4TH GRADE RELEASED ITEMS NB by 76o87GJ8

VIEWS: 56 PAGES: 139

									NO.1.4.1
Recognize equivalent representations for the same whole number and
generate them by composing and decomposing numbers
Ex.
1,076 = 1,000 + 70 + 6; 500 + 500 + 25 + 25 + 25 + 1;
250 + 250 + 250 + 250 + 75 + 1, etc…
AR4M05N0101NXXX-021D
13. Which shows the expanded form of the number below?
                    656,094
     A. 60,000 + 56,000 + 90 + 4
     B. 600,000 + 56,000 + 90 + 4
     C. 600,000 + 50,000 + 6,000 + 94
   * D. 600,000 + 50,000 + 6,000 + 90 + 4
     2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   1
NO.1.4.2
Use the place value structure of the base ten number system and be able
to represent and compare whole numbers to millions (using models,
illustrations, symbols, expanded notation and problem solving)
             Ex. 1,246,477___1,244

4. What is the value of the underlined digit below?
                                   218,036,097
     A. three thousand
   * B. thirty thousand
     C. thirty-six thousand
     D. three hundred thousand
     2006 – %

9. Jean made the chart below to record the number of pencils sold at the school
   store for the last four months.
                                    Pencil Sales
                              Month             Number of
                                               Pencils Sold
                            September            1,
                                              543
                             October             1,
                                              867
                            November             1,
                                              290
                            December             1,
                                              789
   Which of the following is a true statement about the number of pencils sold?
      A. 1,789 < 1,543
      B. 1,290 > 1,867
   * C. 1,543 > 1,290
      D. 1,867 = 1,789
      2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        2
38. The chart below shows the number of calories consumed by a group of
  students in one week.
                            Student Calorie Chart
                                           Number of
                       Student
                                            Calories
                        Tony                 15,285
                        James                14,768
                        Kendra               14,876
                        Sophia               15,852
  Which student consumed the least number of calories?
     A. Tony
  * B. James
     C. Kendra
     D. Sophia
     2006 – %

26. Mrs. Kramer wrote the following number on the board:
                                     9,463,187
  What is the value of the 6 in this number?
     A. 00,006
     B. 06,000
  * C. 60,000
     D. 63,000
     2004 – %

14. In the number 652,479,103, in what place value is the underlined digit?
      A. tens
      B. ten thousands
      C. millions
  * D. ten millions
      2003 – %

39. What is the value of 3 in 32.05?
  * A. 3 tens
     B. 3 ones
     C. 3 hundreds
     D. 3 thousands
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    3
A. Rashid and Matthew are playing a math game. There are two stacks of number
   cards with the digits 0–9 on them. Each player draws 4 cards.
             • Rashid’s cards:    7 0 3 9
             • Matthew’s cards: 0 8 5 2
   1. The winner of the first game is the person who can make the largest four-
      digit number with the numbers drawn. Tell who won the first game. Explain
      your answer with words and/or numbers.
   2. The winner of the second game is the person who can make the smallest
      four-digit number with the numbers drawn. Tell who won the second game.
      Explain your answer with words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2003 – /8
                                         SOLUTION
Part 1: Rashid won.
  Work/Explanation: 9,730 > 8,520
OR
  Rashid has 9,730 and Matthew has 8,520.
OR
  Student states that Rashid’s largest number can have a “9” in the thousands place so it
      will be greater than Matthew’s largest number, which can only have an “8” in the
      thousands place.
Part 2: Matthew won.
   Work/Explanation: 2,058 < 3,079 (or 0258 < 0379)
OR
   Matthew has 2,058 and Rashid has 3,079 (or 0258 and 0379).
OR
   Student states that Matthew’s smallest number can have a “2” in the thousands place
      so it will be less than Rashid’s number since the smallest digit he can have in the
      thousands place is a “3.
Scoring (4 total points possible)
Part 1: (2 points possible)
  • 1 point for correct answer of “Rashid won” with work or explanation containing
      evidence of some correct procedure using any of the following:
       Correct comparison of any 4-digit numbers formed using the digits of 7, 0, 3, 9
          and 0, 8, 5, 2, or
       Some correct explanation regarding place value (ex. 9 is the biggest number),
          or
       4-digit number formed with 9 in the thousands place using 7, 0, 3, 9 (ex. 9037).
OR
  • ½ point for correct answer of “Rashid won” with no work or explanation containing
      any of the above support.
OR
  • 0 points for answer of “Rashid won” with evidence of incorrect procedure:
       Adding digits (7 + 0 + 3 + 9 = 19 and 0 + 8 + 5 + 2 = 15) and comparing


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008             4
         numbers: 19 > 15, or
       Comparing first digits listed (7 > 0).
Work/Explanation:
  • 1 point for either of the following:
       2 correct numbers (9,730 and 8,520), or
       Correct and complete explanation regarding place value (ex. 9 > 8, etc.).
  OR
  • ½ point for either of the following:
       1 correct number (9,730 or 8,520), or
       Partial explanation regarding place value (ex. 9 is the largest number).
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  • 1 point for correct answer of “Matthew won” with work or explanation containing
      evidence of some correct procedure using any of the following:
       Correct comparison of any 4-digit numbers formed using the digits of 7, 0, 3, 9
         and 0, 8, 5, 2, or
       Some correct explanation regarding place value (ex. 2 is the smallest number),
         or
       4-digit number formed with 2 in the thousands place using 0, 8, 5, 2 (ex. 2,508)
         (or 2 in the hundreds place and 0 in the thousands place – ex. 0285).
OR
  • ½ point for correct answer of “Matthew won” with no work or explanation containing
      any of the above support.
OR
  • 0 points for correct answer of “Matthew won” with evidence of incorrect procedure:
       Adding digits (7 + 0 + 3 + 9 = 19 and 0 + 8 + 5 + 2 = 15) and comparing
         numbers: 15 < 19, or
       Same numbers in Part 1 are compared.
Work/Explanation:
  • 1 point for either of the following:
       2 correct numbers (2,058 and 3,079 or 258 and 379), or
       Correct and complete explanation regarding place value (ex. 2 < 3, etc.)
  OR
  • ½ point for either of the following:
       1 correct number (258; 2,058; 379; or 3,079), or
       Partial explanation regarding place value (ex. 2 is the smallest number).




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008             5
NO.1.4.3
Use mathematical language and symbols to compare and order any whole
numbers with and without appropriate technology (<, >, =)

17. Sean has 36 baseball cards. Tom has 25 baseball cards. Which of the following
  is a true statement about their baseball card collections?
      A. 25 > 36
      B. 25 × 36
  * C. 36 > 25
      D. 36 = 25
      2006 – %

29. What symbol can replace the     in the number sentence below to make it
  true?
                              1,840        1,804

   * A. >
     B. =
     C. <
     D. +
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      6
NO.1.4.4
Write a fraction to name part of a whole, part of a set, a location on a
number line, and the division of whole numbers, using models up to
12/12
Ex.

 1
 4




1
  =
4


1
  =I        *     I          I
4
            1     1
      0                      1
            4     2

1
  = One cookie shared by 4 children
4

29. What fractional part is shown on the geoboard below?




          1
     * A.
          4
          3
       B.
          4
       C. 1
       D. 4
       2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   7
33. Toby has a candy bar that is divided into 12 squares, as shown below.




   He gave Shelly 2 pieces and Ron 3 pieces. What portion of the candy bar does
   Toby have left for himself?
         5
     A.
        12
         7
   * B.
        12
        5
     C.
        7
         7
     D.
         5
     2007 – %

40. Which of the following fractions identifies the part of the dozen eggs shown
   below that has been used?




          1
       A.
          8
          1
       B.
          4
           4
       C.
          12




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008         8
          8
   * D.
         12
       2006 – %

Use the figures below to answer question 14.




14. Stanley’s mom made 2 sandwiches for his lunch. She cut each into 4 pieces.
  Stanley ate only the shaded portions. What fraction of the sandwiches did he
  eat?
         3
      A.
         5
         3
      B.
         4
           1
  * C. 1
           4
           1
      D. 1
           3
      2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       9
NO.1.4.5
Utilize models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to recognize that the
size of the whole determines the size of the fraction




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   10
NO.1.4.6
Use the place value structure of the base ten number system and be able
to represent and compare decimals to hundredths (using models,
illustrations, symbols, expanded notation and problem solving)
                Ex. 3.87___3.78




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   11
NO.1.4.7
Write an equivalent decimal for a given fraction relating to money
Ex.   1/10 = $0.10
       1/4 = $0.25

18. Which amount equals ¼ of $1.00?
     A. $0.04
  * B. $0.25
     C. $0.40
     D. $0.50
     2007 – %

                       1
3. Bill’s mom gives him  of a dollar for taking out the trash. Which decimal
                       4
   represents the amount of money Bill receives?
      A. 0.04
      B. 0.14
      C. 0.20
   * D. 0.25
      2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     12
NO.1.4.8
Write a fraction that is equivalent to a given fraction with the use of
models
    1   2    4
Ex. = =
    3   6   12




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   13
NO.2.4.1
Develop an understanding of the associative and zero properties of
multiplication using objects




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   14
NO.2.4.2
Apply number theory
 determine if any number is even or odd
 use the terms multiple, factor, and divisible by in an appropriate context
 generate and use divisibility rules for 2, 5, and 10
 demonstrate various multiplication & division relationships

35. Mr. Booth put the two groups of numbers below on the board.




   What is the rule he used when forming the two groups?
     A. Group X: Multiples of 5 Group Y: Even Numbers
   * B. Group X: Odd Numbers Group Y: Even Numbers
     C. Group X: Odd Numbers Group Y: Multiples of 3
     D. Group X: Odd Numbers Group Y: Multiples of 6
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   15
AR4M02N107Y130-130R
E. Jake used the 100’s chart above to solve a mystery number puzzle with the
   following clues:
       ● It is a two-digit number greater than 23, but less than 50.
       ● It is an even number.
       ● Two, four, and twelve are some of its factors.
       ● The sum of its digits is a two-digit number.
   What is the mystery number?
   Use words, pictures, and/or numbers to explain your answer.
   2004 – /8
                               SOLUTION AND SCORING
Answer: The mystery number is 48.
   Explanations may be:
   ● Numerical –
       Clue 1: All numbers from 24 to 49 (or 23 to 50) are listed.
       Clue 2: All odd numbers are eliminated: 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42,
          44, 46, 48 remain.
       Clue 3: All numbers that do not have two, four and twelve as factors are
          eliminated: 24, 36 and 48 remain.
       Clue 4: All numbers whose digit sum is not a two-digit number are eliminated:
          only 48 remains.
   Note: Some students perform Clue 4 before Clue 3 (after Clues 1 and 2).
   ♦ Example: 28, 38, 46 and 48 remain since the digit sum is a 2-digit number. Then,
      the only number remaining with factors of 2, 4 and 12 is 48.
OR
   ● A chart – The numbers are listed and eliminated clue by clue. The clues are
      differentiated in some way.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008            16
OR
     ● Verbal – The response contains a correct and complete verbal explanation of the
        procedure using elimination clue by clue, with at least 24, 36, and 48 mentioned (or
        28, 38, 46, and 48 if Clue 4 is performed before Clue 3).
          Example: “First, I omitted all of the numbers that were not greater than 23 or
            less than 50.
     Then I omitted all of the odd numbers, since it said the number was even. Then I
        crossed out all of the numbers that 2, 4, and 12 did not go into, leaving 24, 36 and
        48. Then I saw which of these numbers had a 2-digit sum and it was 48.”

19. Mrs. Teasley’s fourth-grade class divided into teams of 4 for field day races.
  There were 3 students left over after all of the teams were formed. Which
  could be the total number of students that are in Mrs. Teasley’s class?
     A. 24
     B. 26
  * C. 27
     D. 28
2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008               17
NO.2.4.3
Use conventional mathematical symbols to write equations for contextual
problems involving multiplication
See Appendix for examples

1. Michael bought 5 cases of juice for the soccer team. Each case cost $6. Which
   equation (number sentence) describes how much money Michael paid in all?
      A $6 x 1 = 6
      B 5 + 1 = $6
      C 5 + $6 = $11
   * D 5 x $6 = $30
      2008 -




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     18
NO.2.4.4
Represent and explain division as measurement and partitive division
including equal groups, related rates, price, rectangular arrays (area
model), combinations and multiplicative comparison See Appendix for
more details
Ex.
 translate contextual situations involving division into conventional
mathematical symbols
 explain how a remainder may impact an answer in a real world situation

20. Ms. Summers has 41 pencils for 9 students. If they all receive the same
  number of pencils, what is the greatest number each student can receive?
  * A. 4
     B. 5
     C. 32
     D. 50
     2007 – %

6. Mrs. Smith and Mr. Jones are taking their classes on a field trip. Each school
   van holds 8 people. If there are 48 people going on the trip, how many vans do
   they need?
      A. 5
   * B. 6
      C. 40
      D. 56
      2006 – %

22. Sheila is making beaded necklaces that are 10 inches long. She has a piece of
  string that is 78 inches long. How many necklaces can she make from the
  string?
  * A. 7
      B. 8
      C. 780
      D. 800
      2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     19
31. The fourth-grade classes at Valley Elementary are going on a field trip. There
  are 392 students. Each bus holds 56 students. How many buses will they need?
     A. 6
  * B. 7
     C. 8
     D. 9
     2005 – %

11. Marty is about to begin reading the 250-page book she just checked out from
  the library. She plans to read 25 pages per night. At this rate, how many
  nights will it take her to finish her book?
     A. 1
     B. 5
  * C. 10
     D. 20
     2004 – %

25. Lark Creek Elementary School had 4 fifth-grade classrooms and a total of 96
  fifth-grade students. If each classroom has exactly the same number of
  students, which number sentence could be used to calculate the number of
  students in each classroom?
      A. 96 + 4 =
       B. 96 − 4 =
       C. 96 × 4 =
   * D. 96 ÷ 4 =
       2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     20
NO.3.4.1
Demonstrate, with and without appropriate technology, computational
fluency in multi-digit addition and subtraction in contextual problems

11. The table below shows how many students are in each fourth-grade class at
  Birchwood School.
                  Fourth-Grade Students at Birchwood School
                          Class             Number of Students
                       Mrs. Adams                     25
                      Mr. Thompson                    28
                       Ms. Sanchez                    29
                        Mr. Jones                     27
  1. The cafeteria can seat as many as 83 students. Name three classes that
     could sit in the cafeteria at the same time. Explain your answer using words
     and/or numbers.
  2. The school auditorium seats 500 people. After all four fourth-grade classes
     are seated in the auditorium, how many seats are left empty? Explain your
     answer using words and/or numbers.
                    BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
     2008 -




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     21
ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   22
NO.3.4.2
Demonstrate fluency with combinations for multiplication and division
facts (12 x 12) and use these combinations to mentally compute related
problems (30 x 50)




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   23
NO.3.4.3
Attain, with and without appropriate technology, computational fluency in
multiplication and division using contextual problems using
 two-digit by two-digit multiplication (larger numbers with technology),
 up to three-digit by two-digit division (larger numbers with technology),
 strategies for multiplication and dividing numbers,
 performance of operations in more than one way,
 estimation of products and quotients in appropriate situations, and
 relationships between operations

E. Jansen is helping to prepare for a bicycle race. His job is to set up tables with
   cups of water along the course. There will be 10 tables with 24 paper cups of
   water on each table.
   1. How many paper cups will Jansen need in all? Explain your answer using
      words and/or numbers.
   2. The paper cups come in packages of 48. Based on your answer in Part 1,
      how many packages of cups will Jansen need? Explain your answer using
      words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2
   2007 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
2 points possible
   1 point: Correct answer: 240 (cups).
                                              AND
   1 point: Correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
      Work may contain a calculation or copy error.
      Give credit for the following or equivalent:
      • 10 × 24 = # cups, or
      • Student adds 24 ten times, or
      • “I multiplied 10 by 24 to get my answer.”
PART 2
2 points possible
   1 point: Correct answer: 5 (packages), or correct answer based on calculation
      error in Part 1.
   Note: Answer may be a mixed # or rounded up to the next whole #.
                                              AND
   1 point: Correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
      Work may contain a calculation, copy, or counting error or may be based on an
          incorrect answer in Part 1.
      Give credit for the following or equivalent:
      • 240 ÷ 48 = # packages, or
      • “I divided 240 by 48 to get the # of packages,” or
      • (# of cups from Part 1) ÷ 48 = # of packages, or
      • “Since 24 + 24 = 48, 2 tables will use 1 package. There are 10 tables, so they will
          need 10/2 = 5 packs,” or



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008              24
      • 5 x 48 = 240 (guess and check), or
      • 48 + 48 + 48 + 48 + 48 = 240 (guess and check).
   Note: Do not give credit for incomplete or vague procedure.

7. Ashley has a 43-page sticker album. Each page will hold about 20 stickers.
   About how many stickers can she place in the album?
      A. 2
      B. 20
      C. 60
   * D. 800
      2006 – %
01/
C. Mrs. Grey wrote the following two numbers on the board.
                                      12      4
   1. What is the sum of the two numbers that Mrs. Grey wrote on the board?
      Write a number sentence using Mrs. Grey’s numbers and your sum.
   2. If 12 is the dividend and 4 is the quotient, what is the divisor? Write a
      number sentence using Mrs. Grey’s numbers and your divisor.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
      2006 – /8
                                SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
 2 points possible
    1 point: Correct answer: 16 (sum).
    Note: Do not give credit if incorrect procedure is used:
    Ex: 4 x 4 = 16
                                             AND
    1 point: Correct equation given.
    Work may contain a calculation error.
    Give credit for the following:
    • 12 + 4 = # or
    • 4 + 12 = #
    Give credit for the following only with an answer of 16:
    • 16 – 4 = 12 (Guess & Check)
    • 16 – 12 = 4 (Guess & Check)
    Note: Do not give procedure credit for work that is not in the form of an equation:
    Ex: 12 or
        +4
        16
    Ex: “I added 12 and 4 and got…”
PART 2




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                25
 2 points possible
    1 point: Correct answer: 3 (divisor).
    Give credit if the answer is stated “The divisor is 3.” or if 3 is shown as the
                                                      4
     divisor in a division operation: Ex:         3 12
     Note: Do not give credit if incorrect procedure is used:
     Ex: 4 ÷ 12 = 3.
     AND
     1 point: Correct equation given. (Divisor may be incorrect.)
     Give credit for the following:
     • 12 ÷ 3 = 4 or
     • 12 ÷ (divisor) = 4. or
     Give credit for the following only with an answer of 3:
     • 3 x 4 = 12 (Guess & Check)
     • 4 x 3 = 12 (Guess & Check)
     • 12 ÷ 4 = 3 (Give credit except at “4” level).
     Note: Do not give procedure credit for work that is not in the form of an equation:
                                         4
     Ex: Shows short division:        3 12 or
     Ex: “I divided 12 by 3 and got…”

34. The fourth grade had a pizza party. There are 86 children in the fourth grade.
  If each child ate 3 slices, how many total slices were eaten?
      A. 83
      B. 89
      C. 256
  * D. 258
      2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                 26
NO.3.4.4
Solve simple problems using operations involving addition, subtraction,
and multiplication using a variety of methods and tools
(e.g., objects, mental computation, paper and pencil and with and without
appropriate technology)

7. Beth had 9 groups of pencils with 4 in each group. She skip-counted by 4 to
   find the total number of pencils. What are the last 3 numbers she said?
      A. 14 23 32
      B. 20 24 28
   * C. 28 32 36
      D. 32 36 48
      2007 – %

24. Larissa needs to bake 120 cookies. If there are 30 cookies in a batch, how
  many batches does she need to bake?
      A. 3
  * B. 4
      C. 90
      D. 150
      2005 – %

Use the table below to answer question 40.
                      Money Lisa Earned Last Week
      AJob             Baby-Sitting Raking Leaves Mowing Lawn
      Hourly Rate          $2.25            $1.50        $3.00
      Number of              7                 3           2
      Hours Worked
40. How much money did Lisa earn baby-sitting last week?
     A. $ 9.25
     B. $15.25
     C. $15.65
  * D. $15.75
     2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       27
                                          School Store
                                   Item          Amount
                                   Pencils       $1.25
                                   Pen           $1.75
                                   Paper         $2.25
                                   Ruler         $1.75
                                   Eraser        $0.10
                                   Notebook      $3.50

D. Anthony needs to buy school supplies.
   1. Anthony plans to buy one pack of pencils, paper, a ruler, and a notebook at
      the school store. What will be the total cost for all of Anthony’s supplies?
      Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   2. Anthony has $10.00. Will this be enough money for all of the supplies
      Anthony plans to buy? Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
      2005 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)
Answer: 1 point for correct answer of ($)8.75.
                                            AND
  Work: 1 point for correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained. Work may
      contain a calculation or copy error.
  ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
        $1.25 + $2.25 + $1.75 + $3.50 = Total Cost, or
        “I added 1.25, 2.25, 1.75 and 3.50 to get the cost of the supplies.”
  Note: Do not give credit for vague or incomplete explanations.
  ● Example: “I added his supplies.”
Part 2: (2 points possible)
Answer: 2 points for correct answer and explanation based on total in Part 1.
  ● Give credit for the following or equivalent:
       “Yes, because he only spent (8.75 or Total Cost in Part 1 ≤ 10.00), and he has
         10.00” (both 10.00 and Total Cost from Part 1 are mentioned), or
       “Yes, since 8.75 < 10.00,” or
       “Yes, because 10.00 – 8.75 = 1.25,” or
       “No, because he spent (Total Cost in Part 1 > 10.00) and he only has 10.00”
         (both 10.00 and Total Cost from Part 1 are mentioned).
  OR
  1 point for correct “Yes, No” response based on answer in Part 1. Explanation is partial,
      vague, or work contains an error.
  ● Example: Only 10.00 or 8.75 (or Total Cost from Part 1) is mentioned.
  ● Example: No “Yes, No” answer is given, but work is correct and complete.
  Note: Do not give credit for “Yes” or “No” answer without any valid support.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008              28
Use the table below to answer question 6.
                                     Hector’s Table
                            State Park      Approx. Miles From
                                                 Little Rock
                       Pinnacle Mountain              10
                       Woolly Hollow                  40
                       Village Creek                  90
                       Crater of Diamonds            100
                       Bull Shoals                   120
6. Hector made the table above for his family to compare the approximate
   distance from their home in Little Rock to several state parks. How many more
   miles is it to Village Creek State Park than to Woolly Hollow State Park?
      A. 40
   * B. 50
      C. 80
      D. 90
      2004 – %

Use the chart below to answer question 35.
                            Super Cinema Theaters
                        Adult admission            $6.25
                        Children                    $3.75
                        Large popcorn              $4.00
                        Small popcorn              $3.00
                        Large soda                 $1.89
                        Small soda                 $0.99
35. Mr. Dunbar took his five-year-old daughter to the movies. After paying for the
  admission for each of them, he bought a large popcorn and 2 small sodas. How
  much did he spend?
     A. $14.98
  * B. $15.98
     C. $16.88
     D. $17.98
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      29
NO.3.4.5
Use estimation strategies to solve problems and judge the reasonableness
of the answer

6. Maria bought 10 plants for her garden. Each plant cost $7.97. What would be
   the estimated total cost of Maria’s plants?
      A $ 8.00
      B $10.00
   * C $80.00
      D $90.00
      2008 -

39. Which state has a population that is about 2,000,000 greater than that of
  Arkansas?
                Population of Arkansas and Its Border States
                           State                Population
                           Texas                22,118,509
                         Tennessee               5,841,748
                          Missouri               5,704,484
                         Louisiana               4,496,334
                         Oklahoma                3,511,532
                         Mississippi             2,881,281
                          Arkansas               2,725,714
     A. Tennessee
     B. Missouri
  * C. Louisiana
     D. Oklahoma
     2007 – %

12. Randy has 3 bags of marbles. Each bag has 86 marbles. About how many
  marbles does Randy have in all?
     A. 83
     B. 89
     C. 240
  * D. 270
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      30
6. The bicycle repair person told Jon that it would cost about $60.00 to fix his
   bike. If the repair person rounded the bill to the nearest ten dollars, which of
   the following could have been the actual amount?
      A. $49.95
      B. $52.60
   * C. $58.45
      D. $65.80
      2005 – %
AR4M03N103NXXX-015B
12. Randy counted 5,624 tickets sold for the school carnival. What is this number
   rounded to the nearest hundred?
      A. 5,000
   * B. 5,600
      C. 5,700
      D. 6,000
      2005 – %

35. The distance from Austin’s house to his grandparents’ house is 234 miles.
  About how many miles, rounded to the nearest hundred, is this?
  * A. 200
     B. 230
     C. 240
     D. 300
     2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       31
A.4.4.1
Identify a number that is more or less than any whole number using
multiples of 10, 100 and/or 1000
Ex. 100 more than 4987 is 5087




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   32
A.4.4.2
Use repeating and growing numeric and geometric patterns to make
predictions and solve problems

9. Lee found 5 rocks each day for 5 days to add to his rock collection. Which
   pattern can Lee use to count his rocks?
      A 5 7 9 11 13
      B 5 15 25 35 45
   * C 5 10 15 20 25
      D 17 19 21 23 25
      2008 -

19. If the pattern below continues, how many squares will be in Figure 5?




     A. 4
     B. 11
     C. 13
   * D. 17
     2007 – %

5. Zach created the secret code below to write messages to his friends.
                                My Secret Code
                                      1=B
                                      2=C
                                      3=D
                                      4=E
                                       etc.
   What numbers will Zach write to represent the word “HE”?
      A. 4, 7
   * B. 7, 4
      C. 4, 8
      D. 8, 4
      2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      33
B. Karen wants to make a bookmark out of leather. She is planning the design
   below on paper before she starts cutting the leather.




   1. Using Karen’s pattern, complete the design for the bookmark.
   2. How many of each shape will she need to cut out to make her bookmark?
   3. Use the same number of squares, circles, and rhombuses to design a new
      bookmark that follows a regular pattern.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1, 2, AND 3.
   2006 – /8
                             SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
 1 point possible
    1 point: The last 4 top and bottom sections of the bookmark (positions 7-
       10) are correctly completed, as shown in the diagram below:




      Note: Top and bottom row do not have to be aligned.
PART 2
 1 point possible
    1 point: Correct number of shapes: 10 squares, 5 rhombuses, 5 circles
    (shapes may be named or drawn).
 Or
    Correct # of squares, rhombuses and circles based on Part 1 answer.
PART 3
 2 points possible
    Note: Design may be in a single row or a continuous pattern.
    Note: If design is in a double row, both rows must have a repeating pattern or the
          nd                           st
         2 row is a repeat of the 1 row.
      Note: Design must be different from the original bookmark.
      2 points: Correct and complete design that contains all of the following:
      • 10 squares, 5 rhombuses, 5 circles OR Equal #’s of each shape.
      • The pattern is repeating horizontally, repeats at least once and has no errors.
      Or
      1 point: Partially correct design:
      • Design uses 10 Squares, 5 rhombuses, 5 circles or equal #’s of each.
      (Repeats correctly at least once, proceeds with something incorrect.) or
      • The #’s of squares, rhombuses and circles ≠10, 5, and/or 5, and there are not
         equal #’s of each shape, but the design repeats correctly at least once.



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                34
4. Laura kept track of the growth of her ivy plant. It was 6 inches long when she
   planted it, and it grew about 2 inches each week. About how many inches long
   was it by the end of the fourth week?
      A. 8
      B. 10
      C. 12
   * D. 14
      2005 – %

Use the chart below to answer question 23.
                                   IN    OUT
                                    A     B
                                    5     10
                                    10    20
                                    20    40
                                    40    80
                                    80     ?
23. Mrs. Bunch put the pattern above on the board. Which number would correctly
  complete the pattern?
     A. 100
     B. 120
     C. 140
  * D. 160
     2005 – %

Use the pattern below to answer question 26.
AR4M03P106NXXX-043B
                               1 6 11 16 21 . . .
26. In the pattern above, each number increases by how many?
      A. 1
  * B. 5
      C. 21
      D. 26
      2005 – %

23. What number comes next in the pattern?
                             1, 2, 4, 7, 11, __
     A. 15
  * B. 16
     C. 18
     D. 22
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     35
31. What is the rule for the pattern below?
                            2 4 7 14 17 34 37
     A. Add 2, then add 3 in a repeating pattern.
     B. Double each number.
     C. Double the first number, then double the next number, then subtract 1.
  * D. Double the first number, then add three to the next number.
     2004 – %




D. Dwight and his brother, Jim, decided what they would like to eat for breakfast
   every day for a month. They each began filling in the calendar above with their
   favorite breakfast foods.
   1. If Dwight’s pattern on the calendar above continues, how many times during
      the month will he have eggs? Explain your answer using words, numbers,
      and/or pictures.
   2. If both Dwight’s and Jim’s patterns continue, how many days during the
      month will both boys have the same thing for breakfast? Explain your
      answer using words, numbers, and/or pictures.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2004 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       36
   1 point for correct answer of Dwight eats eggs 10 times,
                                              AND
   1 point for correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
   ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent (Answer might not be “10.”):
        “He has eggs on the 2nd ,5th ,8th, 11th, 14th, 17th, 20th, 23rd, 26th, and
           29th;” or
        “He has eggs on the 2nd and every third day after that;” or
        31/3 = 10 r1; or
        Correct number of times eggs are eaten each week (1 + 3 + 2 + 2 + 2); or
        Calendar is correctly filled out indicating days when Dwight eats eggs. (Dates
           do not have to be circled.)




Note: Do not give credit for incorrect or incomplete procedures:
   ● Student continues the pattern past May 31st. (Incorrect procedure. This usually
      follows an answer of “He has eggs 11 times.”)
   ● “The pattern is CEW,” or “I did the pattern.” (Incomplete procedure.)
Part 2: (2 points possible)
   1 point for correct answer of they will eat the same things 11 times,
                                               AND
   1 point for correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
   ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent (Answer might not be “11.”):
        “They will both have –
              ♦ Cereal on the 1st, 7th, 13th, 19th, 25th, and 31st; and
              ♦ Waffles on the 6th, 12th, 18th, 24th, and 30th,” or
        “They will eat the same things on the following dates: 1, 6, 7, 12, 13, 18, 19,
           24, 25, 30, and 31,” or
        “They will both have cereal on the first day of the month and every sixth day
           after that. They will both have waffles every sixth day,” or
        Correct number of times they have the same breakfast each week (1 + 2 + 3 +
           3 + 2), or
        Calendar is correctly filled out indicating days when they eat the same thing.
           (Dates do not have to be circled.)




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008              37
                                              APRIL
                              SUN. MON. TUE.WED. THUR. FRI. SAT.
1              2               3         4         5          6                           7
basketball         soccer       football    basketball        soccer          football    basketball
8              9               10           11              12               13           14
    soccer         football    basketball      soccer        football        basketball       soccer
15             16              17           18              19               20           21
    football
22             23              24           25              26               27           28

29             30

C. Jake and Timothy play sports in the neighborhood every day. The calendar
   above shows how many times they have played basketball, soccer, and football
   so far during the month of April.
   1. If this pattern continues, what sport will Jake and Timothy play on Saturday,
      April 21? Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   2. How many times will Jake and Timothy play soccer during the month of
      April? Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2003 – /8
                                        SOLUTION
Part 1: Football
  Work/Explanation: Response states any of the following:
  • Football is played every third day.
OR
  • 21 is a multiple of 3.
OR
  • Student fills in calendar with appropriate sport for April 16 through April 21.
OR
  • Explains that the pattern is “basketball, soccer, football” and if started on the 16th,



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                             38
       football would be played on the 21st.
OR
  • Equivalent work or explanation.
Part 2: 10
  Work/Explanation: Response states any of the following:
  • Soccer is played 5 times during the first 15 days of April, so they will play 5 times
      during the last 15 days of the month.
OR
  • 30 ÷ 3 = 10.
OR
  • Student fills in or lists appropriate soccer dates on calendar through April 29.
OR
  • Equivalent work or explanation.
Scoring (4 total points possible)
Part 1: (2 points possible)
   • 1 point for correct answer of Football,
                                               AND
   • 1 point for correct and complete work or explanation.
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  • 1 point for correct answer of 10.
                                               AND
  • 1 point for correct and complete work or explanation.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                  39
A.4.4.3
Determine the relationship between sets of numbers by selecting the rule
(2 step rule in words)

9. Pam created the table below using a 2-step rule.
                                   X          Y
                                   2          5
                                   3          7
                                   4          9
                                   5         11
   What did Pam do to create her set of numbers?
     A. Add 4 to the x-value, and then subtract 1.
   * B. Multiply the x-value by 2, and then add 1.
     C. Add 2 to the x-value, and then add 1 more.
     D. Multiply the x-value by 2, and then subtract 1.
     2007 – %

25. Toby recorded the height of a plant for four weeks. He noticed a pattern.
                               Week            Height
                                 1             2 inches
                                 2             5 inches
                                 3            11 inches
                                 4            23 inches
  What is the rule for the changes in height?
     A. Add 3.
     B. Add 12.
     C. Double each number.
  * D. Multiply each number by 2 and add 1.
     2007 – %

30. Mr. Teck wrote the sets of numbers below on the board.
                   (5, 9) (6, 12) (7, 15) (8, 18)
  What rule did Mr. Teck use to determine the value of the second number in
  each set?
     A. Add 4 to the first number.
     B. Multiply the first number by 2.
     C. Multiply the first number by 2, and then add 1.
  * D. Subtract 2 from the first number, and then multiply by 3.
     2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      40
31. What is the rule for the pattern below?
            2 4 3 6 5 10 9 . . .
     A. Add 2, and then subtract 1.
     B. Divide by 2, and then add 1.
     C. Multiply by 2, and then add 1.
  * D. Multiply by 2, and then subtract 1.
     2007 – %

1. What is the missing operation in the pattern below?

          Input           n        10         11        12         13        14   15
          Output          ?         3         4          5          6        7     8

     A. add 7
     B. add 10
     C. subtract 3
   * D. subtract 7
     2006 – %

13. What is the rule for the number pattern below?
                            1,125     225     45                   9
     A. add 900
     B. divide by 2
  * C. divide by 5
     D. subtract 900
     2006 – %

31. When Ashley says “13,” the answer is 113. When she says “36,” the answer is
  136. When she says “94,” the answer is 194. What is the rule for Ashley’s
  pattern?
  * A. add 100
     B. add 117
     C. divide by 100
     D. divide by 117
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008             41
B. Use these equations to answer the questions that follow.
                                                6+5=
                                             60 + 50 =
                                         600 + 500 =
                                     6,000 + 5,000 =
   1. Find each sum above.
   2. What pattern do you notice?
   3. Explain how you could use this pattern to find the sum of 6,000 + 8,000.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1, 2, AND 3.
   2005 – /8
                                SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (1 point possible)
  Answer: 1 point for 4 correct answers given: 11; 110; 1,100; 11,000.
OR
  ½ point for 2 or 3 correct answers given.
Part 2: (1 point possible)
  Answer: 1 point for correct and complete statement of the pattern.
  ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
       “The sum of 6 + 5 = 11. All the answers start with 11 and add a pattern of
         zeros; first one, then two, then three,” or
       “Each sum has the same number of zeros after ‘11’ that are in each addend.
         Example: 60 and 50 each have one ‘0.’ Therefore, their sum would be 110,” or
       “Add a 0 every time.”
  Note: Do not give credit for incomplete explanations.
  ● Example: “I added zeros.”
  ● Example: “Add a 0 to the 5 and 6” (only addresses the addends).
Part 3: (2 points possible)
  Answer: 2 points for correct and complete explanation.
  ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
       6 + 8 = 14; add 3 zeros to get 14,000, or
       6 + 8 = 14 and add 3 zeros, or
       6 + 8 = 14 and add zeros to get 14,000, or
       6 + 8 60 + 80 600 + 800 6,000 + 8,000. Give full credit with or without sums of
         14, 140, 1,400, 14,000.
  OR
  1 point for incomplete or vague explanation, but understanding of pattern is shown.
  ● Give credit for the following or equivalent:
       14 140 1400 14,000 (only sums given), or
       “Add 6 + 8 = 14 and add 0’s” (incomplete), or
       Student uses given pattern (6 + 5, etc.) to find 6,000 + 8,000.
  ▲ Example: “I could add 6,000 + 5,000 and then add 3,000.”
  Note: Do not give credit for 6,000 + 8,000 = 14,000 only.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008          42
Use the chart below to answer question 33.
                        ISABEL’S SAVINGS CHART
     Week’s Saved        2           3         4                               5
     Total Saved       $8.00      $12.00    $16.00                           $20.00

33. The chart above shows the pattern of Isabel’s savings over a 5-week period.
  What is the rule Isabel used to create this pattern?
  * A. add 4
     B. subtract 4
     C. divide by 4
     D. multiply by 2
     2003 – %

Use the information below to answer question 36.

                           Amount of          Distance
                         Time Traveled        Traveled
                           10 minutes          5 miles
                           20 minutes         10 miles
                           30 minutes         15 miles
                           40 minutes         20 miles
                           50 minutes         25 miles
36. Bridget’s dad kept count of how far he bicycled over a period of 50 minutes. If
  this pattern continues, how many miles will Bridget’s dad have traveled in 90
  minutes?
     A. 30 miles
  * B. 45 miles
     C. 60 miles
     D. 90 miles
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008            43
A.5.4.1
Select and/or write number sentences (equations) to find the unknown in
problem-solving contexts involving two-digit by one-digit division using
appropriate labels

3. Mrs. Barwick bought 18 boxes of colored pencils for her students. There are 72
   pencils in all. If n = the number of pencils in a box, which equation (number
   sentence) can Mrs. Barwick use to find the number of colored pencils in each
   box?
   * A 72 ÷ n = 18
      B 72 x n =_ 18
      C 72 - 18 =_ n
      D 72 + 18 = n
      2008 -

10. Mr. Carter’s class has 30 students. Which mathematical sentence shows how
  many 5-player basketball teams the class will be able to make at recess?
  * A. 30 ÷ 5 = n
     B. 30 × 5 = n
     C. 30 – 5 = n
     D. 30 + 5 = n
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     44
A.5.4.2
Express mathematical relationships using simple equations and
inequalities (>, <, =, ≠ ) Ex.
4 x 5 ____ 8 x 2 + 3

12. Kim wrote the following number sentence (inequality) on the board.
                               3 × 6 − 4 < 6[ ]3
  Which symbol will make the number sentence true?
      A. +
      B. −
  * C. ×
      D. ÷
      2007 – %

2. Mr. Douglas asked each of his fourth-grade students to write an inequality
   statement. Which one of the following inequality statements is true?
      A. 1258 < 1249
      B. 76,849 > 76,890
   * C. 94,682 > 94,628
      D. 1,238,489 < 1,219,999
      2003 – %

10. Maria collects pictures of butterflies. She has 140 pictures. Of these, 80
  pictures show butterflies. Which equation can you use to show pictures without
  butterflies?
     A. 140 + 80 = N
  * B. 140 – 80 = N
     C. 140 × 80 = N
     D. 140 ÷ 80 = N
     2003 – %

15. Which comparison is correct?
  * A. 0,500 < 550
     B. 0,300 > 2,850
     C. 4,300 = 3,400
     D. 9,919 < 9,919
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      45
A.5.4.3
Use a variable to represent an unknown quantity in a number sentence
involving contextual situations and find the value
Ex. Susie bought 48 pencils. If the pencils came in packages of 12, how
many packages of pencils did she buy?
               P = 48 ÷ 12

21. Eleven students paid a total of $55 to go on a field trip. Which equation
  (number sentence) shows how much money each student paid (n), if each
  student paid an equal amount?
  * A. 55 ÷ 11= n
      B. 11 × 55 = n
      C. 55 – 11 = n
      D. 55 + 11 = n
      2007 – %

24. Marguerite needs 24 squares to make one patchwork quilt. She wants to make
  6 quilts. Which mathematical sentence shows how many squares she needs?
      A. 24 ÷ 6 = n
      B. 6 ÷ 24 = n
  * C. 24 × 6 = n
      D. 4 × 24 = n
      2007 – %
AR4M03P104NXXX-104B
29. In the equation below, what is the value of n?
                               (81 − 9) ÷ n = 9
      A. 0
  * B. 8
      C. 72
      D. 81
      2005 – %

1. Which number will make the equation true?
                           (10 + n) – (2 × 3) = 8
   * A. 4
     B. 9
     C. 10
     D. 16
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      46
37. What number does n represent in order for the statement below to be true?
                                 6×3=2×n
     A. 1
     B. 3
     C. 5
  * D. 9
     2004 – %
AR4M01P104NXXX-085D
20. Mr. Dove wrote the number sentence N ÷ 3 = 9 on the board. What number
  could replace N to make this number sentence true?
     A. 3
     B. 6
     C. 12
  * D. 27
     2003 – %

24. LaToya made up this number sentence: N × 4 = 2 × 8. What number could
  replace N to make LaToya’s number sentence true?
      A. 2
  * B. 4
      C. 16
      D. 64
      2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      47
A.6.4.1
Create a chart or table to organize given information and to understand
relationships and explain the results
Ex. Troy must read independently for 2 hours a week. If Troy reads 20
minutes a day, how long will it take him to read a total of two hours?

4. Marley tracked the number of minutes she spent writing in her journal in the
   table below.
                        Time Spent Writing in My Journal
                                 Day          Total
                                              Minutes
                                   1            20
                                   2             ?
                                   3            60
                                   4            80
                                   5           100
   If Marley wrote in her journal the same number of minutes each day, how many
      total minutes did she write by the end of Day 2?
      A 20
      B 30
   * C 40
      D 80
      2008 -

36. Lisa must walk the family dog for 30 minutes each day. The table below shows
the total amount of time she has walked the dog so far this week.
                                 DAY        TOTAL TIME
                                          FOR THE WEEK
                                   1           1
                                                  hour
                                               2
                                            2                1 hour
                                            3                   1
                                                            1     hour
                                                                2
                                            4                    ?
                                            5                    ?
                                            6                    ?
                                            7                    ?
   According to the table, how much time will Lisa have spent walking the dog by
   the end of the 7th day?
                                              1
      A. 2 hours                        B. 2 hours
                                              2
                                              1
      C. 3 hours                      * D. 3 hours
                                              2
      2007 – %


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     48
A. Cheryl has a new 20-gallon fish tank. She only has a 1-quart pitcher that she
   will use to fill the tank. She started making the table below to help her find out
   how many times she would need to fill and pour with her quart pitcher.
Number of         1      2     3     4    5     6     7     8     9    10
  Gallons
Number of         4      8
  Quarts
   1. In your answer document, copy and complete Cheryl’s table, showing the
       relationship between quarts and gallons.
   2. How many times will Cheryl need to fill and pour her pitcher in order to fill
       her 20-gallon tank?
   Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2007 – /8
                                SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
2 points possible
2 points: Chart is correct and complete, as shown in the diagram below.
   Note: Work is not required.
   Note: 1 & 2 Gallons and 4 & 8 Quarts (given) may be missing but are required for a
      score of 4. Labels (# of Gallons, # of Quarts) may be missing, but are required for
      a score of 4.
Ex:



OR
     1 point: Chart is incomplete or incorrect due to one of the following:
     • 1 or more #s are incorrect due to one calculation, counting or copy error.
     Correct procedure used: 4 is added to all entries to get the next entry, or each
     entry for # of gallons is multiplied by 4.
     Ex: Response contains 1 calculation error.



   Error: 20+4=23, others from that point on are correct based on error (+4).
   • Chart is incomplete: One entry is missing from 12–40. The #s listed are correct.
Ex:



   • The # of Quarts (12–40) are correct and complete but they aren’t associated
   with corresponding # of Gallons.
Ex:


Note: Do not give credit if work contains more than 1 calculation error or


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008              49
   incorrect procedure is used.
PART 2
2 points possible
   1 point: Correct answer: 80, or correct answer based on calculation in Part 1.
                                               AND
   1 point: Correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
   Work may contain a calculation error or may be based on a calculation, counting, or
      copy error in Part 1.
   Give credit for the following or equivalent:
   • 20 × 4 = # (4 quarts/gallon, has 20 gallons), or
   • 40 (or # of quarts for 10 gallons in Part 1) × 2 = #, or
   • The chart is extended to 20 gallons and is completed correctly, or multiples of 4 from
       44 to 80 are listed: 44, 48, 52, 56, 60, 64, 68, 72, 76, 80 (may be based on
       incorrect entry in Part 1), or
   • 10/40 = 20/x, x = #, or
   • “The chart shows that it would take 40 quarts to fill a 10-gallon tank. A 20-
   gallon tank is 2 times larger, so it would need two times as much water so I
   doubled 40.”
   Note: Do not give credit for incomplete work or explanation.
   Ex: “I counted by 4’s”

Use the chart below to answer question 39.
                                   IN      OUT
                                    8       16
                                    9       18
                                   10       20
                                   12       24
                                   14        ?
39. The chart above shows a relationship between the numbers in the “IN” column
  and the numbers in the “OUT” column. What number would complete the chart
  above?
     A. 16                              B. 26
  * C. 28                               D. 32
     2005 – %

2. Mr. Preddy put the chart below on the board. He asked his students, “If the
   pattern continues, which pair of numbers would come next?” What answer
   should the students have given?
      A. 55, 10                        * B. 60, 12
      C. 75, 15                          D. 90, 18
      2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008              50
Use the chart below to answer question 15.
                                 Pattern Chart
                                   A       B
                                    6      12
                                   12      24
                                   24      48
                                    ?       ?
15. Mrs. Gordon put the chart above on the board. What pair of numbers would
  come next in the pattern?
     A. 30, 60                          B. 30, 96
     C. 48, 60                        * D. 48, 96
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     51
A.7.4.1
Identify, describe and generalize relationships in which quantities change
proportionally
Ex. If a car travels at a rate of 50 mph, how far will it travel in three
hours?

hours       1        2       3
miles       50      100     150

26. It is 150 miles between Little Rock and Ashdown. Driving at 50 miles per hour,
  how many hours will the trip take?
  * A. 3
            1
      B. 2
            2
      C. 2
            1
      D. 3
            2
      2006 - %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     52
G.8.4.1
Identify, describe and classify three-dimensional solids by properties
including the number of vertices, edges, and shapes of faces using models

7. How many edges does the brick below have?



     A4
     B6
     C9
   * D 12
     2008 -

20. Which of the following is most like a cylinder?
  * A. soda can
     B. stop sign
     C. cereal box
     D. front door of a house
     2006 – %

24. How many more vertices does a cube have than a triangular prism?




   * A. 2
     B. 6
     C. 8
     D. 14
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   53
Use the figures below to answer question 5.




5. Mr. Joyner asked his students to construct 3-D shapes using construction paper
   and tape. Which of the following shapes could Marlene make from the three
   shapes above?
      A. cone
      B. cube
   * C. cylinder
      D. rectangular prism
      2005 – %

7. Aaron has paper cut-outs of a rectangle and two circles. Which of the following
   3-dimensional shapes could Aaron make using all three of his cut-out shapes?
      A. a cone
      B. a sphere
   * C. a cylinder
      D. a rectangular prism
      2003 – %

12. How many faces does a cube have?
     A. 4
     B. 5
  * C. 6
     D. 7
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      54
18. How many figures (circle, triangle, rectangle, square . . .) do you need to
  make the cylinder below?
     A. 2 congruent circles and 1 triangle
  * B. 2 congruent circles and 1 rectangle
     C. 2 congruent circles and 1 trapezoid
     D. 2 congruent circles only
     2003 – %

26. Which figure below could be folded to make a cube?




       A.                                          B.




   * C.                                            D.
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        55
G.8.4.2
Identify regular and irregular polygons including octagon
See the Polygons page in the Appendix

15. Which statement best describes the polygons below?




     A. Both are regular.
   * B. Both are irregular.
     C. Both are congruent.
     D. Both are pentagons
     2007 – %

B. Susan wrote the clues below to describe a mystery shape.
       • It is a quadrilateral.
       • It has only one set of parallel sides.
       • It has no right angles.
       • It has only one line of symmetry.
   You may use your pattern blocks to help answer Parts 1 and 2.
   1. In your answer document, draw and name Susan’s mystery shape.
   2. Draw and label a rhombus, and give three “mystery shape” clues for it.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2007 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
2 points possible
   1 point: Correct drawing of a trapezoid.
   Ex:
AND                                   trapezoid
   1 point: Correct name of “Trapezoid.”
PART 2
2 points possible
   2 points: Correct drawing of a rhombus, as shown below.



                                          rhombus
   Note: The label of “rhombus” is only required for a score of 4.
   A drawing of a square is acceptable because a square is a rhombus.
                                             And
   Response contains any 3 clues that correctly describe a rhombus.



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     56
     Examples:
     • I am a quadrilateral.
     • I am a parallelogram or I am like a diamond.
     • I have 4 sides, lines, or edges (“edges” is not acceptable for a score of 4).
     • I have 4 vertices or corners (“points” is not acceptable).
     • The lengths of all of my sides are equal.
     • I am an equilateral.
     • My opposite sides are parallel.
     • I have 2 sets of parallel sides.
     • I have 2 lines of symmetry.
     • I have 2 obtuse angles.
     • I have 2 acute angles.
     • The measures of my opposite angles are equal.
     • My diagonals are perpendicular.
     • My diagonals bisect each other.
     • My diagonals bisect my angles.
     Note: If a drawing of a square is given, score clues accordingly.
OR
     1 point: Response contains either of the following:
     • Correct drawing of a rhombus but clues are incomplete or missing, or
     • Drawing of rhombus is missing or not obviously incorrect. 3 correct clues for a
        rhombus are listed with no incorrect clues included.
     Note: No credit is given in Part 2 if the diagram is incorrect.

37. I am a polygon. I have 6 sides. What is my name?
      A. square
      B. octagon
  * C. hexagon
      D. quadrilateral
      2006 – %

Use the figure below to answer question 1.




1. Ms. Sutton drew the rhombus above on the board. She asked her students to
   describe the shape. Which of the following is a correct description of the shape?
      A. 4 even sides; 4 right angles; 2 sets of parallel lines
      B. 4 uneven sides; 2 acute angles; 2 obtuse angles; 2 sets of parallel lines
   * C. 4 even sides; 2 acute angles; 2 obtuse angles; 2 sets of parallel lines
      D. 4 even sides; 2 acute angles; 2 obtuse angles; 1 set of parallel lines
      2005 – %



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008               57
Use the graph below to answer question 3.
                        PLAN FOR THE WALKWAY
                                 9 ft.


                         3 ft.


3. Caleb wants to help his dad build a walkway to his front door using square tiles.
   If each tile is 1 square foot, how many tiles will Caleb and his dad need?
       A. 6
       B. 12
       C. 24
   * D. 27
       2005 – %

Use the pictures below to answer question 18.




                       Group A                   Group B
18. What rule was used for sorting the objects above?
  * A. Group A: objects without angles
        Group B: objects with angles
     B. Group A: objects that are food
        Group B: objects with angles
     C. Group A: objects that are balls
        Group B: objects with angles
     D. Group A: objects that are round
        Group B: objects that are triangular
     2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       58
28. Mr. Taylor told his math students to guess what pattern block he was holding.
  He gave the following clues:
            • It has 4 sides.
            • All of its sides are equal.
            • It has no right angles.
  What is it?
     A. triangle
     B. hexagon
  * C. rhombus
     D. trapezoid
     2004 – %

32. I am Sam the Robot. My head is a hexagon. My legs are right triangles. My
  body is a trapezoid. Which robot am I?




   * A.                                     B.




       C.                                   D.
       2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      59
G.8.4.3
Identify, draw, and describe a line, line segment, a ray, an angle,
intersecting, perpendicular, and parallel lines

2. Which of the following represents two line segments?
   * A.


       B.


       C.


       D.
       2008 -

34. Mr. Thompson showed his class a line segment and a ray that are parallel to
  one another. Which figure did he show them?




       A.                                          B.




     C.                                        * D.
   2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        60
G.8.4.4
Identify and describe intersecting, perpendicular and parallel lines in
problem solving context

1. Which term describes the relationship of the bookcase shelves?




   * A. parallel
     B. intersecting
     C. line segment
     D. perpendicular
     2007 – %

6. Which shape does not have parallel sides?



   * A.                                            B.



       C.                                          D.
       2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   61
G.8.4.5
Classify angles relative to 90° as more than, less than or equal to

8. Which clock below has hands at an angle less than 90 degrees?
   * A.                                      B.




       C.                                                                    D.




       2007 – %

27. Which two shapes have at least one angle that is greater than 90°?




     A. E and H
   * B. F and G
     C. G and H
     D. E and F
     2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    62
G.9.4.1
Determine the result of a transformation of a two-dimensional figure as a
slide (translation), flip (reflection) or turn (rotation) and justify the
answer

38. Which shows the figure below after it has been flipped (reflected)?




       A.                                          B.




       C.                                        * D.
       2007 – %

Use the figure below to answer question 8.

                              FIGURE 1


8. Which figure is the flip image of Figure A above?




   * A.                                     B.




       C.                                   D.
       2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   63
G.10.4.1
Locate and identify points on a coordinate grid and name the ordered pair
(quadrant one only) using common language and geometric vocabulary
(horizontal and vertical)




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   64
G.11.4.1
Construct a three-dimensional model composed of cubes when given an
illustration

AR4M05G1101Y078-078B
37. Abner is building a fort with his friends. If he uses at least 25 blocks, which
  figure could be a model of his fort? (There are no hidden blocks.)




            I                          II                     III            IV
     A. I
   * B. II
     C. III
     D. IV
     2007 – %

Use the figure below to answer question 30.




30. How many blocks are there in the figure above?
     A. 14
     B. 18
  * C. 28
     D. 34
     2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008            65
G.11.4.2
Create new figures by combining and subdividing models of existing
figures in multiple ways and record results in a table


Ex    .




4. If Alan combines the two triangles below, what type of parallelogram could he
   make?



       A. trapezoid
       B. rhombus
     * C. rectangle
       D. square
       2007 – %

14. Joey covered a hexagon pattern block using 3 triangles and 1 other shape.
  What is the other shape? You may use your pattern blocks to help you.
      A. square
      B. triangle
      C. rhombus
  * D. trapezoid
      2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      66
15. How many triangle pattern blocks are needed to cover the figure below? You
  may use your pattern blocks to help you.




     A. 3
     B. 4
   * C. 12
     D. 13
     2006 – %

Use the shapes below to answer question 25.



25. When the shapes above are combined with no empty spaces left over, what
  new shape is formed? (You may use your pattern blocks to help you.)


       A.                                          B.


       C.                                      * D.
       2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    67
D. Casey used four pattern blocks to create the design below.




   1. Name the four pattern blocks Casey used. You may use your pattern blocks
      to help you find the answer.
   2. What is another way that Casey’s design could have been created if he had
      used more than four blocks? Explain your answer using words, numbers,
      and/or pictures.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2006 – /8
                                SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
 2 points possible
    2 points: Answer is correct and complete: 2 Hexagons, 1 Trapezoid and 1
       Square.
    (Shapes are correctly named with correct # of each.)
    Note: Rhombus, rectangle, parallelogram or quadrilateral may be used for the
       square.
    Quadrilateral may be used for trapezoid.
    But do not give credit if quadrilateral is used for both the trapezoid & square.
 Or
    1 point: Partially correct answer.
    Give credit for the following:
    • Hexagon, Trapezoid and Square (correct shapes, no #’s)
 Or
                                        rd
   • 2 names & #’s are correct, 3 has correct drawing of remaining shape, but name
       may be incorrect or missing.
PART 2




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008             68
 2 points possible
    2 points: Correct and complete answer.
    Give credit for the following:
    Note: If incorrect name(s) are given in Part 1, do not penalize again.
    Credit can be given if answer is “correct” based on Pt. 1 answer.
    • Correct shapes and # of shapes (> 4) needed to make new design with
    support explaining or showing why they will work:
    Ex: 1 hexagon, 3 trapezoids and 1 square with given diagram correctly divided.
    Ex: “4 trapezoids, 3 triangles and one square because 2 trapezoids could make up
       each hexagon and 3 triangles could make up one trapezoid.”
    Ex: “2 hexagons, 1 square, 1 triangle, 1 rhombus since a trapezoid can be made up
       of 1 triangle and 1 rhombus.”
    Ex: 5 trapezoids and 1 square with given diagram correctly divided.
    Ex: “15 triangles and 1 square because 6 triangles make up 1 hexagon and 3
       triangles make up 1 trapezoid so 6 + 6 + 3 = 15 triangles, + 1 square.”
 Or
    • Correct and complete drawing of given design divided up into more than 4 pattern
       blocks.
 Or
    1 point: Partially correct answer.
    Give credit for the following:
    • Correct shapes and #’s of each shape needed to make new design with missing,
       incomplete or contradicting support. or
    • Correct and complete new drawing with contradicting support. or
    • Description of how to divide one of the figures in the given drawing, but no
       reference is made to the rest of the given figure.

Use the figure below to answer question 13.




13. Ward made the above design with pattern blocks. If he makes a congruent
  design with triangular pattern blocks, how many triangles will he use? (You
  may use your pattern blocks to help you.)
     A. 3
  * B. 6
     C. 8
     D. 9
     2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008           69
Use the figure below to answer question 36.




36. The area of a trapezoid pattern block is equal to 3 triangular pattern blocks.
  How many triangles would be needed to find the area of a hexagon? (You may
  use your pattern blocks to help you.)
     A. 2
     B. 3
  * C. 6
     D. 7
     2005 – %




E. Emily took the hexagon pattern shape above and cut it symmetrically into two
   equal pieces, cutting from one vertex to another across the shape.
   1. What shape are the two new pieces? Use words or a picture to explain your
      answer.
   2. If Emily cuts the hexagon on all lines of symmetry, what shape will the new
      pieces be? Use words or a picture to explain your answer.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2005 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)
  Answer: 1 point for correct answer of “Trapezoid” or “Quadrilateral.”
  Note: Give credit for a drawing of a trapezoid (with no name or incorrect name) if no
      credit is given for the work or explanation in Part 1.
  Note: Do not give credit for “Trapezoid” or “Quadrilateral” if the explanation includes a
      diagram of a hexagon that is divided into shapes, none of which are trapezoids or
      quadrilaterals.
                                             AND
  Work: 1 point for the following work or explanations:
  ● One of the following diagrams of a hexagon cut symmetrically from 1 vertex to
      another:




   ● Correct and complete definition of trapezoid.


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008               70
         Example: “She would have two trapezoids since each shape would have 4 sides
          with just 1 pair of sides being parallel.”
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  Answer: 1 point for correct answer of “Triangle.”
  Note: Give credit for a drawing of a triangle (no name) if no credit is given for the work
      or explanation in Part 2.
  Note: Do not give credit for “Triangle” if the explanation includes a diagram of a
      hexagon that is divided into shapes, none of which are triangles, or multiple
      answers are given.
                                              AND
  Work: 1 point for the following work or explanation:
  ● Correct drawing of hexagon with anywhere from 3 lines of symmetry (connecting the
      opposite vertices, or connecting the midpoints of opposite sides, resulting in 6
      triangles) up to all 6 lines of symmetry (resulting in 12 triangles), as shown below:




   3 Lines of Symmetry Connecting Opposite Vertices          All 6 Lines of Symmetry Connecting
                                                             Opposite Vertices and Midpoints of
                                                                     Opposite Sides , or
   ● “If she cut the hexagon on all lines of symmetry, she will have 6 triangles (or 12
       triangles).”
   Note: Do not give credit for incomplete procedure (< 3 lines of symmetry), vague
       explanations, or explanations that basically repeat the prompt.
   ● Example: “If I draw all of the lines of symmetry, I’ll get triangles.”

Use the figure below to answer question 12.




12. Annie made a pattern block design using 1 hexagon and 2 trapezoids. How
  many equilateral triangles will cover this design? (You may use your pattern
  blocks to help you find the answer.)
     A. 3
     B. 6
  * C. 12
     D. 14
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                        71
M.12.4.1
Recognize that 60 seconds equals 1 minute

8. Marsha jumped rope for 1 minute without stopping. How many seconds did she
   jump?
      A 10 seconds
      B 30 seconds
   * C 60 seconds
      D 90 seconds
      2008 -

21. One morning it took Carlos 167 seconds to brush his teeth. How many
  minutes and seconds did it take him to brush his teeth?
  * A. 2 minutes and 47 seconds
     B. 3 minutes and 67 seconds
     C. 4 minutes and 17 seconds
     D. 16 minutes and 7 seconds
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   72
M.12.4.2
Distinguish the temperature in contextual problems using the Fahrenheit
scale on a thermometer

17. Mr. Barnhill has the temperature in his house set to a comfortable level—not
  too hot, not too cold. What temperature would the thermometer show?
     A. 25°F
     B. 45°F
  * C. 72°F
     D. 99°F
     2005 – %

20. Kathy is wearing a heavy coat, scarf, mittens, and a hat. Which temperature is
  it most likely outside?
      A. 35°C
  * B. 35°F
      C. 68°C
      D. 68°F
      2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     73
M.12.4.3
Use the relationship among units of measurement
Length:                  Capacity:                                           Weight:
12 in = 1 ft             2 cups = 1 pint                                     16 ounces = 1 lb
3 ft = 1 yd              2 pints = 1 quart
36 in = 1 yd             4 quarts = 1 gallon
100 cm = 1 m

11. Felton weighed 8 apples and found that they weighed 2 pounds.
  Approximately how much does 1 apple weigh?
      A. 2 oz
  * B. 4 oz
      C. 16 oz
      D. 32 oz
      2006 – %

36. Mrs. Berini used 18 yards of fabric to make her living room curtains and 16
  yards to make her bedroom curtains. How much more fabric did she use in the
  living room than in the bedroom?
      A. 2 feet
  * B. 6 feet
      C. 34 feet
      D. 72 feet
      2006 – %

39. Craig’s little brother weighed 5 pounds and 8 ounces when he was born. How
   many ounces did he weigh?
      A. 40
      B. 44
      C. 80
   * D. 88
      2006 – %
AR4M03M103NXXX-114A
8. Malek jumped a distance of 6 feet on his dirt bike. How many yards did he
   jump?
   * A. 2
      B. 3
      C. 4
      D. 6
      2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                      74
                      1
10. It is exactly 6     feet from Jomarie’s desk to the classroom door. How far is
                      2
   that in inches?
      A. 62 inches
      B. 72 inches
   * C. 78 inches
      D. 84 inches
      2005 – %

              1
22. Sarah is 4  feet tall. How tall is Sarah in inches?
              2
     A. 45 inches
     B. 48 inches
   * C. 54 inches
     D. 56 inches
     2005 – %

4. Last week, Mark’s pet bunny weighed 12 ounces. This week, it had gained 4
   more ounces. How much does it weigh now?
   * A. 1 pound
      B. 8 ounces
      C. 16 pounds
      D. 48 ounces
      2004 – %

27. Jim’s fish tank holds 40 quarts of water. How many gallons of water does that
  equal?
  * A. 10
      B. 20
      C. 40
      D. 60
      2004 – %

36. Pinnacle Mountain has a height of 1,011 feet. What would be its height in
  yards?
  * A. 337 yards
      B. 975 yards
      C. 1,014 yards
      D. 3,033 yards
      2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008           75
C. Barb and William are each growing sweet potato vines. Barb’s plant measures
   one-and-a-half feet long. William’s plant measures 24 inches long.
   1. Whose plant is longer? Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   2. How much must William’s plant grow before it is one yard long? Explain your
      answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2004 – /8
                                 SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)
1 point for correct answer of William’s plant is longer.
   ● Note: Do not give credit if there is clear evidence of incorrect procedure.
                                               AND
   1 point for correct conversion of Barb’s 1 ½ foot plant into 18 inches or William’s 24
      inch plant into 2 feet shown and/or explained.
   ● Give credit for any of the following explanations or equivalent:
       12 + 6 = 18 and 24 >18, or
       24/12 = 2 and 2 >1 ½, or
       “Twenty-four inches equals two feet, so William’s plant is longer,” or
       “His plant is longer since a foot and a half would only be eighteen inches.”
   ● Do not give credit for the following incomplete explanations:
       “His plant is 6 inches longer,” or
       “His plant is longer since 24 inches is longer than 1 ½ feet.”
Part 2: (2 points possible)
1 point for correct answer of “12 inches” or “1 foot.” Label must be correct.
                                             AND
1 point for correct procedure shown and/or explained.
   ● Give credit for any of the following explanations or equivalent:
       There are 36 inches in a yard. William’s plant is 24 inches long. The difference is
          12 inches, or
       1 yard = 3 feet and he has 2 feet. Therefore, it needs to grow 1 foot, or
       1 yard = 36 inches. 36 - 24 = 12 inches.
OR
   ● Answer is incorrect due to a calculation or copy error, but correct procedure is used.
        Example: 36 - 24 = 11 inches.
   ♦ Note: Credit will be received for the procedure, but not for the answer.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008              76
5. Alex drew a floor plan of her house. What is the length in feet of Alex’s house
   from the corner of the kitchen to the corner of the baby’s room?




     A. 04 feet
     B. 05 feet
     C. 20 feet
   * D. 40 feet
     2003 – %

13. Lee’s mother has a 32-fluid-ounce pitcher filled with milk. How many cups can
   she fill?
(8 fluid ounces = 1 cup)
   * A. 004
       B. 024
       C. 040
       D. 256
       2003 – %

17. Four feet equals ________.
      A. 3 inches
      B. 4 inches
      C. 12 inches
  * D. 48 inches
      2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008           77
27. A Ferris wheel at the fair is 208 feet high. About how
  high is the Ferris wheel in yards?
  * A. 069 yards
      B. 104 yards
      C. 205 yards
      D. 624 yards
      2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   78
M.12.4.4
Create and complete a conversion table to show relationships between
units of measurement in the same system




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   79
M.13.4.1
Using a calendar to determine elapsed time from month to month
AR4M05M1301NXXX-111A
10. Mrs. Merchant’s students wrote in their journals every day beginning on
  January 31st. They wrote their last journal entries on February 9th. How many
  total days did the students write in their journals?
     A 8 days
     B 9 days
  * C 10 days
     D 22 days
     2008 -

5. José’s school has a week-long spring break starting on March 28. On what date
   will the school reopen?




   * A. April 4
     B. April 5
     C. April 11
     D. March 12
     2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    80
Use the calendar below to answer question 9.




9. The calendar above shows that John cleans his hamster’s cage every 3 days
   and his gerbil’s cage every 5 days. If this pattern continues, how many times
   during the month of July will he clean both cages on the same day?
      A. 1
   * B. 2
      C. 6
      D. 9
      2005 – %

Use the calendar below to answer question 7.
                                 MAY
                     SUN      MON      TUE      WED THUR            FRI      SAT

                              1          2        3         4        5        6
                             SWIM
                       7      8          9       10         11      12       13

                      14      15        16       17         18      19       20
                             SWIM
                      21      22        23       24         25      26       27

                      28       29       30       31

7. Jane has swim practice on the first and third Monday of each month. What will
   be the date of her first swim practice in June?
      A. 1st
   * B. 5th
      C. 15th
      D. 29th
      2004 – %


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008         81
M.13.4.2
Solve problems involving conversions between minutes and hours

10. It took Sara 1 hour and 30 minutes to do her homework, and she practiced
  piano for 45 minutes. What was the total amount of time Sara spent doing
  homework and practicing piano?
      A. 1 hour and 15 minutes
      B. 1 hour and 30 minutes
  * C. 2 hours and 15 minutes
      D. 2 hours and 25 minutes
      2007 – %
IMPORTANT: This item appeared in the Grade 4 Benchmark Examination test
  booklet as item 12 and again as item 48. Students were required to answer this
  item correctly only once. Answering correctly for item 12 but incorrectly for
  item 48 (or vice versa) resulted in a student receiving credit for the item. The
  student’s score was not harmed by the duplication of the item.

28. Justine can run one-fourth of a mile in 120 seconds. How many minutes is
  that?
  * A. 2
      B. 4
      C. 20
      D. 30
      2005 – %

30. During the month of February, a student in fourth grade read for a total of
  1,680 minutes. For how many minutes did the student read each day if she
  read for the same number of minutes on each of the 28 days in February?
     A. 0028
  * B. 0060
     C. 0070
     D. 1,680
     2003 – %

31. Troy must read independently for 2 hours per week. If Troy reads for 20
  minutes per day, how many days will it take him to read for a total of 2 hours?
      A. 20 + 120 =
       B. 120 − 20 =
       C. 120 × 20 =
   * D. 120 ÷ 20 =
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        82
34. Students in Mr. Kon’s science class want to determine which hours of the day
  are the warmest and the coolest. They put a beaker of water outside in the sun
  and recorded the temperature of the water at 4 different times for one week.
  What are the best times for the students to record their data?
  * A. 8:15 a.m., 12:00 noon, 1:30 p.m., and 4:00 p.m.
      B. 1:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 5:30 p.m., and 7:30 p.m.
      C. 8:15 a.m., 9:15 a.m., 10:15 a.m., and 11:15 a.m.
      D. 4:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m., 8:00 p.m., and 10:00 p.m.
      2003 – %

               1
35. It takes 3   hours to drive from Fayetteville to Little Rock. If you leave
               2
   Fayetteville at 4:15 p.m., what time will you arrive in Little Rock?
                          DEPARTS FAYETTEVILLE, AR




                                             4:15 P.M.
     A. 4:45 p.m.
     B. 7:15 p.m.
   * C. 7:45 p.m.
     D. 8:00 p.m.
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       83
M.13.4.3
Restate the time in multiple ways given an analog clock to the nearest
one-minute

32. What is another way you could write “5 minutes before 9 o’clock”?
     A. 5:09
     B. 8:11
  * C. 8:55
     D. 9:05
     2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   84
M.13.4.4
Determine elapsed time in contextual situations to five-minute intervals
with beginning time unknown
Ex. Mary watched a movie for 1 hour and 15 minutes. The movie ended at
8:15. When did the movie begin?

12. When Marissa went to the amusement park, it took her 1 hour and 10
  minutes to wait in line and ride the roller coaster. The ride ended at 11:55 A.M.
  1. At what time did Marissa begin waiting in line to ride the roller coaster?
     Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
  2. Marissa got in line for the bumper boats at 12:30 P.M. The ride began at
     1:10 P.M. How long did Marissa stand in line? Explain your answer using
     words and/or numbers.
  BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
  2008 -




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       85
11. José attended a science program that lasted 1 hour and 10 minutes. The
  program ended at 3:20 P.M. What time did the program begin?
      A. 4:30 P.M.                      B. 4:20 P.M.
      C. 2:20 P.M.                   * D. 2:10 P.M.
      2007 – %

16. On Saturday night, Roberto’s family watched a movie that lasted 2 hours and
  10 minutes. If the movie ended at 9:10 P.M., what time did the movie start?
  * A. 7:00 P.M.                         B. 7:10 P.M.
     C. 11:00 P.M.                       D. 11:20 P.M.
     2007 – %

Use the information below to answer question 13.
                                    SCHEDULE
                             FOR FEEDING SNAKES
                                     10:00 A.M.
                                     12:00 P.M.
                                      2:00 P.M.
                                      4:00 P.M.
13. Sandra’s fourth-grade class went to the Little Rock Zoo on a field trip. Her
  group arrived at the snake exhibit at 10:25 A.M. How long will the group have
  to wait to see the next snake feeding?
     A. 2 hours                           B. 35 minutes
  * C. 1 hour, 35 minutes                 D. 2 hours, 35 minutes
     2004 – %
AR4M02M301NXXX-095B
38. Pat’s coach told the team to arrive at the ballpark 45 minutes before their
  baseball game. The game begins at 6:00 P.M. What time should Pat arrive at
  the ballpark?
     A. 4:45 P.M.                       * B. 5:15 P.M.
     C. 5:30 P.M.                         D. 6:45 P.M.
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     86
M.13.4.5
Apply money concepts in contextual situations
Ex.
 determine the better buy
 determine change back with the least amount of currency
 compare money

28. Brian has $6.50 in quarters. How many quarters does Brian have?
     A. 4
     B. 12
     C. 24
  * D. 26
     2007 – %

C. Thomas, Sam, and David all put their coins together to buy a set of comic
   books. Altogether, they paid $4.48.
   1. Thomas contributed 7 quarters, 4 dimes, 2 nickels, and 3 pennies. How much
      money did Thomas contribute? Explain your work using words, numbers,
      and/or pictures.
   2. David contributed only nickels and dimes for a total of $1.20. What are two
      possible combinations that he could have used? Explain your work using
      words, numbers, and/or pictures.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2005 – /8
                                SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)
  Answer: 1 point for correct answer of ($)2.28.
                                              AND
  Work: 1 point for correct and complete procedure showing how to determine the
      answer.
  ● Give credit for the following work and/or explanations or equivalent. Work may
      contain a calculation or copy error.
        7(.25) + 4(.10) + 2(.05) + 3(.01) = Total Amount, or
        1.75 + .40 + .10 + .03 = Total Amount, or
        Correct number of each coin drawn with correct $ values indicated. Do not give
          credit if coins only have “Q”, “D”, “N”, etc.
  Note: Do not give credit for partial or incomplete work.
  ● Example: “I added 7 quarters, 4 dimes, 2 nickels and 3 pennies.”
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  Answer: 1 point for 2 correct combinations of nickels and dimes (combinations listed
      below).
  ● Example: 8 nickels and 8 dimes, and 6 nickels and 9 dimes.
  OR
  ½ point for 1 correct combination.
  ● Example: 2 nickels and 11 dimes.
           Nickels          Dimes             Total


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008           87
          #         $        #         $    $1.20
          2         .10      11       1.10      "
          4         .20      10       1.00      "
          6         .30       9        .90      "
          8         .40       8        .80      "
         10         .50       7        .70      "
         12         .60       6        .60      "
         14         .70       5        .50      "
         16         .80       4        .40      "
         18         .90       3        .30      "
         20        1.00       2        .20      "
         22        1.10       1        .10      "
                                            AND
   Work: ½ point (1 point total) for work showing why each combination of nickels and
      dimes will total $1.20 as shown in the $ columns of the chart above.
   ● Example: 6 nickels = .30, and 9 dimes = .90.
   ● Example: Correct drawing with correct $ values indicated.
   Note: Work may contain a calculation or copy error. Do not give credit for partial or
      incomplete work.

5. Kisha visited the Aerospace Education Center in Little Rock with her family. She
   bought a toy airplane for $4.88 in the gift shop. She gave the salesperson
   $5.00. How much change should Kisha receive?
   * A. $0.12
      B. $0.22
      C. $1.12
      D. $1.88
      2004 – %

39. Alex went to a movie. His ticket cost $5.75, and he bought a popcorn and
  soda for $3.50. His change was $10.75. What amount of money did he take to
  the movie?
      A. $ 9.25
      B. $10.00
  * C. $20.00
      D. $21.25
      2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008             88
M.13.4.6
Read temperatures on Fahrenheit and Celsius scales




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   89
M.13.4.7
Use appropriate customary and metric measurement tools for length,
capacity and mass

                                                              1
28. What is the length, measured to the nearest                 inch, of the plastic fork below?
                                                              2
   Use your ruler to help you.




     A. 4 inches
           1
     B. 4    inches
           2
   * C. 5 inches
           1
     D. 5     inches
           2
     2006 – %

32. Jacob drew the map below to show the distance he drives from his house to
  the mall.




   Based on Jacob’s scale, what is the distance? Use your ruler to help you.
   * A. 3 miles
     B. 4 miles
     C. 7 miles
     D. 8 miles
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                    90
2. Which of the following units would you use to measure the weight of a penny?
     A. tons
   * B. grams
     C. pounds
     D. kilograms
     2005 – %

Use the figure below to answer question 16.

16. How long is the rod above, to the nearest half inch?
         1
  * A. 4 in.
         2
     B. 5 in.
     C. 11 cm
           1
     D. 11 cm
           2
     2004 – %

34. Sandra brought a bottle of soda to share at her class party. What is most
  likely the size of the bottle?
  * A. 2 liters
     B. 20 liters
     C. 2 milliliters
     D. 20 milliliters
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      91
Use the figure below to answer question 8.




8. Which measurement best describes the length of a jump rope?
     A. 07.3 inches
   * B. 07.3 feet
     C. 07.3 yards
     D. 73.0 feet
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   92
M.13.4.8
Estimate and measure length, capacity/volume and mass using
appropriate customary and metric units
         1
Length: inch, 1 cm
         2
Perimeter: inches, feet, centimeters, meters
Area: square inches, square feet, square centimeters, square meters
Weight: pounds/ounces
Mass: kilograms/grams
Capacity: cups, pints, quarts, gallons
Volume: liters

                                                    1
27. Which length, rounded to the nearest              inch, best describes the toy cheetah
                                                    2
   below? Use your ruler to help you.




   * A. 4 inches
           1
     B. 4    inches
           2
     C. 5 inches
           1
     D. 5    inches
           2
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008               93
37. Roberto’s pet rabbit weighs 3 kilograms. If his cat weighs the same as his
  rabbit, how many grams does the cat weigh?




     A. 0003 grams
     B. 0030 grams
     C. 0300 grams
   * D. 3000 grams
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       94
M.13.4.9
Use strategies for finding the perimeter of a rectangle

3. How many yards of fencing would it take to surround a dog’s play area that is a
   square measuring 412 yards per side?
      A. 16 yards
      B. 1612 yards
   * C. 18 yards
      D. 25 yards
      2006 – %

Use the picture below to answer question 11.




11. What is the perimeter of the swimming pool, in meters?
     A. 80
     B. 85
  * C. 90
     D. 110
     2005 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      95
Use the picture below to answer question 27.




27. Marla wants to glue a piece of yarn around the outer edge of the picture frame
  above. How many inches of yarn does she need to cut?
     A. 12
     B. 14
  * C. 24
     D. 35
     2005 – %

Use the diagram below to answer question 17.




17. The basketball court above is 94 feet long and 50 feet wide. What is the
  perimeter of this basketball court?
     A. 0,144 ft
     B. 0,188 sq ft
  * C. 0,288 ft
     D. 4,700 sq ft
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     96
Use the figure below to answer question 4.




4. What is the perimeter of the rug above?
     A. 07 ft.
     B. 11 ft.
     C. 12 ft.
   * D. 14 ft.
     2003 – %

21. Sam makes his own frames to display his photography. The shop sells 48-inch
  wood strips for framing. If all of Sam’s frames are 4 in. × 6 in. rectangles, how
  many frames can he make from 1 strip?




   * A. 2
     B. 3
     C. 8
     D. 12
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       97
E. Mrs. Needham wants to put a border around the edge of the bulletin board
   above.
   1. What is the perimeter of the bulletin board? Explain your reasoning with
      words and/or pictures.
   2. Mrs. Needham has 20 feet of border. Is that enough to go around the
      bulletin board? Explain your reasoning with words and/or pictures.
      BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
      2003 – /8
                                           SOLUTION
Part 1: Perimeter is 18 feet.
  Work/Explanation: 3 + 3 + 6 + 6 = 18 feet.
  OR
  Equivalent work or explanation.
Part 2: Yes, there is enough.
  Work/Explanation: She has enough since she only needs 18 ft and she has 20 ft of
      border.
OR
  18 < 20.
OR
  20 – 18 = 2.
OR
  Equivalent work or explanation.
Scoring (4 total points possible)
Part 1: (2 points possible)
  • 1 point for correct answer of 18.
  (Note: Give credit for 18 if work includes 6 × 3 (student might be grouping), but do
      not give credit for 18 if it is evident that the incorrect procedure was used: e.g.,
      work includes L × W = 6 × 3 = 18.)
Work/Explanation:
  • 1 point for correct and complete procedure for perimeter: L + L + W + W = P.
  (Note: Work might have a calculation or copy error. Do not give credit for 6 × 3.)
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  If the answer in Part 1 is 18, or incorrect due to a calculation error with correct
      procedure used:
  • 2 points for correct Y/N corresponding to answer in Part 1, and clear, correct
      work/explanation in Part 2.
OR
  • 1 point for correct Y/N corresponding to answer in Part 1, but work/explanation in


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008               98
       Part 2 is vague, incomplete, or absent.
OR
  • 1 point for missing Y/N answer with clear and correct work/explanation in Part 2.
  If the answer in Part 1 is incorrect due to a procedural error:
  • 1 point for correct Y/N corresponding to answer in Part 1 with at least some correct
      work/explanation in Part 2.
OR
  • 1 point for missing Y/N answer with clear and correct work/explanation in Part 2.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008             99
M.13.4.10
Use strategies for finding the area of a rectangle

26. Kara put wallpaper on one wall in her room, as shown below. How much
  wallpaper did she use?




     A. 20 sq ft
     B. 40 sq ft
   * C. 96 sq ft
     D. 98 sq ft
     2007 - %

D. Rachel and Hannah are getting new desks for their rooms. Their parents said
   that the larger desk should go in the larger room. Below is a grid model of each
   girl’s room and the two desks.




   1. The area of Rachel’s room is 95 square feet. What is the area of Hannah’s
      room? Explain your answer using words, numbers, and/or pictures.
   2. Which girl will get Desk A? Explain your answer using words, numbers,
      and/or pictures.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2007 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
2 points possible
   1 point: Correct answer: 85 (square feet required for a score of 4).
   AND
   1 point: Correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
   Work may contain a copy, calculation, or counting error ± 1.
   Give credit for the following or equivalent:



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        100
   • 8 × 10 = 80, 80 + 5 = #, or
   • (5 × 9) + (5 × 8) = #, or
   • 10 × 9 = 90, 90 – 5 = #, or
   • “The first row has 5, and there are 8 rows of 10, so I added them all up and got 85,”
       or
   • The response includes a diagram of the room with squares numbered from 1–85.
   Note: Do not give credit for incomplete or vague explanations. Ex: “I counted the
       squares.”
PART 2
2 points possible
2 points: Correct answer: Rachel, or correct answer based on an incorrect answer
   in Part 1 with correct and complete work shown and/or explanation that
   includes both of the following:
   • A comparison in words or symbols of the areas of the rooms.
   • A comparison of the desks using 1 of the following methods:
       Compares using letters A & B.
   Ex: A > B
       Compares areas using #s.
   Ex: 8 > 6
       Names the areas of the desks.
   Ex: A = 8 and B = 6
   Comparative words include “bigger, larger, greater, more than,” etc.
   Give credit for the following or equivalent:
   • “Rachel gets Desk A because she has the bigger room since 95 > 85. Desk A is
      bigger than Desk B since 2 × 4 = 8, 2 × 3 = 6, and 8 > 6,” or
   • “Rachel gets A, Rooms: 95 > 85, Desks: 8 > 6,” or
   • “Rachel will because she has the bigger room and Desk A is the bigger desk,” or
   • “Rachel, because her room has more area and A = 8 and B = 6.”
OR
   1 point: Give credit for the following or equivalent:
   Work may contain a copy, calculation, or reasonable counting error.
   • Correct answer (may be based on incorrect work in Part 1) with incomplete work
      and/or explanation that includes a comparison of the areas of the rooms OR a
      comparison of the desks using A & B and/or comparing or naming of the areas of
      the desks using #s.
   Ex: “Rachel gets A since A > B” (no comparison of rooms).
   Ex: “Rachel gets Desk A because she has the bigger room––hers is 95 and
   Hannah’s is only 85” (no comparison of desks), or
   • Work or explanation does not included comparative symbols or words, but includes
      the correct answer (Rachel) and all 4 correct areas.
   Ex: “Rachel. Rooms: Rachel’s is 95, Hannah’s is 85. Desks: A is 8, B is 6.”
   Note: Do not give credit for “Rachel gets Desk A” with no comparison of the
      areas of the rooms or naming the areas and/or comparison of the desks.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008            101
19. Mrs. Rodriguez will use 54 square feet of tile to cover her bathroom floor.
  What are the dimensions of her bathroom?
  * A. 6 ft by 9 ft
     B. 7 ft by 8 ft
     C. 5 ft by 4 ft
     D. 8 ft by 8 ft
     2006 – %

A. Cameron drew the rectangle below.




   The length of Cameron’s rectangle is 3 times its width.

   1. What is the length of Cameron’s rectangle? Explain your answer using words,
      numbers, and/or pictures.

   2. What is the area of Cameron’s rectangle? Explain your answer using words,
      numbers, and/or pictures.

   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2006 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
 2 points possible
    1 point: Correct answer: 9 (cm).
    Note: Do not give credit for answer if incorrect procedure is evident.
                                             AND
    1 point: Correct procedure shown and/or explained.
    Work may contain a calculation error.
    Give credit for the following or equivalent:
    • 3 x 3 = L (uses fact that length is 3 times the width and w = 3 cm.)
    • “If the width is 3, just multiply that by 3.” or
    • 3 + 3 + 9 + 9 = 24 (Finds length based on perimeter, uses Guess & Check) or
    • 3 + 3 = 6, 24 – 6 = 18, 18 ÷ 2 = L.
    Note: Do not give credit for incomplete procedure:
    Ex: L = 9 because 24 – 6 = 18.
PART 2




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008          102
 2 points possible
    1 point: Correct answer: 27 (square cm) or correct answer based on incorrect
        answer to Part 1.
                                              AND
    1 point: Correct procedure shown and/or explained.
    Work may contain a calculation error and/or may be based on an incorrect answer
        given in Part 1.
    Give credit for the following or equivalent:
    • “3 x 9 = Area.” or
    • “I multiplied the width of 3 by the length of 9.” or
    • “I multiplied the length times the width, and the length is 9 and the width is 3.” or
    • Drawing of a 3 x 9 rectangle that is divided into 27 squares.
    Note: Do not give credit for only repeating the formula LW = Area only.


16. Melissa’s sandbox is 4 feet wide and 6 feet long. Which of the following
  number sentences would she use to find its area?
     A. 6 + 4 = n
  * B. 6 × 4 = n
     C. 4 + 4 + 6 + 6 = n
     D. (4 × 4) + (6 × 6) = n
     2005 – %

29. Ms. Smith wants to cover the floor of her sun porch with tiles. Which of the
  following is the correct formula for finding the area of the porch?
      A. l + w = A
  * B. l × w = A
      C. 2l + 2w = A
      D. l + l + w + w = A
      2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008              103
B. A group of students is helping to paint the basketball court at their
   neighborhood recreation center. They need to find the area of the court in order
   to buy enough paint. They measured the court and found the length to be 80
   feet and the width to be 50 feet.
   1. What is the area of the court? Explain your answer using words, numbers,
      and/or pictures.
   2. They need to tape the outer edges before painting. They need to find the
      perimeter so they will know how much tape they need. How much tape will
      they need? Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2004 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)
1 point for correct answer of 4,000 (with or without square feet),
AND
1 point for correct and complete procedure for finding area shown and/or explained.
   ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
        Area is found by multiplying the length by the width. The length is 80 feet and
           the width is 50 feet. Therefore, the area is 4,000 (square feet), or
        A = 80 x 50 = 4,000 (square feet), or
        Correct procedure (l x w = A) to find area is used, but answer is incorrect due
           to a calculation or copy error.
   Note: Do not give credit for copying the formula l x w = A only.
Part 2: (2 points possible)
1 point for correct answer of 260 (with or without feet),
AND
1 point for correct and complete procedure for finding perimeter shown and/or explained.
   ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
       Perimeter is found by multiplying the length and the width times two, then
          adding these two numbers. Two times 80 is 160. Two times 50 is 100; therefore
          160 added to 100 is 260 feet, or
       P = 2l + 2w = 2(80) + 2(50) = 160 + 100 = 260 (feet), or


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008          104
        Diagram correctly labeled on all four sides (l = 80, w = 50), or
        Correct procedure (l + l + w + w = P) to find perimeter is used, but answer is
         incorrect due to a calculation or copy error.
   Note: Do not give credit for copying the formula l + l + w + w = P or 2l + 2w = P only.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008            105
M.13.4.11
Use strategies to find the volume (cubic units) of rectangular prisms and
cubes

35. Thomas built the structure below.




   What is its volume?
     A. 12 cubic units
     B. 16 cubic units
   * C. 24 cubic units
     D. 28 cubic units
     2007 – %

2. Jamie built a block structure with a volume of 9 cubic units. Which of the
   structures below did he build?




     A. Figure 1
     B. Figure 2
   * C. Figure 3
     D. Figure 4
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      106
Use the figure below to answer question 14.




14. The figure above is made with cubes which are 1 cm3. What is its volume?
     A. 6 cm3
     B. 12 cm3
  * C. 18 cm3
     D. 21 cm3
     2004 – %

32. Mrs. O’Keefe’s kindergarten students made structures with sugar cubes. The
  volume of each sugar cube is l cubic inch. Who made the structure with the
  greatest volume?




   * A. Amy
     B. Brent
     C. Chris
     D. David
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     107
DAP.14.4.1
Create a data collection plan after being given a topic and collect,
organize, display, describe and interpret simple data using frequency
tables or line plots, pictographs and bar graphs

3. The frequency table below shows how students in Ms. Wheeler’s class voted to
   name their class pet.




How many more students voted for Spike than for Fuzzy and Squirmy combined?
    A. 1
  * B. 3
    C. 4
    D. 7
    2007 – %

AR4M05D1401Y142-142B




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   108
14. Ms. Judge’s class recorded the daily high temperatures from January 8 through
   January 12 and made the bar graph below.




   What was the difference in the high for January 9 and the high for January 10?
     A. 10°F
   * B. 15°F
     C. 35°F
     D. 50°F
     2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    109
8. Based on the data collection below, how many more fourth-grade students
   preferred chocolate chip than preferred vanilla?




     A. 4
     B. 5
   * C. 19
     D. 27
     2006 – %

33. Toshio asked 55 fourth-grade students about their favorite after-school
  activity. He created the graph below to display the results of his survey.




   How many students chose riding their bike as their favorite activity?
     A. 15
   * B. 25
     C. 30
     D. 55
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     110
Use the chart below to answer question 40.
        Books Read by Fourth-Graders at Burton Elementary

       Mrs. Brown’s Class

       Mrs. Connor’s Class

       Mr. Sharp’s Class

       Ms. Jarrell’s Class

                     Key:       = 25 books
40. Molly made the pictograph above to show how many books were read by all of
  the fourth-grade students at Burton Elementary. Students in Ms. Jarrell’s class
  read a total of 250 books. How many books should Molly display in the row
  representing Ms. Jarrell’s class?
  * A. 10
     B. 25
     C. 250
     D. 275
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   111
DAP.15.4.1
Represent and interpret data using pictographs, bar graphs and line
graphs in which symbols or intervals are greater than one

2. The pictograph below represents the number of pies each fourth-grade teacher
   made for the bake sale.




   How many pies did Mrs. McLain make for the bake sale?
          1
     A. 2
          2
          1
     B. 3
          2
   * C. 7
     D. 12
     2007 – %

32. The pictograph below shows the number of books read by each of the fourth-
  grade classes during a reading contest.




   How many more books did Mr. Haywood’s class read than did Ms. Kirby’s?
     A. 10
   * B. 25
     C. 35
     D. 60
     2007 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   112
C. Taylor walks dogs on the weekends to earn money. The graph below shows the
   number of times Taylor has walked dogs over the last 6 weekends.




   1. How many more times did Taylor walk dogs during the last 3 weekends than
      during the first 3 weekends? Explain your answer using words and/or
      numbers.
   2. Taylor charges the dog owners $2.00 per walk. How much money did Taylor
      earn over the 6 weekends? Explain your answer using words and/or
      numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2007 – /8
                                  SOLUTION AND SCORING
PART 1
2 points possible
   1 point: Correct answer: 15 (more walks).
                                               AND
   1 point: Correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
   The student finds 2 totals (work shown or explained) and the difference.
   Work may contain a calculation or copy error.
   Give credit for the following or equivalent:
   • 16 + 4 + 10 = 30, 20 + 10 + 15 = 45 (some grouping is acceptable), 45 – 30 = #,
   or
   • “I added the # of walks from the 1st 3 weeks and got 30. I added the # of walks
       from the last 3 weeks and got 45. Next, I found the difference to get my answer.”
OR
   ½ point: Incomplete, but correct, procedure shown and/or explained.
   Give credit for the following or equivalent:
   • 1st 3 weeks: 30, Last 3 weeks: 45, 45-30 = #, or
   • 1 total correct, 1 total incorrect (no work shown), and correct difference found.


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008           113
PART 2
  1 point: Correct answer: ($) 150.00, or correct answer based on incorrect
     amount(s) in Part 1.
                                             AND
  1 point: Correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
  Work may contain a calculation or copy error or may be based on an incorrect amount
     in Part 1.
  Give credit for the following or equivalent:
  Note: Work done in Part 1 does not have to be repeated.
  • 30 + 45 = 75, 75 x 2 = 150
  • 2 × 16 + 2 × 4 + 2 × 10 + 2 × 20 + 2 × 10 + 2 × 15 = #
  • “There were 30 walks in the 1st 3 weeks and 45 in the last 3 weeks. I added those
     together and multiplied the sum by 2 to get my answer.”
  • (T for 1st 3 weeks from Part 1) x 2 + (T for last 3 weeks from Part 1) x 2 = #.
  OR
  ½ point: Incomplete, but correct, procedure shown and/or explained.
  Give credit for the following or equivalent:
  • 32 + 8 + 20 + 40 + 20 + 30 = # (×2 not shown or explained), or
  • 30 + 45 = 75, $150.00 made (×2 not shown or explained).
  Note: Do not give any credit for 30 + 45 = 75 only.

21. Jim and his friends made the table below to show how many seashells they
  have in their collections.




   How many seashells do they have in all?
           1
     A. 13
           2
     B. 14
           1
     C. 52
           2
   * D. 54
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        114
E. Joseph made the pictogram below to show the number of hits he had in his last
   four baseball games.




   1. How many hits did Joseph have in Game 2? Explain your answer using words
      and/or numbers.
   2. How many more hits did Joseph have in Game 4 than in Game 3? Explain
      your answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2006 – /8
                          SOLUTION AND SCORING
 PART 1
 2 points possible
    1 point: Correct answer: 8 (hits).
    Note: Do not give credit if incorrect procedure is evident.
                                        AND
    1 point: Correct and complete procedure shown and/or explained.
    Work may contain a calculation error.
    Give credit for the following or equivalent:
    • 4 x 2 = # of hits or
    • “I multiplied 4 and 2.” or
    • 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 = # of hits or
    • 4 + 4 = # of hits or
    • “I skip counted by 2 four times.” or
    • Draws four baseballs and accumulates hits.
    With the correct answer of 8, give credit for the following:
    • “I counted (skip counted) by 2’s.”
PART 2



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   115
 2 points possible
    1 point: Correct answer: 6 (more hits).
    Note: Do not give credit if incorrect procedure is evident.
    Ex: 10 – 4 = 6
    AND
    1 point: Correct procedure shown and/or explained.
    Work may contain a calculation error.
    Give credit for the following or equivalent:
    • Game 4: (2 x 4) + 1 = 9 Game 3: 2 + 1 = 3 9 – 3 = 6
    • “He has 9 hits in game 4 and 3 hits in game 3 so minused 3 from 9.” or
    • 9 – 3 = # or
    • 4½ – 1½ = 3 baseballs, 3 x 2 = # or
    • “I subtracted 3 from 9.” or “I subtracted 9 and 3.”
    Note: Do not give credit for incomplete procedure:
    Ex: “He had 9 hits in Game 4 and 3 hits in game 3.” and stops.
    Note: Do not give credit for vague procedure or procedure stated incorrectly:
    Ex: “I subtracted 3 and 9.” (order implies 9 is subtracted from 3)
    Ex: “I subtracted 9 from 3.” (incorrectly stated)

Use the chart below to answer question 7.




7. Mr. Kimble asked his students to choose their favorite sport. How many
   students did not choose soccer?
      A. 4
      B. 7
   * C. 11
      D. 18
      2005 – %



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008          116
Use the pictograph below to answer question 25.




25. Karen and her friends picked 16 baskets of strawberries. Based on the
  pictograph above, how many baskets did Amanda pick?
     A. 1
  * B. 4
     C. 6
     D. 12
     2005 – %

Use the pictograph below to answer question 37.




37. Based on the data in the pictograph above, which of the following statements
  is true?
      A. More people visited in June than in July.
      B. More people visited in September than in August.
      C. More people visited in September and October combined than in the other
         three months combined.
   * D. More people visited in June and July combined than in the other three
         months combined.
      2005 – %



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   117
3. The school librarian made a graph showing the number of books checked out
   each month by students in the fourth grade. In April, there were 45 books
   checked out. How many books should be displayed in the graph?




     A. 05
     B. 06
   * C. 09
     D. 45
     2004 – %

Use the chart below to answer question 25.
                            The Population of Pulaski
                                County, Arkansas
                                   1960–2000
                              Year         Population
                              1960           242,980
                              1970           289,189
                              1980           340,613
                              1990           349,660
                              2000           361,474
AR4M02D102Y061-061B
25. According to the table above, which of the following is a true statement about
  the population of Pulaski County, Arkansas?
     A. It has remained the same.
  * B. It has increased every ten years.
     C. It has increased every five years.
     D. It has decreased every ten years.
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    118
Use the table below to answer question 33.
AR4M02D102Y100-100B
33. Alicia took a survey of the fourth-graders in her class to find out which of the
  four snacks above they liked best. Which of the following statements is true
  about the data Alicia collected?
      A. No fourth-graders liked yogurt.
  * B. More fourth-graders like cheese and crackers than chips.
      C. Fourth-graders like chips better than yogurt.
      D. More fourth-graders prefer yogurt to fruit.
      2004 – %

23. Ramiro made a graph showing the number of crickets the class pet turtle ate
  in a five-day period. How many crickets did it eat in 5 days?




   * A. 20
     B. 40
     C. 60
     D. 80
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        119
Use the figure below to answer question 38.




38. Raul has a game that uses the spinner shown above. What is the probability
  that a player will spin and land on “RETURN 2 START”?
         1
  * A.
         8
         2
     B.
         8
         3
     C.
         8
          7
     D.
          8
     2003 – %

40. Steve and Michael were playing a number game. They turned the 15 cards
  shown below face down. If Michael chooses one card, what is the probability
  that he will choose a card with an even number on it?


   * A. 9 out of 15
     B. 1 out of 9
     C. 1 out of 15
     D. 6 out of 9
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      120
B. The chart above shows a record of how much paper was used in one week by
   five students in Mrs. Drew’s class.
   1. How many more sheets of paper did Aaron use than Kayla? Explain your
      reasoning using wordsand/or numbers.
   2. Compare the amount of paper used on Friday to the amount used on
      Monday. Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2003 – /8
                                       SOLUTION
Part 1: 8 more sheets.
  Work/Explanation: 26 – 18 = 8.
OR
  Aaron: 26 sheets and Kayla: 18 sheets. The difference is 8.
Part 2: More paper was used on Friday.
OR
  Less was used on Monday.
OR
  Symbolic representation of comparison: 32 > 15.
Work/Explanation: Friday: 32, Monday: 15.
OR
  32 – 15 = 17, etc.
Scoring (4 total points possible)
Part 1: (2 points possible)
  • 1 point for correct answer of 8.
Work/Explanation:
  • 1 point for correct procedure used: Student finds Aaron’s number – Kayla’s number.
  (Note: Work might have calculation, counting, or copy error.)
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  • 1 point for correct answer using either of the following:
       “Friday uses more…”, or
       Symbolic comparison (F# > M#).
  (Note: Work might have a calculation, counting, or copy error.)
Work/Explanation:



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008         121
   • 1 point for correct work using either of the following:
       Association of days and numbers: Friday – 32 and Monday – 15, or
       Subtraction (32 – 15 = 17) without “Friday, Monday” labels.




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   122
DAP.15.4.2
Match a set of data with a graphical representation of the data




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   123
DAP.16.4.1
Make predictions for a given set of data

5. Barry recorded the temperature over a four-hour period one day in May.




   If the temperature pattern continues, what will the temperature most likely be
       at 4:00 P.M.?
       A 60°F
       B 65°F
   * C 75°F
       D 90°F
       2008 -




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    124
DAP.17.4.1
Use fractions to predict probability of an event
Ex. There are 5 blue tiles, 3 red tiles, and 2 green tiles What is the
probability of pulling out a green tile?

6. What is the probability of spinning a number less than 4 on the spinner below?




          3
   * A.
          8
          4
       B.
          8
          8
       C.
          4
          8
       D.
          3
       2007 – %

AR4M05D1701NXXX-125B
17. Lea has 12 crayons in a bag: 3 green, 5 blue, 2 yellow, 1 black, and 1 brown.
   What is the probability that Lea will pull out a yellow crayon if she pulls out one
   crayon without looking?

         1
       A.
        12
         2
   * B.
        12
         2
     C.
        10
        1
     D.
        2
     2007 – %

AR4M05D1701NXXX-132A




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        125
23. At the school carnival, Sue played the “Pop-a-Balloon” game. Inside each of 8
  inflated balloons was a slip of paper with the name of a prize written on it. The
  name of the prize and the number of balloons containing that prize is shown in
  the table below.
                                Prize         Number of
                                               Balloons
                              Cupcake              2
                               Brownie             3
                             Ice cream             1
                             Snow cone             2
      What is the probability that Sue will win a brownie?
         3
  * A.
         8
         3
      B.
         5
         5
      C.
         8
         8
      D.
         3
      2007 – %

30. There are 124 jelly beans in a bag. The table below lists the colors and
  number of jelly beans. Which fraction represents Katie’s chances of picking out
  a pink jelly bean on her first try?
                               Jelly beans in the Bag
                               Color           Number
                               Black              16
                              Orange              17
                                Pink              24
                              Purple              12
                                Red               14
                              Yellow              24
                               white              17
          16
     A.
         124
          12
     B.
         124
          24
  * C.
         124
         124
     D.
          24
     2006 – %



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      126
20. Karen’s crayon box contains 3 shades of green, 6 shades of blue, 4 shades of
  red, and 2 shades of brown. If she picks a crayon from the box without looking,
  which shade is she least likely to pick?
     A. red
     B. blue
     C. green
  * D. brown
     2005 – %

9. Cliff brought cupcakes to share with his classmates. He brought 12 chocolate
   and 13 vanilla. What are Jane’s chances of getting a chocolate cupcake?
       A. 01 out of 25
       B. 01 out of 12
   * C. 12 out of 25
       D. 12 out of 13
       2004 – %

A. Each of the four counselors at Camp Lake View must choose one camper from
   his/her group to go waterskiing. Each counselor will put the names of all his/her
   campers in a bag. One name will be drawn from the bag to select the “winner.”
   Each group consists of the following:
         ● Lonnie’s group: 10 boys and 8 girls
         ● Maria’s group: 8 boys and 10 girls
         ● James’s group: 9 boys and 9 girls
         ● Tonya’s group: 6 boys and 12 girls
   1. Which of the four groups offers the best chance that a boy will win? Explain
      your answer using words and/or numbers.
   2. Which of the four groups offers the best chance that a girl will win? Explain
      your answer using words and/or numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2004 – /8
                                   SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)
  1 point for correct answer of Lonnie’s group,
                                             AND
  1 point for correct and complete work or explanation.
  ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
       “Lonnie’s has more boys than any other group and all groups have the same
         number of kids (or 18 kids),” or
       “They are the only group with more boys than girls,” or
       “They have the greatest number of boys and the fewest number of girls of any
         group,” or
       “10/18 are boys,” or “There are 10 chances out of 18.”
OR
  ½ point for correct, but incomplete work or explanation.



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        127
  ● Example: “Lonnie’s group has the most boys (or more boys) than any group.
  Note: Do not give credit for the following incomplete explanation.
  ● “Lonnie’s group has more boys than girls.” (Doesn’t say “only group.”)
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  1 point for correct answer of Tonya’s group,
                                             AND
  1 point for correct and complete work or explanation.
  ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
       “Tonya’s has more girls than any other group and all groups have the same
         number of kids (or 18 kids),” or
       “They have the greatest number of girls and the fewest number of boys of any
         group,” or
       “12/18 are girls,” or “There would be 12 chances out of 18.”
OR
  ½ point for correct, but incomplete work or explanation.
  ● Example: “Tonya’s group has the most girls (or more girls) than any group.”
  Note: Do not give credit for the following incomplete explanation.
  ● “Tonya’s group has more girls than boys.” (So does Maria’s group.)




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008        128
DAP.17.4.2
Conduct simple probability experiments, record the data and draw
conclusions about the likelihood of possible outcome (roll number cubes,
pull tiles from a bag, spin spinner, or determine the fairness of the game)

AR4M05D1702NXXX-133A
22. Maria rolled a number cube 36 times and recorded the numbers she rolled
   below.
                            Number        Number of
                                         Times Rolled
                                1              3
                                2              6
                                3              8
                                4             10
                                5              4
                                6              5
   If Maria rolls the cube another time, which number is she most likely to roll?
   * A. 4
      B. 6
      C. 10
      D. 36
      2007 – %

16. Carl has a bag of fruit-flavored candy that contains the following pieces:

               •   3   grape
               •   5   strawberry
               •   1   cherry
               •   2   watermelon

   Carl pulls a piece of candy from the bag without looking. What is the probability
     that he picks a watermelon-flavored piece?
     A. 1 out of 11
   * B. 2 out of 11
     C. 3 out of 11
     D. 5 out of 11
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       129
18. Patty is playing a shape game with the spinner below.




   What is the probability that the pointer will land on a hexagon on her next spin?
     A. 1 out of 10
     B. 2 out of 10
     C. 3 out of 10
   * D. 4 out of 10
     2006 – %

23. On the cube below, the shapes on the faces not showing are triangles.




   What are the chances the cube will land on a triangle when rolled?
     A. 1 out of 3
     B. 2 out of 6
   * C. 4 out of 6
     D. 6 out of 4
     2006 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      130
34. Brad has a bag containing the shapes below.




   Which statement best describes the outcome if Brad chooses a shape from the
     bag without looking?
     A. He is most likely to choose a triangle.
   * B. He is most likely to choose a rectangle.
     C. He is least likely to choose a rectangle.
     D. He is equally likely to choose triangles and circles.
     2006 - %

19. Melissa is first in line to go on the pony ride at the state fair. There are 2
  brown ponies, 4 tan ponies, and 3 black ponies. What is the probability that she
  will get to ride on a black pony?
          2                                      3
     A.                                   * B.
          9                                      9
          1                                      4
     C.                                      D.
          9                                      9
     2004 – %

1. Which two spinners below would give you an equal chance of spinning a C?




     A. I and II
   * B. I and III
     C. II and III
     D. III and IV
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    131
16. Look at the spinner below. How many times is the spinner likely to land on
  blue in 24 spins?
      A. 3
      B. 6
  * C. 12
      D. 24
      2003 – %

29. Todd has a collection of pro football team T-shirts. He has 4 Miami Dolphin
  shirts, 3 Jacksonville Jaguar shirts, and 5 from other teams. If Todd selects a
  shirt at random, what is the probability that he will pick a Dolphin shirt?
           1
     A.
          12
           3
     B.
          12
           4
  * C.
          12
           5
     D.
          12
     2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008      132
DAP.17.4.3
Find all possible combinations of two or three sets of objects

22. Ashley is visiting her grandparents for the weekend. Her mom packed 1 pair of
  black pants, 1 pair of tan shorts, and 4 shirts: white, blue, green, and yellow.
  How many different outfits can she make from the clothes her mom packed?
     A. 2
     B. 4
     C. 6
  * D. 8
     2004 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008    133
NO LONGER TESTED

Use the chart below to answer question 15.
AR4M03D302NXXX-142B
                           Tom’s Math Test Scores
                                      88
                                      97
                                      75
                                      85
                                      71
                                      75
                                      90
15. What is the mean (average) of Tom’s math test scores?
     A. 75
  * B. 83
     C. 85
     D. 97
     2005 – %

Use the picture below to answer question 19.




19. Which weight would be the best choice for Latoya to use to weigh her science
  book?
     A. one ton
     B. one gram
     C. one ounce
  * D. one kilogram
     2005 – %

Use the numbers below to answer question 21.
                                               96
                                               86
                                               93
                                               86
                                               99
                   AR4M03D302Y119-         119B
21. Jorge’s spelling test grades are shown above. What is the mean (average) of
  his grades?
      A. 86
  * B. 92
      C. 93


ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   134
       D. 94
       2005 – %

Use the chart below to answer question 33.
                           Glasses of Milk Per Week
                              Week         Number of
                                            Glasses
                                1              18
                                2              21
                                3              14
                                4              20
                                5              12
33. Joanne kept track of the number of glasses of milk that she drank each week
  for 5 weeks. What was the average number of glasses that she drank per
  week?
      A. 5
      B. 7
  * C. 17
      D. 21
      2005 – %

Use the chart below to answer question 38.
                         Cookies Made for Class Party
                            Blair           28
                            Michelle        30
                            Boyd            42
                            Travis          25
                            Jean            34
                            Holly           45
38. The chart above shows how many cookies Blair and her friends made for the
  class party. What is the mean (average) number of cookies made by the
  students?
     A. 23
     B. 25
  * C. 34
     D. 45
     2005 – %

                  How Many States Can You Name in One Minute?
                            Name Number of States
                             Laurie              15
                             Justin              16
                            Thomas               18



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   135
                             Serena                   9
                             Mariah                  16
                            Candace                   9
                            Zachary                   9
                            Isabelle                 15
                            Anthony                  13
                             William                 10
A. Mrs. Johnson asked a group of students in her class to name as many states in
   the United States as they could in one minute. The data collection is shown
   above.
   1. What is the mean (average) number of states the group of students could
      name? Explain your answer using words and/or numbers.
   2. What is the mode of the data? Explain your answer using words and/or
      numbers.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2005 – /8
                                SOLUTION AND SCORING
Part 1: (2 points possible)
  Answer: 1 point for correct answer of 13.
  Note: Do not give credit if incorrect procedure is used.
                                              AND
  Work: 1 point for correct and complete procedure for Mean shown or explained. Work
      may contain a calculation or copy error.
  ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
        15 + 16 + 18 + 16 + 9 + 9 + 15 + 13 + 10 + 9 = Sum
  Sum ÷ 10 = Mean, or
        “The average is found by adding all the numbers together (130) and then
          dividing by the number of pieces of data (10).”
Part 2: (2 points possible)
  Answer: 1 point for correct answer of 9.
  Note: Do not give credit if incorrect procedure is used.
  ● Example: 18 – 9 = 9 (range is found).
                                              AND
  Work: 1 point for correct and complete procedure for Mode shown or explained.
  ● Give credit for the following explanations or equivalent:
        “The mode is the number that occurs most often,” or
        “There are three 9’s,” or
        Numbers are listed and the 9’s are identified in some way (circled).
  ● Give credit for the following only if a Mode of 9 is given:
        “I counted how many there were of each number.”
  Note: Do not give credit for vague explanation.
  ● Example: “I counted.”




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008       136
10. Mrs. Andrew’s class collected canned food for a local food drive. They wanted
  to sort the cans before they donated them. Which of the following is not a way
  they could group the cans?
     A. size
     B. weight
     C. type of food
  * D. total number of cans
     2004 – %

18. A runner can burn 1,280 calories in 60 minutes. Which of the following
  number sentences would you use to find out how many calories can be burned
  in 30 minutes of running?
      A. 1,280 × 30 =
   * B. 1,280 ÷ 2 =
       C. 21,380 − 30 =
       D. 1,280 × 2 =
       2004 – %

24. Which of the following has the most lines of symmetry?

       A.                                          B.


       C.                                       * D.
       2004 – %

Use the table below to answer question 30.
                       Lengths of Snakes at City Zoo
                       Black Rat Snake           72"
                       King Snake                48"
                       Worm Snake                11"
                       Scarlet Snake             15"
                       Brown Snake               13"
                       Ring-neck Snake           15"
30. The table above shows the lengths of the snakes at City Zoo. What is the
  mode of these lengths?
     A. 6"
  * B. 15"
     C. 29"
     D. 57"
     2004 – %



ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008     137
9. Angelo was asked to find the quotient of two numbers. What operation did he
   need to do?
     A. add
     B. subtract
     C. multiply
   * D. divide
     2003 – %

11. Find the mean (mean = average) for the set of numbers below.
                             5, 3, 8, 4, 10, 12
      A. 04
  * B. 07
      C. 08
      D. 10
      2003 – %

22. Which set of figures is congruent?


       A.                                      * B.




       C.                                          D.
       2003 – %

Use the figure below to answer question 28.




28. Juan put the above shapes in a box because they all follow a common rule.
  What is one common rule that fits all of the shapes in Juan’s box?
      A. They all have at least 4 sides.
      B. They all have at least 3 vertices.
      C. They all have at least one acute angle.
  * D. They all are symmetrical.
      2003 – %




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008   138
D. Mrs. Lehman drew the design shown on the grid above.
   1. How many completely shaded squares are there in the design? How many
      half-squares are there in the design?
   2. What is the total area of the SHADED part of the design? Explain your
      reasoning for determining the answer using words, numbers, and/or
      pictures.
   BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES 1 AND 2.
   2003 – /8
                                        SOLUTION
Part 1: Correct answer of 9 (shaded squares) and 12 (half-shaded squares).
OR
Correct answer of 9 (shaded squares) and 24 (half-squares).
Part 2: Correct answer of 15 sq. cm.
Work/Explanation: 9 + 12/2 = 9 + 6 = 15 sq. cm.
OR
Equivalent work or explanation.
Scoring (4 total points possible)
Part 1: (2 points possible)
   • 1 point for correct answer of 9 shaded squares,
                                             AND
   • 1 point for correct answer of 12 half-shaded squares or 24 half-squares.
Part 2: (2 points possible)
   • 1 point for correct numerical answer based on shaded answers given in Part 1.
   (Note: Student might refer to 24 half-squares in Part 1 and refer to 12 half-shaded
      squares, etc., in Part 2.)
   AND
   • 1 point for showing or explaining correct and complete procedure for finding total
      shaded area.
   (Note: Work might contain a calculation or copy error.)




ELKINS ELEMENTARY (NEVIN) MATH RELEASED ITEMS – 4TH GRADE   UPDATED 7/2008                139

								
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