independant_and_informal_care_provision

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					INDEPENDENT AND
  INFORMAL CARE
     PROVISION
 INDEPENDENT AND INFORMAL
      CARE PROVISION

Britain has a mixed economy care provision.
Many of the care services come from the
  a) Independent sector –
              non-statutory organisations
              private organisations
  b) Informal Carers
INDEPENDENT AND INFORMAL
     CARE PROVISION

This care sector has become more
important over the last 20 years because:

   The Conservative and Labour governments
    have deliberately encouraged provision by the
    independent sector.
INDEPENDENT AND INFORMAL
     CARE PROVISION
   Demographic factors, including an ageing
    population, have created an increasing need
    for health and social care services.

   An increasing number of women who work
    outside the home have created a demand for
    more childcare.

   There is a shortage of public services in some
    areas.
INDEPENDENT AND INFORMAL
     CARE PROVISION

It has also been suggested that the
change in people’s attitude towards health
and physical awareness has made the
public more willing to spend money on
such things as dentistry and cosmetic
surgery.
    THE PRIVATE SECTOR


This is a ‘market’ which sells care to
people. This care includes such diverse
services as screening and dentistry,
home modifications, fertility treatment
and tertiary care when someone is
dying. The people who provide private
care do so in order to make money.
     THE PRIVATE SECTOR
    Until recently, the individual had to buy the
care with cash or personal insurance. Lately, in
some circumstances, it is possible to receive
private care which has been funded by public
bodies.

   A partnership is agreed between a statutory
organisation and a private organisation e.g.
home care for older people, cataract surgery
and screening. This shows how the boundary
between the sectors is becoming less defined.
                    FACTS
Facts
   14 million people in Britain use private care in
   one way or another
   many do so in order to avoid NHS waiting lists
   many treatments are not available under the
   NHS e.g. un-necessary cosmetic surgery
   850 000 private treatments are undertaken
   every year
   1:3 private knee replacements
   1:2 private abortions
   THE PRIVATE SECTOR
    Although this sector is growing, only the
services which the public are prepared to pay for
are offered by the private sector. They tend to
be specialist services which are associated with
lifestyle.

  The statutory institutions (the NHS and the
Local Authorities) tend to offer services to a
more diverse public sector which often needs
more complex and more expensive care.
   THE PRIVATE SECTOR

There is considerable economic, political
and ethical debate concerning the
increasing use of private services in the
country’s health and care services.
    Put your mind to work….
Working in Pairs

 Discuss the advantages and
 disadvantages of using private services in
 connection with these three areas.

 List your answers
  THE PRIVATE SECTOR
Examples of private provision in Health and
Social Care

hospitals, nursing homes, residential homes,
nurseries, clinics
drugs, medical apparatus, bandages etc, being
sold to the NHS and local authorities
treatments, drugs without prescription,
apparatus and therapies purchased directly
from private providers e.g. pharmacists,
optician, dentist, practitioners of
complementary and alternative medicine
THE VOLUNTARY SECTOR
The Voluntary Sector originated in the
eighteenth century. Religious voluntary
organisations, such as the Quakers and
wealthy, philanthropic people like the
Cadbury      family  began   supporting
voluntary services to help the less
fortunate. But these were few and far
between because they were expensive to
run and depended entirely on financial
contributions.
  THE VOLUNTARY SECTOR
The Voluntary Sector:

 was established as a result of a specific
 need. No law was required to establish it
 is usually made up of registered charities –
 they are non-profit making
 employs some staff while other workers
 are volunteers.
  THE VOLUNTARY SECTOR
  They traditionally focus more on social care
  rather than on health.
  They often ‘fill the gap’ left by the other
  sectors, e.g. care for the very poor or the
  homeless. They are not found in every area.
  The care provided by the Independent Sector
  is monitored and moderated by:
a) The health care commission
b) Commission for social care review
THE INFORMAL CARE SECTOR
According to a national survey in 1995, 1:8
adults in Britain provide informal care and
1:6 home includes a carer. A ‘carer’ is
someone who looks after a person who is
ill, disabled or old in their own homes.

It is estimated that 7 million persons,
women mainly, are informal carers in
Britain.
 THE INFORMAL CARE SECTOR
Facts:
    2:3 informal carers work in paid employment; also
    parents are often dependent on their children, 10,000
    carers are under 18 yrs old; the majority of carers are
    women

  Examples of the tasks undertaken by an informal carer:
   assisting with personal care – dressing, washing etc.
   shopping and collecting prescriptions, household
   cleaning, walking the dog for someone who is house
   bound, keeping company.
 ASSESSING INFORMATION
Questions:
      . Why has the independent sector increased in
          importance over the last 20 years?

         Describe the main characteristics of the private
          health care sector.

         Describe the main characteristics of the voluntary
          care sector.

         Explain the importance of the role of informal carers.
ASSESSING INFORMATION
In the UK health care provision is mostly via the
statutory organisations.
What is the meaning of statutory?
Give an example of this
The private sector is?
Give an example of this
The voluntary sector is?
Give an example of this
The voluntary and private sectors are called
Independent sectors. Why?
                   CARE
Practitioners in the private and voluntary sectors
can also offer statutory care services, if they
receive a contract and finance from the
government to do this.

This does not happen often. Instead, these
services usually offer non-statutary services, e.g.
nursing home care, physiotherapy, to people
who are willing to pay for them.
              CARE
Social care is any non-medical care
which offers support or help to vulnerable
groups. The main users of social care
services are:
Children and families
Older people
People with disabilities (physical,
sensory or learning)
People who suffer from mental strain
                 CARE
Social care is also provided via statutory,
private and voluntary organisations.

Discuss and then make a list of
different examples of social care
services.
               CLASS WORK
 Class Work (on a sheet of A3 paper) :-
  Think of all the health, social care and childcare
  services which you know about.
  Group the services into the 3 categories mentioned
  above (table format).
  Define the sector of each one (i.e. statutory, informal,
  independent)
  Specify whether the health services are primary,
  secondary or tertiary care
  Briefly note what is the main purpose of each service
(The answers are to be found on page 531, 532, 554-559
  in the book ‘Babies and Young Children, UWIC)
       FURTHER WORK
Identify the 4 different care sectors
which exist within the care system in
the UK.
Explain the meaning of the terms
‘mixed economy care’ and ‘internal
market’ in relation to care services.
What is the effect of the internal market
on the care system?

				
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