here," Stubbs said.

 "Thanks so much," Rebecca said. "I appreciate seeing you guys."

  Once back in line outside the funeral home with the other riders,
  Stubbs said he and the rest of the volunteers were invited by the
family and just want to show their support for the fallen serviceman.

"I don't know how to say it," Stubbs said. "If I can do anything, and
   I'm sure the other (riders) feel the same, they'd jump right in."

  Technical Sergeant Tim Sterner had known Brad since October
1995. The two remained close despite being separated by thousands
       of miles. Brad was the best man in Sterner's wedding.

   Sterner is trim with broad shoulders who carries himself with
  formality. On this day, his face broke and his eyes watered as he
                began talking about his fallen friend.

 "He's the kind of guy who would give you anything," Sterner said,
 looking through the window of the funeral home toward the riders
   holding flags outside. "I'm sure there are better ways of putting
                                 that."

Sterner said his friend was not only a good friend, but a good soldier.

"What's the best way to put it? When he saw a job that needed done,
         he'd latch onto it. He was a bulldog," Sterner said.

"If it needed done, it was getting done, and nothing was going to stop
                         him," Rebecca said.

   Pastor Doug Hudson, the pastor of Trinity Reform Church in
   Ramstein, Germany, conducted the funeral service. Brad and
   Rebecca met while they both were stationed in Germany and
  attended the church led by Hudson, an Army Reserve chaplain.

 "The one thing I can say about Brad: I'm not sure he was afraid of
                      anything," Hudson said.

Hudson spoke of Brad's professionalism and extensive knowledge in
   diverse areas. He spoke directly to Brad's two sons, 3-year-old
daughter and Rebecca, who, shortly before Brad was killed, told him
 she was pregnant. Hudson quoted Ecclesiastes and told the family
                  there was a time for every season.

"I want you to remember these seasons in particular: there is a time
         to be born and a time for laughter," Hudson said.

Rebecca kept her composure during the service and read a poem she
                     had written for Brad.

  "I wrote this a long time ago when we were dating," she tells the
                              audience.

      The poem, titled "Tomorrow," is a requiem on parting.

          "As you leave tomorrow, you will take my light,

          As you leave tomorrow, you will take my night."

      "As you leave tomorrow, promise we won't be far apart.

    "As you leave tomorrow, promise the love will never part."

 When she finished the 20 lines of verse, Brad's mother and other
friends said a few words about him. "I never really realized what a
   wonderful, wonderful child I had made," said Brad's mother,
Pamela Clemmons. "He gave his life for his country and he'd gladly
                     go back and do it again."
 Brad Clemmons' body made the trip from Iraq to Dover Air Force
Base in Dover, Delaware, and then to Pittsburgh, where a motorcade
of Columbus City Police officers and State Highway Patrol escorted
  him to Haller Funeral Home in Chillicothe. It was one of the final
 legs of a journey that began when Clemmons was deployed to Iraq.
   His travels will end at 1 p.m. Tuesday when he is laid to rest in
  Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, resting place
 for thousands who have given their lives in service of their country.



                         1 September 2006:

 Their courtship was full of goodbyes and reunions. That’s military
                  life, and they both understood.

 Before one of those goodbyes, Rebecca Clemmons jotted down her
feelings in a poem and gave it to her husband, Brad, right before he
                      left to return to his base.

      "As you leave tomorrow, promise we won’t be far apart.

     As you leave tomorrow, promise the love will never part."

 Rebecca Clemmons repeated those words yesterday as she said her
last goodbye to her husband, who always kept the poem close to him
                      until his death last week.

"He didn’t like you to know he was a sentimentalist," she said. "He
                  carried it around in his wallet."

  About 100 people gathered to honor the life of Air Force Master
 Sergeant Brad Clemmons, 37, who was killed August 21, 2006, by a
roadside bomb in Iraq. He was part of a transportation convoy on its
                        way to Taji, Iraq.

Some remembered his laughter. Others admired his intelligence. But
the Chillicothe-area native stood out to those who loved him most as
a man who chose his dream early in life and never faltered from that
                                path.

 Rebecca Clemmons and their daughter, Isabelle, made the trip to
Chillicothe from Alaska, where Clemmons was stationed at Eielson
Air Force Base for the past eight months. He was assigned to the 354
                    th Civil Engineer Squadron.

He also left behind two sons, Nicholas and Zachary, from an earlier
                              marriage.

 The walls of Haller Funeral Home were covered with flowers and
many of the awards Clemmons had earned since he enlisted in 1987.

     All around were pictures of him: as a young, baby-faced
 Southeastern High School grad; as a more muscular, experienced
            airman; and as an involved, caring father.

   The last time Rebecca spoke with Brad was August 17, 2006, by
  phone. She told him he was going to be a father for a fourth time.

 Rebecca said yesterday that she’s heard many stories from friends
              Brad served with — mostly about her.

 "I have learned a lot since he died, about how he knew right away
     that I was the one and how much he loved me," she said.

Rebecca stopped and looked away for a moment. "It does help, but it
                     doesn’t lessen the pain."

 F. Douglas Hudson is a pastor in Ramstein, Germany, where Brad
  was stationed at one point. He came to know the couple well and
                      baptized their daughter.

   Hudson, also a reserve military chaplain, said he always was
 impressed with Brad’s wit and his knowledge of the world around
            him, as well as his devotion to his family.

"He was always talking about training the soldiers and getting them
prepared for the worst-case scenario," he said. "If there’s one thing I
   can say about Brad, I’m not sure if he was afraid of anything."

 Pamela Clemmons, Brad’s mother, said her son discovered his love
   of the Air Force as a child, and she watched as he meticulously
               worked his way up to master sergeant.

   "I never realized what a wonderful child I had made," she said,
 fighting to stop her tears. "I will sorely miss him and everything he
                            meant in my life.
 "I want everyone to know that he died doing what he loved. And
 he’d go back and do it all over again because that’s how much he
                           believed in it."

 Brad Clemmons was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.
  Military graveside services are scheduled Tuesday in Arlington
               National Cemetery near Washington.




                   Pamela Clemmons touches the casket of her son




    A group of airmen offer their condolences to Rebecca Clemmons, left, and Pamela
                                       Clemmons,
the widow and mother, respectively, of Air Force Master Ssergeant Brad Clemmons. They
                                      were at Haller
                     Funeral Home in Chillicothe, Ohio, yesterday.
       Clemmons’ body will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery on Tuesday.


Posted: 1 September 2006 Updated: 17 September 2006 Updated: 22
                          October 2006
                           Photo Courtesy of Holly, October 2006

Brad A. Clemmons
Thursday, August 24 2006 @ 06:23 AM EDT




The Columbus Dispatch -- Just a few days before he died, Brad Clemmons learned
he was going to be a dad again.




The 37-year-old Chillicothe airman called home from Iraq on Aug. 17 and heard the good news
from his wife, Rebecca. It was the last time they spoke.

"He was delighted," a tearful Rebecca Clemmons said of her husband's reaction to the
pregnancy. "He was such a doting father."

The U.S. Air Force master sergeant was killed Monday when his vehicle struck a roadside bomb
in Iraq. He was part of a convoy headed to Taji.

Rebecca said she and her husband had lived in Alaska for the last eight months. He was
stationed at Eielson Air Force Base in Fairbanks, assigned to the 354th Civil Engineer
Squadron.
He was sent to Maryland in May for 2? months of training, then to Iraq, where he was going to
stay until early next year.

Rebecca said that an e-mail from her husband on Sunday expressed optimism about the U.S.
military's work in Iraq.

"He wrote, 'We are making a difference out here.' He was a very positive person," she said.

His dedication to his country was rivaled only by his devotion to his family. Brad had a 2-year-
old daughter with Rebecca, and two sons from a previous marriage.

When Rebecca talked to him by phone on Aug. 17, she confirmed what she already suspected,
that she was pregnant with a baby due in April.

They were happiest when they could spend time together doing ordinary things as a family,
she said.

"We just went to church and hung out with friends," she said. "We liked to sit around and play
board games."

Brad grew up near Chillicothe and graduated from Southeastern High School. Haller Funeral
Home in Chillicothe is handling arrangements for his funeral. No date has been set.

Pamela Clemmons, Brad's mother, said her son was an honor student who signed up for the
Air Force before his 18th birthday.

"This boy was totally dedicated to his job and loved his country," she said. "He was one of the
most honest people that I've ever met in my life. He never pulled any punches."

Brad's father, David Clemmons, of Latham, said his son knew right away that he wanted to
make a career out of the military. Brad had about three more years to go before he retired.

"Military life is kind of tough for families. But he was a devoted family man," David Clemmons
said. "He was really proud of his children.

"It's an awful loss," he said, his voice breaking. Brad's way with children drew Rebecca to him.
They had been married for four years.

"He wanted to be such an involved dad," she said. "And he was Uncle Brad to everybody."

She last saw him when she visited him in Maryland at the end of July. "He was so happy to see
us," she said quietly.

Brad A. Clemmons

Chillicothe, Ohio
An Ohio airman killed in Iraq found out his wife was pregnant with his fourth child
just a few days before an improvised explosive device struck his vehicle as he was
traveling in a convoy.


Air Force Master Sgt. Brad A. Clemmons, 37, of Chillicothe, died Monday, the
Defense Department said Wednesday. The convoy was en route to Taji.
Clemmons' wife, Rebecca, said she told him she was pregnant with a baby due in
April when he called home last week.


He was delighted, Rebecca Clemmons said. He was such a doting father.
Clemmons was assigned to the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron at Eielson Air Force
Base in Alaska. His wife said they had lived in Alaska for the last eight months.
In May, he left for 2 1/2 months of training in Maryland, where his wife last saw
him at the end of July. He then left for Iraq, where he was supposed to stay until
early next year.


He grew up near Chillicothe, about 45 miles south of Columbus, and graduated
from Southeastern High School. His mother, Pamela, said he signed up for the Air
Force before he turned 18.


This boy was totally dedicated to his job and loved his country, she said. He was
one of the most honest people that I've ever met in my life. He never pulled any
punches.


Friend Marcus Bost said he and Clemmons played military games, chased snakes
and caught crawdads in a creek as children. Clemmons' mother said her son
pretended tubes of Old Spice deodorant were bombs for the war games.


Clemmons had about three more years to serve before he retired from the military.
Military life is kind of tough for families. But he was a devoted family man, said his
father, David. He was really proud of his children.


Brad Clemmons had a 2-year-old daughter with Rebecca, his wife of four years. He
also had two sons from a previous marriage.


No date had been set for the funeral in Chillicothe.
Rebecca Clemmons said her husband expressed optimism about the military's work
in Iraq in an e-mail message on Sunday.
He wrote, 'We are making a difference out here.' He was a very positive person,
she said.
--
Brad A. Clemmons put his heart into virtually every endeavor. Marcus Bost
remembered his friend participating in the calf scramble at the Ross County Fair in
Ohio every year when they were kids.


Every year he was taken off by the ambulance. He never did get a cow, he said
with a chuckle.


Clemmons, 37, of Chillicothe, Ohio, died Aug. 21 in Taji when his vehicle hit a
roadside bomb. He was assigned to Eielson Air Force Base. Pamela Clemmons,
Brad's mother, said her son was an honor student who signed up for the Air Force
before his 18th birthday.


This boy was totally dedicated to his job and loved his country, she said. He was
one of the most honest people that I've ever met in my life. He never pulled any
punches.


When his wife, Rebecca, talked to him on Aug. 17, she told him she was pregnant
with a baby due in April. He was delighted, she said. He was such a doting father.
The couple already had a 2-year-old daughter and he had two sons from a previous
marriage. He wanted to be such an involved dad, she said. And he was Uncle Brad
to everybody.

      Age: 37
      Gender: M
      Service: Air Force Active duty 354th Civil Engineer Squadron
      Rank: Master Sgt.
      Stationed in: Eielson Air Force Base Alaska
      Date of death: 08/21/06
      Incident location: Taji, Iraq
      Incident details: died when an improvised explosive device struck his vehicle
      Incident cause: Action

Sources: Source of the data is U.S. Department of Defense, AP, Chronicle research.



Iceman Team dedicates facility to lost
comrade
Posted 8/27/2008 Updated 8/27/2008
by Tech. Sgt. Gloria Wilson
354th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

8/27/2008 - EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- In 2006 the family, friends and extended military
family of explosive ordinance disposal Master Sgt. Brad Clemmons gathered to mourn his death and
celebrate his life in a memorial service here. Exactly two years after his life was tragically cut short on
Aug. 21, people gathered again for Sergeant Clemmons, this time for an EOD facility dedication
ceremony honoring the man many describe as a hero.

Master Sgt. David Teague, master of ceremony and 354th Civil Engineer Squadron EOD superintendant,
formally introduced Eielson leadership and distinguished guests to include Sergeant Clemmons' wife
Rebecca, daughters, Isabelle and Gabrielle, sons, Nicholas and Zachary, and father, David, during the
ceremony held outside the EOD building. As he said the families' names his voice sounded hoarse and
cracked, as if choking back tears.

In addition to the building dedication, the EOD squadron created a memorial that stands in the new
facility, a silent testament to one Airman's ultimate sacrifice. But before the memorial was unveiled, Brig.
Gen, Mark Graper, 354th Fighter Wing commander, commented on the reason why everyone was there.

"We gather here on this beautiful morning to honor bravery, to salute dedication and sacrifice to
memorialize the uncommon valor of Master Sergeant Brad Clemmons and in so doing to celebrate his
service to our nation," said General Graper. "We are here to dedicate the EOD building to an American
Airman."

General Graper added that while he personally didn't have the privilege of serving with Sergeant
Clemmons he had the honor of learning about his contributions and sacrifice through his military service
record, what the general referred to as his "written history." Within that selfless-filled history was the fact
that Sergeant Clemmons had volunteered for a yearlong deployment to Iraq as a member of a weapons
intelligence team. It was during that deployment his vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive
device.

But although the accomplishments and acts read by General Graper were many, he said that there was
more to Sergeant Clemmons than what was in his service record.

"Master Sergeant Clemmons also has an unwritten history - scribed in the memories of his family, friends,
close teammates and comrades," said the general. "And that forms perhaps the most eloquent history of
all."

Everyone was later invited inside to see the new facility and the memorial in tribute of both the written and
unwritten history of Sergeant Clemmons.

As Sergeant Clemmons' family viewed the memorial for the first time, 4-year-old Isabelle ran her fingers
over the white letters etched on black marble honoring the father she lost when she was only two. One of
the phrases on it, John 15:13, reads, "Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his
friends."

After the viewing of the memorial, the building was open for touring and the cutting of cake as family and
friends celebrated the sacrifice and duty of Sergeant Clemmons.

Rebecca Clemmons said she has been shown love and support from the Eielson team and thanks them
for what they have done. She plans on bringing her children back in about six years; her youngest
Gabrielle is only 15 months old.

Both Nicholas and Zachary said they liked the memorial and the building. "Our dad did what he loved; he
served his country," said Nicholas.
David Clemmons said he was impressed by what everyone thought of his son and that he thought the
memorial was beautiful. He said he hoped the memorial would be beneficial to the EOD Airmen that pass
through the doors of the building--a sentiment similar to what was expressed by General Graper when he
said that generations of Airmen who work and train in the facility will remember Brad's sacrifice and that
all Eielson Airmen will draw commitment and strength from his example of service before self and
sacrifice.

"It's important to remember his sacrifice and when we're long gone, this will help people remember," said
Sergeant Teague. "This will always be the Brad Clemmons facility."
Photos




EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- A memorial dedication ceremony in honor of Master Sgt. Brad
Clemmons, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal flight, was held Aug. 21.
Sergeant Clemmon's family, friends and co-workers attended the building dedication ceremony to honor
his ultimate sacrifice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder)




EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- A purple heart, bronze star and Iraqi campaign medals are
placed at the front of the boots of Master Sgt. Brad Clemmons, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive
ordnance disposal flight, at his memorial Aug. 21. Sergeant Clemmons’ family, friends and co-workers
attended the building dedication ceremony to honor his ultimate sacrifice. (U.S. Air Force photo by
Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder)
EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Fellow Airmen of the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive
ordnance disposal flight pay their respects during Master Sgt. Brad Clemmon's memorial dedication
ceremony Aug. 21. Sergeant Clemmons’ family, friends and co-workers attended the building dedication
ceremony to honor his ultimate sacrifice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder)




EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Mrs. Rebecca Clemmons holds daughter, Isabelle, during the
memorial dedication ceremony of Master Sgt. Brad Clemmons, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive
ordnance disposal flight, memorial dedication ceremony Aug. 21. Sergeant Clemmons’ family, friends and
co-workers attended the building dedication ceremony to honor his ultimate sacrifice. (U.S. Air Force
photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder)
EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Brig. Gen. Mark Graper, 354th Fighter Wing commander, speaks
during a memorial dedication ceremony in honor of Master Sgt. Brad Clemmons, 354th Civil Engineer
Squadron explosive ordnance disposal flight, Aug. 21. Sergeant Clemmons’ family, friends and co-
workers attended the building dedication ceremony to honor his ultimate sacrifice. (U.S. Air Force photo
by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder)




EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Mrs. Rebecca Clemmons and Brig. Gen. Mark Graper, 354th
Fighter Wing commander, take a moment of silence and reflection as they look at the memorial of Master
Sgt. Brad Clemmons, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal flight, memorial Aug.
21. Sergeant Clemmons’ family, friends and co-workers attended the building dedication ceremony to
honor his ultimate sacrifice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder)




Airmen, Soldiers say farewell to comrade in Iraq
Airmen and Soldiers held a memorial service here Aug. 24 for Air
Force Master Sgt. Brad A. Clemmons, a veteran explosive ordnance
disposal technician. From the tools of his trade, the
memorial symbolized the sergeant who was killed Aug. 21 when
his vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device near
Taji, Iraq. Below, a moment of silence is observed during the memorial.

by Lt. Col. Bob Thompson 332d Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs

Honored as a true hero, leader and friend, Air Force Master Sgt. Brad A. Clemmons was remembered by
Airmen of the 332d Air Expeditionary Wing and Soldiers of Logistics
Support Area Anaconda here Aug. 24.

During the memorial service, Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Stan Giles, 732d Expeditionary Mission Support Group
chaplain, asked the standing-room-only crowd of about 400 to pray for Sergeant Clemmons' family and
the families of all explosive ordnance disposal technicians who serve
in harm's way. "Nearly 20 years ago," Chaplain Giles said, "Brad entered perhaps the most dangerous of
all career fields. He became an instructor in the most dangerous of all professions and then volunteered to
come to work in the most dangerous of all neighborhoods here in Iraq."

Sergeant Clemmons, 37, of Chillicothe, Ohio, died Aug. 21 while he was traveling as part of a
convoy just outside of Taji, Iraq. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart.
According to the citation read by Col. Duane D. Lamb, 732d Expeditionary Mission Support Group
commander, Sergeant Clemmons distinguished himself by meritorious
achievement as a team leader, Weapons Intelligence Flight, 732d Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron.

"...he was on a convoy mission using his explosive ordnance expertise to perform forensic analysis and
intelligence collection on two reported improvised explosive devices," Colonel Lamb read. "Upon
returning to...Taji, his vehicle was struck near the rear by an improvised explosive device hidden in the
road. Sergeant Clemmons gave his life in the defense of our nation and for the freedom of the Iraqi
people." "Sergeant Clemmons fulfilled a critical role," said Lt. Col. Frank Freeman, 732d EMSG deputy
commander. "He led his team in collecting crucial evidence and post blast analysis of the number one
killer in Iraq – IEDs."
The primary job of an EOD team is to disarm, or what they call "render safe," bombs of all
types. Usually, the teams dispose of the explosives in a controlled detonation at the scene or at a secure
range. Sergeant Clemmons was deployed from the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, Eielson Air Force
Base, Alaska and had come to Iraq to find ways to defeat the roadside bombs. "Sergeant Clemmons was a
great teacher," Colonel Freeman said. "His purpose was to inform others to keep them safe from harm."

Chaplain Giles visited Sergeant Clemmons when he first arrived in Iraq about 9 days prior to the incident.
"EOD is a very tight team," Chaplain Giles said. "It was clear that Brad was a leader and a lover of his
team, his people, his family, his mission and his country."

"One of his best qualities was his leadership," Colonel Freeman said. "He led from the front, back and
middle. He was a people person and his team loved him too. "His team couldn't wait to get back out after
the incident," Colonel Freeman said. "Because they know, that is what Sergeant Clemmons would want
them to do."

"When there is sudden death, it is human nature to ask, 'Why?'" Chaplain Giles said. "We ask, 'What if?'
These are understandable questions, but there's no answer for them." "In times of war, we see human
nature at its extremes," the chaplain said. "We see it at both its absolute worst and absolute best. Today,
we honor one of the best. Brad was a true hero, a hero who put service before self and died in the line of
duty."


Master Sgt Brad Allen Clemmons

August 9th, 2009
Born: August 27, 1966
Died: August 21, 2006 in Iraq


Master Sgt. Brad A. Clemmons of Chillicothe, Ohio grew up near Chillicothe and graduated
from Southeastern High School where he was an honor student who signed up for the Air
Force before his 18th birthday. He loved people, he loved kids, he loved this country and he
loved working for the Air Force. Though he was stationed in Alaska, he and his wife,
Rebecca, would return to Chillicothe every year of their four-year marriage, usually in
December. Just a few days before he died, Brad learned he was going to be a dad again. He
called home from Iraq on Aug. 17 and heard the good news from his wife. It was the last
time they spoke. His dedication to his country was rivaled only by his devotion to his family.
Brad had a 2-year-old daughter with Rebecca, and two sons from a previous marriage. The
family was happiest when they could spend time together doing ordinary things as a family.
They went to church and hung out with friends and liked to sit around and play board
games. Brad was killed at age 37 when his vehicle struck a roadside bomb in Iraq. He was
part of a convoy headed to Taji.


Army
354th
Civil Engineer Squadron
Eielson Air Force Base
Alaska


Burial is at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia - Sec 60 Site 8417
                Spec. Joshua D. Jones




                Hometown: Pomeroy, Ohio, U.S.

                Age: 24 years old

                Died: August 27, 2006 in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

                Unit: Army, 3rd Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th
                Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Tex.

                Incident: Killed when his Humvee came in contact with enemy forces using small arms
                fire during combat operations in Baghdad.



Joshua D. Jones
Thursday, August 31 2006 @ 01:13 PM EDT

The Columbus Dispatch -- As the oldest of six children, Joshua D. Jones had always taken on the
role of family protector.




That sense of responsibility was also behind the southeastern Ohio native’s decision to sign
up for military service nearly three years ago.

"Whenever he was talking about the Army, he always said he was going to go fight so that his
siblings would never have to," Jones’ father, Gary, said yesterday from his home in
Langsville, in Meigs County. "I was just so proud of him for everything."
The Department of Defense says that Jones, a 24-year-old Army specialist, was killed Sunday in
Baghdad when his Humvee was attacked by small-arms fire. Jones was assigned to the 3 rd
Battalion, 67 th Armor Regiment, 4 th Brigade Combat Team, 4 th Infantry Division, in Fort
Hood, Texas.

Now that word of the death is spreading through the tightknit Appalachian community where
Joshua Jones was raised, his father says he has been overwhelmed by the support of others.

Jones and his wife, Tiffany, had moved to Georgia just before he enlisted in the Army in January
2004. There, he earned his general educational development diploma. After finishing boot camp
at Fort Knox, he was stationed in Louisiana, and then at Fort Hood. He shipped to Iraq on Dec. 6
last year, his dad’s birthday.

He last visited home in June, and spent some quality time with his 2-year-old daughter, Cami,
the elder Jones said.

"And then not long after he was home, we got the call.

"His wife is expecting again," Gary Jones said. After pausing to collect himself, he added: "He
was a great husband, and a great father. I wish this second child would have at least gotten the
chance to know that."

Gary Jones said his son most cherished his role as protector, but he also was passionate about his
hobbies, which included riding all-terrain vehicles in the rough Meigs County countryside and
racing remotecontrolled cars.

"If it had wheels, he loved it," Gary Jones said. "That’s all he loved until his daughter came
along, and then he understood the joys of being a dad."

He said he’s still awaiting word from the Army on when his son’s body will arrive home.
Whenever that is, he said, the whole family will be there waiting.




                Capt. Shawn L. English
                Hometown: Westerville, Ohio, U.S.

                Age: 35 years old

                Died: December 3, 2006 in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

                Unit: Army, 577th Engineer Battalion, 1st Engineer Brigade, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.

                Incident: Killed when a makeshift bomb exploded near his Humvee during combat
                operations in Baghdad.


                Shawn L. English returned home for a short leave last month and visited his son
                Nathan's elementary school class. "He stressed to them how fortunate we are to be
                living in America, with the freedoms we have," said his brother-in-law Todd Daily. He
                also told them how much simple things, such as soccer balls, meant to Iraqi kids. The
                class pledged to collect as many as they could and send them to him when he got back
                to Iraq. English, 35, of Westerville, Ohio, was killed Dec. 3 by a roadside bomb in
                Baghdad. He graduated Wright State University in 1999 and was assigned to Fort
                Leonard Wood. Capt. Nathan Surrey considered English his best friend, someone he
                instantly bonded with when they met for Army management training in Missouri. "We
                just clicked," Surrey said. "We were fanatical Ohio State fans, we loved sports, just our
                ideas on life. Our personalities were the same." He served in an armored cavalry unit
                during the first Gulf War, later joined a Ranger battalion and became an Army deep-
                sea diver in 1999. He is survived by his wife, Tricia, and two other sons, Noah, 5, and
                Austin, 3.

Shawn English

Family-Placed Obituary

ENGLISH, Shawn L. Captain United States Army, of Panama City Beach, Florida, died
during combat operations in Iraq December 3, 2006. Survived by wife Trica; sons;
Nathan (7), Noah (5) and Austin (3); mother, Lois English; sister Dawn (Chris) Carroll;
niece Samantha, nephew Christopher of Westerville, father-in-law & mother-in-law; Curt
& Bev Daily; brother-in-law & sister-in-law; Todd & Barb Daily of Lewis Center; niece
Shane and nephew, Callen. Shawn's passions in life were his wife and his sons, faith
and his country. Virtues instilled through his father, Donald English, who preceded him
in death in 1997. He held a BA & MS degrees from Wright State and Webster
Universities. A much decorated soldier, Shawn served his country, 1990-2006 including
operations Desert Storm/Shield as well as Operation Iraqi Freedom. Prior to deployment
to Iraq, he was Commander, Co. D, 577 Engineering Battalion and Sr. Liaison Officer,
Naval Dive Center, Panama City, Florida. Funeral service will be held 1:00 P.M.
Wednesday, December 13, 2006 at the Central College Presbyterian Church, 975
South Sunbury Road Westerville, Ohio. Dr. Richard Ellsworth and Rev. Wayne Morrison
officiating. Interment Maplewood Cemetery, New Albany, Ohio. Arrangements by the
Moreland Funeral Home, Westerville, Ohio.

In lieu of flowers, friends, if they wish, may contribute to the Capt. Shawn L. English
Memorial Fund, c/o Fifth Third Bank, Columbus, Ohio.

								
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