Caboolture Sunshine Coast Sep2010 by HC12051903625

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									Slide 1
Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences
Caboolture-Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area
September 2010

Slide 2
Source: ABS, 2006 LGA boundaries

The Caboolture-Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area consists of four Local
Government Areas;

Caboolture (S) LGA
Caloundra (C) LGA
Maroochy (S) LGA
Noosa (S) LGA

The Caboolture-Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area is based on the 2006 LGA
boundaries. However, since then the Caloundra (C), Maroochy (S) and Noosa (S)
LGAs were merged in 2008 to become one LGA – Sunshine Coast (R). The Caboolture
(S) LGA was merged with Pine Rivers (S) LGA and Redcliffe (C) LGA (the latter two are
not part of the Priority Employment Area) to form Moreton Bay (R) LGA.

The Caloundra (C), Maroochy (S) and Noosa (S) LGAs make up the entire Sunshine
Coast Labour Force Region (LFR). The Caboolture (S) LGA is in the North Brisbane
Statistical Division (BSD) Balance LFR and makes up 41% of the population in the
North BSD Balance LFR. Other LGAs in the North BSD Balance Labour Force region
are the Pine Rivers (S) LGA and Redcliffe (C) LGA.

The working age population in the area is 295,300, 36% of the population lives in
Maroochy (S) LGA, 32% in the Caboolture (S) LGA, 21% in the Caloundra (C) LGA and
11% in the Noosa (S) LGA.

The Adult population (15+ population) in the area is 367,200, 36% of the population
lives in Maroochy (S) LGA, 31% in the Caboolture (S) LGA, 22% in the Caloundra (C)
LGA and 11% in the Noosa (S) LGA.

Slide 3
Source: Adult population and population growth data are based on the 2004 and
2009 Estimated Residential Population data. Participation rate, Indigenous and
overseas data are from ABS, 2006 Census of Population and Housing. All data
concorded by LGA/SLA.

The population in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area
increased by 19% between 2004 and 2009, which is higher than the increase for
Queensland (14%), and Australia (10%). Coolum-Mudjimba SLA (which is located in
the Maroochy (S) LGA) and Burpengary-Narangba SLA (which is located in the
Caboolture (S) LGA) had the highest growth (30% and 29% respectively).
Population Growth by Age:

       Caboolture-Sunshine Coast PEA              QLD            AUST
WAP                  17%                          14%            10%
Adult Pop            19%                          14%            10%
65+                  23%                          17%            13%
(Source: 2003 and 2008 Estimated Residential Population data)

The participation rate for the working age population (those aged 15-64 years) for
the area (73.1%) was lower compared with the State (76.2%) and national (75.0%)
averages. Of the LGAs in the area, Caboolture (S) LGA had the lowest participation
rate (71.1%). The participation rates in the other LGAs were 71.5% in Noosa, 73.0%
in Caloundra and 75.6% in Maroochy.
(Source: ABS, 2006 Census of Population and Housing)

The Caboolture - Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area has a lower proportion of
people born overseas (18.4%) compared with Australia overall (23.9%). The Noosa
LGA had the highest proportion of people born overseas (22%) compared with
Maroochy (19%), Caloundra (18%) and Caboolture (16%).
(Source: ABS 2006 Census of Population and Housing (note: data excludes not
stated)).

The proportion of Indigenous people in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority
Employment Area was lower than the proportion for Queensland and Australia (1.6%
compared with 3.5% and 2.4% respectively). The Caboolture LGA had the highest
proportion of Indigenous people (2.4%) in the area compared with Caloundra (1.4%),
Maroochy (1.3%) and Noosa (1.0%).
(Source: ABS 2006 Census of Population and Housing (note: data excludes not
stated))

Slide 4
Source: ABS Labour Force Survey data, the Sunshine Coast LFR and North BSD
Balance, Queensland and Australia (original data, 3 month average to July 2010).
100% of the Sunshine Coast LFR is made up of LGAs from Caboolture-Sunshine Coast
Priority Employment Area (Caloundra (C), Maroochy (S) and Noosa (S)).

Unemployment Rate
Since the onset of the global recession the unemployment rate in the Sunshine Coast
LFR increased dramatically. In the 12 months to July 2010 there has been some
recovery with the unemployment rate falling 2.7 percentage points down to 5.8%.
Despite this the unemployment rate in the Sunshine Coast LFR has consistently
remained above the rate for Queensland and Australia since the onset of the global
recession. Over the same time the unemployment rate fell from 5.3% to 4.0% in the
North BSD Balance LFR.
Over the same period the Participation rate has increased slightly from 61.0% to
61.4% in July 2010.
Slide 5
Source: DEEWR Small Area Labour Markets, March 2010; ABS Labour Force, July
2010 (March 2009 and 2010 data), seasonally adjusted.

Unemployment Rate by SLA
The above table compares the unemployment rate of selected SLAs with Queensland
and Australia.

Overall, the unemployment rate as at March 2010 was higher in the Caboolture-
Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area (7.1%) compared with Queensland and
Australia (5.5% and 5.6% respectively (seasonally adjusted)).

The unemployment rate in the PEA was driven up by high unemployment in some
SLAs – the highest being Caboolture – Central (10.6%), Maroochy (S) –
Maroochydore (9.4%) and Deception Bay (9.3%).

Slide 6
Source: ABS, Labour Force Australia, Detailed – Electronic Delivery, July 2010 (cat. no.
6291.0.55.001), 12 month averages

Long-term unemployment for the Sunshine Coast and North BSD Balance LFRs
The above table shows the proportion of unemployed people who have been
unemployed between 52 to 104 and over 104 weeks.

A smaller proportion of unemployed people had been unemployed between 52 and
104 weeks as at July 2010 in the Sunshine Coast LFR (7.0%) and the North BSD
Balance LFR (8.7%) compared with QLD (9.0%) and Australia (10.4%).

The proportion of unemployed people who have been unemployed between 52 and
104 weeks has increased over the past year in the Sunshine Coast LFR and the North
BSD Balance LFR.

A smaller proportion of unemployed people had been unemployed for 104 or more
as at July 2010 in the Sunshine Coast LFR (1.2%) compared with QLD (5.8%) and
Australia (7.8%), however the North BSD Balance LFR (6.4%) was higher than the
state average.

Over the same period the proportion of unemployed people who have been
unemployed for over 104 weeks has decreased in the Sunshine Coast LFR and the
North BSD Balance LFR.

Slide 7
Average number of weeks unemployed
The average number of weeks that people are unemployed for in the North BSD
Balance LFR increased between July 2009 from 21.8 weeks to 36.0 weeks in July
2010. This is above the average for Queensland (28.2 weeks) and Australia (34.4
weeks).
The average number of weeks that people are unemployed for in the Sunshine Coast
LFR increased between July 2009 from 13.9 weeks to 19.6 weeks in July 2010.
Despite this the average number of weeks unemployed is below the average for
Queensland and Australia.

Slide 8
Source: ABS, Labour Force, July 2010, 12 month averages

Teenage Unemployment
A smaller proportion of teenagers (15-19 years) in the Sunshine Coast LFR were
looking for full-time work (4.2%) compared with both Queensland (5.8%) and
Australia (4.6%). The proportion was high for the North BSD Balance LFR (5.6%)
when compared with Australia (4.6%) and slightly smaller compared with QLD (5.6%
compared with 5.8%)

The full-time unemployment rate for teenagers in both the Sunshine Coast LFR
(20.3%) and the North BSD Balance LFR (23.3%) was slightly lower compared with
Queensland (24.3.%) and Australia (24.2%).

Slide 9
Source: ABS Publication of Labour Force Characteristics of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander Australians, Estimates from the Labour Force Survey, 2009. ABS Census
of Population and Housing, 2006

Note: Denominator (Indigenous and non-Indigenous - excludes not stated)

Indigenous population
At the time of the 2006 Census, Indigenous Australians represented a small
proportion of the population in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority
Employment Area (1.6%) compared with Queensland (3.5%) and Australia (2.4%).
Caboolture LGA had the highest proportion of Indigenous people (2.4%) which is the
same as the average for Australia overall.

In 2009, the Indigenous unemployment rate for Queensland was almost four times
higher compared with the whole population (20.9% compared with 5.6%).

The Indigenous participation rate for Queensland was low compared with the whole
population (66.4% compared with 78.0%).

The Indigenous employment to population ratio for Queensland was low compared
with the whole population (52.5% compared with 73.6%)
Slide 10
Source: DEEWR administrative data, June 2010.

Recipients of Centrelink benefits
A higher proportion of the working age population (those aged 15-64 years) in the
Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area are in receipt of a Centrelink
benefit compared with Australia overall (16.5% compared with 14.8%). The number
of people on Centrelink benefits in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority
Employment Area increased by 3% over the 12 months to June 2010.

A higher proportion of the working age population in the Caboolture – Sunshine
Coast Priority Employment Area are in receipt of an unemployment benefit
compared with Australia overall (4.9% compared with 3.9%). The number of people
on unemployment benefits in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment
Area increased by 9% over the 12 month to June 2010. (Note: unemployment
benefits includes Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance Other)

The most common benefits in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment
Area are Disability Support Pension (28% of Centrelink recipients), Newstart
Allowance (25%) and Parenting Payments (20%).

Slide 11
Source: ABS, Education and Training Experience, 2009, cat. no. 6278.0

Labour market outcomes for persons (aged 15-74) with a disability, 2009
This slide shows the effect of having a disability on labour market outcomes.

In 2009, over one in four (28.7 per cent) of employed persons aged 15-74 years
reported having a disability.
10.4 per cent of employed persons (aged 15-74 years) reported having a disability
that restricted their employment or schooling.

In contrast, almost one in three (32.9 per cent) of the total population aged 15-74
years reported having a disability in 2009.
15.5 per cent of the population (aged 15-74 years) reported having a disability that
restricted their employment or schooling.
The unemployment rate was much higher and the participation rate was much lower
for people with a disability that restrict their employment/schooling.

Please note: data excludes persons aged 65-74 years who are not in or marginally
attached to the labour force.
Slide 12
Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, 4 Quarter average to May 2010.

Employment by Industry
An indicator of labour market vulnerability is a high concentration of employment in
industries that are sensitive to economic downturns, such as the Retail Trade,
Construction and Accommodation and Food Service industries.

The chart above shows the high concentration of employment in Retail Trade (14%),
Construction (13%), Health Care and Social Assistance (10%) and Accommodation
and Food Services (9%) in the Sunshine Coast LFR. In addition, three of these
industries had a higher proportion of the workforce compared with Australia.

In the North BSD Balance LFR, Health Care and Social Assistance (12%) Construction
(11%) and Retail Trade (10%) were the largest employing industries. Two of these
industries had a higher proportion of the workforce compared with Australia.

Slide 13
Projected Employment Growth
This slide shows projected employment by industry to 2014-2015.

Employment growth is projected in all industries except Manufacturing (decline of
0.2%).

The Health Care And Social Assistance industry is projected to experience the largest
amount of growth (4.0%), followed by Construction (2.9%), Education and Training
(2.5%) and Professional, Scientific, Technical Services (1.9%).

Slide 14
Source: ABS, 2006 Census of Population and Housing, Caboolture-Sunshine Coast
Region concorded from LGAs.

NOTE: data excludes not stated

Educational Attainment
The level of educational attainment is strongly linked with labour market
performance and the ability of a region (or its population) to respond flexibly to an
economic shock. Accordingly, regions with relatively low levels of educational
attainment tend, on average, to be less flexible in the face of economic slowdowns
and face greater labour market difficulties. For example, upon retrenchment, those
with lower educational attainment will find it significantly more difficult to find
subsequent employment than their more highly skilled counterparts.

At the time of the 2006 Census, a smaller proportion of the working age population
(15-64 years) in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area had
finished year 12 compared with Australia (43% compared with 51%). The Caboolture
LGA had the lowest proportion of the working age population who had completed
year 12 (37%) compared with Caloundra (43%), Maroochy (48%) and Noosa (48%).

At the time of the 2006 Census, a smaller proportion of the working age population
(15-64 years) in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area had
attained a Bachelor degree or higher compared with Australia (12% compared with
19%). The Caboolture LGA had the lowest proportion of the working age population
who had attained a Bachelor degree or higher (8%) compared with Caloundra (12%),
Maroochy (15%) and Noosa (15%).

However, a higher proportion of the working age population (15-64 years) in the
Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area had attained a certificate
qualification compared with Australia (24% compared with 20%).

Slide 15
Source: ABS, 2006 Census of Population and Housing.

NOTE: data excludes not stated

Educational Attainment by Labour Force Status
There is a strong relationship between educational attainment and employment
outcomes. For those of working age (15-64) who did not complete year 12 in the
region, the unemployment rate was 8.3% at the time of the 2006 Census, while for
those who had a Bachelor degree or higher, the unemployment rate was 2.9%.

Further training such as a Certificate level qualification could improve job seekers’
engagement in the labour force. The unemployment rate for people who completed
a Certificate level qualification was 4.6% compared with 8.3% for those who did not
complete year 12. In addition the participation rate was 83% for those who
completed a Certificate level qualification compared with 63% for those who did not
complete year 12.

In addition, around three quarters of jobs growth is in jobs which require education
and training (DEEWR, New Jobs – Employment trends and prospects for Australian
industries, November 2008) – this is a global trend.

Slide 16
As mentioned previously, the level of educational attainment is strongly linked with
labour market performance and the ability of a population to respond flexibly to an
economic shock. Post school qualifications, for instance, allow people to gain
employment in higher skilled occupations, such as Professional, Manager and
Technician and Trades Worker occupations, which tend to be more stable, more in
demand and higher paid.

The largest increase in the number of jobs in the last five years has been in those
suitable for workers with a Bachelor Degree or higher. This trend is projected to
continue for the next five years.
There is also strong employment growth projected over the next five years for jobs
that require a Certificate II or III.

Slide 17
Source: Socio-economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), 2006, Table. 3 Statistical Local
Area (SLA) Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (ABS cat. no.
2033.0.55.001)

Areas of socio-economic disadvantage
This slide uses the Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), which summarises
aspects of the socio-economic conditions of people living in an area. This index is
derived from Census data related to disadvantage, such as low income, low
educational attainment, unemployment and dwellings with no car, among other
things.

Areas with a decile of 8-10 (light blue) had low levels of disadvantage. In this region,
2 of the 24 SLAs recorded high levels of disadvantage. The Caboolture – Central SLA
and Deception Bay both recorded a SEIFA score of 2 which means it is in the bottom
20% of SLAs in Australia. In addition Bribie Island and Morayfield both recorded a
SEIFA score of 3 which means they are in the bottom 30% of SLAs in Australia.

SLA                                           SEIFA score
Caboolture (S) - Central                      2
Deception Bay                                 2
Bribie Island                                 3
Morayfield                                    3
Maroochy (S) - Nambour                        3
Maroochy (S) - Maroochydore                   4
Noosa (S) - Tewantin                          4
Caboolture (S) - East                         5
Caboolture (S) - Hinterland                   5
Caloundra (C) - Caloundra S.                  5
Caloundra (C) - Caloundra N.                  6
Maroochy (S) - Mooloolaba                     6
Caloundra (C) - Hinterland                    6
Caloundra (C) - Rail Corridor                 6
Noosa (S) Bal                                 6
Caloundra (C) - Kawana                        7
Maroochy (S) - Coastal North                  7
Maroochy (S) - Paynter-Petrie Creek           7
Maroochy (S) Bal                              7
Burpengary-Narangba                           8
Noosa (S) - Noosa-Noosaville                  8
Noosa (S) - Sunshine-Peregian                 8
Caboolture (S) - Midwest                      9
Maroochy (S) - Buderim                        9
Slide 18
Source: ABS 2006 Census of Population and Housing; DEEWR, Small Area Labour
Markets, March 2010, MySchool website.

Profile of Caboolture – Central and Deception Bay SLAs
As shown on the previous slide, 2 of the 24 SLAs in the area recorded high levels of
disadvantage. The Caboolture – Central SLA and Deception Bay both recorded a
SEIFA score of 2 which means it is in the bottom 20% of SLAs in Australia.

The median age in the Caboolture–Central and Deception Bay SLAs (35 and 34
respectively) are both slightly lower than the median age in Queensland (36).

The median weekly income in Caboolture – Central SLA ($376) and Deception Bay
SLA ($389) is below the average for Queensland ($476).

A higher proportion of employed people are working in lower skilled occupations in
the Caboolture – Central SLA (54%) and Deception Bay SLA (55%) compared with
Queensland (44%).

The unemployment rate for Caboolture-Central (10.6%) and Deception Bay (9.3%)
are above the average for Queensland (5.6%).

There is a higher proportion of jobless families in the Caboolture – Central SLA and
Deception Bay SLA (both 27%) compared with Queensland (17%).

A higher proportion of people live in rental properties in the Caboolture – Central
SLA (39%) and Deception Bay SLA (35%) compared with 30% for Queensland.

A high proportion of renters are in public housing in both the Caboolture-Central and
Deception Bay SLAs (21% and 20% receptively) compared with Queensland (11%).

A higher proportion of the working age population in the Caboolture – Central SLA
and Deception Bay SLAs (both 31%) are on Centrelink benefits compared with
Queensland (15%).

A lower proportion of the working age population completed year 12 in the
Caboolture – Central SLA (34%) and Deception Bay SLAs (35%) compared with
Queensland (49%).

 A lower proportion of the working age population have attained a bachelor degree
or higher in the Caboolture – Central SLA (7%) and Deception Bay SLAs (6%)
compared with Queensland (19%).

A higher proportion of year 9 students did not meet the minimum standard for
reading and numeracy in the Caboolture – Central SLA (16% for reading and
numeracy) and Deception Bay SLAs (26% for reading and 29% for numeracy)
compared with Queensland (9% for reading and 5% for numeracy).
Slide 19
Survey Results
A Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences for the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast
Priority Employment Area was conducted during October 2009 and again in July
2010. A total of 377 employers were surveyed in July 2010 and 367 in October 2009.

A smaller proportion of employers recruited in July 2010 (72%) compared with
October 2009 (81%) however, this was above the average for all PEAs surveyed in
the 12 months to June 2010 (65%).

Almost half (47%) of the employers who recruited had recruited due to business
growth, while 88% recruited due to staff turnover.

A smaller proportion of vacancies were unfilled (2.8) compared with October 2009
(4.0%) and all PEAs surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (4.8%). Employers who
reported the highest proportion of unfilled vacancies included Professional, Scientific
and Technical Services with 8.5% of vacancies remaining unfilled, followed by Rental,
Hiring and Real Estate Services (7.7%).

A smaller proportion of employers had experienced difficulty (42%) compared with
employers surveyed in October 2009 (52%) and the 12 months to June 2010 (51%).
The Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services industry recorded the highest level of
difficulty (76% of employers) followed by Professional, Scientific and Technical
Services (45%).

The Construction industry in this region is performing particularly well with a larger
proportion of employers recruiting (70%), less recruiting difficulties (38%) and most
of their vacancies being filled (0.4% unfilled).

Slide 20
Vacancies not filled by Occupation
A smaller proportion of the most recent vacancies were not filled (4.4%) compared
with the average from the previous survey in October 2009 (5.0%) and the average
of all PEAs in the 12 months to June 2010.

Sales Workers (6.8%), Clerical and Administrative Workers (6.7%) and Managers and
Professionals (6.7%) had the highest proportion of unfilled vacancies.

The proportion of vacancies unfilled for labourers decreased from 9.2% to 1.6%
between the 2009 and 2010 surveys.
Slide 21
Note: occupations in italics were mentioned as difficult to fill in October 2009 when
the Caboolture area was previously surveyed.

Occupations difficult to fill
Occupations difficult to fill, fall across a range of skill levels and a range of industries.
Although there are a number of jobs that require a higher level of education (either
higher VET (Cert III/IV) or Bachelor Degree or higher), many of the occupations
mentioned as difficult to fill are medium to lower skill level jobs.

Slide 22
Competition for Vacancies

The average number of applicants per vacancy in the Caboolture – Sunshine coast
Priority Employment Area was higher (11.5 applicants per vacancy) compared with
the average when surveyed in October 2009 (9.3 applicants per vacancy) and all
PEAs surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (8.4 applicants per vacancy).

There was a particularly large pool of applicants for Clerical and Administrative
Worker vacancies (31.2 applicants) and Managers (29.5 applicants).

Although there was a relatively large number of applicants, the pool of suitable
applicants was much smaller, with 3.0 suitable applicants per vacancy. However, the
number of suitable applicants was higher than the average received by all employers
surveyed in the area in October 2009 (2.8 applicants per vacancy) and in the 12
months to June 2010 (2.5 applicants per vacancy).

Slide 23
Reasons Applicants were Unsuitable

58% of recruiting employers in Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority Employment
Area had one or more unsuitable applicants during their most recent recruitment
round compared with 70% in October 2009.

Employers were asked the reasons why job seekers were considered unsuitable. The
lack of work experience was the single most common reason for applicant
unsuitability (74%) as well as a lack of qualifications or training (28%), applicants
having limited interest in the job (15%) and applicants lacking basic employability
skills.

Slide 24
Basic Employability Skills
Employers in the Caboolture-Sunshine Coast Priority Employment Area were asked
whether they placed more importance on the applicant’s personal traits and
qualities or on their technical skills and experience.
Of the employers surveyed, 36% stated that both technical skills and personality
traits and qualities were equally important. A further 30% of employers considered
personality traits and qualities were more important whilst 34% rated technical skill
and experience as more important.

These survey results indicate that in today’s labour market, jobs seekers need to
have both technical or job-specific skills and basic employability skills.

Slide 25
Future Recruitment Expectations
The proportion of employers in the Caboolture – Sunshine Coast Priority
Employment Area who expected to recruit in the 12 months following the survey,
was low compared with employers surveyed in October 2009 (47% compared with
60%). However, the proportion of recruiting employers was higher compared with
employers surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (43%).

Of the employers who expect to recruit, a smaller proportion expect to have
difficulty (22%) compared with employers surveyed in October 2009 (27%) and
employers surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (37%).

A higher proportion of employers expect to decrease staff number in the 12 months
following the survey (3%) compared with employers surveyed in October 2009 (2%).

A lower proportion of employers anticipate that they will increase staff numbers in
the 12 months following the survey (26%) compared with employers surveyed in
October 2009 (36%).

A smaller proportion of employers intend to recruit an apprentice (25%) compared
with employers surveyed in October 2009 (38%). This is slightly higher when
compared with all employers surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (22%).

A high proportion of employers in the Construction industry anticipate that they will
recruit in the 12 months following the survey (51%) and a small proportion of those
employers expect to have difficulty doing so (15%).

Slide 26
This slide shows some of the occupations that employers commonly told us were
difficult to fill in Brisbane.

It should be noted that a large proportion of people living in the Caboolture LGA who
are employed work in Brisbane (28%), Pine Rivers (8%) and Redcliffe (5%).

Location of Employment        Caboolture Caloundra  Maroochy  Noosa
in SLA                               46%        57%       70%       69%
in PEA                               48%        83%       86%       84%
in QLD but not in PEA                51%        17%       13%       15%
in Brisbane                          28%         5%        3%        2%
Slide 27
Conclusion
Labour market conditions still relatively soft, but the worst may be over, as
evidenced by the decrease in the unemployment rate in the last 12 months.

The Construction industry in this region is performing particularly well with a larger
proportion of employers recruiting, less recruiting difficulties, most of their vacancies
being filled and a high proportion anticipating recruiting in the 12 months following
the survey.

There may be opportunities for the Technicians and Trades Workers and Labourers
occupations as they had the lowest average number of applicants per vacancy.

Our survey results have shown that employers are looking for job-specific skills, as
well as a positive attitude and basic work readiness skills. Further education and
training and work experience are some methods for improving these skills –
especially for young people.

Job seekers need the skills to take advantage of these opportunities. One way
jobseekers can acquire those skills is through work experience and training in basic
work readiness skills.

Slide 28
More information on labour market conditions and other research on small areas
can be found on these web sites.

www.deewr.gov.au/lmip
www.deewr.gov.au/SkillShortages
www.deewr.gov.au/regionalreports
www.deewr.gov.au/australianjobs
www.joboutlook.gov.au
www.skillsinfo.gov.au
www.jobsearch.gov.au

A report on the survey findings for the Caboolture-Sunshine Coast Priority
Employment Area will be placed on the regional reports section of the DEEWR site.

Thank you.

								
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