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					 Ingalls Shipbuilding
              Gulfport ▪ Avondale ▪ Pascagoula




                Employee

Environmental, Health

  and Safety Handbook




SSG K0200 APRIL 2011
      A Message from the Business Unit VP & General Manager of
                         Ingalls Shipbuilding
Ingalls Shipbuilding is committed to a strong environmental, health and safety
program. Extensive policies, procedures and processes have been established, and
we’ve invested in significant resources, to ensure each employee is provided a safe
and healthful workplace.

Each of us should be mindful of our work environment and practice safe work
procedures at all times during our work day. We should also hold each other
accountable for working safely and be responsible for knowing the right procedure
for any task we undertake.

Commitment from Ingalls Shipbuilding’s management alone cannot achieve optimal
safety and health in the workplace. Telling the truth about issues you see or hear and
reporting any violations immediately are part of taking ownership of your work
environment and being committed to a safe workplace. Your cooperation,
commitment and positive attitude contribute toward the ultimate safety goal of zero
lost time hours and the overall success of our environmental, health and safety
program.

No system of administrative, mechanical and operational safeguards is complete
without everyone’s constant alertness, cooperation and safety awareness. All
employees, subcontractors, vendors, customers and visitors must comply with the
safety regulations, occupational safety and health standards, other safety directives
and environmental policies.

Ingalls Shipbuilding expects each employee to know and embrace the rules stated
within this document and use the Environmental, Health and Safety Program to
develop and maintain a safe workplace.

Thank you for your commitment to continuously improving our environmental,
health and safety performance, and keeping yourself and your fellow shipbuilders
safe. And thanks for all you do to build great ships.

                                                          If you see an unsafe
                                                          operation or practice,
                                                          step in and STOP IT!

 Irwin F. Edenzon                                         No employee shall be
 Corporate Vice President                                 disciplined for stopping
                                                          a process which he/she
 and General Manager                                      determines      to    be
 Gulf Coast Operation                                     unsafe. We need to
                                                          think and act to ensure
                                                          that we work safely.
                                 IS GOOD
                                                          Irwin F. Edenzon
                                PROGRESS



                                          2
                   Environmental, Health and Safety Policy

Ingalls Shipbuilding is committed to:
 Compliance with laws, regulations and policies that protect people and the
    environment
 Prevention of pollution, injuries and illness
 Response to employer, customer and community needs
 Continuous improvement




                            EHS Vision Statement

The vision of Ingalls Shipbuilding is to achieve excellence in environmental,
health and safety by providing best-in class services and support to our
employees, our customers and the community in which we live and work.




                           EHS Mission Statement

The mission of the Ingalls Shipbuilding EHS organization is to build and
sustain an environmental, health and safety management system that will
integrate environmental, health and safety planning into all aspects of Ingalls
Shipbuilding’s business by:

   Providing training and support for the EHS staff
   Communicating throughout the organization
   Continuous process improvement
   Engaging and empowering the workforce to enhance safety, health and the
    environment



                                         Management Commitment
                                         Employee Involvement
                                         Worksite Analysis
                                         Hazard Prevention and Control
                                         Safety and Health Training



                                      3
                                                    CONTENTS

Environmental, Health and Safety Responsibilities .................................................... 6
Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses ............................................................................ 7
Compliance with Environmental, Health and Safety Requirements ........................... 8
Employee Involvement................................................................................................ 9
Job Safety Analyses .................................................................................................. 10
Take Five for Safety .................................................................................................. 10
Safety Complaints and Hazard Reporting ................................................................. 10
Emergency Action ..................................................................................................... 11
Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing ............................................................ 13
   General Requirements .......................................................................................... 13
   Working Apparel and Personal Clothing .............................................................. 14
   Welding, Tacking, Burning and Other Hot Work................................................. 14
   Grinding and Various Power-tooling .................................................................... 14
   Plate, Sheet, Structure and Pipe Fitting and Fabrication ...................................... 14
   Heavy Machine Operation (Lathes, Presses, etc.) ................................................ 15
   Painting ................................................................................................................. 15
   Abrasive Blasting ................................................................................................. 15
   Material Handling ................................................................................................. 15
   Electrical Work on Energized Equipment ............................................................ 15
   Work with Solvents and Caustic or Corrosive Chemicals .................................... 16
   Personal Fall Protection ........................................................................................ 16
   Respiratory Protection .......................................................................................... 17
   Hearing Protection ................................................................................................ 19
   Personal Flotation Devices ................................................................................... 19
Fire Prevention and Protection .................................................................................. 20
   Fire Prevention ..................................................................................................... 20
   Fire Extinguishers ................................................................................................. 20
   Life Safety ............................................................................................................ 21
Confined Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres ............................................... 21
   Confined Space Hazards and Solutions ................................................................ 22
   Confined Space General Rules ............................................................................. 23
Safe Use of Equipment .............................................................................................. 23
   Powered Industrial Vehicles (PIV’s) .................................................................... 23
   Cranes ................................................................................................................... 24
   General Shipyard Vehicles ................................................................................... 25
   Tool and Machine Guards and Safety Devices ..................................................... 25
   Airless Spray Painting .......................................................................................... 26
   Manual Tools and Equipment ............................................................................... 27
   Welding and Burning............................................................................................ 27
   Compressed Air and Gases ................................................................................... 28
   Illumination .......................................................................................................... 28
   Blowers and Ventilation ....................................................................................... 29




                                                               4
                                          CONTENTS, continued

Walking and Working Surfaces................................................................................. 29
   General Rules ....................................................................................................... 29
   Ladders ................................................................................................................. 30
   Scaffolds ............................................................................................................... 30
Electrical Safety ........................................................................................................ 31
Housekeeping and Shipkeeping ................................................................................ 32
Safety Rules for Specific Operations ........................................................................ 33
   Painting and Abrasive Blasting ............................................................................ 33
   Excavations........................................................................................................... 33
   Work on Lifeboats ................................................................................................ 33
   Radiation .............................................................................................................. 33
   Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) ................................................. 34
Ergonomics ............................................................................................................... 34
   Manual Lifting ...................................................................................................... 35
   Hand Tools ........................................................................................................... 35
   Video Display Terminals ...................................................................................... 35
Office Safety ............................................................................................................. 36
Hazard Communication ............................................................................................. 37
   Container Labels ................................................................................................... 37
   Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) ................................................................... 38
Environmental Awareness ......................................................................................... 39
   Material and Product Spills .................................................................................. 39
   Spill Reporting Procedures ................................................................................... 40
   Good Environmental Practices for Water – Do Not Dump Into: .......................... 40
   Good Environmental Practices for Air – Put a Lid on It! ..................................... 40
   Inspections, Fines and Penalties ........................................................................... 40




                                                              5
Environmental, Health and Safety Responsibilities
Managers and Supervisors
1)   Instruct employees about the potential hazards in the workplace and in the proper
     environmental, health and safety requirements applicable to the tasks they are performing.
2)   Ensure that employees wear the proper personal protective equipment when performing their
     tasks.
3)   Instruct employees in the proper procedures to report workplace hazards and chemical spills.
4)   Inform employees of the proper procedures for reporting work-related injuries or illnesses.
5)   Ensure employees receive all required environmental, health and safety training.
6)   Ensure that subcontractors, vendors and visitors within their domains understand and comply
     with Ingalls Shipbuilding (Ingalls Shipbuilding) environmental, health and safety
     requirements.
7)   Enforce Ingalls Shipbuilding environmental, health and safety regulations.
8)   Conduct a “Take 5 for Safety” jobsite inspection prior to the start of the work shift.
9)   Suspend all observed, reported or suspected hazardous operations, stop unsafe acts, and take
     remedial action.
10) Investigate all recordable work-related injuries and illnesses, fires and significant “near miss”
    incidents.
11) Set the example for environmental, health and safety compliance.
Employees
1)   Comply with all environmental, health and safety rules, regulations, and company policy.
2)   Report all hazardous conditions, including chemical spills, and unsafe acts to your supervisor.
3)   Immediately report all work-related injuries and illnesses to your Supervisor or the Medical
     Department.
4)   Never indulge in horseplay, practical jokes or fighting.
5)   Ingalls Shipbuilding prohibits working while under the influence of alcohol or controlled
     substances.
6)   When an illness or the effects of any medication impairs your ability to perform required
     tasks, notify management. Do not climb, operate any equipment, drive any vehicles, or use any
     hazardous materials.
7)   Do not make unauthorized repairs or modifications to company equipment or tools.
     Immediately report any defective item to your supervisor.
8)   Unless otherwise instructed, use only Ingalls Shipbuilding issued tools and/or equipment to
     perform your assigned tasks. Employees in unique occupations may be required to supply their
     own tools as a condition of employment. Employee supplied tools must be in good condition,
     inspected on a regular basis and approved for use by management.
9)   Read and obey all signs, labels, danger notices and other warning devices; never remove them
     without proper authorization.
10) Conduct a “Take 5 for Safety” jobsite inspection prior to the start of the work shift.




                                                  6
Subcontractors, Vendors and Visitors
1)   Comply with all applicable Ingalls Shipbuilding environmental, health and safety rules,
     regulations and company policy.
2)   Report all hazardous conditions to the Ingalls Shipbuilding process owner or point of contact.
3)   Communicate plans to and coordinate activities with the Ingalls Shipbuilding process owner or
     point of contact.
4)   Communicate all applicable environmental, health and safety rules and regulations to
     subordinates.

Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses
If you sustain a work-related injury or illness, you may be entitled to benefits provided for
you at Ingalls Shipbuilding’s expense under Workers’ Compensation laws. The injury or
illness may result from a single incident or from repeated or prolonged exposure to work
activities or substances at work. If you are injured or become ill as a result of your job, you
must:
1.   Report the injury or illness to your supervisor and the Medical Department immediately. Tell
     them what, where, when, and how it happened. Give them enough information so that they can
     arrange for medical evaluation or treatment and complete the necessary reports.
2.   Your benefits are automatic for injuries arising out of, and occurring in the course and scope
     of your employment. However, proper treatment and benefit payments are delayed until
     Ingalls Shipbuilding knows about the injury. To ensure your right to benefits, report every
     injury or illness promptly, no matter how minor. Even a cut finger can be disabling if an
     infection develops.
3.   Workers’ Compensation benefit amounts are set by state law. If you have a problem or think
     you haven’t received all benefits due you, contact the Medical Department or the Ingalls
     Shipbuilding Compensation representative. Many questions can be cleared up with just a
     phone call.

                       Location       Medical Dept             F.A. Richard
                       Avondale       504-654-4140             504-654-5128
                      Pascagoula      228-935-3842             228-934-1500
                       Gulfport       228-935-7756             228-934-1500
                          F.A. Richard Toll Free No.:          888-560-2562

If complications arise in connection with a job-related injury or illness when you are away
from the plant, report them as soon as possible to your supervisor or the applicable Medical
and/or Human Resources organization.
Access to Your Occupational Medical, Health and Safety Records
You may request to receive (or have your personal or Worker’s Compensation physician
receive) copies of your occupational medical and exposure monitoring records.
To obtain copies of your occupational medical and exposure monitoring records, contact the
Medical Department.




                                                 7
Compliance with Environmental, Health and Safety Requirements
Ingalls Shipbuilding Environmental, Health and Safety requirements are like the rules of any team
sport. They tell us what each team member must or must not do to produce winning results.
Responsibility for environmental, health and safety at work is a joint undertaking that you share
with Ingalls Shipbuilding. The Company is responsible for protecting the environment and
providing you with healthful and safe working conditions. Your responsibility as an employee is to
ensure you understand the environmental, health and safety work requirements and that you follow
them in performing your assigned tasks.
The information in this booklet is based on legal requirements imposed by the EPA, OSHA, and
other applicable government agencies, customer requirements and Ingalls Shipbuilding policies and
procedures. You have an obligation to yourself and your co-workers to understand and follow these
requirements, and to recognize that their fair and impartial enforcement is necessary.
Fair and impartial enforcement requires that the circumstances of each case be determined and that
disciplinary action, when appropriate, be taken and documented. The severity of the discipline, up
to, and including termination, will be determined by the nature and frequency of the violation, in
accordance with Ingalls Shipbuilding policies (Working with Ingalls Shipbuilding) and/or the local
site’s bargaining agreement.

The following are examples of violations of Environmental, Health, and Safety
requirements established by Ingalls Shipbuilding:
    Unauthorized operation of Ingalls Shipbuilding equipment.
    Operating equipment without the required training or certification.
    Failure to obey posted warning and danger signs.
    Falsifying or omitting pertinent information on any company records, such as monitoring logs,
     accident reports, or workers’ compensation claims.
    Smoking in an area identified as a “No Smoking” area for fire, environmental, health or safety
     reasons.
    Failure to wear eye, hearing, respiratory, or other protective equipment in required areas.
    Failure to lock out and/or tag out electrical equipment before performing service or
     maintenance.
    Violating shipyard confined space procedures.
    Operating equipment or processes in violation of lockout/tagout procedures, or the
     unauthorized removal of lockout/tagout devices.
    Unsafe use of any vehicle on Ingalls Shipbuilding property or while driving on company
     business.
    Unauthorized removal of machine guarding or warning signs.

    Bypassing or otherwise making safety devices inoperative, such as interlocks, two-hand
     controls, self-adjusting guards, or brakes.
    Running on Company property.
Compliance with the requirements outlined in this book will benefit both you and your fellow
                                        workers.




                                                  8
Employee Involvement
Ingalls Shipbuilding believes in teamwork when it comes to Safety and the Environment.
Ingalls Shipbuilding is presently in an alliance with our Labor Unions and the U.S.
Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to make our
shipyard a safer place to work. To meet goals that will eventually qualify Ingalls Shipbuilding
as a Voluntary Protection Program site (VPP), we established management accountability, and
through our Environmental, Health and Safety Action Teams, employee involvement.
Environmental, Health and Safety Action Teams participate in jobsite inspection, accident
investigation, trend analysis, Job Safety Analysis development, personal protective equipment
(PPE) selection and many other safety, health and environmental initiatives. These dedicated
workers are greatly responsible for much of the progress that Ingalls Shipbuilding has
achieved in making its shipyards safer places to work, and the company encourages all
shipbuilders to explore and seek membership in this vital institution.




Ingalls Shipbuilding is also working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to
implement an Environmental Management System (EMS) that ensures compliance, pollution
prevention, and continuous improvement. In order to accomplish our goal of implementing an
EMS that will meet the requirements of ISO 14001, we have also established accountability
for our management staff, as well as employee involvement with our EHS Action Teams.




                                              9
Job Safety Analyses
What is a JSA?
A Job Safety Analysis is a guide that places particular emphasis on accident prevention. This is
how it works. First, a job is broken down into individual steps. That is, the JSA identifies the job's
phase-by-phase sequence from start to finish. Next, the JSA identifies the potential safety or health
hazards associated with each step. Finally, the JSA lists the necessary precautions to keep the
hazards from becoming an accident. The Job Safety Analysis incorporates safety and health
considerations into the actual production process. Each craft, with employee input, develops its own
JSA’s.
What are the benefits?
  JSA's provide efficient and uniform instructions on how to do a job safely.
  JSA's increase knowledge of job hazards and how to prevent accidents.
  JSA's contribute to a positive attitude among workers who understand what to do and how to
   do it safely.

Take Five for Safety
“Take Five” is a pre-job safety and health inspection intended to ensure that employees are suitably
equipped for work and jobsites are free of recognized safety hazards. Ingalls Shipbuilding requires
all supervisors, hourly workers and subcontractors to conduct these surveys and expects supervision
to document their findings and correct identified problems. Never overlook an unsafe act or
condition. If you observe a hazard, notify your supervisor and get it fixed.

Safety Complaints and Hazard Reporting
Effective communication between employees and management is essential to achieving a safe and
healthy workplace, and Ingalls Shipbuilding encourages all shipbuilders to report any observed or
suspected hazards that they may encounter. Occasionally, however, the normal chain of command
may be ineffective in solving these problems. Should this be the case, the Company provides
several forums for its employees to register safety and health complaints and report jobsite hazards.
Ingalls Shipbuilding pledges that it will investigate each report and take no retribution against the
person who files it. Employees may submit reports anonymously by any of these methods:
    Employee Safety and Health Hazard Report forms are available at tool rooms. The Safety
     Department and/or employee Environmental Health and Safety Action Teams investigate all
     reports and advise process owners to abate any confirmed hazard.
    Phone call to the Safety Department:
      Avondale:               (504) 654-5133
      Pascagoula:             (228) 935-2100
    OpenLine call to Ingalls Shipbuilding:           1-800-631-0020




                                                 10
Emergency Action
Emergencies do occur. They may be medical emergencies, fires, natural disasters, bomb threats,
hazardous material releases, or utility outages. When unplanned events happen, it is vital that
everyone understand and follow the designated procedures to preserve life, prevent injury and
minimize property loss.
Medical Emergencies
1.   Unless life-threatening conditions arise, only qualified persons designated by the Medical
     Department shall treat an injured employee.
2.   Confined spaces may contain invisible hazards. Do not attempt to rescue an unconscious
     person from a confined space until it is absolutely certain that the space is safe for entry.
     Should there be doubts, contact Emergency Services.
3.   When reporting an accident by phone, describe clearly what occurred and the specific location
     of the accident. Remain on the phone until Emergency Services releases you.
4.   Treat the blood or body fluids of others as hazardous materials. You will likely not know if
     these fluids contain blood-borne pathogens such as HIV or hepatitis C. Assume that they do
     and avoid contact. In the event of contact with blood, report to the Medical Department
     immediately for a private consultation.
Fires, Hazardous Material Releases, Natural Disasters, and Other Emergencies.
1.   Report fires immediately by looking for the closest fire alarm system in the area and activating
     the signal. Aboard ship, sound-powered phones are also available to report emergencies.
2.   Know the location of fire fighting equipment and how to use it.
3.   If the evacuation alarm is sounded, evacuate the work area in an orderly fashion to a
     predetermined safe refuge for a roll call by supervisors. Do not panic!
4.   Any employees observing a hazardous materials release are to evacuate and assemble in a safe
     area and notify supervision and EHS.
5.   Remain in the predetermined safe area until your supervisor completes the headcount.
Evacuation Drills
1.   Supervisors must advise employees of the designated muster points. There will be primary and
     secondary safe areas.
2.   The shipboard alarm system consists of:
         Fire Alert - constant monotone sound
         Abandon ship alert – an oscillating high-low sound accompanied by flashing temporary
          lights
         Flooding signal – a beep-beep sound
3.   Area owners must schedule emergency evacuation drills every six or three months aboard
     vessels (depending upon their degree of completion) and annually at shops and offices.




                                                11
Emergency Response Phone Numbers

Pascagoula and Gulfport Facilities for All EHS Emergencies
 Facility Phone ………………….……….…….911
 Cell Phone or Outside Line …..…. (228) 935-6101

Avondale Facility for All EHS Emergencies
 Facility Phone ……………….………….…….911
 Cell Phone or Outside Line …...… (504) 654-5151


Emergency Information / Communications Phone Numbers

Should extreme weather or other phenomenon necessitate a Plant closing, call the appropriate
number below to receive facility status reports, instructions and additional pertinent information:

Pascagoula Facility:
    (228) 935-INFO(4636)
    1-800-659-6646

Avondale Facility: 1-877-463-6937




                                                12
Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing




All employees must wear personal protective equipment (PPE) whenever there is a reasonable
probability that the use of such equipment can prevent injury or illness. When potential chemical
hazards exist, review the appropriate Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) to determine the correct
protective measures to safeguard against harmful exposure. If you are unsure about the equipment
or clothing prescribed for a specific job, consult your supervisor, a Job Safety Analysis (JSA) or
EHS for information on where to obtain it and correctly use it. Maintain all PPE according to the
instructions of the manufacturer or EHS and return damaged PPE for repair or replacement. You
may acquire suitable PPE at a tool room or the Safety Store.

General Requirements

1.   Employees must wear approved safety glasses with side shields, hard hats and steel-toed shoes
     in all production areas at all times. Except for designated “PPE-free Zones,” Ingalls
     Shipbuilding expects its shipbuilders to enter its gates wearing this basic protective gear.

2.   When applicable, personal protective equipment (PPE) must bear an inscription certifying its
     conformance with the appropriate standard, including:
         Safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields, goggles, face shields, and burning
          and welding lenses: ANSI Z87.1
         Hard hats and protective headgear: ANSI Z89.1
         Safety-toed shoes: ANSI Z41/ASTM F2413

3.   Prescription glasses must have side shields, and both must meet the ANSI Z87.1 safety
     standard.

4.   Ingalls Shipbuilding disallows the wearing of contact lenses in production areas.

5.   Ingalls Shipbuilding prohibits the use of metal hardhats in its facilities.

6.   For the general population, safety shoes must be made of all leather tops. Persons who may be
     exposed to irritating or corrosive substances or wet conditions shall wear impermeable
     (rubber, neoprene, etc) boots. Employees shall not wear canvas, plastic, cloth-top shoes,
     sandals, or other unsafe footwear in production areas. Employees performing the following
     jobs must wear boots at least eight inches high:
         Welding, burning, gouging, and other hot work applications
         Applications involving exposures to paints, solvents and other irritating or corrosive
          chemicals
         Applications involving exposures to stagnant water or liquid

7.   Never perform unauthorized modifications on any protective equipment. This voids the
     manufacturer’s approval and compromises safety performance.




                                                  13
Working Apparel and Personal Clothing

1.   Wear clothing appropriate for the work being done. Do not wear loose gloves, sleeves,
     Scarves, neckties, necklaces, or other loose clothing or jewelry that can become entangled in
     moving machinery.
2.   Shop employees must wear ankle-length trousers, slacks, or jeans. Shirts and blouses must
     cover the shoulder and the midriff. Skirts, shorts, dresses, and tank tops are prohibited in
     production areas.
3.   Wear long sleeve shirts and clothing made of natural fabrics (cotton, denim, leather, etc.)
     when performing hot work.
4.   While working around machinery, keep long hair confined. Head coverings must not hang
     loosely nor allow hair to protrude.
5.   Ingalls Shipbuilding prohibits loose or dangling earrings, bracelets, rings, or similar jewelry in
     production areas. Business Unit management may allow certain types of jewelry.
6.   Personal headset radios are not permitted.

Welding, Tacking, Burning and Other Hot Work

1.  Hard hat
2.  All leather-top steel toed boots at least six-inches high
3.  Welding shield with the appropriate shade lens (for altered or damaged shields refer to
    General Requirement section item 7 on page 13.)
4. Burning goggles with the appropriate shade lens and safety glasses with side shields (for
    burners, heaters and brazers.)
5. Safety glasses with side shields under welding shield
          (NOTE: Welders must wear IR Reduction safety glasses.)
6. Long sleeve shirts made of natural fabrics, NOMEX® or other heat resistant fiber
7. Trousers or coveralls made of natural fabrics, NOMEX® or other heat resistant fiber. To keep
    fire from entering the boot, always keep the leg cuff outside of the footwear.
8. Gauntlet (or longer) welding gloves made of natural fabrics, Kevlar® or other heat resistant
    material
9. Leather sleeves, jackets or welding chaps as required
10. Hearing protection
11. Respiratory protection (for welders and gougers.)

Grinding and Various Power-tooling

1.   Hard hat
2.   All leather steel toed boots
3.   Face shield
4.   Safety goggles
5.   Long sleeve shirts
6.   Gloves
7.   Hearing protection
8.   Respiratory protection

Plate, Sheet, Structure and Pipe Fitting and Fabrication

1.   Hard hat
2.   All leather steel toed boots
3.   Safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields
4.   Gloves
5.   Hearing protection (where required)




                                                 14
Heavy Machine Operation (Lathes, Presses, etc.)
1.   Hard hat
2.   Steel toed boots
3.   Safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields
4.   Gloves:
          Do not wear gloves when hands may come within close proximity of moving machine
           parts.
          Use impermeable (rubber, neoprene, etc.) gloves when handling cutting oils or other
           lubricants.
5.   Hearing protection (where required)
6.   Take steps to avoid getting pulled into moving parts. Button shirt fronts and shirt sleeves, tuck
     in shirttails, and remove jewelry.
Painting
1.   Hard hat
2.   Impermeable steel toed boots (when handling or applying solvents or solvent diluted paints)
3.   Safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields
4.   Impermeable gloves (when handling or applying solvents or paints)
5.   Buttoned long sleeve shirts (for brush or roll painting)
6.   Coveralls (for spray painting)
7.   Respiratory protection
         Positive pressure supplied-air hood for spray painting
         Negative pressure air-purifying respirator for brush/roll paining and mixing
8.   Hearing protection (where required)
Abrasive Blasting
1.   Hard hat (when not blasting with the supplied-air hood)
2.   Steel toed boots
3.   Safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields (when not blasting with the supplied-air
     hood)
4.   Gloves
5.   Coveralls
6.   Positive pressure “Type C” supplied-air hood
7.   Hearing protection
Material Handling
1.   Hard hat
2.   Steel toed boots
3.   Safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields
4.   Gloves
Electrical Work on Energized Equipment
1.   Non-conductive hard hat
2.   Steel toed boots
3.   Safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields
4.   Remove jewelry and other conductive items
5.   Do not wear synthetic fabrics such as nylon, polyester or rayon when working on electrical
     systems.
6.   Wear ASTM D 128-87 rubber insulating gloves rated to protect against the anticipated voltage
     exposure, and cover the rubber gloves with protector (leather) gloves. Note: Protector gloves
     need not be used with Class 0 (less than 1000 volts) gloves, under limited-use conditions,
     where small equipment and parts manipulation necessitate unusually high finger dexterity.
7.   Higher voltage operations may also require the use of face shields and ASTM-rated rubber
     insulating sleeves, mats and blankets.

                                                 15
Work with Solvents and Caustic or Corrosive Chemicals

1.   Hard hat
2.   Impermeable steel toed boots
3.   Goggles or safety glasses with hard, impact-resistant side shields
4.   Face shield
5.   Impermeable gloves
6.   Buttoned long sleeve shirts (for brush or roll painting)
7.   Impermeable coveralls or aprons
8.   Respiratory protection

Personal Fall Protection

Employees exposed to falls of five or more feet must protect themselves from susceptibility to these
falls. If structural fall protection (e.g., scaffolds, guardrails, manhole covers) is missing or
incomplete, then workers must use personal fall arrest system consisting of a full-body safety
harness equipped with a self-retracting lanyard or lifeline.

1.   An anchor capable of supporting an impact of 5000 pounds per person attached. Do not tie
     onto wire rope guardrails (except as a component in suitably installed and tested lifelines),
     raceways, sheetmetal ductwork or other flimsy structures. If the jobsite lacks an appropriate tie
     off point, notify your supervisor or the Scaffold Department to correct the problem.

2.   Do not use defective equipment. Inspect safety harnesses before each use, and replace all
     faulty gear.

3.   Safety harnesses should be
     disconnected when suspended in
     baskets over water.      Before                         Impacting Structures Below
     disconnecting, ensure that you
     are wearing a personal flotation
                                                                (Total Fall Distance)
     device (work vest).

4.   Always tie off overhead.                                                                        6’ Lanyard Length
     Remember that a six-foot
     lanyard will extend another 3.5
                                                                                                     3.5’ Deceleration Device
     feet when fully deployed. Add
     your body height to this length,
     and calculate that your anchor                                                                   5’ From D-Ring to
                                                                                                                                                               Total 18.5’
     point will always have to be at                                                                  Worker’s Feet
                                                                                                                                                                 below
     least 18 feet from the next level                                                                   3’ Safety Factor (stretch,
                                                                                                                                                               anchorage
     down. If this is not feasible, use                                                                                                                          point
                                                                                                         bounce, etc.)
     a self-retracting lanyard.
                                          All distances are approximate, and shown for illustration only. This is why it is critical to maintain the safety factor distance!




                                                          16
Respiratory Protection
Any employee working in an area containing potentially hazardous airborne contaminants must
wear approved respiratory protection. To obtain the specific respirator that you need, inform the
tool room attendant of the particular job that you are performing so that you receive the exact
respirator that you need to protect your lungs.
Airborne contaminants that typically require respiratory protection include:
    Metal fume from hot work
    Metal particles from grinding
    Painting and solvent vapors
    Adhesive vapors
    Chemical vapors and mists
    Blast grit
The two basic types of respirators are air-purifying respirators (APR’S) and supplied-air respirators
(SAR’s).
Air-Purifying Respirators:
1.   Function by negative pressure, and they consist of a tight-fitting silicone face piece with:
        Two inhalation valves
        One exhalation valve
        Head and neck straps
        Twin filters or cartridges covering the inhalation valves
2.   Since APR’s operate by negative pressure, the face piece must fit securely around the
     user’s face so that when he or she inhales the sealing surface around the mask’s perimeter
     collapses the face and forms a vacuum. This forces the air through the filters which
     intercept the contaminant before it enters the mask, enabling you to breathe clean air.
     This means that:
          There can be no breach between the face piece’s sealing surface and the wearer’s
           skin. In order for the negative pressure vacuum to develop and route the pollutant
           through the filters, the mask must completely adhere to bare skin. To maintain the
           necessary seal:
            Do not wear the respirators over facial hair of any kind.
            Do not wear the respirators over head/face clothing, such as ski masks or
                 hoods often worn during cold weather.
            Do not allow eyewear temple bars to protrude under the edges of full-face
                 masks.
          Everyone whose job requires that he or she use an APR must be fit-tested before
           initial use and at least annually thereafter. Employees who wear respirators must use
           the same size and model APR for which they were tested. If problems develop and
           you suspect that you are no longer getting an adequate seal, consult the Safety
           Department for further advice and a possible fit-test on a different size respirator.
          Every employee must perform a field fit test each time he or she puts on a
           respirator.
          Wearing a negative pressure respirator adds stress on the pulmonary system. Since
           some persons may not have the lung capacity to use an APR, each prospective user
           must receive medical clearance to be fitted for a negative pressure respirator.
3.   Understand that APR’s have serious limitations:
        Never enter an oxygen deficient atmosphere wearing a negative pressure respirator. An
         APR only filters the air that is already in your environment. It does not provide
         additional air or oxygen.
        For an APR to function correctly, you must use the appropriate filter or cartridge. The
         cleansing element will only work on the contaminant for which it was designed and
         manufactured. Commonly available at Ingalls Shipbuilding are:
                                                 17
           N95, N100 and P100 filters for solid particulates, such as dusts, mists, welding fume
               and fibers
           Organic vapor cartridges for vapors from paints, solvents and adhesives
          Consult the Safety Department about obtaining cartridges for other types of airborne
          contaminants.
         APR’s do not offer unlimited protection. As with all filters, respirator pads and cartridges
          will eventually become overloaded. When congestion or breakthrough occurs, the APR is
          no longer effective. As a rule:
           In most cases, exchange organic vapor cartridges after four hours of use at a
                normal work rate. If you detect an odor, the cartridge is likely saturated. Evacuate
                the worksite and obtain new cartridges. If necessary, consult the Safety Department
                for more detailed advice.
           Exchange the particulate filters when inhalation becomes more difficult. This is a
                sign that the pads are congested, and, consequently, your lungs must exert more
                effort to receive sufficient air.
          Replace all filters and cartridges at the nearest tool room.
Supplied-Air (Air Line) Respirators:
1.   Function by positive pressure and provide a virtually unlimited continuous flow of clean air
     from a source that is remote from the work environment. SAR’s provide higher protection
     levels than APR’s because the breathing air supply is independent of the ambient worksite air.
     Most SAR’s receive breathing air via an air hose that connects the source to the head/face
     gear. An intermediate filter removes contaminants and moisture from the compressed air to
     ensure suitable breathing air. Among the advantages that SAR’s offer over APR’s are:
         SAR’s can guard against a higher airborne contaminant concentration
         There is no need for daily exchange of congested cartridges and filters
         SAR’s protect against the gamut of different types of contaminants
         Employees using SAR’s with loose-fitting hoods do not have to be fit-tested
         Employees receive breathing air without effort, enabling persons with diminished lung
          capacity to work in tainted atmospheres.
2.   Activities that require supplied-air respiratory protection include:
         Arc gouging in a confined or semi-confined space.
         Performing hot work in a confined space with inadequate ventilation.
         Spray painting.
         Abrasive blasting.
3.   Although SAR’s provide air and oxygen from an independent source, DO NOT attempt to use
     air line respirators in an oxygen deficient or otherwise Immediately Dangerous to Life and
     Health (IDLH) atmosphere. Only designated emergency responders, who are trained in the use
     of Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, may enter such environments.
General Rules for Respiratory Protection:
1.   All participants in the Respiratory Protection Program must have initial and annual
     recertifications in the particular respirator(s) that they will use on the job.
2.   As with all PPE, Ingalls Shipbuilding prohibits modifications of any sort to respiratory
     equipment.
3.   Inspect and clean respirators daily. Replace all damaged and excessively soiled equipment at
     the nearest tool room.




                                                 18
Hearing Protection
1.   Prolonged exposure to excessive loud noise can result in hearing loss. All employees working
     in designated “high noise areas” must wear the required hearing protection. Examples of areas
     or operations which may require wearing hearing protection are: engine rooms, compressor
     rooms, pump rooms, shops, chipping, grinding, gouging, and abrasive blasting.
2.   Ingalls Shipbuilding
     provides     hearing      How to Wear Soft Foam Earplugs
     protection for all        To get the best protection from your soft foam earplugs, remember to
     employees.       Ear      roll, pull, and hold when putting them in. Use clean hands to keep
     muffs and plugs are       from getting dirt and germs into your ears!
     available at the          1. Roll the earplug up into a small, thin "snake" with your fingers. You
     Safety Store or any       can use one or both hands.
     tool room.
                               2. Pull the top of your ear up and back with your opposite hand to
3.   If there is a question    straighten out your ear canal. The rolled-up earplug should slide right
     as to whether a           in.
     specific area or          3. Hold the earplug in with your finger. Count to 20 or 30 out loud
     operation is loud         while waiting for the plug to expand and fill the ear canal. Your voice
     enough to require         will sound muffled when the plug has made a good seal.
     hearing protection,       Check the fit when you're all done. Most of the foam body of the
     use the following         earplug should be within the ear canal. Try cupping your hands tightly
     rule of thumb: If         over your ears. If sounds are much more muffled with your hands in
     the environment is        place, the earplug may not be sealing properly. Take the earplug out
     so noisy that you         and try again.
     yell to be heard two
     feet away, then you
     need           hearing
     protection.
4.   To ensure that the
     plug fits securely in
     the ear canal, follow
     the instructions on
     the packet. Foam plugs accommodate a variety of ear canal sizes. See the frame at right for
     correct insertion instructions.
5.   Any employee using personal hearing protection not supplied by the company must first have
     these protectors inspected and approved for use by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Safety
     Department.
Personal Flotation Devices
1.   Employees working over water or near unguarded edges of the decks of floating vessels shall
     wear an approved personal flotation device (life jacket or work vest).
2.   Employees working on scaffolding over the side of vessels afloat shall wear an approved
     personal flotation device.
3.   Employees working near unguarded deck edges or in personnel baskets suspended over water
     shall wear an approved personal flotation device.
4.   U.S.C.G. approved 30 inch life rings with at least 90 feet of line attached shall be installed
     aboard all vessels, barges, and floating staging, on which work is being performed.
5.   In the vicinity of each occupied floating vessel, there shall be at least one portable or
     permanent ladder of sufficient length to assist employees to reach safety in the event that they
     fall into the water.


                                                  19
Fire Prevention and Protection
Fire Prevention
1.   Shipyards contain many congested areas, combustible materials and ignition sources. To
     prevent a fire either:
         Move the hot work or other ignition source at least 35 feet from combustibles, or…
         Move combustibles at least 35 feet from the hot work or other ignition source, or…
         Install a non-flammable barrier between the ignition source and the combustible material,
          such a metal panel or fire resistant blanket, or...
         If none of the above is feasible, assign a firewatch to the hot work operation.
2.   Firewatch personnel must be trained and certified to perform this function. Firewatchers must
     also have full view of the entire hot work area and can perform no other duties while hot work
     is underway.
3.   Inspect your area, and practice good housekeeping. Remove all combustible debris from the
     worksite and into their designated receptacles.
4.   As much as possible, all wood aboard ships must be fire-retardant. To minimize the fuel for
     fire, uncrate material and leave wooden pallets on the dock before transporting loads onto a
     vessel.
5.   At the end of the shift, disconnect all oxygen and fuels gas lines at the manifold and store them
     in the open air:
          Never leave an unattended torch line in an enclosed space for more than 15 minutes.
          Never leave an unattended torch line in a confined space for any length of time.
          Never store torch hoses in gang boxes or other locations that may retain gas still trapped
           in the lines.
6.   Follow all instructions issued by an Operations Fire Marshall, Certified Marine Chemist or
     Shipyard Competent Person. When in doubt check the:
         Fire Marshall’s hot work permit
         Marine Chemist Certificate
         Competent Person “OSHA 74 Log of Inspection”
7.   Obey “No Smoking” and No Hot Work” signs as well as similar warnings posted anywhere in
     the Yard.
8.   Hot work and other ignition sources must be no less than 50 feet from flammable liquids,
     gases or mists. These include paints, solvents, fuels, oils and any job involving these materials.
9.   The Ingalls Shipbuilding Fire Department must inspect the area and issue a hot work permit
     before anyone begins hot work on a building or other facility structure.
10. Never place material on or in the path of firefighting stations.
Fire Extinguishers
1.   Fire extinguishers are for early stage small fires only. Should you encounter a large blaze
     activate the nearest alarm, alert occupants, evacuate the location and notify management so
     that they can contact the Fire Department.
2.   Ingalls Shipbuilding generally stocks carbon dioxide CO2 and dry chemical extinguishers. Use
     the correct extinguisher for the type of fire that you are fighting. The extinguisher will bear a
     letter(s) of the alphabet identifying type(s) of fire for which it was intended. The
     classifications for the most common fires are:




                                                 20
         “A”        Routine solid materials, such as wood, paper, leaves and many plastics
         “B”        Oils, fuels, solvents or other hydrocarbons
         “C”        Electrical

3.   Never use an extinguisher for any
     purpose other than firefighting.

4.   Notify the Fire Department whenever
     you activate a fire extinguisher so that
     they can replace it with a fully charged
     one.

5.   Use     the    “PASS”       method      for
     extinguishing fires.
         Pull the pin from the handle
         Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire
         Squeeze the discharge handle
         Sweep the nozzle back and forth at
          the base of the fire

6.   Always return an unused extinguisher to its designated mounting station.

Life Safety

1.   Keep all aisles, passageways, stairways and gangways clear and free from obstructions.

2.   Never block exits or access to exits. Also, keep the path from the exit to the safe refuge
     outside of the building clear. Never park a vehicle or store material in a fire lane or in front of
     an exit or escape portal.

3.   In the event of a fire, the last thing anyone needs to discover is that he or she cannot escape.
     Never lock an exit!

4.   Ensure that all exits and exit routes are appropriately and conspicuously identified.

5.   Ensure that evacuation drawings are accurate and prominently posted in shops and offices.

6.   Do not disable, muffle or cover PA systems, alarms or other emergency alert devices.

Confined Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres
Confined and enclosed spaces are locations surrounded by bulkheads and decks, or walls and floors
and have an overhead. Confined spaces are smaller than enclosed spaces and by their small size and
confined nature can create or aggravate a hazardous exposure.

To identify, control and eliminate potentially hazardous atmospheres, Ingalls Shipbuilding has on
staff Certified Marine Chemists (CMC), Shipyard Competent Persons (SCP) and trained
firefighters. The results of their inspections and the corresponding instructions are listed on the
Marine Chemist Certificate and/or the OSHA 74 Log of Instructions by a Shipyard Competent
Person.

These documents are posted in designated locations aboard ship or at its access. Areas with hot
work or entry restrictions will have these postings at the entrance(s). Should you have doubts about
a location’s fitness for entry or a particular operation, do not take risks. Contact your supervisor or
the Safety Department or the Fire Department.

                                                   21
Confined Space Hazards and Solutions
1.   Hazard: Oxygen Deficiency
        Potential Sources:
          Inert gas emissions – Argon and CO2 are common welding shield gases at Ingalls
              Shipbuilding, and both are heavier than air. If substantial leakage occurs in a
              confined space, the gas will travel to the bottom and, as its volume increases, force
              out the air and the oxygen in it.
          Sealed compartments with drying paint – The hydrocarbons in drying paint will
              readily absorb oxygen, and a bolted shut space may not permit sufficient makeup air
              to replenish the oxygen supply.
          Rusted bulkheads in sealed tanks or cargo holds. Rust is a product of oxidation and
              will also absorb oxygen.
          Residue from previous cargos – Some vessel cargos, such as grains, fruit and raw
              sugar may remove airborne oxygen in sealed cargo holds.
        Solutions:
          Call a CMC or SCP to monitor the space’s atmosphere before entry.
          Read and adhere to all instructions on Marine Chemist Certificates and/or OSHA 74
              forms.
          Identify and control/eliminate the source of the oxygen deficiency.
          Use argon flow meters with all inert gas welding equipment.
          Remove all inert gas lines in to the open air at the end of the shift and disconnect
              the flow meter at the manifold. Disconnect the flow meter at the manifold before
              lunchtime or whenever you leave the compartment for a lengthy period.
          Tighten all inert gas connections and fittings with tools, not fingers.
          Supply forced air ventilation until sampling reveals that the air contains a full
              sustainable complement of oxygen.
2.   Hazard: Fire or Explosion
        Potential Sources:
          Torch hose fuel gas or oxygen emissions
          Liquid fuel aboard ship
          Painting operations
          Unauthorized smoking
          Stored flammable liquids
          Combustible material in the way of hot work
          Defective, unsuitable or modified electrical equipment
        Solutions:
          Call a CMC or SCP to monitor the space’s atmosphere before entry.
          Follow the instructions on Marine Chemist Certificates, OSHA 74 forms and hot
              work permits.
          Adhere to all warning and identifying signs, labels, and stencils
          Disconnect/remove torch gas hoses as directed in the “Fire Prevention” segment.
          Tighten all torch, oxygen and fuel gas connections and fittings with tools, not
              fingers.
          Remove combustibles from the area or cover them with flame retardant material
          Never modify electrical equipment
          Ensure that electrical conductors are appropriately guarded or insulated
          Store flammable liquids in designated containers and locations
          Know the location of firefighting equipment, designate a trained firewatch when
              required
          Check the adjacent space and the opposite side of the surface before starting hot
              work.
          Use or install intrinsically safe electrical equipment in spaces containing flammable
              vapors
          Use explosion-proof exhaust ventilation until sampling reveals no explosive
              readings

                                               22
3.   Hazard: Toxic Atmosphere
        Potential Sources:
          Metal fume from welding and burning
          Ingredients in solvents, adhesives, paints, lubricants and other products
          Carbon monoxide from vehicles with internal combustion engines
          Miscellaneous substances
        Solutions:
          Call an Industrial Hygienist, CMC or SCP to monitor the space’s atmosphere before
              entry.
          Follow the instructions on Marine Chemist Certificates, OSHA 74 forms
          Wear the prescribed respirator and other PPE
          Operate electrically powered vehicles in enclosed spaces
          Install mechanical ventilation until sampling reveals acceptable exposure
              concentrations

Confined Space General Rules

1.   Many hazardous atmospheres offer no warning. If you see an unconscious person in a
     confined space, DO NOT ENTER unless you can positively identify the problem and
     determine that it is safe to do so. Contact the Safety Department or Fire Department to assess
     the hazard and execute rescue procedures.
2.   Employees shall never work alone and left unattended in confined spaces.
3.   Confined spaces must have mechanical ventilation before employee entry.
4.   Confined space rules apply landside as well as on waterways.

Safe Use of Equipment
Powered Industrial Vehicles (PIV’s)
1.   Employees must be trained and authorized to
     operate specific types of vehicles. Among these are:
         Cranes
         Aerial platforms
         Forklifts
         Skid steer loaders (Bobcats)
2.   Operators shall never load a PIV’s structure,
     hoisting gear, rigging gear, attachments, extensions
     or personnel platforms beyond its rated capacity.
3.   Operators must use the vehicle’s daily checklist to
     inspect the equipment before the start of the shift. DO NOT OPERATE DEFECTIVE
     VEHICLES. Report all deficiencies to your supervisor and/or the Maintenance Department so
     that the appropriate persons can correct them.
4.   Aerial platform occupants must wear a safety harness with self-retracting lanyard and engage
     it to a suitable anchor in the basket.
5.   Employees shall never ride on a forklift or other vehicle that is not equipped with a passenger
     seat.




                                                23
Cranes

1.   Operators, riggers and load handlers must be trained and authorized through the Training and
     Workforce Development Department.
2.   Riggers directing the operator must know and use the appropriate hand signals and remain
     within the operator’s line of sight.
Employee Responsibilities

1.   It is everyone’s responsibility to pay attention to his or her surroundings.
2.   Pay attention to the crane’s travel bell and warning horn. Make sure that you are clear of the
     tracks and suspended loads.
3.   Observe Ingalls Shipbuilding’s policy against unauthorized passage under a suspended load.
4.   Abide by the instructions of the crane rigger.
5.   Listen to the crane riggers. They will verbally instruct you to stay clear of crane operations.
     Evacuate the intended path of an approaching load and remain clear of overhead loads. Crane
     riggers may use whistles or bull horns to keep people away from suspended loads.
6.   Failure to comply with instructions from a crane rigger while the rigger is performing his/her
     job will result in disciplinary action.
The Crane Rigger is responsible for:
1.   Knowing the capacity of the crane and the weight of all loads being lifted.
2.   Selecting the proper equipment to attach a load.
3.   Inspecting all rigging equipment and taking any damaged equipment out of service before
     each use.
4.   Stopping a lift they suspect is unsafe.
5.   Verifying that the direction of the crane and the load motion is clear prior to signaling the
     crane to move.
6.   Controlling personnel access around suspended loads and loads about to be suspended. If
     circumstances interrupt a lift in progress, the crane crew shall set the load on the ground
     pending resumption of the job. If this is infeasible and a suspended load must remain
     stationary for a lengthy period of time, riggers must barricade the area and post attendants.
7.   Not directing loads over people in the area.
8.   Verifying that the hook is directly over the load to be lifted.
9.   Check the entire area surrounding the travel path to make sure no obstacles are present.
10. The crane rigger shall not engage in any practice that will divert his attention while actually
    engaged in supporting crane operations.
11. Whenever there is any doubt as to the safety, the rigger shall consult with the crane operator or
    the supervisor before handling the load.
12. When attaching a load the hook shall be positioned over the load in a manner to prevent
    swinging (no side loading).
13. Failure of riggers to abide by these responsibilities will result in disciplinary action.




                                                    24
General Shipyard Vehicles
1.   Obey all traffic signs and the standard rules of the road. The Ingalls Shipbuilding speed limits
     are:
         Pascagoula Facility:             15 mph and 5 mph in production areas
         Avondale Facility:               10 mph and 5 mph in production areas
         Gulfport Facility:               5 mph
2.   To ensure pedestrian safety, Ingalls Shipbuilding prohibits vehicle, including bicycle,
     operation during shift change:
         Pascagoula Facility:        5:30 a.m. to 5:45 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.
         Avondale Facility:          4:30 p.m. to 4:40 p.m.
3.   Drivers and operators must use seat belts or shoulder harnesses in vehicles so equipped.
4.   Employees may not drive unauthorized passenger vehicles into shops or other covered
     worksites.
5.   Pedal and motorbike operators must wear high visibility reflective vests. Motorbike operators
     must also wear DOT approved head protection.
6.   Commercial drivers must possess a valid Commercial Driver’s License.
7.   Never park or store material within four feet of crane/railroad tracks.
8.   Except for recharging emergency vehicles, never leave the engine running on unattended
     motor vehicles.

Tool and Machine Guards and Safety Devices
1.   Machinery whose point of operation or
     other mechanism creates pinch points or
     similar hazards must be designed,
     constructed and operated to minimize
     employee exposure to these hazards.
     These safety measures include:
         Guards and barriers
         Presence-sensing devices, such as
          limit switches and laser light
          curtains
         Two-hand trip mechanisms
2.   Never remove or alter a guard or safety
     device. If equipment comes with a guard,
     then you must use it with the guard in place and intact.
3.   Never disable a safety device or override a normal operating control switch, lever or
     pushbutton.
4.   Portable electric tools must be suitably grounded or double insulated.
5.   Continuous run controls on hand-held electric tools must be disabled before these tools are
     placed into service.




                                                 25
Airless Spray Painting
1.   Fluid Injection Hazard
     Airless spray equipment generates very high fluid pressure. Spray from the gun, leaks, or
     ruptured components can inject fluid through the skin and into your body and cause extremely
     serious bodily injury, including the need for amputation. Also, fluid or splashed into the eyes
     or onto the skin can cause serious damage.
         Never point the spray gun at anyone or at any part of the body.
         Never put hand or fingers over the spray tip.
         Always have the tip guard in place on the spray gun when spraying.
         Always follow the pressure relief procedure before cleaning or removing the spray tip or
          servicing any system equipment.
         Never try to stop or deflect leaks with your hand or body.
         Be sure equipment safety devices are operating properly before each use.
2.   Spray Gun Safety Devices
     Be sure all gun safety devices are operating properly before each use. Do not remove or
     modify any part of the gun; this can cause a malfunction and result in serious bodily injury.

         Safety Latch
          Whenever you stop spraying, even for a moment, always engage the gun safety latch in
          the closed or ON SAFE position, making the gun inoperative. Failure to engage the
          safety latch can result in accidental triggering of the gun.

         Diffuser
          The gun diffuser breaks up spray and reduces the risk of fluid injection when the tip is
          not installed.
          o     Check diffuser operation regularly. Follow the pressure relief process, and then
                remove the spray tip.
          o     Aim the gun into a grounded metal pail, holding the gun firmly to the pail.
          o     Using the lowest possible pressure, trigger the gun. If the fluid emitted is not
                diffused into an irregular stream, replace the diffuser immediately.

         Tip Guard
          Always have the tip guard in place on the spray gun while spraying. The tip guard alerts
          you to the fluid injection hazard and helps reduce, but does not prevent, the risk of
          accidentally placing your fingers or any part of the body close to the spray tip.

         Trigger Guard
          Never operate the gun with the trigger guard removed. The trigger guard reduces the risk
          of accidentally triggering the gun if it is dropped or bumped.
3.   Spray Tip Safety
     Use extreme caution when cleaning or changing spray tips. If the spray tip clogs while
     spraying, engage the gun safety latch immediately. Always follow the pressure relief
     procedure, below, and then remove the spray tip to clean it. Never wipe off build-up around
     the spray tip until pressure is fully relieved and the gun safety latch is engaged.
4.   Pressure Relief Procedure
     To reduce the risk of serious bodily injury, including fluid injection, splashing in the eyes or
     on the skin; or injury from moving parts, always follow this procedure whenever you shut off
     the spray equipment, when checking or servicing any part of the spray system, when installing,
     cleaning, or servicing any part of the spray system, when installing, cleaning or changing
     spray tips, and whenever you stop spraying.
          Engage the gun safety latch

                                                26
         Shut off the power supply to the pump and close any bleed-type master air valves in the
          air supply.
         Disengage the gun safety latch.
         Hold a metal part of the gun firmly to the side of a grounded metal pail, and trigger the
          gun into the pail to relieve pressure.
         Engage the gun safety latch.
         Open the pump fluid drain valve, having a container ready to catch the drainage.
         Leave the drain valve open until you are ready to spray again.
         If you suspect that the spray tip or hose is completely clogged, or that pressure has not
          been fully relieved after following the steps above, very slowly loosen the tip guard
          retaining nut or hose end coupling andrelieve pressure gradually, then loosen completely.
          Now clear the tip or hose.
Manual Tools and Equipment
1.   Never use homemade tools or defective equipment. Inspect all tools before you use them.
     Replace tools with split handles, cracked housings, mushroomed hammerheads and sprung or
     expanded hooks.
2.   Use tools for their intended purposes. For instance, never use a screwdriver as a punch or pry
     bar.
3.   Hooks must be equipped with a safety latch to prevent accidental load disengagement.
4.   Do not tip-load hooks. Always position the load squarely in the throat of the hook.
5.   Do not try to make a tool do more than it can handle. Never use a “cheater” pipe or bar to
     generate more force on wrenches, ratchet handles or come-alongs.
Welding and Burning
1.   Always check the opposite side of the surface before beginning hot work.
2.   Always inspect torches and torch hoses for tightness. Ensure that connections are wrench tight.
3.   Never use oil or grease on torches or oxygen hoses or fittings.
4.   Only authorized employees may repair welding or burning equipment. Return defective
     equipment to the tool room.
5.   Supervision must ensure that torch hoses undergo leakage tests at least every 45 days.
6.   Control your torch lines and minimize the possible explosive effects of oxygen and fuel gas
     leaks by:
         Never leaving an unattended torch in a confined space
         Never leaving an unattended torch in an enclosed space for more than 15 minutes
         Disconnecting the hoses at the manifold and storing them in the open air at the end of the
          shift and during extended absences for the jobsite. Insert the caps on unused manifold
          headers.
7.   All welding shield gas must be equipped with a flow meter at the manifold.
         Use the flow meter to test the line for leakage at the start of shift and periodically
          throughout the day.
         Disconnect the flow meter from the manifold at the end of the shift and cap the manifold
          header.
8.   Do not leave electrodes in unattended electrode holders.
9.   Ensure that welding lines and grips on electrode holders are fully insulated to prevent
     electrical shock.


                                                 27
10. Follow the instructions listed on the OSHA 74 Log of Inspection, the Marine Chemist
    Certificate and the Facilities Hot Work Permit. Observe all posted hot work restrictions.
11. Know the location of firefighting equipment before starting hot work.
12. Ensure that welding equipment is adequately grounded before energizing it.
13. All welding shield gas hoses and torch hoses must have durable tags bearing the badge number
    of the person responsible for that equipment.
         Always check the tag to ensure that the torch actually belongs to you before plugging the
          gas and oxygen hoses into the manifold.
         Never use a line that is assigned to another employee.

Compressed Air and Gases
1.   Each type of manifold is fitted so that it will only connect to a hose intended to carry the
     identical substance. In other words, you cannot accidentally plug an argon hose into an air
     manifold or vice versa. Never modify or field-engineer any pipe or hose equipment since this
     could create serious hazards. Ingalls Shipbuilding only authorizes trained Maintenance
     technicians to work on these systems.
2.   All manifolds and cylinders must bear labels identifying their contents.
3.   Use compresses air and oxygen only for their intended purposes. For example, using
     pressurized air or oxygen to clean clothing or your body may:
         Embed particles in your pores or eyes or…
         Saturate your clothing with concentrated oxygen that can easily ignite and sustain
          combustion.
4.   Never use oxygen for ventilation.
5.   Install fuel gas and oxygen manifolds in the open air, not in confined or enclosed spaces.
     Maintain unobstructed access to the manifolds.
6.   Never use torches as makeshift heaters.
7.   If a production process requires using compressed air for cleaning, the nozzle must be
     equipped with a reducer and chip guard that will decrease the discharge to less than 30 p.s.i.
8.   When storing compressed gases, separate flammable gases and oxygen by a solid partition or a
     20 foot interval.
9.   Always insert caps on unused manifold headers and secure valve protection caps on unused
     cylinders.
10. Set acetylene and other fuel gas cylinders in the upright position.
11. If not stored in a rack, always secure upright cylinders with a chain or strap.
Illumination
1.   Only use portable lights that are in good condition. A single drop light or flashlight does not
     constitute proper illumination of a confined or semi-confined space.
2.   Only use explosion proof or intrinsically safe lights approved for use in Class 1 Group D
     atmosphere to work in potentially flammable or explosive environments.
3.   Never remove broken light bulbs from lighting fixtures. If replacements are required, notify a
     qualified electrician.
4.   Always keep light extensions out of water.



                                                  28
5.   Never attempt to change the bulb in an explosion proof light. Bring the light to qualified
     electricians so that they can correctly reassemble and torque the globe to specifications.
6.   Do not suspend temporary lights by their electrical cords unless cords and lights have been
     designed for such use.
7.   Keep electrical cords clear of working surfaces and walkways or other locations where they
     would be readily exposed to damage.
8.   Never enter a darkened area without a suitable light. The use of matches and open flame
     lights is prohibited.
9. Temporary lights shall have approved guards covering the bulbs at all times.
10. In the event electrical power is lost and the lights go out, stop what you’re doing and stay
    where you are until help arrives.
Blowers and Ventilation
1.   Ignitable vapors must be removed from work spaces by grounded explosion proof exhaust
     ventilation. Air movers and ducts shall be electrically grounded in areas where flammable
     liquids are used or stored, as with painting and gas freeing operations.
2.   Confined spaces must have mechanical ventilation before employees enter them.
3.   Air hoses and/or air rings are not suitable ventilation.
4.   Only designated employees may repair, dismantle, energize or de-energize ventilation.
5.   Always exhaust contaminants to the outside open air away from ignition sources or work
     areas.
6.   Never remove ventilation ducts from their assigned locations unless approved by supervision.
7.   Do not cut holes in ventilation ducts.
8.   Hot work in confined and enclosed ventilation requires, at minimum, forced air mechanical
     ventilation to reduce airborne concentrations.

Walking and Working Surfaces
General Rules
1.   Keep all aisles, passageways, stairs, ladders and other working surfaces clear of lines, tools,
     material and debris. Except when prevented by the vessel’s configuration, all temporary
     working surfaces must have a clear width of at least 20 inches.
2.   Permanent aisles in shops and warehouses must be clearly marked and unobstructed.
3.   Working platforms more than five feet high must have suitable guardrails to keep employees
     from falling to the level below. If installing guardrails is infeasible, employees must use
     personal fall arrest systems.
4.   All floor and deck openings through which a person or any part of a person can pass must be
     securely covered or guarded.
5.   When employees must work in vessel bilges, Ships Management shall ensure that the crafts
     remove the minimum number of deck plates to perform the work, and that either:
        An adequately secured 20-inch wide temporary platform replaces the missing deck
         plates, or…
        A barricade with “CAUTION” tape or a human attendant is present to alert passersby.



                                                  29
Ladders
1.   Never use a metal ladder while working on or near any electrical system or while using
     electrical tools.
2.   Never use unstable or damaged ladders. Report damaged ladders immediately to your
     supervisor.
3.   When positioning a straight ladder, put the base approximately one quarter the length of the
     vertical height to the top of the supporting structure.
4.   Be sure that the ladder extends at least three feet above the landing.
5.   Secure the top of straight ladders and extension ladders to a firm support to prevent
     unexpected movement. Set up step ladders so that the side braces are extended, and all four
     legs contact the surface.
6.   Use barricades when using ladders in traffic aisles.
7.   Do not place ladders where they can be accidentally struck, such as the opposite side of exit
     doors.
8.   Be sure to block or lock the wheels on rolling stands or
     mobile platforms.                                                    INGALLS SHIPBUILDING
9.   As you climb the ladder:
                                                                         Carpenter
         Face toward the ladder and use both hands when                  SCAFFOLD COMPLETE
          climbing up or down.                                               READY FOR USE
         Carry all tools in tool holders or use rope to raise and
          lower equipment.
         Never lean around and outside the ladder rails.                          DO
         Stand no higher than the third rung from the top. Never                  NOT
          stand on the ladder’s first or second rung.                             ALTER
Scaffolds
1.   Ingalls Shipbuilding only authorizes trained Scaffold                    ANY PROBLEMS WITH
                                                                                  SCAFFOLD:
     Competent Persons to erect, alter or dismantle scaffolds and              PULL TAG
     temporary staging. Never attempt to build your own                        TURN TAG AROUND
     scaffold or modify existing scaffolds except for simple                   PUT IN HOLDER
     maintenance adjustments, such as:
         Restoring the tension on wire rope guardrails by
          tightening turnbuckles so that the bolt threads extend
                                                                          INGALLS SHIPBUILDNG
          past the nut.
         Tightening loosened connections on temporary access

                                                                          DANGER
          ladders
2.   Ingalls Shipbuilding implements a tagging system to advise

                                                                            DO
     you when the scaffold is ready to use and alert you when it
     is not. The tags are color-coded, with the “GO” side green
     and the “STOP” side red. Never climb onto scaffold bearing

                                                                            NOT
     a red “DANGER” placard or that has no tag. You will find
     these tags at the access points to the staging.
3.   Even if the scaffold is “green-tagged” always inspect the
     scaffold before you begin the job. Make sure that the                  USE
     structure meets these requirements:
          Guardrails must consist of a top rail between 45 and 42
           inches high with a mid-rail one-half the height between
           the upper rail and the working/walking surface. Ensure
           that:
                                                  30
         Wire rope guardrails are taut.
         Turnbuckle bolts are fully engaged and protrude past the nut ends
         Cable eye clamps are tight
       Platforms are at least 20 inches wide
       Walking/working platforms are banded or otherwise secured to the supporting structure
       Walking/working platforms are intact and not cracked, splintered or excessively charred
       Access ladders are secured to prevent slippage
       The scaffold includes all bracing and reinforcing members
       Locking pins, bolts and nuts are in place and fully engaged
4.   Wooden scaffold boards must be OSHA-approved fire-retardant planking.
5.   Access ladders must be installed so that employees do not have to step any more than one foot
     onto a platform.
6.   Never attempt to move a rolling tubular scaffold while someone is atop the platform.
7.   Always lock the casters before mounting a rolling scaffold.
8.   Employees who must use a powered adjustable scaffold, such as Spider®, must receive
     specialized training in its correct operation.
9.   Staging must include toeboards where tools or equipment may accidentally fall and strike
     workers below.
10. Except for jobs of brief duration, workers whose vision is impaired by PPE, such as welding
    shields or paint or blast hoods, must work from scaffolds instead of ladders.
11. All employees working at more than a five feet elevation must have fall protection. If the
    structure lacks permanent railing, then it must have temporary guard-railing. Should temporary
    staging be infeasible, employees must use personal fall arrest systems.
12. Never use defective scaffolding. Report all deficient or suspect staging to your supervisor or
    the Scaffold Department.

Electrical Safety
As a source of power, we accept electricity without much thought to the hazards that it may present.
Perhaps because it has become such a familiar part of our surroundings, we often fail to give it the
respect it deserves.
1.   Ingalls Shipbuilding only permits authorized electricians and electrical technicians to repair
     and service electrical equipment.
2.   Never splice, tap into or otherwise modify electrical equipment to accommodate work tools,
     household appliances, makeshift heating or cooking devices or any type of unapproved
     apparatus.
3.   Assume that all electrical wires, conductors, and equipment are energized until positively
     determined otherwise.
4.   Electrically powered tools and equipment must be adequately grounded.
5.   Do not store material in switchboards or other electrical cabinets.
6.   Do not store material in such a manner that blocks access to switchboxes or switchboards.

7.   All switches and valves must be opened and closed by authorized persons only, and this
     authorization requires full knowledge concerning the lines and/or circuits affected. All main
     circuit switches must be properly labeled, identifying the locations affected by the switch.



                                                 31
8.   When opening or closing electrical safety switches, use your left hand, stand to the right side
     of the switchbox, and turn your head facing away from the switchbox. When activating
     circuits, stand clear of the switchbox to avoid possible sudden flash.
9.   All light streamers and electrical tools shall be equipped with three conductor cords. Do not
     use equipment without a ground conductor unless the tool is double insulated. Homemade pig
     tail electric cords are prohibited.
10. Do not bring personal electrical equipment or tools into the plant.
11. Frequently inspect portable power tools for worn or damaged electrical cords.
12. Keep electrical cords clean and free of kinks.
13. Make sure the insulation on electrical cord is in good condition.
14. Do not drag electrical cords over hot or rough surfaces. Keep electrical cords free of grease
    and oil.
15. Prior to working around unshielded 4160 volt cables in wireways, all crafts must complete a
    work permit through a Qualified Person. This procedure must be in writing and cover:
        A detailed description of the task and the process to complete it
        A description of the safe work practices selected to complete the task
        A list of the PPE required to safely perform the task
        A determination of the prescribed shock/arc protection boundaries
        A determination as to whether the task requires standby personnel
        A determination as to what, if any, emergency response equipment is required on site
        A determination of the measures necessary to protect the cable(s).
     The Qualified Person must sign the wireway work permit and post it throughout the course of
     the task. Upon job completion the Qualified Person must inspect the wireway to ensure that
     the cable(s) is undamaged, then remove and file the work permit.

Housekeeping and Shipkeeping
1.   Although Ingalls Shipbuilding does have shipboard cleaning crews, each employee is
     responsible for cleaning up and properly disposing of the debris that he or she generates,
     including:
         Food wrappers, beverage containers and food scraps
         Job supplies, such as welding rod stubs, used grinding wheels and paint sticks
2.   Much of the waste must be segregated for proper disposal, so place each type of waste in its
     designated receptacle. For instance, do not throw cardboard into a scrap metal bin.
3.   Remove all combustible materials out of the way of hot work and other ignition sources.
4.   Lines and hoses on decks and floors present major tripping and falling hazards. Always try to
     route them overhead or in some manner so that they do not cross aisles, passageways,
     stairways and ladder rungs. To do this use:
          Tree racks and overhead “deer stands”
          “J” hooks and “S” hooks
          Rope and tie-wraps
5.   If you must run lines on the ground, use crossover plates or other devices to lessen the hazard
     and protect the line from damage.
6.   Do not feed stray or feral animals that make their way into the Yard.
7.   Use only designated restrooms to emit body waste. Ingalls Shipbuilding will terminate the
     employment of anyone who violates this rule.
                                                32
Safety Rules for Specific Operations
Painting and Abrasive Blasting
1.   Supervisors of painting operations must post the appropriate warning signs before starting the
     job and remove them after the space has been cleared to resume normal status.
2.   Supervisors of paint mixing and chemical handling operations must arrange to provide
     emergency eye wash and flushing equipment before starting the job.
3.   Food, beverages, using tobacco products and applying cosmetics are prohibited in painting,
     abrasive blasting and chemical handling worksites.
Excavations

1.   To prevent cave-in and employee engulfment, trenches more that five feet deep must have
     either:
         Structural reinforcements along the sidewalls or…
         A sloped sidewall
2.   Supervisors must ensure that the excavation has a ladder or other suitable means for occupants
     to safely exit the trench.
Work on Lifeboats
Supervision must ensure that a suspended lifeboat is secured independent of its releasing gear
before permitting employees to work in it.
Radiation
1.   Radioactive Materials and other sources of ionizing
     include radioactive materials, and equipment that
     produce x-rays. All aspects of ionizing radiation
     sources within the Business Unit, from acquisition,
     to possession, use, storage, and final disposition
     (including transfer, surplus or disposal) require
     specific authorization of the designated site or
     Business Unit Radiation Safety Officer (RSO).
     Direct all questions or concerns about radiation to
     the designated RSO.
2.   Only specially trained and authorized personnel may
     work with ionizing radiation sources.
3.   These certified employees must follow applicable
     operating procedures, use all required protective
     equipment, and wear film badges or dosimeters.
4.   Operations involving sources which might create
     high radiation levels or cause contamination will be confined to specifically restricted areas.
5.   Unauthorized personnel must stay out of these restricted areas. If access is required, request
     permission to enter from the RSO, supervisor or person in charge of that area.
6.   While inside a restricted area, visitors shall comply with all applicable procedures, including
     (if necessary) being escorted and wearing a film badge or dosimeter for radiation monitoring.
7.   Restricted areas must post warning signs.
8.   Do not test ship’s radar system until all employees are removed to the minimum specified safe
     distance.


                                                 33
Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)
Lockout and tagout procedures exist for everyone’s safety,
including persons who service and maintain equipment and
machinery, those who operate equipment and machinery and even
innocent passersby who normally have nothing to do with the
equipment that is being serviced.
Simply stated, it takes all of us to control possible hazardous
energy sources, such as electricity and hydraulic pressure to
prevent injury to ourselves or colleagues. To ensure that the
program works successfully, employees who are authorized to
apply locks and tags must follow the necessary procedures to
ensure that machines and equipment are isolated from all
potentially hazardous energy and freed of all stored energy.
Equally important, all other workers must understand the urgent
need to recognize and observe lockout and tagout policies.
1.   All employees who may become susceptible to the
     unexpected release of hazardous energy while performing
     service and maintenance must receive formal and field
     training in implementing lockout/tagout. This includes not
     only Maintenance and Facilities technicians but all workers,
     regardless of craft who may be exposed to this hazard in the
     course of repairing, servicing, installing, modifying or inspecting equipment. Among other
     things, the training must cover:
          The sequences for applying and removing lockout/tagout devices
          The methods to identify hazardous energy sources
          The methods to isolate hazardous energy
          The methods to ensure a “zero energy state” before beginning work
2.   Only authorized persons may implement lockout/tagout procedures.
3.   Only the person who applied the lockout/tagout device may remove it.
4.   Designated lockout/tagout devices may only be used to control the release on hazardous
     energy.
5.   Never, under any circumstances, remove or attempt to defeat a lockout/tagout device.
6.   Each authorized employee must have an adequate number of lockout/tagout devices to apply
     to all hazardous energy sources.
7.   If more than one employee is working on an installation, each must affix his or her
     lockout/tagout device to the machine’s energy isolating device.
8.   When applicable, Ingalls Shipbuilding personnel, contractors and ship’s force must advise
     each other of their respective lockout/tagout procedures and coordinate implementation.

Ergonomics
Ingalls Shipbuilding is in the midst of a major initiative to reduce work-related sprains and strains
within its workforce. Ergonomics is simply fitting the job to the employee instead having the
employee adapt to the job. This offers great challenges in shipyard employment; however, the
Company continues to explore work station and tool design, PPE and other controls to reduce the
instances of awkward postures and lessen fatigue from repetitive motion. Among the things to
consider in safeguarding against sprains and strains are:




                                                 34
Manual Lifting
1.   Avoid twisting and turning at the waist. Pivot your feet, face the direction of travel and then
     proceed.
2.   When possible set up your work station or store heavier objects parallel to the “safe zone”
     between your knees and chest to eliminate or minimize bending at the waist.
3.   Observe the Ingalls Shipbuilding personal load limit of 50 pounds. If the object is too heavy,
     get help.
4.   When possible avoid lifting heavy or cumbersome loads altogether. Use mechanical aids such
     as cranes, jib hoists and lift trucks.
5.   If you must manually lift the object:
         Bend at the knees, not the waist
         Avoid overreaching. If possible, slide the object; when sliding the object down, straddle
          the corner so that your knees are out of the way.
         Keep the object close to your body.
         Keep your shoulders aligned over your hips.
         Avoid twisting. Take a wide stance; pivot with your feet; keep your shoulders and hips in
          alignment.
Hand Tools
1.   Avoid working in an awkward position when using any hand tool.
2.   The hand and the forearm should remain in alignment during tool use.
3.   Use pistol grips handles as follows:
         Vertical surfaces where the tool is used at elbow height.
         Horizontal surfaces where the tool is used below the waist.
4.   Use straight handles as follows:
         Vertical surfaces below waist height.
         Horizontal surfaces elbow height.
5.   The tool should not dig into the palm or the area between the thumb and index finger.
Video Display Terminals
Proper arrangement of your computer work area and maintaining a neutral body posture can help
minimize problems associated with computer use.
1.   Reorganize materials, keeping frequently used items within easy reach
2.   When sitting in the chair:
       Use the armrests provided.
       Keep your feet flat on floor
       Make sure the backrest supports lower back.
3.   When using the keyboard:
       Keep hands in a neutral position in line with your forearms.
       Place keyboard just below elbow height.
       Keep arm at 90˚ angle.
4.   When using the mouse:
       Position to right or left of keyboard.
       Keep keyboard and mouse at same level to prevent lifting of arm to operate mouse.
       Keep wrist in a neutral position.


                                                  35
5.   A properly set monitor is important for relieving stress:
         Ensure the top of the screen is at eye level or just below.
         Keep screen 20 inches or more from the eyes.
         Position monitor to minimize glare and reflections.

Office Safety
1.   Be sure that aisles and exits are kept clear; do not extend telephone lines, coaxial cables, or
     extension cords across passageways.

2.   Keep paper clips, thumbtacks, pins, and other small objects off the floor.

3.   Only use proper step ladders or step stands. Do not climb on chairs, overturned wastepaper
     baskets or other items not designed for climbing.

4.   Be alert when you or anyone carries hot or cold drinks. Place lids on containers and clean up
     all spills immediately.

5.   Cabinet and desk drawers can easily cause injuries:
        When not in use, keep all drawers closed. Upper drawers can cause bump injuries to your
         head and bottom drawers can cause tripping.
        Prevent tipovers by loading bottom drawer of file cabinet first, loading heavier materials
         in bottom drawers. Also, never overload top file drawers or open more than one drawer at
         a time.
        Report broken or damaged furniture to your supervisor as soon as you are aware that
         damage has occurred. See that it is removed from the work area or ensure that no one can
         use it.
        Keep X-acto knives, scissors, razor blades, and other sharp or pointed instruments
         properly covered and stored when not in use.

6.   Avoid storing heavy or loose items on top of cabinets.

7.   Tilting of chairs is dangerous because a backward fall may result.

8.   Correct sitting position and good posture prevent accidents as well as fatigue.

9.   Open and close doors cautiously and use caution at blind hallway intersections.

10. All household-type appliances must bear a UL approval stamp. Portable space heaters must be
    equipped with an automatic tipover shut-off control.




                                                  36
Hazard Communication
This section has been prepared to increase the safety of our employees by assisting them in
identifying, understanding, and working properly with hazardous chemicals and other substances
used in the shipyard.
Why Should You be Aware of Chemical Hazards?
Many of the chemicals to which workers are exposed can be potential health hazards if they are
handled improperly. Some chemicals are potential causes of fire or explosion, while others may
directly affect workers who misuse them.
To prevent these hazards, chemicals and other substances must be properly stored and properly
used.
How Can a Chemical be Determined to be Hazardous?
Chemical manufacturers and distributors are responsible for determining the potential problems a
chemical may pose to individuals or to the environment. This information must be provided to users
of the substance, and must be posted on each container for permanent information. Ingalls
Shipbuilding relies on this information in efforts to protect employees who utilize particular
chemicals in their daily work.
How Do You Get Needed Information on a Particular Chemical?
1.   Container Labels. To guard your safety, each container of hazardous chemicals is labeled
     with information and warnings.
2.   Material Safety Data Sheets. These documents, available through your supervisor, describe
     the potential hazards of chemicals you may be using, as well as indicate proper methods of
     safe handling of the chemicals.
3.   Employee Field Training and Weekly Safety Training Modules (Safety Briefings). These
     sessions inform employees of the possible hazards certain chemicals may present to
     employees using the chemicals and to employees who may be working in an area where
     chemicals are present.
4.   Warning Signs in Shops and Other Areas.
Container Labels
1.   Containers in the shipyard must bear labels
     that identify the product inside and warn of
     potential hazardous properties.
2.   Any material transferred from its shipping
     container must have a temporary Hazardous
     Material Index Service (HMIS) or NFPA
     “diamond” label affixed to its new container.
     To fill out the label:
          Write the name of the material
          Transcribe       the  hazard     ratings
           information from the label the shipping
           container or the Material Safety Data
           Sheet




                                                37
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
The Material Safety Data Sheet is often called the key to Hazard Communication. It is your
reference to the hazards related to the chemical you are working with. This is where you can find
important information such as personal protective equipment and for a chemical or product that you
use on the job.
Do you know the correct chemical name of the chemical or product you are working with? Do you
know the hazards associated with this chemical? How can this product or chemical that you are
working with affect you? Will its effects be induced by inhalation, ingestion, or by contact with
your skin? If you are overexposed to this product, do you know the signs and symptoms that you
should be looking for?
By familiarizing yourself with the specific MSDS’s for the materials that you use on the job, you
will be better prepared to protect yourself from the dangers they present.
The MSDS by Section
Suppliers Information tells you the product’s name, its manufacturer and the company’s address.
You must know the correct chemical name of the product that you are working with so that proper
medical treatment can be given if needed.
Hazardous Ingredients lists the harmful components of the chemical and identifies how much of it
is in the product. This section also shows harmful exposure concentrations, including OSHA’s
Permissible Exposure Limits (PELS).
Physical/Chemical Characteristics informs you about the material’s appearance and conditions
that will change the chemical’s form.
Fire and Explosion Hazard Data reveals if a material is flammable and what to use to extinguish
the fire.
Reactivity Data advises you about what may happen if the product is mixed with air, water, or
other chemicals. This section also tells you what to keep the product away from.
Health Hazard Data informs you how the substance may enter your body - whether it is by
inhalation, ingestion, or absorption. This part also reveals the acute (short-term) and/or chronic
(long-term) health effects.
Precautions for Safe Handling and Use gives information on what to do if the chemical
spills/leaks or is released into the air.
Control Measures identifies the types of protective clothing and equipment to use when working
with the chemical.
1.   All products containing hazardous ingredients must include an MSDS when received at the
     warehouse and in the field.
2.   Field supervision must be able to produce MSDS’s for products containing hazardous
     ingredients promptly.
3.   Supervisors must review an MSDS with their employees when the product is introduced in the
     field and annually thereafter.
4.   The Safety Department maintains a master file of MSDS’s on site.
5.   All employees have the RIGHT TO KNOW about the products that they use at work and the
     right to request a copy of a product MSDS.




                                               38
Protection from Chemical Hazards
You can prevent accidental exposure to hazardous chemicals or substances by following these basic
procedures:
1. Work Safely. Obey all safety rules; don’t take short cuts when storing, handling, or using
   hazardous chemicals.
2. Be Informed. Don’t take training lightly; learn to use available information for your own
   protection.
3. Use Protective Equipment. Use approved protective clothing and equipment that fit properly.
   Replace defective or damaged equipment.
4. Learn Emergency Procedures. Learn where to find and how to use first aid equipment,
   eyewash equipment, and respiratory equipment. Learn proper methods to notify your fellow
   employees of potential problems and safety procedures.
Summary
This Hazard Communications Program is designed to assist you in ensuring safe work habits when
dealing with hazardous chemicals and substances.
Ingalls Shipbuilding and you as an employee are responsible for ensuring the safe use of hazardous
chemicals and substances. Ingalls Shipbuilding provides the information you need to work safely
with these materials. You should know about the potential effects of hazardous chemicals and
substances and how to assure that you and your fellow workers use them safely.
We all must be aware of potential hazards of chemicals and substances we use in the shipyard...we
must use information provided to us concerning these hazards...and we must always use proper
procedures for handling and storing hazardous chemicals and substances. If you need information
about hazardous chemicals or substances, ask your supervisor or the Safety Representative in your
work area. They will be glad to help you.

Environmental Awareness
Material and Product Spills
1.   Prevent any materials and products from spilling on the ground, drain, or into the water.
2.   Drip pans or secondary containment must be used when working with liquids or when mixing
     products.
3.   Siphoning is prohibited. NO SIPHONING HOSES! Pumps and gravity flow drum racks must
     be used.
4.   Material containers must never be overfilled. Leave sufficient room for material expansion. 7”
     to 9” is recommended for drums.
5.   Know where the spill cleanup material is located (ex. Absorbent pads, socks, etc.).
6.   Leaking equipment and vehicles must be fixed immediately! Employees should stop the
     equipment and contact maintenance.




                                                39
Spill Reporting Procedures
1.   Everyone is responsible for reporting spills.

2.   To report a spill, call extension 911 on shipyard phones.

3.   The following information should be provided by the caller to 911 dispatcher:
         Location
         Identification (caller and material)
         Has it entered the water or storm drain?

Good Environmental Practices for Water – Do Not Dump Into:

1.   Surface Waters – Many pollutants can damage the living species in the rivers and gulf.

2.   Storm Drains – All storm drains lead to surface water NOT TO TREATMENT PLANTS.

3.   Sinks and Toilets – Dumping pollutants may disrupt treatment, will result in pollutants getting
     into the environment, and is illegal.

4.   Facility Grounds – Dumping pollutants onto the ground will result in the contamination of the
     soil and storm water.

Good Environmental Practices for Air – Put a Lid on It!

1.   Paints, thinners, solvents, degreasers, adhesives, sealant, etc. are just a few of the chemicals
     that emit vapors called Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC’s) into the atmosphere. VOC’s
     contribute to formation of smog in the atmosphere.

2.   There are simple and effective ways to prevent VOC emissions:
         Keep lids on containers when you are not using the material.
         Make sure funnels are locked.
         Keep equipment covers closed.
         Do not leave brushes, rollers, etc. in solvent containers.

Inspections, Fines and Penalties

1.   Ingalls Shipbuilding is open to inspection by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA –
     Federal), and Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ – State).

2.   EPA and DEQ can issue fines and penalties up to $27,500 per day, per violation.

3.   A container that is missing a lid, has no label or leaking, can cost your company per violation.

              Please do your part in following environmental practices!




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