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James Cook University Compact

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James Cook University Compact Powered By Docstoc
					Mission-Based Compact
   Between:
     The Commonwealth of Australia
     and
     James Cook University
              CONTENTS


             Context

             Part One:         Establishment of the Compact
                               The University’s Mission

             Part Two:         Teaching and Learning
                               Performance Funding

             Part Three:       Research, Research Training and Innovation

             Part Four:        Compact Review

             Part Five:        General Provisions



              Attachments
              A.    Indicative list of Commonwealth Funding provided to the University which is
                    administered by DEEWR and relevant to this Compact.
              B.    List of Commonwealth Funding provided to the University which is
                    administered by DIISR and relevant to this Compact.
              C.    University Confidential Information1.
              D.    Terms and Conditions of Agreement between the Minister for Tertiary
                    Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations and the University about
                    Performance Funding.
              E.    Copy of Commonwealth Grant Scheme Funding agreement between the
                    Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations and the
                    University.




1
  There will be an Attachment C only where the University provides commercially sensitive material. The
published version of a Compact will indicate the existence or otherwise of an Attachment C (University
Confidential Information) but will not include the content.




                                                    Page 2
Date
This Compact is made on _______________________
between
The Commonwealth of Australia (Commonwealth) represented by and acting
through both:
          The Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations
          Assisted by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace
          Relations (DEEWR)
          ABN 63 578 775 294
          Of
          50 Marcus Clarke Street
          Canberra ACT 2601

          And

          The Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
          Assisted by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
          (DIISR)
          ABN 74 599 608 295
          Of
          Industry House
          10 Binara Street
          Canberra ACT 2601


And


James Cook University
ABN 46253211955
A body corporate under the James Cook University Act 1997
Of
1 James Cook Drive
Townsville Qld 4811
(University)




                                 Page 3
     CONTEXT
A.   The Purpose and Effect of this Compact
     This Compact is an agreement between the Commonwealth and the University.
     It demonstrates that the Commonwealth and the University have a shared and
     mutual commitment to provide students with high quality educational experiences
     and outcomes and to building research and innovation capabilities and international
     competitiveness.
     The Compact recognises that the University is an autonomous institution with a
     distinctive mission, operating within a state or territory, national and international
     higher education environment.
     The purpose of this Compact is to provide a strategic framework for the relationship
     between the Commonwealth and the University. It sets out how the University’s
     Mission aligns with the Commonwealth’s goals for higher education, research,
     research training and innovation, and includes information on funding provided by
     the Commonwealth to the University.
     Section 4 and Attachment D of this Compact together constitute the funding
     agreement, for the purpose of section 30-25 of the Higher Education Support Act
     2003 (HESA), for the grant of teaching and learning Performance Funding to the
     University. Similarly, Attachment E of this Compact contains the funding agreement,
     for the purpose of section 30-25 of HESA, for the provision of other Commonwealth
     Grant Scheme funding to the University.
     This Compact also refers to funding provided under DIISR's Collaborative Research
     Networks (CRN) funding program. Any funding provided under that program is not
     made under HESA and is separate to, but made within the framework of, this
     Compact.
     In addition, this Compact refers to a range of other funding that is provided by DIISR
     and DEEWR to the University under various legislative and/or contractual funding
     arrangements. The details of relevant DEEWR funding arrangements are set out in
     Attachment A and the details of relevant DIISR funding arrangements are set out in
     Attachment B.
     By detailing Commonwealth funding commitments and reciprocal University
     commitments, this Compact also contributes to creating a transparent and
     accountable system of administration of Commonwealth funding. To support this
     purpose, the Commonwealth and the University agree that this Compact will be
     published on Commonwealth websites and may be published on the University
     website.




                                       Page 4
B.   The Principles of Commonwealth Funding Support
     The principles under which Commonwealth funding for higher education is provided
     are:
        opportunity for all, especially for those students from groups under-represented
         in higher education;
        access to university based on merit;
        world-class teaching and learning that advances the international standing of
         Australian education;
        world class research and research training that advances knowledge, critical
         thinking and Australia’s international standing;
        responsiveness to the economic and social needs of the community, region,
         state, nation and the international community;
        a sustainable higher-education sector; and
        academic freedom and institutional autonomy.
C.   The Commonwealth’s ambitions for Higher Education and Innovation
     The Commonwealth’s vision for the higher education sector is set out in
     Transforming Australia’s Higher Education System available at
     http://www.deewr.gov.au
     Higher education is central to achieving the key objectives for the nation’s future,
     including:
        A stronger Australia – boosting Australia’s share of high skilled jobs and
         productivity growth will require a highly skilled workforce that can rapidly adapt
         to meet future challenges; and
        A fairer Australia – all Australians will benefit from widespread equitable
         access to a diverse tertiary education sector that allows each individual to
         develop and reach their potential. Society as a whole will benefit from the
         widespread application of cutting-edge research.
     In supporting these objectives, the Commonwealth's ambitions for higher education
     include:
        producing graduates with the knowledge, skills and understandings for full
         participation in society and the economy;
        providing opportunities for people from all backgrounds to participate to their full
         potential and be supported to do so;
        providing students with a stimulating and rewarding higher education
         experience;
        playing a pivotal role in the national research and innovation system through
         generation and dissemination of new knowledge and through the education,




                                      Page 5
         training and development of world class researchers across a wide range of
         intellectual disciplines; and
        being amongst the leading Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
         Development (OECD) countries in terms of participation and performance.
     The higher education system also plays a crucial role in supporting innovation. The
     Commonwealth’s policy statement, Powering Ideas - An Innovation Agenda for the
     21st Century http://innovation.gov.au is designed to build innovation skills, support
     research to create new knowledge, increase business innovation and boost
     collaboration.
     For higher education research, research training and innovation, the
     Commonwealth’s ambitions include:
        progressively increasing the number of research groups performing at world-
         class levels;
        boosting research collaboration by Australian universities;
        significantly increasing the number of students completing higher degrees by
         research over the next decade; and
        building an innovation system that promotes economic growth and well being by
         promoting linkages between Australian businesses, universities and publicly-
         funded research agencies.
D.   Structure of this Compact
     Part One provides for the establishment of the Compact, its Term and the purpose
     of the University’s Mission. Part One also contains the University’s Mission
     Statement. Part One also provides for the Commonwealth to inform the University of
     any actual or prospective changes to policy and for the University to inform the
     Commonwealth of any actual or prospective changes to its Mission and for each to
     consult the other about the possible effects of these changes.
     Part Two provides for matters related to teaching and learning, which are matters
     administered by DEEWR.
     Part Three provides for matters related to research, research training and
     innovation, which are matters administered by DIISR.
     Part Four provides for review of the Compact.
     Part Five provides for operational issues, including the general matters which the
     two Departments will administer jointly, liaison between the Departments and the
     University, privacy, confidentiality and information sharing, addresses for notices
     and how the Compact may be varied and how it may be terminated. This Part also
     includes the Dictionary.
     The Attachments A to E form part of this Compact and are referenced and explained
     in the relevant Parts of this Compact.




                                     Page 6
PART ONE

1.         ESTABLISHMENT OF THE COMPACT
The Commonwealth and the University agree:
1.1.       This Compact consists of Parts One to Five and any Attachments.
1.2.       The term of this Compact is from 1 January 2011 until 31 December 2013, unless
           terminated earlier in accordance with clause 10.7.
1.3.       In agreeing to this Compact for and on behalf of the Commonwealth each of the
           Ministers is acting only to the extent of that Minister’s powers and functions under
           any Commonwealth law, including under the terms of any relevant Appropriation.
1.4.       The University acknowledges that a policy underlying some or all of this Compact
           may be subject to review by the Commonwealth from time to time. The
           Commonwealth and the University agree that if the Commonwealth considers that it
           may need to change the Compact because of such a review, the Commonwealth
           will notify the University of this in writing and will consult with the University
           accordingly.
1.5.       Some or all of the funding arrangements set out in Attachments A and B may be
           updated by DEEWR and DIISR from time to time. The Commonwealth will notify the
           University of any such updates.
1.6.       Either party may propose changes to this Compact at any time. Except for any
           changes pursuant to clause 1.5 above, clause 10.5 will apply to any variation
           proposed by either party to the Compact.



2.         THE UNIVERSITY’S MISSION

2.1.       The purpose of the University’s Mission
 2.1.1.    The University's Mission sets out its values and aspirations, what it does and how it
           can best serve the interests of its students, staff and key stakeholders. The
           Commonwealth and the University recognise that the University's Mission may
           evolve.
 2.1.2.    The University and the Commonwealth recognise that the University is an
           autonomous institution which is responsible for the determination of its Mission and
           for its aspirations and strategies for their achievement.

2.2.       The University’s Mission statement

Current Circumstances

James Cook University (JCU) was established in 1970, after ten years as the University College
of Townsville, part of and stewarded by the University of Queensland. The University was




                                            Page 7
established with a clear and potent vision, articulated in the Act of Parliament which gave life to
the institution which stated: James Cook University is to focus on both meeting the educational
needs of northern Queensland and on education and research on topics of relevance to the
peoples of the tropics.

For more than forty years, JCU has worked to deliver on this ambition from our northern
Queensland bases, initially from Townsville and later from Cairns. We have continued to focus
on our tropical agenda, the contemporary expression of which is contained in the University’s
Statement of Strategic Intent (provided below). In that statement, we commit to creating a
brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide through graduates and discoveries that make a
difference. This is an endeavour of growing global significance when we consider the metrics of
tropical Australia and the tropics world-wide.

Our footprint now extends beyond northern Queensland to include a Singapore Campus and a
presence in Brisbane in conjunction with the Russo Higher Education Group. In May 2011 we
acquired the minority shareholding of our Singapore Campus and now wholly own the
operation. The prospect of our greater engagement in Singapore promises to enliven and add a
new dimension to our strategic intent, broadening our tropical agenda and making the tropics
more fully our place. Our aim is to be a tri-city university across three tropical cities - Townsville,
Cairns and Singapore

JCU is a contemporary and dynamic institution and a major driver of economic growth and
social change in northern Queensland, as well as having international impact and reach. Our
focus is on producing graduates who have the expertise and intellectual curiosity to make a
difference in their profession and their communities and conducting the research needed to
meet the challenges facing the tropical world. We are also committed to producing the
professional workforce for under-served communities and providing access and opportunity to
those who may not have previously been able to access higher education.

At JCU, staff and students benefit from our tropical location to conduct research in a range of
areas including those judged by Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) to be at or above world
standard. These areas include: environmental science and management; fisheries sciences;
geochemistry, geology, evolutionary biology, plant biology, zoology; tourism; inorganic
chemistry, oceanography; physical geography and environmental geoscience; biochemistry and
cell biology; genetics; materials engineering; immunology; neurosciences; nursing; specialist
studies in education; anthropology; human geography; linguistics; and historical studies.

The University is rated in the top 400 universities in the world in the Shanghai Jiao Tong World
Rankings, an achievement equalled or surpassed by only one other Queensland University.

We recognise that the University is judged not only on its quality, but also on its relevance and
impact. Accordingly, we commit ourselves to research of excellence and high impact,
particularly on issues of critical importance to the world’s tropics. We recognise our obligation
to engage with industry and government, commercialise our research findings and achieve
critical mass through productive research partnerships with other research organisations.

JCU is a site and catalyst for innovation and understanding. Our teaching is high-quality,
innovative and engaging to students. Our approach is characterised by personal contact with
students. We provide alternate modes of delivery responsive to their needs and a contemporary
learning environment, ensuring contact with teachers and other students.




                                               Page 8
JCU recognises its “power of place” and engages with all its communities and industry to
promote a sustainable region that is socially inclusive. Through our graduates, James Cook
University provides the human capital for the region. We also play a vital role in attracting other
scientific assets to the region.

We work closely with the Queensland Government and have been integrally involved in the
development and implementation of their tropical science, knowledge and innovation agenda
formalized through the Q-Tropics strategy. The Queensland Government has contributed
funding to landmark infrastructure projects at JCU including the Australian Tropical Science and
Innovation Precinct, and Queensland Tropical Health Alliance. This infrastructure has enabled
the co-location of significant scientific assets in northern Queensland and the creation of a
world-class tropical research hub at JCU.

Our staff have strong connections in the Cairns and Townsville business communities and are
an important part of community networks. The University looks for ways to add value to our
community through knowledge transfer, innovations, research, use of facilities etc. JCU also
has strong relationships with other education providers in the region – high schools, TAFE
colleges and TechNQ.

As northern Queensland is a site for a first and second roll-out of the National Broadband
network, JCU will work with the Government to maximise the opportunities that the NBN
presents to reduce the disadvantage of distance, and provide opportunities for students to
access education and resources.

Our Strategic Intent

OUR INTENT - A brighter future for life in the tropics, world-wide
   We will focus our energies on advancing northern Queensland, northern Australia and
      the Asia Pacific region, while looking for our work to benefit the tropics world-wide
      We will work with business, industry, government the community and selected national
       and overseas universities’ and philanthropic organisations’, to create lasting intellectual,
       cultural, social, health, environmental and economic benefits for our region and beyond
      We will produce graduates with the expertise and intellectual curiosity required for
       sustainable development of our communities, and we will conduct research to provide
       the knowledge and understanding needed to meet the challenges facing northern
       Australia and the tropics world-wide
      We will embrace the communities we serve and engage with them at all levels, sharing a
       sense of pride in the University’s achievements
OUR PURPOSE - Graduates and discoveries that make a difference
   Our staff, students and alumni are proud of James Cook University’s reputation as a
     provider of high quality teaching and learning and world-class research
      Our key responsibility is to our students. We aim to inspire them to make a difference in
       their fields of endeavour and in their communities
      Discoveries derived from high quality and high impact research are the hallmark of our
       endeavours
      We offer our students a comprehensive range of courses and opportunities to work with
       world-class researchers and teachers in areas of special relevance to the tropics.




                                             Page 9
      Our University is about people and place, and we adopt new methods, new approaches
       and new technologies to help our students develop the skills, abilities and knowledge
       base they need to succeed
      We bring a diverse array of knowledge, skills and experience through our staff and the
       broader community to fulfil the potential of our University

Strategic Themes

In light of this Strategic Intent, JCU is committed to providing shape and direction to our
teaching and research by alignment to four major themes:
          Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
          Industries and Economies in the Tropics
          Peoples and Societies in the Tropics
          Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity


As JCU’s research and teaching are both aligned across these four thematic areas, there are
strong linkages between research and teaching. A recent example of research informing
teaching was the development of the new Bachelor of Sustainability, where a world class
researcher in this area played a leading role. However, we are also paying more attention to this
through the Curriculum Refresh Project. Information on the teaching/research nexus is
captured through the Course Performance Reports which is being used as a mechanism to
prompt reflection in the Schools and Disciplines.


Our future aspirations

We will build on current areas of world-class excellence to achieve strong performance in
scholarship and teaching inspired by a research-enriched environment. Over the next five years
we will be aiming to:
    increase our student population to 25,000 on all campuses, with 5,000 in Cairns, and
        5,000 in Singapore
    increase our research-related income (research grants and other Commonwealth
     funding) to $75 million per annum
    develop teaching and research specialisations on our different campuses, particularly
     acknowledging the growth potential of Cairns and Singapore


Future Priorities and Strategies

The University Plan gives life and substance to the Strategic Intent for the whole of the JCU
community, establishing the high-level framework from which Faculty and Divisional plans are
developed. The University Plan has a five year outlook and articulates high level objectives and
strategies to realise the Strategic Intent aspirations that incorporates the following domains:
             Academic (Teaching & Learning, and Research & Innovation);
             People and Culture;
             Physical and Virtual Infrastructure;
             International and Engagement; and
             Finance and Resources.




                                             Page 10
Academic Plan Objectives
    Enhance our tropical focus by strategically focusing our teaching and research on issues
      of particular relevance to the tropics and particularly to rural. The University will address
      issues particularly relevant to rural, remote, Indigenous and underserved populations
    Promote leadership for teaching and learning
    Develop curriculum for change
    Enhance flexibility for an inclusive student experience
    Promote excellence in research and research education
    Deliver research that has impact
    Foster a culture supportive of research and develop capability in research and research
      education
    Improve planning for and provision of research capacity and infrastructure

People and Culture Plan Objectives
    Foster a culture of scholarship and innovation and an inclusive campus community for
       staff and students
    Foster an environment that recognises and supports the diverse cultural communities in
       which the University resides;
    Create a culture with the capacity, capability and resilience to anticipate and respond to
       future changes;
    Recognise that the University requires good leadership at all levels and an effective
       management culture to be an employer of choice

Physical and Virtual Infrastructure Plan Objectives
    Transform our campuses into places of international renown
    Provide welcoming, sustainable and fit-for-purpose facilities and spaces
    Provide a robust virtual environment that fosters sustainable teaching and research and
       builds a sense of community
    To be a leader in environmentally sustainable infrastructure development and operations

International and Engagement Plan Objectives
     Enhance internationalisation at JCU through the curriculum, student and staff mobility,
        and strategic alliances with other universities located in the tropics
     Enhance the degree to which JCU is engaged with its communities in a global context
     Promote inclusion and core values within the region through community engagement
        and increased participation especially for our Indigenous communities

Finance and Resources Objectives
    Manage resources in an ethical, financially responsible, and sustainable way
    Realise capabilities to achieve a consistent and efficient financial management
      framework with strong accountabilities
    Adopt a continuous improvement culture that seeks to enhance productivity and ensure
      value for money
    Integrate risk management framework into University-wide processes, procedures and
      decision-making

Planning and Performance Management

A suite of performance measures has been developed to focus Management on the




                                            Page 11
achievement of the performance targets, and to enable Governance Committees to more
effectively monitor and assess the University’s performance. Challenging but attainable targets
are set each year as part of the University’s planning process. This approach encompasses:

       The Council approved Statement of Strategic Intent developed with extensive
        stakeholder consultation and articulating the University’s intent, purpose and values;
       The University Plan taking a five year outlook to give effect to the Strategic Intent and
        presenting objectives and strategies under five domains;
       Faculty and Division plans, for the triennium, that align with, underpin and give effect to
        the University Plan;
       A clear performance measurement scheme, with targets, set annually, for key
        performance drivers aimed at achieving the University’s Intent and Plan. This scheme
        comprises
             - 23 Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) monitored by Council
             - 39 Key Performance Measures (KPMs), reflecting the key performance issues,
                    monitored by Committees of Council
             - 115 Operational Performance Targets (OPTs), some specifically for Faculties
                    and some for each Division, reviewed by VCAC twice per year to affirm
                    measures, set targets, and check progress and acquit outcomes
       an integrated approach to planning with an annual planning package incorporating a
        prior year acquittal, and review and refresh of the University, Faculty and Division plans;
       Additional annual Vice Chancellor’s strategic priorities which unify our direction for the
        following year: For 2011 these are:
             - distinctiveness
             - a scholarly community
             - sustainability;
       Alignment of timelines for planning (incl. budgeting) and performance processes and
        activities, and scheduled reporting through to relevant management and governance
        committees;
       Annual VCAC, senior management, faculty and division planning retreats and events to
        inform the annual planning process; and
       Linkage of individual performance through the Performance Management Program
        (PMP) to school, faculty, directorate, division plans and University Plan.
       Preparation and review by management and Council of the JCU Performance Report

In addition, quality and performance is managed and monitored through:
     Annual Faculty Academic Program reports and Course Performance Reports; and
     External faculty/divisional reviews undertaken on a rotating, four-yearly basis
        (commenced 2009).

Several of the performance measures in place directly link to the Government’s reform agenda,
including:
     Teaching Performance:
         o CEQ results for Overall Student Satisfaction (KPI/OPT), Good Teaching (KPM),
             and Generic Skills (KPM)

        Participation/Attainment/Social Inclusion
           o Student retention (KPI/OPT)
           o Indigenous participation (KPI/OPT)
           o % Indigenous staff (KPI)




                                             Page 12
             o Commencing Low SES enrolments (KPI/OPT)
          Research
             o Research income (KPI/OPT)
             o Publications (KPI/OPT)
             o HDR Load (KPI)
             o HDR Completions (KPI/OPT)



2.3.         Changes to the University's Mission
 2.3.1.       The Commonwealth acknowledges that the University may adjust its mission from
              time to time. The University agrees that it will give the Commonwealth notice in
              writing in advance of:
               a. any significant changes that it proposes to make to the Mission during the
                  term of the Compact; or
               b. any significant changes that it intends to make to its activities that could affect
                  either or both of the content and the practical application of its Mission.
 2.3.2.       If the Commonwealth receives notice from the University under clause 2.3.1 and
              considers that the proposed changes would require a change to this Compact, the
              Commonwealth will notify the University of this in writing and will consult with the
              University accordingly.




                                             Page 13
PART TWO

              The Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations, with
              assistance from DEEWR, has Commonwealth responsibility for the matters set out
              in this Part Two of the Compact.

3.            TEACHING AND LEARNING

3.1.          Quality

Quality: Commonwealth objectives
 3.1.1.        A focus on teaching and learning quality underpins the Commonwealth’s vision for
               Australia to be one of the most highly educated and skilled nations in the world.
 3.1.2.        A focus on quality is an essential element of a system where funding is driven by
               student choice, and is essential for ensuring that the Commonwealth’s participation
               and social inclusion ambitions are achieved without a risk to quality.
 3.1.3.        The Commonwealth has made a commitment to provide more autonomy to
               universities through the removal of funding caps on Commonwealth supported
               places. In turn, the Commonwealth expects the University to participate in new
               higher education quality arrangements which will be overseen by the Tertiary
               Education Quality and Standards Agency. The new arrangements are designed to
               support academic autonomy while ensuring that the achievement of minimum
               standards can be demonstrated and that there is a strong focus on enhancing the
               quality of teaching and learning while expansion of the higher education system
               meets national participation ambitions.
 3.1.4.        The University also has obligations under the quality and accountability
               requirements in Division 19 of HESA. This Compact does not change those
               obligations.

Quality: University strategies


The Quality of Teaching and Learning
The Academic component of the University Plan provides the platform from which the teaching
and learning quality agenda operates at JCU.

The Academic Plan consists of five objectives which guide teaching and learning activity, and
quality:
1.     Alignment of JCU’s teaching programs and courses with four major tropical themes
       With a current emphasis across the four thematic areas on issues of particular relevance to
       sustainability in the Tropics and to rural, remote and Indigenous and underserved
       populations, JCU’s courses and teaching programs are to be aligned with the four strategic
       themes:
               Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
               Industries and Economies in the Tropics
               Peoples and Societies in the Tropics




                                             Page 14
             Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity

     The alignment of JCU’s courses and teaching programs is measured through the
     Curriculum Refresh project (see section 3.5 below), annual Faculty and Divisional acquittals
     of the University Plan and also through processes which support JCU’s Quality
     Enhancement principles of self reflection where annual Course Performance reports are
     prepared by course coordinators. The Course Performance reports are consolidated into
     Faculty Academic Program reports which inform systematic future planning and strategy
     development.

2.   Promote Leadership for Teaching and Learning
     This is achieved through a range of strategies including: consolidating and supporting key
     leadership positions such as Heads of School, Course Coordinators and First Year
     Experience Coordinators; strengthening the role of the Teaching and Learning Academy
     (see section 3.5 below) to support recognition of staff development efforts related to
     teaching and learning; establishing peer review of teaching as a quality enhancement
     mechanism; and revising the Graduate Certificate in Tertiary Teaching and the JCU
     Teaching induction programs to provide core skills in teaching and teaching and learning
     scholarship. These strategies will be measured through the membership of the Teaching
     and Learning Academy, establishment of peer review processes of teaching, increased
     enrolments in the Graduate Certificate of Tertiary Teaching, and increased attendance at
     JCU teaching induction programs.

3.   Develop curriculum for change
     This is achieved through a range of strategies including: rolling out the Learning, Teaching
     and Assessment policy; finalising the Curriculum Refresh project (see section 3.5 below);
     and embedding the use of Course Performance reports in academic culture. These
     strategies will be measured through the annual review of assessment practices and student
     progression by Faculty Teaching and Learning Committees, and annual Course
     Performance Reports and consolidated Faculty Academic Program reports, and also via
     reports to Education Committee and ultimately Academic Board.


4.   Enhance flexibility for an inclusive student experience.
     Through this objective JCU will enhance and develop access pathways and equity
     initiatives that minimise the impacts of disadvantage, and will enhance the student
     experience with a particular focus on first year (see further below Equity Initiatives). JCU
     will support student populations at study locations to meet their needs through the flexibility
     of our programs and delivery.
     These strategies will be measured through retention, participation, student completions,
     progression rates, AUSSE and Student Barometer survey results, subjects offered in
     flexible delivery mode, and through annual Course Performance reports, consolidated
     Faculty Academic Program Reports, and Faculty and Divisional acquittals of their plans. In
     addition, in 2011, 3 appointments (one of which will focus on educational technologies) will
     be made to the Teaching and Learning Development Unit to provide support to enhance
     these goals and strategies and to respond to the Federal Government’s agenda of
     extending reach and enhancing quality. These positions are funded from money provided
     for improvement from the Learning and Teaching Performance Fund.




                                             Page 15
Student Engagement and Student Outcomes

In the same vein as teaching and learning quality, relevant University objectives and strategies
guide JCU’s focus on improving the student experience.

The recently developed (and awaiting final approval) Learning, Teaching and Assessment
Policy outlines our core principles, many of which extend well beyond teaching and pervade all
aspects of the student’s life at JCU. These core principles are:
      Students are at the core of our University;
      Student success is built on their whole University experience;
      The diversity of students is recognised and welcomed; and
      Open communication builds shared understanding.

JCU uses an evidence-based approach to identify areas where the student experience could be
improved. Mechanisms to evaluate the student experience include:
     Student survey data is collated, analysed and reported on and distributed to relevant
       committees and academic staff for action by relevant organisational units;
     Annual faculty, divisional and university performance portfolios are developed
       incorporating relevant data from our Institutional Performance Portfolio (IPP), our own
       KPIs, KPMs and OPTs, and other corporate statistics. These portfolios are used to
       analyse performance and compare performance across the University;
     Organisational unit reviews; and
     Course performance reports collate relevant student experience data around the
       curriculum.

‘The Student Experience’ is a core term of reference for all faculty and divisional reviews.
Review panels meet with a sample of undergraduate and postgraduate students in Cairns and
Townsville and, if significant numbers make it relevant, at other teaching sites. All students are
also invited to make a written submission to the panel. Student feedback is captured in the
review report or may be provided separately to the organisational unit where matters outside the
review scope are raised.

The Student Experience Advisory Committee (SEAC) has developed a Student Charter and the
Student Complaints Protocol designed to ensure fair, consistent and prompt resolution of
student complaints across the University. A new Student Complaints Management Policy
currently under development will, when endorsed, replace the Protocol. A Student Complaint
Management Unit has been established to develop processes, communication and other
resources for managing student complaints. It reports quarterly to the Vice-Chancellor’s
Advisory Committee to identify trends in student complaints, report on management issues and
suggest improvements to improve policy and process and reduce student complaint cases.

The Student Associations in Townsville/Cairns, Singapore and Brisbane provide a range of
services for students including a wide range of sporting clubs and affiliations and special
interest clubs. The Sports and Recreation Centre in Townsville, opened in 2009 and operated
by the Student Association, has enriched student life beyond the classroom. Students can
access a range of support services and counselling through the units like the Teaching and
Learning Development Unit and the Equity Careers and Counselling Division.

Students are included as members on a range of University wide committees such as University
Council, Academic Board and SEAC through to faculty and school committees with most




                                            Page 16
schools having School Liaison Committees.




3.2.       Equity

Equity: Commonwealth objectives
 3.2.1.     The Commonwealth is committed to a fair and equitable higher education system
            that provides equal opportunity for people of all backgrounds to participate to their
            full potential and the support to do so.
 3.2.2.     In particular, the Commonwealth has an ambition that by 2020, 20 per cent of
            higher education enrolments at the undergraduate level will be people from low
            socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds.
 3.2.3.     The Commonwealth is also committed to enhancing participation and outcomes for
            Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in higher education.
 3.2.4.     The Commonwealth funds a range of programs to encourage and support access
            to and participation in higher education by people from low SES backgrounds,
            Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other under-represented groups,
            including the Higher Education Loan Program and Student Income Support.
 3.2.5.     The Commonwealth expects all universities to play a part in meeting the
            Commonwealth's higher education participation ambitions, consistent with the
            objectives and regulatory requirements of specific equity programs and income
            support measures.
 3.2.6.     The Commonwealth will monitor the University’s equity performance through the
            existing reporting requirements attached to individual programs. The University’s
            performance in meeting equity objectives will also be linked with teaching and
            learning Performance Funding targets, as specified in the table under paragraph
            4.14 of this Compact.
 3.2.7.     Universities have obligations under the fairness requirements in Division 19 of
            HESA. This Compact does not change those obligations.

Equity: University strategies

James Cook University was established over forty years ago to provide higher education
opportunities to residents of northern Queensland. The commitment to providing access and
opportunity for those who may not have previously considered tertiary education as an option




                                           Page 17
has continued throughout the history of the University. JCU has continually achieved above the
state and sector averages on equity measures of access and participation rates for students
from low socio economic backgrounds, students from regional and remote locations and
Indigenous students.

Our commitment to providing access to, and participation in, higher education from under-
represented groups is clearly articulated in the University Plan through the following objectives:
       Offer a socially inclusive learning environment focusing on the student experience
       Foster a culture of scholarship and innovation and an inclusive campus community for
        staff and students
       Foster an environment which recognises and supports the diverse cultural communities
        in which the University resides
       Promote inclusion within the region

We aim to achieve these objectives through the following strategies:
       Enhance and develop access pathways and equity initiatives that minimise the impacts
         of disadvantage, whether geographic, cultural or financial
       Promote access and participation especially for our Indigenous communities
       Enhance the student experience, with particular focus on the first year
       Increase the proportion of students from Indigenous and from diverse backgrounds
         through targeted recruitment programs supported by an expanded range of University
         scholarships
       Implement the University Indigenous Employment strategy for staff supported by
         identification of designated Indigenous positions, targeted advertising and marketing,
         direct input from indigenous communities
       Raise awareness in the University regarding equity and diversity issues and initiatives to
         enable students and staff to engage and participate in an inclusive culture

James Cook University has supported a study centre on Thursday Island since 2003, and
provides both teaching and learning facilities for Education and Nursing students in the Torres
Strait.

JCU’s equity measures are co-ordinated through the Equity, Counselling and Careers
Directorate which incorporates student and staff equity, careers and employment, counselling
and chaplaincy. The work of the directorate is supported by the Equity and Diversity Advisory
Committee (EDAC) which reports to the Vice Chancellor quarterly on progress being made
toward the achievement of the University’s equity objectives and targets. The Social Inclusion
and Attainment Working Group (an EDAC working group) has the responsibility for developing
and coordinating the overall JCU widening participation strategy, including the use of HEPPP
funds.

Strategies to improve access and participation of students in equity groups

Delivery of aspiration raising programs to school students
The JCU Aspire program currently targets 54 priority secondary schools and 103 primary
schools in North and Far North Queensland. The program includes aspiration raising residential
program for Year 9 students’ a student ambassador program and Academic Encouragement
Awards for students in Year 10 and 12. The Aspire program will be extended to increase the
number of identified low-SES schools it reaches.




                                            Page 18
Partnerships with schools and colleges
Work has begun on developing Partnership Agreements with Western Cape College and Rio
Tinto at Weipa and Tagai College and the Torres Strait Regional Educational Council in Torres
Strait. JCU is also working with Smithfield High School adjacent to the Cairns Campus to
establish a Year 11/12 Learning Academy to raise aspirations and prepare students for
University study.

Tailored Marketing Strategies
Initiatives include the annual Indigenous Careers Roadshow which promotes health professions
to Indigenous secondary students, a “True Story” DVD showing university life through the eyes
of current Indigenous students, and the subsidising of travel expenses for students in identified
equity groups to attend the residential University Experience program.

Collaboration with other Queensland Universities
JCU is part of an agreement between all Queensland Universities which allocates each
University a cluster of low-SES schools. Within their allocated cluster, each university
undertakes an agreed suite of activities designed to stimulate interest in post-school study, with
an emphasis on promoting all universities.

Tertiary Access and Enabling Programs
JCU offers a six-month Tertiary Access program to prepare students for selected undergraduate
degrees and a two week Uni Prep program to enable students to get a better understanding of
University study prior to enrolment. These programs are currently available at the Townsville
and Mackay Campuses and in 2011 will be expanded to Mt Isa and Thursday Island Study
Centres.

The Indigenous Health Careers Access Program (IHCAP) is designed to increase Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander student success by enabling students to complete first year subjects
over two years and supplementing the academic program with enabling subjects and additional
support. IHCAP was the first of its kind in Australia with 31 students being enrolled in the
program since its commencement in 2006. About one-third of these students has transferred to
a mainstream program.

JCU has introduced Diplomas in Health Science and Arts which have encouraged participation
from students who could not meet the entry requirements of a degree program or are not in a
position to commit to a full degree program. To date approximately one third of students
completing a Diploma program have articulated into a full degree program.

Alternate Application Process
The high demand health professional programs have a written application process where
prospective candidates are asked to identify how their application supports the themes of rural,
remote, Indigenous and tropical. The School of Medicine interviews are uniquely tailored for
Indigenous students and include Indigenous community panel members.

Tailored Programs
The Remote Area Teacher Education Program (RATEP) is a community-based teacher
education program for Indigenous people, based on a strong partnership with the Queensland
Department of Education and Training (DET) and Tropical North Queensland TAFE. It provides
a pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to gain our Bachelor of Education
and then register and teach in Queensland. This program provides access in 21 communities
for Indigenous people whose family and community commitments and cultural obligations




                                            Page 19
prevent them leaving their communities to study on campus.

Strategies to improve retention and success outcomes for equity group students

Financial Support
JCU has a range of scholarships, bursaries and grants, offered in parallel with Commonwealth
Learning Scholarships, to assist undergraduate students from low socio-economic
backgrounds, regional and remote and Indigenous students. In 2010 257 students were
supported at a cost of $234,684. A total of 220 JCU Equity Scholarships, 276 Year 12 Academic
Encouragement Awards, and 450 Equity Support Grants will be provided over the triennium.
Learning Support
The following programs are available to provide additional support to students and also to
identify students who are struggling early in their degree.
       The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Tutorial Assistance Scheme (ATAS) offers
        extra tutoring to assist Indigenous students;
       LearnJCU incorporates student tracking and notification capabilities to identify at-risk
        students who are then contacted and supported by the On Track peer support program;
       Learning Advisors, Academic Advisors, Librarians, First Year Coordinators, Counsellors
        and Student Mentors are all available to support students. Learning and writing skills
        workshops are conducted.
       Web-based library resources enable students from diverse backgrounds to improve
        learning and information literacy skills within the context of the discipline and subject
        requirements.
Peer Support
The Student Mentor Program continues to grow in numbers and value in terms of mentor
support for students and personal development for mentees. In 2011, a retention program to
support Indigenous students will provide networking and support awareness opportunities for
students through regular social activities that will also involve the broader community.

First Year Experience Program
First Year Co-ordinators are appointed for each course to provide additional support for
students commencing university study. The University also has an extensive O Week Program
to welcome students to the university and provide opportunities for them to meet staff and fellow
students in an informal setting.

Indicators for measuring progress

Access and Participation
 Surveying of high school students to determine the level of awareness of tertiary education
     and their aspiration to participate;
 The number of year 12s from target schools who are engaged in university or university-level
       VET studies six months after finishing school.
 Increase in the higher education participation rate in the regions where our campuses are
       located compared to the state average.
 Continued benchmarking of participation and access rates for equity groups across the IRU,
       Queensland and the sector.




                                              Page 20
 Retention and Attrition
 Systematically track student attrition by equity group/by faculty, and also track the attrition
   effects of the scholarships program by equity group and by type of scholarship. Tracking of
   students identified as being as at risk and referred to the On Track Program to measure the
   effectiveness of this program.

University-wide initiatives to assist Indigenous retention and success

School of Indigenous Australian Studies (SIAS)
The SIAS provides support for Indigenous students, teaching and research programs at the
undergraduate and postgraduate levels, cultural awareness programs, research protocols
workshops, and links and partnerships with Indigenous communities and stakeholders.

Indigenous Support Officers
Indigenous Support Officers are employed in each Faculty to support Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander students to participate in and succeed at their university education.

Reconciliation Statement
In 2008, JCU made a further commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
through the launch of the Reconciliation Statement, the appointment of an Advisor on
Indigenous Affairs and of a Reference Group to assist with the reconciliation process. Measures
to support the Statement are extensive and include: Faculty Indigenous coordinating
committees; Indigenous Student Support Officers (ISSOs); Indigenous members of Council and
key committees; Indigenous graduates presented with ceremonial sashes at graduation.

Indigenous Employment Strategy
In 2008, JCU appointed an Indigenous Employment Coordinator and established an Indigenous
Employment Reference Committee to ensure direct input from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander community. Aligned with the 2007 Productivity Commission’s Report – Overcoming
Indigenous Disadvantage, Council in 2009 approved JCU’s first Indigenous Employment
Strategy - a key strategy of the University Plan. The report provides a target of 5% of JCU’s
workforce being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander by 2012 with proportionate representation in
continuing positions across the University.



3.3.        Infrastructure

Infrastructure: Commonwealth objectives
  3.3.1.      The Commonwealth is committed to the development of world class higher
              education infrastructure. A contemporary, technology rich, well designed and
              equipped campus environment has a positive influence on staff and student
              performance and satisfaction.
  3.3.2.      While the responsibility for capital infrastructure development and maintenance
              rests with the University, the Commonwealth’s commitment is demonstrated
              through programs such as the Education Investment Fund. Universities also utilise
              Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding for capital works.




                                            Page 21
3.3.3.   The Commonwealth anticipates that the University will focus not only on
         developing new University-owned and operated buildings but also on optimising
         the use of existing facilities, refurbishing and adequately maintaining existing
         infrastructure, investing in e-learning and other information and communications
         technologies (ICT), and utilising space owned by, or shared with, other education
         providers.
3.3.4.   The Commonwealth will monitor the University's infrastructure programs, and their
         alignment with the Commonwealth's infrastructure objectives, through the
         Institutional Performance Portfolio Information Collection.




                                       Page 22
Infrastructure: University Strategies

The University has expanded its planning timeframe for significant capital and infrastructure
developments to span 2011 to 2017.The Capital and Infrastructure Plan is reviewed annually by
the relevant committee, which is either the Facilities and Infrastructure Advisory Committee
(FIAC), Information and Communications Technologies Advisory Committee (ICTAC), or
Research Committee. The Capital and Infrastructure Plan is informed by the capital bid process.
Capital bids are prioritised depending on the impact they would have on maintaining/upgrading
services or enhancing revenues, and their strategic link to the Faculty and Divisional Plans and
ultimately support of the University Plan. A range of teaching and learning specific selection
criteria are applicable and include:

   Increased flexible and engaging usage of learning spaces: covering the need for better
    and more flexible spaces to allow a variety of teaching approaches
   Infrastructure for increased student access to courses (in particular Cairns):
    improvement of online, mixed mode or cross campus teaching and learning
   Supporting innovations for increased student learning and engagement: where
    innovation and enhancement of the student experience needs capital support

The University also prioritises projects that improve our environmental sustainability and that
deliver efficiencies in both energy and water usage. One such project undertaken recently
(completed in 2009) is the Campus District Cooling project that has reduced the energy
expenditure on the Townsville campus by 15%. The cooling system on the Townsville campus
satisfies the cooling needs of the majority of buildings on that campus, and has reduced the
greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption and the energy cost rate.

James Cook University is also very focussed on the effective management of our Estate as the
cost of maintaining and operating the University’s physical footprint is the second largest cost
after salaries. In particular, space management initiatives are being implemented to ensure that
our existing space is fully utilised.

Capital projects are funded from a variety of sources including external funding and grants,
borrowings and contribution from operating funds. Detailed below are the budgeted major
projects for the period 2011 to 2013.

Specialist Teaching & Student Services Precinct - $19.9m
This project will comprise a contemporary, pedagogically advanced facility of general teaching
space, focusing on active learning modalities and facilitating Next Generation Pedagogy for
Next Generation students. The building will house a completely integrated School of Education
providing flexible delivery modes, peer to peer learning space, collaborative teaching rooms,
tutorial rooms and ICT space. The building will also include the Student Services Hub providing
a one stop shop for student enrolments and enquiries. This will create a vibrant learning,
support and social hub for the campus which will increase student engagement and connection
with the campus, a key contributor to retention.

Queensland Tropical Health Alliance (QTHA) - $7.6m
In collaboration with the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, the Queensland University
of Technology and Griffith University, JCU was awarded funds under the IBF by the
Queensland Government to establish and lead the QTHA. The Alliance coordinates a world
class integrated tropical health and medical network and provides an opportunity for staff and
students to conduct research and develop careers within the network. The Alliance includes a




                                           Page 23
node at the JCU Cairns campus and at other QTHA Participants’ campuses.
Veterinary Precinct - $10.1m
The investment in the Veterinary Precinct will significantly improve the provision of services and
infrastructure to students undertaking the Veterinary Program. The project includes Student
Support and Breakout areas, Laboratory, Clinical and animal handling facilities.

Mackay Teaching Facility - $5.6m
 The University has received funding to secure a Clinical Teaching Facility in Mackay at the
Mackay Base Hospital grounds. The program aims to increase the availability and viability of
Australian rural health services by providing positive clinical education and training experiences
for health students. The facility will be a two level education and research facility that will enable
Medical and Allied Health students to undertake high quality rural training. The University will
also have shared use of other educational facilities including the Library, Simulation Laboratory
and Auditorium. The building will be suitable for the needs of up to 60 medical students and up
to 20 other health related disciplines on clinical placement in Mackay, in a multidisciplinary,
technology focussed environment.

Mackay Clinical School Student Accommodation – $2.6m
This project is to construct an additional 20-bedroom student accommodation complex located
adjacent to the Mackay Base Hospital. This will provide medical students on rural clinical
placements with accommodation and study facilities whilst in Mackay. The complex will consist
of four sections; each section will contain five single bedrooms and be fully self-contained with
cooking, ablution and laundry facilities. This will enable students to undertake high quality rural
training and is essential to maintaining rural training activity levels.

The Cairns Institute - $25.0m
The Institute provides a focal point for tropical research innovation and education in Australia
and promotes collaborative research on social issues, marine and climate science, and
economic issues relevant to the tropics. The project will involve construction of the new building
incorporating research spaces, facilities for conferences and workshops, an information
resources hub and sophisticated ICT facilities. The Institute will bring together leading research
groups and enable collaboration and multidisciplinary approaches to enhance tropical expertise
to address these challenges. It will attract leading academics and students through the provision
of world class infrastructure and services.

Clinical Training Rehabilitation Clinic - $5.0m
The project will include the construction of a multi-disciplinary Clinical Training Rehabilitation
Clinic (building) in Townsville to increase opportunities for students to undertake clinical training
in allied health, psychology and medicine disciplines.

Dental Clinical Teaching Facilities - $32.0m
The project will include the development of Dental Clinical Teaching Facilities in Townsville
($10m) and Cairns ($22m). As part of the clinical requirements of the Bachelor of Dental
Surgery, students are required to participate in offering basic dental services to the public. The
Cairns facilities will be used for Years 3 and 4 of the program, while the Townsville facilities will
be used for Year 5 dental clinical training.

Longreach Hospital Student Accommodation - $1.1m
This project will provide secure reliable, suitable student accommodation in Longreach. The
project is to construct a ten bedroom accommodation facility in Longreach for medical, nursing
and allied health students undertaking clinical placements through the Mt Isa University
Department of Rural Health (UDRH). UDRH staff require access to suitable accommodation in




                                              Page 24
which to place students undergoing clinical placements. Where accommodation is unavailable,
in short supply, poorly maintained or its availability is unpredictable, the clinical training capacity
of a UDRH can be adversely affected.


Ingham Hospital Student Accommodation - $0.3m
This project will provide an additional two bedrooms onto an existing three-bedroom property,
adjacent to the Ingham Hospital. The project is to encourage medical practitioners to take up
rural practice through providing positive clinical education and training experiences for medical
students in rural areas. The objective is to provide medical students on rural clinical placements
with accommodation and study facilities whilst in Ingham. The extension will enable additional
students to participate in rural placements.

Thursday Island Student Accommodation - $2.1m
Funding of $2.1m was receivedfrom the Department of Health and Ageing to establish student
accommodation on Thursday Island as part of the Rural Education Infrastructure Development
(REID) Pool Funding. The project will provide accommodation for health professional students
on clinical placements as part of the joint RCS/UDHR multi-disciplinary education and training
approach of the JCU Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences.



3.4.        Student enrolments

Commonwealth objectives
 3.4.1.       The Commonwealth is committed to the expansion of a high quality higher
              education sector, to provide opportunities for all capable people to participate to
              their full potential.
 3.4.2.       An expanded higher education sector will educate the graduates needed by an
              economy based on knowledge, skills and innovation.
 3.4.3.       The Commonwealth has announced its ambition for growth in higher education
              attainment, so that by 2025, 40 per cent of all 25 to 34 year olds will hold a
              qualification at bachelor level or above.




                                              Page 25
University student enrolment planning

Over the next five years we will be aiming to:
        increase our student population to 25,000 on all campuses, with 5,000 in Cairns, and
          5,000 in Singapore, and

        develop teaching and research specialisations on our different campuses, particularly
         acknowledging the growth potential of Cairns and Singapore.

A major curriculum review has been established to ensure that JCU’s courses are in line with
our Strategic Intent and four strategic themes. As noted above, the themes are:
        Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change

        Industries and Economies in the Tropics

        Peoples and Societies in the Tropics

        Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity


Domestic demand

Since 2007, student demand has steadily increased, with a 6% increase in commencing
students between 2008 and 2009, and 10% increase from 2009 to 2010. The increase is
attributed to the impact of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), enhanced marketing effort, and
other strategies implemented by the University over the last few years, including the curriculum
refresh.

In line with our overall target of 25,000 students by 2015, the University’s Plan plans to continue
to increase domestic student enrolments by 11% between 2010 and 2013.

Discipline shifts reflecting new strategic priorities

Participation in higher education in the Cairns (6.9%) region remains significantly less than that
of Townsville (8.0%), and Queensland (9.5%) average. The University is committed to
increasing higher education participation rates in the northern Queensland region, to contribute
to the achievement of the national attainment target of 40% by 2025. Given the low historical
participation rate in the northern Queensland region, it is not expected that higher education
attainment rates of the northern Queensland population will ever reach the State or National
average.

The University plans to increase the number of students on the Cairns campus from ~3700 to
5000 (or 35%) by 2015, with the aim of improving educational opportunities for Cairns residents,
and to provide economies of scale benefits for the University. This planned increase in student
numbers requires focused attention now as investment in major capital infrastructure is required
to meet this target.

The Bachelor of Dental Surgery was offered for the first time in Cairns in 2009, and there is a
significant capital development on the Cairns campus in support of this program. The
commencement of the first prestige health program on the Cairns campus is expected to have




                                               Page 26
many benefits, including increases in student demand in other programs delivered on the Cairns
campus due to the Dentistry “halo effect”. This development also provides the basis to expand
our Cairns offerings in the health area. While Dentistry will eventually have ~300 enrolments (in
2013), significant growth in other discipline areas is required to achieve the 5000 enrolment
target. Strategies are being developed to achieve this challenging target.

Changes in the profile of Commonwealth-supported load reflecting changes in demand
The University is forecasting an increase in Commonwealth-supported student demand
between 2010 and 2012, resulting in an increase of ~700 EFTSL (or 8%). It is anticipated that
by 2012, the University will slightly exceed its 2011 CSP student load target by 4%. Refer table
below for implications for Cluster Profile.

                                                       Projected 2012
                               2010 Actual                               Variance
                                                       Total CSP Load
                Cluster
                                          %                      %
                            EFTSL                      EFTSL               EFTSL
                                        EFTSL                  EFTSL
                   1         1325        15%           1360     14%          35
                   2          237        3%             246      3%           9
                   3         1820        21%           1931     21%         111
                   4          923        10%            983     10%          60
                   5         1073        12%           1116     12%          43
                   6          583        7%             660      7%          77
                   7         1518        17%           1650     17%         132
                   8         1285        15%           1501     16%         216
                 Total       8764       100%           9448     100%        684

Shifts between undergraduate and postgraduate provision

No significant change is anticipated.

Changes in international student load in response to international student market changes or
new developments.

In line with our overall target of 25,000 students by 2015 contained within the University’s Plan,
an increase in international student enrolments by 29% between 2010 and 2013 is planned,
with the largest growth expected on the Singapore campus, with a enrolment target of 5000 by
2015 (currently ~2500). The on-campus (Townsville, Cairns, Mackay, Mount Isa and Thursday
Island) international student market is important to JCU, however we do not plan for the
proportion of international students to exceed 17% of all on-campus students (currently 13%).

While on-campus student load increased approximately 5% between 2008 and 2009, and 10%
between 2009 and 2010, there are currently significant challenges in the international market
which are negatively impacting JCU’s growth projections. It is anticipated that on-campus
international student demand will fall in 2011, and recover over the triennium.




                                             Page 27
3.5.          Other key teaching and learning priorities: University strategies

     JCU is engaged in a number of significant teaching and learning related projects. These
     include:

     Pathways College
     JCU has a desire to establish a Pathways College (foundation and bridging programs
     incorporating English Language training) from 2012. The College, to be established at
     the Townsville and Cairns Campuses, will provide pathways for students into selected
     JCU degrees. A tender process is currently underway in relation to this project.

     Teaching and Learning Academy
     The JCU Teaching and Learning Academy is a joint initiative of the Senior Deputy Vice-
     Chancellor’s Office and the Teaching and Learning Development Unit and currently has
     130 members. The Academy is representative of a scholarly community and provides a
     space and place for ‘informed and respectful debate’ in relation to the changing culture
     for teaching and learning.

     Curriculum Refresh: Australia’s University for the Tropics Project
     JCU is currently undertaking a DEEWR funded Curriculum Refresh project, ‘Australia’s
     University for the Tropics’ which is due for completion in 2012. The purpose of the project
     is to refresh curriculum so that it aligns with our four strategic themes.

     Schools on Campus Project
     JCU has commissioned the Hornery Institute to assist in developing a University Schools
     partnership between JCU and the Queensland Department of Education and Training.
     The key goals of this partnership would be to strengthen links between JCU and the
     school sector and increase the sense of linkage to the community. This initiative is in its
     early stages and there have been positive discussions with the Regional Directors of the
     Department in both North and Far North Queensland.



4.            PERFORMANCE FUNDING

Commonwealth objectives
4.1           Higher education Performance Funding will provide incentives for universities to
              improve outcomes for students.
4.2           To be eligible for Performance Funding, the University must:
              (i) be a Table A provider (see paragraph 30-1(1)(a)(i) of the Act); and

              (ii) be a provider for which the Minister has allocated a number of Commonwealth
                 supported places to the provider for that year under section 30-10 (see
                 paragraph 30-1(1)(b) of the Act); and




                                               Page 28
           (iii) be a provider which has entered into a funding agreement with the
               Commonwealth under section 30-25 in respect of a period that includes that year
               (this being the 2011-2013 Compact).
4.3        Performance Funding has two components:
           (i) Facilitation Funding; and

           (ii) Reward Funding for achieving university performance targets

Facilitation Funding
4.4        Facilitation Funding acknowledges both the diverse missions of universities and the
           commitment to the Australian Government’s learning and teaching goals.
4.5        The Australian Government will provide Facilitation Funding to universities
           commencing in 2011.
4.6        Facilitation Funding will be paid as a formula driven share of the available funding.
           Each university’s Facilitation Funding payment will be calculated on their proportional
           share of Commonwealth Grant Scheme Basic Grant Amount (section 33-5 of the
           Act) and the Grants to Support National Institutes specified in the Other Grants
           Guidelines (item 4 of subsection 41-10 of the Act). Refer to the Performance Funding
           Technical Guidelines for further details.
4.7        As a condition of the Facilitation Funding component of Performance Funding, in
           accordance with this agreement, the University must:
           (i) inform the Australian Government of strategies and goals for achieving the
               University’s teaching and learning mission described under clauses 3.1, 3.2 and
               3.4; and
           (ii) agree to the performance targets relating to specific Australian Government
               goals contained in clause 4.14.
4.8        Once a 2011-2013 Compact has been agreed, the University will be paid the 2011
           Facilitation Funding amount, plus any indexation, each year of the Compact period.
4.9        The Commonwealth and the University agree to annual review, under Section 9 of
           this Compact, of the effectiveness of implementation of the strategies and goals for
           achieving the University’s teaching and learning mission described under clauses
           3.1, 3.2 and 3.4.
Reward Funding
4.10       From 2012, the Australian Government will introduce Reward Funding for
           universities that achieve performance targets.
4.11       As a condition of the Reward Funding component of Performance Funding, in
           accordance with this agreement, the University must:
           (i) agree performance targets as outlined in clause 4.14;




                                           Page 29
         (ii) supply performance data to the Commonwealth for relevant indicators as per the
             requirements set out in section 2 of the Performance Funding Technical
             Guidelines; and
         (iii) achieve the relevant targets as outlined in clause 4.14.

4.12     Each university’s maximum possible Reward Funding payment will be calculated on
         their proportional share of Commonwealth Grant Scheme Basic Grant Amount,
         consistent with the focus of Performance Funding being on improvement of teaching
         and learning.
HESA Funding Agreement
4.13     This section 4, together with the terms and conditions set out at Attachment D to this
         Compact, constitute the HESA Funding Agreement for the provision of Performance
         Funding to the University.

University performance targets
4.14     The University’s performance targets are in the table below.
         (i) Performance targets refer to the year of payment.

         (ii) Progress targets represent progress towards achievement of aspirational goals.
             Reward Funding for achievement against the 2014 and 2015 progress targets
             and aspirational goals would be the subject of a future Compact.




                                           Page 30
University performance categories and targets

Performance Category 1: Participation and Social Inclusion
Performance indicator 1A: Proportion of domestic undergraduates who are from a low SES
                              background.
Baseline for improvement target: 20.87% (2009 data)


                          2012                    2013                   2014                   2015
                     Reward Payment          Reward Payment         Progress target        Progress target
                      (target for 2011           (target for 2012   (target for 2013           (target for 2014
                          students)                  students)          students)                  students)

 Excellence Target                                                  Subject of future      Subject of future
                         19.39%                     19.39%
                                                                        compact                   compact

 Improvement
                           N/A                        N/A
 Target

 Outcome


Performance indicator 1B: Proportion of domestic undergraduate students who are Indigenous
Baseline for improvement target: 3.79% (average of 2008/09 data)


                                      2012                                         2013
                                 Reward Payment                               Reward Payment
                             (target for 2011 students)                    (target for 2012 students)

 Improvement
                                         3.85%                                         3.96%
 Target

 Outcome




                                                  Page 31
University performance categories and targets

Performance Category 2: Student Experience
Performance indicator 2A: Domestic undergraduate satisfaction with teaching
 (Measured using data from the Australian Graduate Survey – Course Experience
 Questionnaire (CEQ) [Good Teaching Scale and Overall Satisfaction Item])

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                                                    Participate in 2013 CEQ* (2012 final
                                          N/A                     year students) to establish baseline
                                                                              performance.

 Outcome                                  N/A


* the 2012 CEQ report refers to students whose final year of study was in 2011 and who participated in
the CEQ survey in 2012 and where performance was reported in 2013.


Performance indicator 2B: Domestic undergraduate experience
 (Measured using data from the University Experience Survey [UES])

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                                                   Participate in the development of the
                                          N/A                          UES to establish baseline
                                                                              performance.

 Outcome                                  N/A




                                                Page 32
University performance categories and targets

Performance Category 3: Quality of Learning Outcomes
Performance indicator 3A: Domestic undergraduate satisfaction with generic skills
 (Measured using data from the Australian Graduate Survey – Course Experience
 Questionnaire (CEQ) [Generic Skills Scale])

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                                                    Participate in 2013 CEQ* (2012 final
                                          N/A                     year students) to establish baseline
                                                                              performance.

 Outcome                                  N/A


* the 2012 CEQ report refers to student whose final year of study was in 2011 and who participated in
the CEQ survey in 2012 and where performance was reported in 2013.


 Performance indicator 3B: Domestic undergraduate value added generic skills
 (Measured using data from the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA))

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                                                    Participate in the development of the
                                          N/A                           CLA to establish baseline
                                                                               performance.

 Outcome                                  N/A


 Performance indicator 3C: Composite Teaching Quality Indicator (TQI)


                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                                                       Participate in development of
                                                                    composite indicator (including
                                          N/A
                                                                  providing data where requested) to
                                                                   establish baseline performance.

 Outcome                                  N/A

4.15    Section 3 of the Performance Technical Funding Guidelines provides detailed
        information on the calculation and assessment of the above indicators. Section 4.2.2 of




                                                Page 33
       the Performance Funding Administrative Guidelines also provides information on
       implementation of new performance indicators.
4.16   The Australian Government undertakes to consult the higher education sector on the
       development and enhancement of indicators for the purposes of Performance Funding.




5.        COMMONWEALTH GRANT SCHEME
5.1      Attachment E contains the current HESA Funding Agreement for the provision of
         Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding to the University for the 2009 to 2011
         calendar years.
5.2      Attachment E becomes part of this Compact on execution of the Compact.
5.3      The Commonwealth anticipates that any future HESA Funding Agreements for the
         provision of Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding to the University will also form
         part of this Compact.




6.        OTHER FUNDING PROVIDED BY DEEWR
6.1      A list of key programs and funding allocations under which the Commonwealth,
         through DEEWR, provides support to the University is set out at Attachment A. This
         list may be updated from time to time, including if the University is successful in
         applying for any new and/or additional Commonwealth funding.




                                         Page 34
PART THREE

          The Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, with assistance from
          DIISR, has Commonwealth responsibility for the matters set out in this Part Three of
          the Compact.

7.        RESEARCH, RESEARCH TRAINING AND INNOVATION
          A range of research, research training and innovation performance indicators and
          targets are proposed in this section. Principal Performance Indicators are
          compulsory and institutions may voluntarily nominate Additional Performance
          Indicators and targets considered reflective of individual institutional goals.
          The Commonwealth recognises that universities have diverse missions and,
          consequently, targets and performance will vary between institutions. Universities
          should develop performance indicators and targets to reflect their individual
          performance and strategic direction.

7.1.      Research performance and research capability

Research performance and research capability: Commonwealth objectives
7.1.1.    The Commonwealth encourages excellence in research performance and the
          strengthening of research capability. Particular objectives are to:
          a.   progressively increase the number of research groups performing at world class
               levels, as measured by international performance benchmarks; and
          b.   promote collaboration, including collaboration between researchers within
               Australia and internationally.
7.1.2.    The Commonwealth, through DIISR, may provide funding to the University to assist
          the University achieve these Commonwealth research performance and research
          capability objectives, including through the Sustainable Research Excellence in
          Universities (SRE) program, the Research Infrastructure Block Grants (RIBG)
          scheme and, where relevant, the Collaborative Research Networks (CRN) program.
7.1.3.    If the University is provided with funding from DIISR under the Collaborative
          Research Networks (CRN) program, the University will be required to enter into a
          legally binding CRN funding agreement with DIISR. That legally binding agreement
          will not be made under HESA and will be separate from, but made within the
          framework of, this Compact from the date of its execution.
7.1.4.    Other Commonwealth funding to assist the University achieve these Commonwealth
          objectives may also be provided outside of this Compact by the Australian Research
          Council (ARC), the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), the
          International Science Linkages program, the Australia-India Strategic Research
          Fund, and research infrastructure funds such as the Education Infrastructure Fund,
          Super Science Initiative and the Cooperative Research Centres (CRC) program.




                                          Page 35
7.1.5.      The Commonwealth, through the ARC, will implement the Excellence in Research
            for Australia (ERA) initiative which will evaluate research undertaken at Australian
            universities against international benchmarks. ERA will be used in the future to
            assist in determining funding in some research programs (for example, the
            Sustainable Research Excellence in Universities [SRE]) administered by the
            Commonwealth.



Research performance and research capability: University strategies

JCU’s research strategy aligns seamlessly with the University’s vision and the four strategic
themes that underpin the Academic Plan. A portfolio of strategies has been put in place to give
effect to the vision, as outlined below.
Tropical Leaders recruitment program
In 2008, JCU launched its global search for leaders in research of significance to the tropics.
Over the period 2009-2010, 11 internationally recognised scholars have been appointed under
the Tropical Leaders recruitment program. The Tropical Leaders are playing an important role in
extending JCU’s capabilities in research and research education in fields of vital importance to
the tropics in Australia and worldwide. For example, Professor William Laurance was awarded
an Australian Laureate Fellowship in 2010 to support his work on rainforest conservation. In the
most recent ARC grant round four of the Tropical Leaders were awarded a total of 5 grants (3
DP, 1 LP, 1 IRD) and a further grant was awarded to a new member of staff working alongside
another of the Tropical Leaders (Dr Oscar Ventnor, working with Professor William Laurance).
JCU anticipates that the positive influence of the Tropical Leaders will be more evident in the
second round of ERA.
Centres and Institutes
A review of the institutional arrangements for the establishment and operation of centres and
institutes was commissioned in 2009, leading to a new policy, approved by University Council in
2010. Research centres and institutes are primary avenues through which JCU interacts
regionally, nationally and globally with governments, industry, NGOs, communities and other
research institutions in pursuit of its vision. The portfolio of centres and institutes will project the
University’s strategic intent and enable the development of critical mass and focus through
concentration of resources in areas of research strength which have national and international
profile. Research centres and institutes are expected to make significant contributions to the
research culture of schools, faculties and the University, including training and mentoring of
HDR students and early career researchers.
Early Career Researchers (ECRs)
The University recognises that the successful recruitment and retention of ECRs is critical for
JCU’s competitiveness, relevance, productivity and research workforce regeneration.
Accordingly, in 2010 the University developed an ECR career development strategy designed to
ensure that all ECRs at JCU receive the support they need to quickly establish themselves as
productive researchers and to promote a consistent, university-wide approach that ensures
equitable opportunities for new staff. Elements of the strategy include structured professional
development, mentoring, workload management, research funding support, and a ‘rising stars’
program to support new research staff of outstanding potential.
Partnerships
JCU works in partnership with other research organisations, often co-locating research staff and
infrastructure, with the aim of increasing research capacity in north Queensland. A measure of




                                               Page 36
JCU’s success in research collaboration is that according to the SCImago 2010 rankings, JCU
has the second highest proportion of internationally co-authored papers amongst Australian
universities. The ARC Centre of Excellence (ARC CoE) is an outstanding national and
international example of collaboration in research, being a formal partnership between JCU, UQ,
ANU, UWA and AIMS, and working with more than 150 other leading institutions in 36 countries
worldwide.
Other partnerships include:
    AIMS@JCU, a joint venture that brings together JCU and the Australian Institute of
       Marine Science (AIMS) to focus on collaborative research in tropical aquaculture, coastal
       processes and modeling, and stress in tropical marine systems. In 2010 the two
       organisations agreed to continue the joint venture, particularly through support to higher
       degree research students.

       The Tropical Landscapes Joint Venture (TLJV) is a collaborative program of research
        between JCU and CSIRO that focuses on research to underpin the sustainable
        management of tropical Queensland’s environmental assets. In 2010 the administration
        of the TLJV shifted from Cairns to Townsville, coinciding with the occupancy of the new
        state-of-the-art Australian Tropical Science and Innovation Precinct (ATSIP). ATSIP is the
        new home to more than 170 CSIRO and JCU staff and students, with research focused
        on 6 programs: Biodiversity and climate change, Sustainable communities, industries and
        governance systems, Sustainable production systems, Sustainable ecosystem
        management, Hydro-ecological interactions, and Coastal and freshwater systems.

       The Australian Tropical Forest Institute (ATFI) is the focal point for TLJV activities in
        Cairns. ATFI is also the home to the Australian Tropical Herbarium, one of the largest
        collections of Australian tropical flora. ATH is a partnership between the Queensland
        Government, the Australian Federal Government, CSIRO and JCU.

       JCU leads a collaboration with the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, the
        Queensland University of Technology and Griffith University, which was granted $19.45
        million in late 2009 towards the establishment of the Queensland Tropical Health Alliance
        (QTHA). As a result of discussions during 2010, the University of Queensland has joined
        the alliance.

       JCU signed an MoU with Griffith University in 2009 to support cross-institutional research
        relevant to the tropics; 2 rounds of grants have been awarded under the program. In late
        2010, the ANU and JCU signed an MoU to collaborate in research; an immediate
        outcome is joint institutional support for an Australian Laureate application. JCU is also
        leading a project to establish collaborative higher degree research education in tropical
        science, knowledge and innovation.

       On the basis of a very successful history of collaboration, several new partnerships are
        presently in development with the aim of further promoting collaboration and improving
        research performance:
o   With the Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
    (DEEDI) JCU is working to establish Queensland Tropical Agri and Aquatic Sciences
    (QTAAS), bringing together research in tropical agriculture, biosecurity, fisheries and
    aquaculture.
o   JCU partnered with the University of Queensland, Griffith University, Queensland University
    of Technology and Central Queensland University in a successful proposal to the




                                             Page 37
    Queensland Government to establish the new Queensland Centre for Social Science
    Innovation.
o   JCU is a foundation partner in Life Sciences Queensland, a new industry body representing
    the life sciences and biotechnology.
o   JCU was invited to lead the establishment of a new Australian Biofuels Research Institute, a
    $20 million investment in biofuels that address food security issues.
o   Singapore – JCU Tropical Futures work being developed by James Cook University and the
    Singapore Government to deliver world-class research and applied innovations needed to
    achieve a sustainable and stable balance between the social and economic development
    needs of economies in the tropics, while maintaining the physical and biological resilience of
    oceans, land, atmosphere, and biosphere of tropical regions. Tropical Futures aims to:
           Be recognized as a world-leader in marine and terrestrial research and innovation
            relevant to the Tropics.
           Deliver trans-disciplinary research about grand challenge issues that span national
            borders.
           Deliver analytical research on sustainable stewardship of natural resources and
            industries in the region.
           Strengthen the field of tropical studies by developing the institutional capacity of the
            next generation of students, scientists, practitioners, industry sectors, and policy
            makers.
           Deliver applied innovation and solutions for industry through excellence in public -
            private R&D linkage, technology transfer and the timely exploitation of research
            results.
ERA Performance
The ERA results confirm that JCU is performing above world standard in several fields,
particularly environmental science and management, and fisheries sciences (in both of which
JCU was the only Australian university recognised as well above world standard in these fields),
geochemistry, geology, ecology, evolutionary biology, plant biology, zoology, and tourism. In
another 14 4-digit fields JCU was rated at world standard. JCU was assessed in 42 4-digit
fields, indicating a breadth of research; it was evaluated as world class or better in 55% of these
fields.
In respect of these results:
       The University is internationally renowned in several fields, which is reflected in one way
        or another through ERA. JCU will maintain and grow its expertise in these fields through
        ongoing recruitment, development and growth of its partnerships, succession planning,
        and investments in career development, as outlined above.
       There are several fields of research that are of distinct strategic importance to JCU
        however these have not been rated at world standard or better. These include medical
        and health sciences, education, and studies in human society. JCU has invested heavily
        to support the growth and development of these areas through: the Tropical Leaders
        recruitment program (8 appointments across these fields), new strategic partnerships
        (e.g., the Queensland Tropical Health Alliance, Life Sciences Queensland, Queensland
        Centre for Social Science Innovation), and the reform of centres and institutes within
        JCU. Some are expected to indicate stronger performance in the next ERA round, while
        others will require longer to develop.




                                             Page 38
          Much of the research conducted at JCU fulfils a ‘community service’ objective, delivering
           research that has genuine socio-economic impact, but some of which does not rate as
           well within the limits of ERA. The work of the Cyclone Testing Station, which has saved
           Australia literally billions of dollars in the costs of storm damage in avoidable insurance
           losses, is one example. JCU intends to maintain a portfolio of research that meets user
           needs (i.e., has ‘relevance’ and ‘impact’), with a particular view to the needs of the
           communities and economies in the tropics.


Research performance and research capability: Performance indicators and targets
7.1.6.           The purpose of the research performance and research capability performance
                 indicators and targets is to assist the University and Commonwealth monitor the
                 University's progress against the Commonwealth's objectives and the University's
                 strategies for research performance and research capability.
7.1.7.           The University will aim to meet the research performance and research capability
                 performance indicators and targets set out in the following table.

Principal Performance Indicators                                                                        Target
                                                                               Baseline2
(Required)                                                                                              20133

Number of disciplines, as defined by two-digit Fields of                        8                      8
Research (FoR), performing at world standard or above (3,
4 or 5)
Number of disciplines, as defined by four-digit FoR,                            23                     25
performing at world standards or above (3, 4 or 5)
Disciplines the university commits to demonstrating                             n/a                    2
substantial improvement in as defined by two-digit FoR
and/or four-digit FoR




2
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection refers to income in 2009. Similarly, the
targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
3
    Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.




                                                         Page 39
Principal Performance
                                                  Baseline         Progressive          Progressive          Target
Indicators
                                                  20094            Target 20115         Target 2012          20136
(Required)
Category 1 research income                       14,767,237        16,940,000           17,910,000          19,110,000


Number of joint research grants
and jointly supervised PhD
students with other universities
and research organisations
        In Australia                            92                107                  115                 124
        Overseas                                39                47                   51                  55
Number of jointly supervised PhD
students with other universities
and research organisations:
     in Australia                               58                76                   84                  93
     overseas                                   14                20                   23                  27

Additional Performance
                                                 Baseline          Progressive          Progressive          Target
Indicators
                                                 2009              Target 2011          Target 2012          2013
(proposed by the University)
Number of joint publications co-
authored with researchers from
other universities and research
organisations:
    in Australia                                342               367                  383                 398
    overseas                                    368               410                  444                 478



7.2.             Research training

Research training: Commonwealth objectives
7.2.1.           The Commonwealth encourages excellence in the provision of research training.
                 Particular objectives are to:
                 a.   Support research excellence and develop an internationally competitive
                      research workforce in Australia through high quality research training; and




4
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income in 2009. Similarly, the
targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
5
 Progressive target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of
baseline data.
6
    Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.




                                                         Page 40
            b.   Significantly increase the number of students completing higher degrees by
                 research over the next decade.
7.2.2.      The Commonwealth, through DIISR, may provide funding to the University to assist
            the University achieve these Commonwealth objectives, including through the
            Research Training Scheme (RTS), Australian Postgraduate Awards (APA), and
            International Postgraduate Research Scheme (IPRS).
7.2.3.      Other Commonwealth funding to assist the University achieve these Commonwealth
            objectives may also be provided outside of this Compact by the ARC, NHMRC,
            DEEWR and DIISR, for example through the Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs)
            program.

Research Training: University Strategies

As outlined below, JCU has implemented a portfolio of strategies to support high quality
research education that aligns with the University’s Strategic Intent.
JCU Graduate Research School (GRS)
The Dean (70% FTE), supported by two Associate Deans (in Cairns (20% FTE) and Townsville
(10% FTE)) and professional staff, is responsible for the management of all research degrees
(Masters, PhDs and research professional doctorates) with the assistance of the Associate
Deans Research for each faculty; two faculties also have Associate Deans Research Training.
This arrangement enhances the quality of research education by ensuring that policies and
procedures are consistent across the university and facilitates the implemented of reforms in
faculties and schools. In future, we plan to increase staffing in Cairns to better support research
education on that campus.

Selection processes that align with areas of research strength
Our research and research education is concentrated on issues of global significance to
industries and communities in the tropics. Thirty-six percent of JCU research students are
international and come from 61 countries. All generic stipend (APAs, IPRS and JCU) and
tuition fee scholarships are awarded centrally on the basis of an order of merit list developed
across both domestic and international applicants. Each student is rated against agreed criteria
for research capacity (50%), academic record (20%), and strength of the advisory team (30%)
based on the team’s record in research (inputs and outputs) and research student completions.
This system, which is being revised to better reflect output quality, gives priority to competitive
candidates who wish to work with outstanding researchers such as Laureate Fellows and
Tropical Leaders and encourages ECRs to supervise in collaboration with established
researchers. Because of our obligation to service the relatively remote north Queensland
community, JCU offers research education outside its areas of research strength. We are
improving capacity in research education in the humanities and social sciences and medicine
and health through the appointment of Tropical Leaders, especially in Cairns, and our program
to support ECRs.

Collaboration in research education in areas of research strength
Research education is the focus of the AIMS@JCU joint venture (JV) between the Australian
Institute of Marine Science and JCU. Seventeen research students are currently jointly
supervised by AIMS and JCU staff and have access to the specialist infrastructure of both
institutions. The JV provides transport for research students between the JV partner institutions,
competitive stipend and tuition fee scholarships, project and conference funding, and conducts




                                             Page 41
seminar days to provide an opportunity for HDR candidates to present their work. The Tropical
Landscape Joint Venture between JCU and CSIRO is developing a parallel collaborative
research education program facilitated by shared occupancy of the ATSIP in Townsville and the
ATFI in Cairns, both of which house research students.

Structured program to encourage timely completions
The progress of each research higher degree candidate is monitored by a Candidature
Committee chaired by a Research Student Monitor (experienced supervisor in cognate
discipline external to the candidate’s home school) and involving senior staff from the home
school plus the Advisory Team. Each research higher degree candidate is admitted on a
provisional basis until the successful completion of the three components of the Confirmation of
Candidature: project proposal, public seminar and substantive piece of written work. Each
project proposal is also independently reviewed to ensure that the research design is
appropriate. The progress of candidates is formally reviewed annually and especially at mid-
candidature. All candidates must present a public Pre-Completion Seminar before submitting
their thesis to ensure that their research is of the required standard and scope. Their written
work is also formally reviewed by the Candidature Committee at this time. Associate Deans
Research/Research Training and Heads of School are sent summary monthly reports on the
progress of each HDR candidate against candidature milestones; these reports include a
summary of the progress of their candidates compared with those of other faculties and schools
in the University. Opportunities for candidates who are not performing to exit with appropriate
lower qualifications are being developed.

Academic and generic skills support for research students
The GRS employs an Academic Support Co-ordinator who: (1) conducts the compulsory SKIP
(Skills for International Postgraduates) program each semester to support international students
through the Confirmation of Candidature process, (2) provides support with academic writing
and critical thinking both on a one-to-one basis and by facilitating research student writing
groups in both Townsville and Cairns and (3) conducts workshops for research students and
supervisors on academic editing. ESL support is provided by specialist staff based in the
Teaching and Learning Development Unit. The GRS also contracts academic statisticians to
provide statistical support including short courses, workshops and private consultations.
Statisticians from local state government research laboratories are also contracted to assist with
this program to ensure the necessary breadth of statistical expertise. A Research Skills
Program of seminars, workshops and short courses offered in both Townsville and Cairns each
year to develop the generic skills of research students. Each student is encouraged to develop
an annual Research Skills Plan. Induction days for HDR candidates are held each semester in
both Townsville and Cairns. Postgraduate Essentials provides on-line information on how
complete a research higher degree. Each research higher degree candidate also has access to
an e-GRS portal that facilitates thesis management and data storage.

Professional Development of Advisors
The advisors of research students must successfully complete training to be on the JCU
Register of Supervisors. There are four levels on the Register of Supervisors and each advisory
team must include at least one Level 1 Advisor with successful completions at doctoral level.
Additional professional development is offered to advisors through lunchtime seminars and
workshops. From 2011, this training will be linked to the ECR Development Program. Regular
reports on the supervisory performance of individual staff members are being developed for
Heads of Schools.

Collaboration with other universities:




                                            Page 42
JCU has enrolled 22 postgraduate research higher degree candidates in formal co-tutelle
arrangements with international universities. Five candidates have been Australians who have
studied in France (3); Netherlands (1); New Zealand (1). The remainder have been international
students from: Belgium (1); China(2); Columbia (1); France (8); Iran (1); Ireland (1); Italy (1); UK
(1); and US (1). Three of the nine candidates who have graduated have been awarded JCU
University medals, compared with an overall medal rate of <2% for JCU. Two French partner
universities have awarded reciprocal honours: ‘Très honorable avec felicitations’. Only one
student has withdrawn. We plan to expand this program and look forward to being able to make
similar arrangements with Australian universities under changes to the RTS that are being
considered by DISSR. JCU recently signed a MoU with the ANU to establish collaborative
initiatives, including a commitment to develop a joint PhD program. JCU, The University of
Tasmania and UWA have committed to developing joint Masters degrees in marine science
under the aegis of the Australian National Network in Marine Science. The Network also hosts
an annual postgraduate student conference and facilitates internships with industry. As an IRU
university, JCU co-sponsors a program of skills workshops for research students conducted by
staff from Flinders University; these are delivered at JCU as part of the Research Skills Program
and are being expanded to assist with the professional development of ECRs.


Research training: Performance indicators and targets
7.2.4.           The purpose of the research training performance indicators and targets is to assist
                 the University and Commonwealth monitor the University's progress against the
                 Commonwealth's objectives and the University's strategies for research training.
7.2.5.           The University will aim to meet the research training performance indicators and
                 targets set out in the following table.


Principal Performance
                                                                  Progressive           Progressive          Target
Indicators                                     Baseline7
                                                                  Target 20118          Target 2012          20139
(Required)
HDR Student load                              550                 582                  609                  636
HDR Student completions by
level of degree
         masters                             16                  14                   15                   16

         doctorates                          72                  97                   80                   84
Note:
#
  JCU is projecting an unusually high number of completions in 2011, indicating a commitment to completing a cohort of
students who are beyond the benchmark periods of candidature. Business systems have been put in place to facilitate these
completions. In subsequent years we are projecting completions that are more in alignment with the longer term averages.




7
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income for 2009. Similarly, the
targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
8
 Progressive target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of
baseline data.
9
    Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.




                                                        Page 43
7.3.        Innovation

Innovation: Commonwealth objectives
7.3.1.      The Commonwealth encourages innovation and seeks to build an innovation system
            which contributes to economic growth and wellbeing by promoting links between
            Australian businesses, universities and publicly-funded research agencies.
7.3.2.      The Commonwealth, through DIISR, may provide funding to the University to assist
            the University achieve this Commonwealth objective, including through the Joint
            Research Engagement (JRE) program. Details of any funding provided by DIISR to
            the University to encourage innovation are set out in Attachment B.
7.3.3.      Other Commonwealth funding to assist the University to achieve this
            Commonwealth objective may also be provided outside of this Compact including
            through Commercialisation Australia, the CRC and Enterprise Connect programs,
            and by AusIndustry and the ARC.

Innovation: University strategies


The profile of JCU’s research is largely directed towards the public good, with a tropical and
regional focus. The University commits itself to undertaking research with impact, particularly
on issues of critical importance to the economic growth and sustainability of the world’s tropics,
including Northern Australia, as a long-term strategy.

A decade ago the University hosted the Reef and Rainforest CRCs, and since mid 2006 has
been the major research provider for the Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Foundation
(CERF), the successor to those CRCs. A large proportion of that research, which
predominantly falls within disciplines in which JCU excels, responds to the requirements of
government and government agencies, particularly the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
and the Wet Tropics Management Authority. Almost a half of the contract research undertaken
by researchers in 2009-10 was in collaboration with companies and government
instrumentalities operating in the environmental management space.

JCU will continue to rank high impact research in these fields of research excellence as a
strategic priority. For example, two of our most prominent centres are the Australian Centre for
Tropical Freshwater Research (ACTFR) and the Fishing and Fisheries Research Centre
(FFRC). The FFRC was formed out of CRC Reef in 1994 and has developed an outstanding
record of multi-disciplinary collaborative fisheries research and information delivery to fisheries
stakeholders and has established a leading role in tropical fisheries research in Queensland
and Torres Strait.

The ACTFR was established in 1987 to promote water research, technology and information
transfer to community, industry and government agencies. The strength of the Centre is that it
assembles together, in one unit, scientists whose expertise, experience and research interests
are related to the ecology, management and utilisation of water resources and natural
environments in the Australasian tropics. The Centre is predominantly project-funded, bringing
in almost 20% of the University’s contract research work in 2009-10. The increasing interest in




                                             Page 44
developing northern Australia’s water resources positions ACTFR well, and it will remain a key
component of JCU’s interaction with external stakeholders for years to come.

Research in the earth sciences at JCU, which also ranked highly in ERA, is underpinned by
collaboration with the mining sector in northern Australia, most notably through the Economic
Geology Research Unit which has twenty companies in its membership. The University will
continue to foster this essential component to our drive to find innovative ways to advance
tropical economies.

The industry partnership with the most prominence currently at JCU is that between researchers
in the discipline of Aquaculture and in the North Queensland Algal Identification/Culturing
Facility and MBD Energy Limited. The goal of the partnership is to develop a cost-effective
solution for reducing carbon emissions while generating valuable co-products such as biofuels
and animal feed, using algal biomass. Initial proof of concept R&D was conducted at Australia’s
largest and most technically advanced algal production facility, funded by MBD and located at
JCU’s Townsville campus; currently the results of that R&D are being applied at the Tarong
power station in Queensland, with Loy Yang (Victoria) and Eraring (NSW) to follow; respectively
the largest coal fired power stations in each of these States. This work is being supported by
the Commonwealth through the Advanced Manufacturing CRC and the Queensland
Government. Third generation algal biofuels options will be a core component of the
Commonwealth-funded Australian Biofuels Research Institute, of which JCU is the Foundation
Partner.

As previously noted, the work of the Cyclone Testing Station has been critical in developing the
capacity of northern Australian buildings to withstand cyclones, most clearly evidenced by the
work contracted to it by the Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB, part of DIISR) and other
parts of government.

It is not easy to put a value on the economic benefits delivered by the CTS over the past 30
years, but the ABCB recently released a Regulatory Impact Statement that considers a change
to the boundaries of land assessed as cyclone-prone in Western Australia, the Northern
Territory and Queensland. If adopted, expanding the boundaries would mean that all houses
constructed within the new boundaries will have to be built to the appropriate cyclone building
codes. The estimated benefits over the expected life of the proposals equates to just over $3.5
billion of net benefits of avoided insured and uninsured losses. The work of the CTS is pivotal
in this assessment and it is not unreasonable to infer that the benefits already realised by the
work of this group over 3 decades, and many cyclones, are much greater indeed than $3.5
billion.

The University will continue to recognise economic impact through knowledge diffusion and
adaptation as evidenced by these various R&D relationships as a central plank of its research
strategy. However, it also recognises the importance of the research commercialisation
pathway of basic research leading to intellectual property rights being capitalised by licensing
agreements or spin-out companies. With that in mind, in 2008 JCU contracted UniQuest Pty
Ltd to be its research commercialisation agent, thus greatly enhancing its technology transfer
capacity – which already had runs on the board.

Perhaps the most publicly recognisable commercial impact of JCU’s research in northern
Australia is the stinger net, which protects swimmers against box jellyfish through the wet
seasons. The net was developed at the University in the late 1980s and commercialised
through a joint venture, Uninet Enclosure Systems#. A company spun-off to commercialise a




                                            Page 45
cardioplegia solution invented at JCU in 1999 has now moved to the United States, where first
sales were recently achieved*.

UniQuest is now managing the expansion of GRW Industries Pty Ltd, a start-up company for
the CoolMe™ technology that delivers a cost effective and strong cooling effect to the human
body. Its first product is a disposable vest which is ideal for situations that involve intensive
short duration activities and cooling without access to refrigeration or a connection to external
equipment is required to counteract heat stress. The product was developed in collaboration
with the Queensland Fire and Rescue Service and prospective customers who have shown
strong interest include mining companies and the Australian Institute of Sport.

A critical part of UniQuest’s services is its development of a culture of innovation in research
through bootcamps, ideas competitions and so on; in the two years since it has operated at JCU
it has logged more than 100 disclosures by researchers. The relationship has facilitated several
collaborative projects with commercial focus with other institutions in the UniQuest fold. The
University regards this partnership as an essential part of its long-term plans for contributing to
Australian innovation and economic growth.


Note:
# Equity in the JV is not included in the spin-out equity figure recorded in the table below.
* The family of patents developed at JCU over the last decade based on that original invention has been assigned to the
company and hence is not accounted for in the table below.




Innovation: Performance indicators and targets
7.3.4.         The purpose of the innovation performance indicators and targets is to assist the
               University and Commonwealth monitor the University's progress against the
               Commonwealth's objectives and the University's strategies for innovation.
7.3.5.         The University will aim to meet the innovation performance indicators and targets
               set out in the following table.




                                                        Page 46
Principal Performance Indicators                     Baseline      Progressive         Progressive         Target
(Required)                                           (2009)10      Target 201111       Target 2012         201312
Category 3 research income                           5,923,359     8,470,000           8,960,000          9,550,000
Number of active collaborations13 and
partnerships14 with industry and other
partners:
      in Australia                                  87            97                  101                105
      overseas                                      151           171                 173                175
Note: In the table above, the performance indicator “number of active collaborations and partnerships with industry
and other partners” has been measured in accordance with footnote 15, ie. “activities where .. parties work together
and each contributes resources .. to address a shared objective with a view of mutual benefit”, by counting active
collaborations in funded projects through co-investigators from industry and other partners such as foundations,
museums, government and non-government organisations.

Note that in the table below, values are as per the 2009 data collected in 2010 for the National
Survey of Research Commercialisation (NSRC).




10
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income for 2009. Similarly, the
targets relate to the year in which the data is collected
11
   Progressive target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of
baseline data.
12
   Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.
13
   Collaboration involves activities where two or more parties work together and each contributes resources
such as intellectual property, knowledge, money, personnel or equipment, to address a shared objective with
a view of mutual benefit
14
   Research and development collaborations with industry or other partners with a commercial intent: include active
ongoing research projects or partnerships activated through a written agreement (eg contract or signed letter of
intent) between the university and either Australian or overseas industry partners. Activities could include, joint
research/development projects with industry or arrangements with firms to commercialise research outcomes, other
non-teaching activities, or other collaborations).




                                                     Page 47
Principal Performance Information1516
                                                               Baseline
(Required)
Number of patent and plant breeder’s rights                    Filed: 2            Issued: 2              Held: 5.83
families filed, issued and held
Number of licences, options or assignments                    No.: 2                        Value($): 30,000
(LOAs)17 executed and income derived
Number and value of research contracts and                    No.: 104                      Value($): 8,681,198
consultancies executed
Investment in spin-out companies during the                   Investment($): 0              Value($):520,657
reporting year and nominal value of equity in
spin-outs based on last external
funding/liquidity event or entry cost
7.3.6.        The set of performance information on patents and other research
              commercialisation activities does not require targets. Universities should advise their
              baseline performance here. Annual reporting on future performance against these
              indicators will be in the context of the Institutional Performance Portfolio Information
              Collection commencing in 2011.




8.            FUNDING FOR RESEARCH AND RESEARCH TRAINING PROVIDED BY DIISR

8.1    Attachment B sets out the University’s Commonwealth funding allocations for 2011 from
Commonwealth research and research training programs administered by DIISR. This list may
be amended from time to time, including if the University is successful in applying for any new
and/or additional Commonwealth funding.




15
   This set of performance information does not require targets. Universities will be asked to advise their baseline
performance and will report on their future performance in the context of the Institutional Performance Portfolio
Information Collection commencing in 2011. Patent and plant breeder right family refers to a group of patent or plant
breeder rights applications or grants emanating from a single filing. Note: this question only concerns patent and
plant breeder rights families, and is not in reference to families of other forms of registered IP (ie trade marks).
16
  Please use the definition of contracts and consultancies utilised in the National Survey of Research
Commercialisation (NSRC). A copy of the survey is available at this URL:
http://www.innovation.gov.au/Section/Innovation/Pages/TheNationalSurveyofResearchCommercialisation.aspx
17
   A LICENCE agreement formalises the transfer of technology between two parties, where the owner of the
technology (licensor) grants rights to the other parties (licensee). An OPTION agreement grants the potential
licensee a time period during which it may evaluate the technology and negotiate the terms of a licence agreement.
An option agreement is not constituted by an Option clause in a research agreement that grants rights to future
inventions, until an actual invention has occurred that is subject to that Option. An ASSIGNMENT agreement
conveys all right, title and interest in and to the licensed subject matter to the named assignee.




                                                       Page 48
PART FOUR

9.      COMPACT REVIEW
9.1     This Compact will be reviewed annually by both the Commonwealth and the
        University. This review will be a mechanism for considering progress made towards
        agreed goals outlined in this Compact. It will aim to ensure that the Commonwealth
        and the University will continue to focus on key objectives and strategies.
9.2     The review will create an opportunity to consider any developments that may have
        occurred in the previous year, and whether these may impact on the Compact or
        trigger a need to amend the Compact.
9.3     To facilitate this review the Commonwealth will produce an annual Institutional
        Performance Portfolio and the University agrees to contribute to the annual
        Institutional Performance Portfolio Information Collection (IPPIC). The
        Commonwealth will consult with the higher education sector on the information
        collection requirements and any issues arising from the IPPIC process.




                                        Page 49
PART FIVE

10.         GENERAL PROVISIONS

10.1     Administration of the Compact by the Departments
10.1.1      DEEWR will administer Part Two of this Compact and DIISR will administer Part
            Three of this Compact, in accordance with their respective Ministers’ legislative
            responsibilities under the Administrative Arrangements Orders as in force from time
            to time. The other Parts of this Compact may be administered by one or both
            departments
10.1.2      In administering the Compact, employees of each Department will make decisions in
            accordance with any relevant instruments of delegation or authorisation in force from
            time to time.

10.2     Departmental Meetings and Liaison
10.2.1      Employees of the Departments will collaborate to streamline as far as practicable the
            Commonwealth’s interactions with the University.

10.3     Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreements
10.3.1      To the extent that this Compact contains Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreements, the
            University acknowledges that each such Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreement is
            subject to specific legislative and other requirements and that the University will need
            to meet all such requirements.

10.4     Privacy, confidentiality and information sharing
10.4.1      Subject to clause 10.4.2 below, the University acknowledges and agrees that any
            information it provides to either DEEWR or DIISR for the purposes of this Compact,
            or for any Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreement contained in this Compact, may be
            accessible under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 and may also be:
            a.   published by the Commonwealth in any manner in accordance with any
                 legislative requirement;
            b.   used by a Department for any purpose of the Commonwealth, including
                 dealings with other Commonwealth agencies;
            c.   used in reporting to or answering questions from a Minister of State of the
                 Commonwealth or a House or Committee of the Parliament of the
                 Commonwealth; or
            d.   disclosed where the Commonwealth is required or permitted by law to do so.
10.4.2      The Commonwealth and the University agree to carry out their roles under this
            Compact in accordance with any obligations they have under the Privacy Act 1988 or
            any state or territory law relating to the protection of personal information.
10.4.3      The Commonwealth recognises that the University’s Confidential Information has
            commercial value to the University and may disadvantage the University if it is




                                             Page 50
            disclosed. Accordingly, the Commonwealth will not publish or otherwise disclose the
            University’s Confidential Information unless required by law to do so, or unless the
            University consents in writing prior to such disclosure.

10.5     Variation
10.5.1      Subject to clause 10.5.2 below, except for action that either the Commonwealth or
            the University is expressly authorised to take elsewhere in this Compact, any
            variation to this Compact is to be in writing and signed by the University's, and both
            of the Commonwealth’s Representatives.
10.5.2      A variation to:
            a.     any provision of Part Two only or to any Attachments to this Compact that arise
                   solely under a provision of Part Two must be in writing but needs only to be
                   signed by the Commonwealth's DEEWR Representative and the University.
            b.     any part of this Compact that forms part of a Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreement
                   may only be made under this clause 10.5.2 if that funding agreement does not
                   contain variation provisions specific to that funding agreement;
            c.     any provision of Part Three only or to any Attachments to this Compact that
                   arise solely under a provision of Part Three must be in writing but needs only to
                   be signed by the Commonwealth's DIISR Representative and the University.
            Either DEEWR or DIISR as the case requires will send the other Department notice
            of any variation made in accordance with paragraph (a) to (c) above.

10.6     Notices
10.6.1      A party wishing to give notice under a provision of this Compact:
            a.     must do so by sending it to each of the other Representatives set out in
                   clause 10.6.3; and
            b.     must, if a response is required to the notice, set out the time in which the
                   response is to be given;
10.6.2      Notices required to be sent by the University to the Commonwealth under this
            Compact are to be sent to both the DEEWR and DIISR Representatives set out in
            clause 10.6.3.
10.6.3      The Representatives are:
            a.     University Representative
                      Vicki Hamilton
                      Director, Corporate Planning & Performance
                      James Cook University
                      Townsville QLD 4811
                      OR
                      vicki.hamilton@jcu.edu.au




                                               Page 51
            b.     DEEWR Representative
                     Group Manager
                     Higher Education Group
                     Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
                     GPO Box 9880
                     Canberra ACT 2601
                     OR
                     compacts@deewr.gov.au

            c.     DIISR Representative
                     Head of Division
                     Research Division
                     Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
                     GPO Box 9839
                     Canberra ACT 2601

                     OR
                     compacts@innovation.gov.au

10.7     Termination/Transition Plan
10.7.1      If for any reason, either or both of the Commonwealth or the University reasonably
            believes that it is not possible to continue the operation of this Compact:
              a. The Commonwealth and/or the University, as the case requires, will give the
                   other notice of that belief;
              b. The Commonwealth and the University will negotiate in good faith to resolve
                   any issues in bringing this Compact to an end; and
              c. The Commonwealth and the University will implement an agreed transition out
                   plan to bring the Compact to an end.
10.7.2      Notwithstanding clause 10.7.1, if:
              a.     the University ceases to exist as a body corporate; or
              b.     the University ceases to be approved as a higher education provider under
                     HESA,
            the Commonwealth shall have the right to terminate this Compact immediately by
            giving the University Representative written notice.
10.7.3      Except to the extent of any rights the University has under a Part 2-2 HESA Funding
            Agreement contained in this Compact, the University is not entitled to compensation
            for any loss, damage or claim arising from or in connection to the early termination of
            this Compact by the Commonwealth.




                                              Page 52
10.7.4      These termination and transition out provisions are without prejudice to and do not
            alter any other rights or obligations of the Commonwealth and the University
            pursuant to their funding arrangements.
10.7.5      Rights and obligations of the Commonwealth and the University under the Funding
            Agreement at Attachment E that exist as at the date of termination of the Compact
            survive the termination of the Compact

10.8     Order of precedence
10.8.1      In this Compact:
             a. each HESA Funding Agreement contained in this Compact operates as a
                  separate agreement between the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs
                  and Workplace Relations and the University.
             b. In the event of an inconsistency between the terms of a HESA Funding
                   Agreement contained in this Compact and the Operational Provisions in this
                   Part Five, the term of the HESA Funding Agreement will prevail for the
                   purpose of that agreement.

10.9     Counterparts
10.9.1      This Compact may be signed in any number of counterparts and all counterparts
            together constitute one instrument.

10.10 Dictionary
10.10.1     In this Compact, unless the contrary intention appears:
            ‘Appropriation' means a law, or provision in a law, that authorises the expenditure of
            money by the Commonwealth.
            ‘DEEWR’ means the Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and
            Workplace Relations or any successor.
            ‘Department’ means either or both of DEEWR or DIISR as the case requires.
            ‘DIISR’ means the Commonwealth Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and
            Research or any successor.
            ‘Tertiary Education Minister’ means the Minister administering Part 2-2 of HESA.
            ‘HESA’ means the Higher Education Support Act 2003 and includes any subordinate
            legislation or Ministerial determination made under that Act.
            ‘HESA Funding Agreement' means a funding agreement:
            a.   that is made under section 30-25 of HESA by the Minister for Tertiary
                 Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations and the University for the
                 provision of a grant of funding to the University under Part 2-2 of HESA; and
            b.   with which the University is required to comply under section 36-65 of HESA.




                                            Page 53
‘Institutional Performance Portfolio’ (IPP) is a report which provides an historical record of
a university's performance based on information provided by the university and an
analysis of the Higher Education Data Collections. An IPP will be prepared by the
Commonwealth for the University annually using the latest available data.
‘Institutional Performance Portfolio Information Collection’ (IPPIC) is a set of
Commonwealth instructions requesting that universities provide a submission to the
Commonwealth, endorsed by the university's chief executive, that includes student, staff,
financial and research information needed for the preparation of an Institutional
Performance Portfolio for that university.
‘Minister’ means either or both of the Tertiary Education Minister and the Research
Minister.
‘Mission’ means the University’s Mission set out at Part One of this Compact as
amended in accordance with the variation provisions in this Compact from time to
time.
‘Research Minister’ means the Minister administering the Australian Research
Council Act 2001.
‘TEQSA’ means the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency.
‘University’ means James Cook University ABN 46253211955
‘University’s Confidential Information’ means the information referred to at
Attachment C to this Compact as 'University Confidential Information' or that the
Commonwealth otherwise agrees in writing is 'University Confidential Information',
but does not include information that is or becomes public knowledge, except due to
non-compliance with this Compact.




                                   Page 54
SIGNED for and on behalf of JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY
by

……………………………………………………..
Signature
Professor Sandra Harding
The Vice Chancellor and President

In the Presence of:

.....................................................................................
WITNESS
.....................................................................................
Full name and occupation or profession of witness (Please print)

SIGNED for and on behalf of
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
by

……………………………………………………..
Signature
David de Carvalho
the Group Manager
of Higher Education Group
of the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
a Delegate of the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations

In the Presence of:

.....................................................................................
WITNESS
.....................................................................................
Full name and occupation or profession of witness (Please print)

SIGNED for and on behalf of
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
by
……………………………………………………..
Signature
Anne Baly
the Head
of Research Division
of the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
a Delegate of the Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research

In the Presence of:

.....................................................................................
WITNESS
.....................................................................................
Full name and occupation or profession of witness (Please print)




                                                         Page 55
ATTACHMENT A    INDICATIVE LIST OF COMMONWEALTH FUNDING PROVIDED TO THE
          UNIVERSITY BY DEEWR AND RELEVANT TO THE COMPACT

DEEWR provides a range of funding to the University under various legislative and/or
contractual funding arrangements. The following is an indicative list of that funding. The
table will be updated from time to time.


Funding to be delivered during the Compact ($m)                               2011
Commonwealth Grant Scheme
 -   Cluster funding                                                                 97.357
 -   Regional loading                                                                 4.502
 -   Enabling loading                                                                 0.148
 -   Medical student loading                                                          0.962
 -   Transitional loading (Maths/Science)                                             3.837
 -   Advance payment for estimated over enrolment                                     2.061
 -   Facilitation Funding                                                             2.164
Higher Education Partnerships and Participation Program

 -   Participation component                                                          2.215

 -   Partnership component
                                                                                      0.356
Disability Support Program

 -   Additional support for students with disabilities
                                                                             Not Yet Known
 -   Performance based funding
                                                                             Not Yet Known
Indigenous Support Program                                                            1.908
Capital Development Pool
                                                                                      2.241
Commonwealth Scholarships Program                                                     3.282




                                              Page 56
ATTACHMENT B: LIST OF COMMONWEALTH FUNDING PROVIDED TO THE UNIVERSITY BY DIISR
            AND RELEVANT TO THE COMPACT




James Cook University – Research Block Grant Funding for 2011
Research Training Scheme (RTS)                                             $7,808,726
Australian Postgraduate Awards (APA)                                       $2,254,445
International Postgraduate Research Scholarships (IPRS)                     $211,718
Research Infrastructure Block Grants Scheme (RIBG)                         $2,665,022
Joint Research Engagement (JRE)                                            $3,629,647
Commercialisation Training Program (CTS)                                          $0
Sustainable Research Excellence (SRE) Base                                  $294,994
Sustainable Research Excellence (SRE) Threshold 1                           $472,100
Sustainable Research Excellence (SRE) Threshold 2                           $849,390
James Cook University – Collaborative Research Networks Funding for 2011
Collaborative Research Networks (CRN)                                             $0




                                           Page 57
ATTACHMENT C      UNIVERSITY CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION


Not applicable.




                                   Page 58
ATTACHMENT D       TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF PART 2-2 HESA FUNDING AGREEMENT FOR
                   THE PROVISION OF PERFORMANCE FUNDING


Terms and Conditions of Funding Agreement between the Commonwealth and the University
for the purposes of grants in respect of Performance Funding under section 30-25 of HESA

1.   Agreement

     1.1    Pursuant to clause 4.13 of the Compact, section 4 of the Compact together with the
            terms and conditions in this Attachment D of the Compact constitute the HESA
            Funding Agreement entered into by the Minister or his or her delegate (on behalf of
            the Commonwealth) with the University under section 30-25 of HESA, for the
            provision by the Commonwealth of Performance Funding to the University.

     1.2    These terms and conditions apply only to Performance Funding and do not apply to
            any other agreement between the Commonwealth and the University entered into
            for the purposes of section 30-25 of HESA or for the purposes of any other
            legislative provision.

2.   Eligibility

     2.1    The University meets the requirements of subparagraph 30-1(1) (a)(i) or
            subparagraph 30-1(1)(a)(ii) of HESA.

     2.2    It is a precondition to funding being provided under this agreement that the
            University does and will continue to meet the requirement in paragraph 30-1(1)(b) of
            HESA in each of the Grant years during the term of this agreement.

     2.3    Entering into this agreement is a requirement under paragraph 30-1(1)(c) of HESA
            for a grant to be payable to the University under Part 2-2 of HESA for Performance
            Funding.

3.   Term and Grant years

     3.1    The term of this agreement is the same as the term of the Compact.

     3.2    This agreement is made in respect of the Grant years 2011, 2012 and 2013.

4.   Conditions additional to the HESA

     4.1    Subject to subsections 30-25 (2A) and 30-25 (2B) of HESA, this agreement
            specifies conditions to which the grant is subject that are additional to the conditions
            to which the grant is subject under Division 36 of HESA.




                                             Page 59
5.   Publication

     5.1   The Compact, of which this agreement forms part, will be tabled in Parliament in
           accordance with subsection 30-25(4) of HESA.

6.   Preconditions to receiving Performance Funding

     6.1   Facilitation Funding

     As a condition of the Facilitation Funding component of Performance Funding, in
     accordance with this agreement, the University must:
     (a) inform the Commonwealth of strategies and goals for achieving the university’s
         teaching and learning mission described under clause 4.7 of the university’s 2011-13
         Compact; and
     (b) agree to the performance targets relating to specific Commonwealth goals contained
         in clause 4.14 of the 2011-2013 Compact.

     6.2   Reward Funding

     As a condition of the Reward Funding component of Performance Funding, in accordance
     with this agreement, the University must:
     (a) agree performance targets as outlined in clause 4.14 of their 2011-2013 Compact
         agreement;
     (b) supply performance data to the Commonwealth for all indicators as per the
         requirements set out in section 2 of the Performance Funding Technical Guidelines;
         and
     (c) achieve the relevant excellence or improvement targets as outlined in clause 4.14 of
         their 2011-2013 Compact agreement.


7.   University’s Grant Amount

     7.1   Facilitation Funding

     The University’s grant amount for the Facilitation Funding component of Performance
     Funding will be calculated in accordance with the Commonwealth Grants Scheme
     Guidelines Chapter 12 as in force from time to time during the term of this Agreement.

     7.2   Reward Funding

     The University’s grant amount for the Reward Funding component of Performance
     Funding will be calculated in accordance with the Commonwealth Grant Scheme
     Guidelines as in force from time to time during the term of this Agreement.




                                          Page 60
     7.3   Performance Funding Grant Amount

     The University’s total grant amount for Performance Funding in each Grant year (that is,
     the total of the amounts in that Grant year for Facilitation Funding and for Reward
     Funding) will be the University’s ‘Performance Funding Grant Amount’ for the purposes of
     Subsection 33-1(1A) of HESA.

8.   Payment of Grant Amounts

     8.1   Facilitation Funding

     Subject to the University’s compliance with this agreement and with HESA, the
     Commonwealth will pay the Facilitation Funding Grant Amount to the University in
     accordance with the following timeframes and conditions:
     (a) Facilitation Funding will be paid to eligible universities fortnightly commencing in 2011
         and ending in December 2013, with the amount to be paid as per the calculations
         outlined in the Technical Guidelines.
     (b) In accordance with section 164-5 of the Act, Facilitation Funding payments will be
         paid in such a way as the Minister determines, and at such times as the Secretary
         determines.

     8.2   Reward Funding

     Subject to the University’s compliance with this agreement and with HESA, the
     Commonwealth will pay the Reward Funding Grant Amount to the University in
     accordance with the following timeframes and conditions:
     (a) Reward Funding will be paid to eligible universities in one instalment in the second
         half of each of 2012 and 2013, with the amount to be paid as per the calculations
         outlined in the Technical Guidelines.
     (b) In accordance with section 164-5 of the Act, Reward Funding payments will be paid in
         such a way as the Minister determines, and at such times as the Secretary
         determines.

     The University is not entitled to be paid any instalment of its Reward Funding Grant unless
     and until the Commonwealth is satisfied that the requirements for paying that instalment
     have been met.

9.   Waiver

     9.1  If either party does not exercise (or delays in exercising) any rights under this
          agreement, that failure or delay does not operate as a waiver of those rights.
     9.2 Any waiver by either the Commonwealth or the University of any provision or right
          under this Agreement:
     (a) must be in writing signed by that party’s representative;




                                           Page 61
      (b) is effective only to the extent set out in the waiver; and
      (c) does not prevent the further exercise of any right.

10.   Dispute resolution

      10.1 Subject to clause 10.3, the parties agree not to commence any legal proceedings in
           respect of any dispute arising under this agreement, which cannot be resolved by
           informal discussion, until the procedure provided by this clause 19 has been used.

      10.2 The parties agree that any dispute arising during the course of this agreement is
           dealt with as follows:

      (a) the party claiming that there is a dispute will send the other party a written notice
          setting out the nature of the dispute;
      (b) the parties will try to resolve the dispute through direct negotiation by persons who
          they have given authority to resolve the dispute;
      (c) the parties have 10 business days from the receipt of the notice to reach a resolution
          or to agree that the dispute is to be submitted to mediation or some alternative dispute
          resolution procedure; and
      if:
      (a) there is no resolution of the dispute;
      (b) there is no agreement on submission of the dispute to mediation or some alternative
          dispute resolution procedure; or
      (c) there is a submission to mediation or some other form of alternative dispute resolution
          procedure, but there is no resolution within 15 business days of the submission, or
          extended time as the parties may agree in writing before the expiration of the
          15 business days,

      then, either party may commence legal proceedings.

      10.3 This clause 10 does not apply if:

      (a) either party commences legal proceedings for urgent interlocutory relief;
      (b) action is taken by Us under clause 20; or
      (c) an authority of the Commonwealth, a State or Territory is investigating a breach or
          suspected breach of the law by the University.

      10.4 Despite the existence of a dispute, both parties must (unless requested in writing by
           the other party not to do so) continue to perform their obligations under this
           agreement.

11.   Termination for default

      11.1 The Commonwealth may immediately terminate this agreement by giving written
           notice to the University of the termination if:




                                             Page 62
      (a) the University fails to fulfil, or is in breach of any of its obligations under this
          agreement, and does not rectify the omission or breach within 10 business days of
          receiving a notice in writing from the Commonwealth to do so; or
      (b) the University is unable to pay all its debts when they become due;

12.   Notices

      12.1 Notices under this Agreement must be sent to the addresses and in accordance with
           the procedures set out at clause 10.6 of the Compact.

13.   Reports

      13.1 The University must, during the term of this agreement, provide the Commonwealth
            with the following reports by the due dates set out below:
      (a) a report on the provision of performance data by 31 December of each year.

      13.2 The University owns the intellectual property rights in the reports and grants to the
           Commonwealth (or must arrange for the grant to the Commonwealth of) a
           permanent, irrevocable, free and non-exclusive license (including a right of
           sublicense) to use, publish or disclose the reports in any of the ways set out in
           subclause 10.4.1 of the Compact.

14.   Applicable law and jurisdiction

      14.1 The laws of the Australian Capital Territory apply to the interpretation of this
           agreement.

      14.2 The parties agree to submit to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of the
           Australian Capital Territory and any courts which have jurisdiction to hear appeals
           from any of those courts in respect to any dispute under this agreement.

15.   Entire agreement, variation and severance

      15.1 This agreement records the entire agreement between the parties in relation to its
           subject matter.

      15.2 Except for action the Commonwealth is expressly authorised or required to take
           elsewhere in this agreement or HESA, no variation of this agreement is binding
           unless it is agreed in writing and signed by the parties.

      15.3 If a court or tribunal says any provision of this agreement has no effect or interprets
           a provision to reduce an obligation or right, this does not invalidate, or restrict the
           operation of, any other provision.




                                             Page 63
16.   Interpretation

      16.1 Words used in this Part D that are defined in HESA or in the Commonwealth Grants
           Scheme Guidelines have the same meaning in this Part D as they do in the
           document in which they are defined.

      16.2 In this Part D:

‘Compact’ means the Mission Based Compact between the Commonwealth and the University
of which this Attachment D forms part;

‘Grant year’ means a calendar year in respect of which the University has entered into this
agreement;




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ATTACHMENT E     PART 2-2 HESA FUNDING AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE COMMONWEALTH
           AND THE UNIVERSITY FOR THE PROVISION OF THE COMMONWEALTH GRANTS
           SCHEME FUNDING




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