Docstoc

Credit_Scoring_Webinar_PPT

Document Sample
Credit_Scoring_Webinar_PPT Powered By Docstoc
					         What You Need To Know: 
               How The New
Credit Rules And Disclosures Will Affect You



                                       Have the 
                                    Understanding 
                                    Credit Reports 
                                     1.4.2 lesson 
                                    plan available 
                                     to reference
By Educators…for Educators

“Provide educators with no‐cost curriculum materials and the 
  skills and confidence to effectively teach family finance”

FEFE principles:
• Support staff
• Professional development opportunities 
• Free, up‐to‐date, research‐based curriculum
• By educators…for educators
                                        Today’s webinar in 
                                        collaboration with
   Credit Unit 4.0
8 Lesson Plans available 

   Understanding 
 Credit Reports 1.4.2



       Shelly Stanton – Business Educator
          FEFE National Master Educator
     News Headline Activity
• To introduce the concept of credit history
• Prompts thinking about what participants 
  may have seen in the media relating to 
  credit reports and scores
• Allows a safe area for learners to 
  communicate initial thoughts and learn 
  others’ ideas

                            Anticipatory set option 2
                        Found on page 6 of the lesson plan
News Headline Activity Video
               News Headline 
                  Recap
• Introduces the topic and creates connections for 
  learners
• Initiates discussion and ownership in learning 
  related to the topic of credit
• Compares and contrasts perceptions and opinions 
  amongst a classroom 
• Evaluates media as a reliable form of information

 Sample articles are available on the FEFE website, Credit 
                  Scoring Webinar page
How the New Credit Score Disclosures  
       Rules Will Affect You
                 Prof. Michael Staten
       Director, Take Charge America Institute
   Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences




              September 29, 2011
                    Concepts for Today

• Reminder:  A good credit score is more important than ever  
• Quick primer on scoring:  what is a credit score, how is it 
  used
• Consumers have more than one credit score
   – Why?
   – What is the most important thing for consumers to keep in mind 
     when interpreting their score?

• New regulations mean that consumers will see more score 
  disclosures than in the past, and from different score 
  providers.
• As a result, financial educators need to know more about 
  credit scores than ever before to be prepared to answer 
  questions
     A Good Credit Score is More Important
            Now Than Ever Before

• Lenders are backing away from higher‐risk applicants
   – Higher downpayment and higher qualifying scores for mortgages
   – Tougher to get credit cards, especially for young people and others 
     with limited credit history


• Risk‐based pricing means a low credit score will cost you 
  money – possibly big money
   – Lenders typically will not quote an interest rate on your loan until 
     they’ve examined your credit report and credit score.  Then they 
     adjust the interest rate to your level of risk.
           Example of How Much a Low Score 
                     Can Cost You

Product:        30‐year, fixed rate mortgage,  $300,000 loan
            FICO Score       Interest Rate   Monthly 
                                             Payment

                760               5.9%        $1,787

                650               7.2%        $2,047
                590               9.3%        $2,500


Source:  Fair Isaac Co:  www.myfico.com
Interest rates as of mid 2010.
         A Good Credit Score is More Important
                Now Than Ever Before

•   Lenders are backing away from higher‐risk applicants
•   Risk‐based pricing means a low credit score will cost you money –
    possibly big money


• Credit scores have become an important screening tool for 
  many businesses other than lenders
     –   Insurance  (auto; homeowners; life)
     –   Apartment rentals
     –   Cell phone service providers
     –   Utilities  (electric, gas, water, cable)
     –   Employers
     –   Income estimator used by creditors to approve new accounts and 
         change credit lines
So, Your Credit Score is One of the Most 
Important Barometers of Your Financial 
    Health.  And, You Can Manage It
  This Begs a Question (or two):
– Do you understand how a credit score works?    

– Can you explain it to someone else?
To Understand Credit Scores, Let’s Spend a 
    Few Minutes in a Lender’s Shoes
Costs to Running a Visa or MasterCard Program
   Source of Bank Credit Card Company Expenses, 2006
           (Cross‐industry Total  = $87 billion)
                                  Fraud
                                   1%


                                                       Cost of Funds
      Marketing &                                          33%
      Operations
         38%




                                          Chargeoffs
                                            28%


   Source: Card Industry Director, 2007
    So, Lenders Try To Reduce Loan Losses By 
  Improving Risk Evaluation Before the Loan is 
         Made…  by Using Credit Scoring
• The Five “C”s of consumer lending:   lenders gather data on 
  the borrower to measure the following: 
   – Character  (Willing to repay? Demonstrated by past track record?)
   – Capacity   (Income?  Amount of debt already owed?)
   – Capital    (Savings?  Other financial assets?)
   – Collateral    (Downpayment, or asset to pledge against loan?)
   – Conditions    (How will economic climate influence repay risk?)

• Until the 1970s, most consumer loans were based on the  
  personal judgment of a loan officer  
   – No credit scores, just intuition and experience with the Five “C”s for 
     every borrower they’d ever dealt with
 The Loan Officer Noticed that the Past was a 
Guide to the Future.  Statistical Scoring Models 
          Are Built on the Same Idea
Premise:   The patterns observed in the past regarding 
   characteristics of accounts that pay as agreed (“good 
   accounts”) and accounts that pay late (“bad accounts”) will 
   be repeated in future loans.

• In effect, the scoring model automates the evaluation of the 
  first two “Cs”
   – Better for lenders than an army of loan officers to handle millions of 
     loan applications
       •   Cheaper
       •   Faster
       •   More accurate
       •   More consistent decisions
              How Scoring Models Work 

   What is the objective?    Reduce the “fog of uncertainty” 
    that surrounds a pool of loan applicants.
   – The lender wants to find and use easily observable 
     characteristics to sort (i.e., help to predict) the “good” 
     borrowers from the “bad” borrowers.   

• So, the design objective is to create a numerical index that:
   – Makes borrowers that will exhibit “good” behavior score 
     higher than borrowers that will exhibit “bad” behavior
   – Analogy:  Magazine self‐tests to measure how we score in 
     terms of:
       • Compatibility with spouse/partner
       • Type A personality
  A Hypothetical and Simple Scoring Model for a New 
      Loan Application:   4 Variables in the Model
Characteristic                    Possible Values            Our Applicant
Type of Housing                               Rent
                                        Lives with parents
                                              Owns
Household Income                        Less than $25,000
                                        >$25K but, < $50K
                                            > $50,000
# of accounts 60 days past due                  0
                                                1
                                                2
                                            3 or more
Number of bankcards                             0
                                              1 ‐ 2
                                           3 or more
  A Hypothetical and Simple Scoring Model for a New 
   Loan Application:  Points for each Variable Value
Characteristic                    Possible Values            Assigned Points
Type of Housing                               Rent                 0
                                        Lives with parents         15
                                              Owns                 38
Household Income                        Less than $25,000          7
                                        >$25K but, < $50K          35
                                            > $50,000              61
# of accounts 60 days past due                  0                 120
                                                1                  34
                                                2                  13
                                            3 or more              0
Number of bankcards                             0                  0
                                              1 ‐ 2                37
                                           3 or more               20
Minimum possible score = 7        Maximum score = 256
  Emergence of Credit Scores as a Commercial 
                  Product 

• During the 1970s and 1980s, most large national lenders 
  invested in developing proprietary, custom‐built models to 
  process loan applications
   – These models use data from credit reports AND information that the 
     borrower provides on the loan application
   – Many of these custom scoring models are still being used today by 
     large lenders


• 1980s:  A new idea is born: build a model that only uses 
  credit report data
   – Developers found such a model could predict default risk very 
     accurately, using only credit report data  (didn’t even need borrower 
     income for some kinds of account applications, like credit cards)
   – Any lender (of any size) could purchase a score on a borrower and 
     use it to make credit decisions
              Emergence of the FICO Score 


• 1989:   Fair, Isaac Corp introduces the first FICO score
   – The FICO score is often called a “generic bureau score”.   Translation:  
     It uses only information in a credit report – nothing more. 

• 2001:  FICO began making FICO scores available to 
  consumers through its myfico.com website
   – FICO was the first scoring company to make its product available for 
     consumers to view

• Until this year, consumers have been required to pay a fee to 
  see their FICO score.  
   – And, unless you’ve been turned down for credit or have been subject 
     to “adverse action” by a creditor, you still have to pay a fee to see
   Comprehension Check:   There are many kinds of 
  credit scores;   FICO is just the most widely used by 
                         creditors

• Many large lenders still build their own scoring models
   – Custom models , built on data from just the lender’s own account 
     holders
   – These scores have been generally unavailable to consumers

• Each of the three major credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax, 
  and Trans Union) sells their own generic bureau score
   – Example:  Experian’s score is called the Plus score

• Vantage Score (introduced in 2006) is a direct competitor to 
  FICO.  It was developed as a joint venture by the three major 
  credit bureaus to compete with FICO for creditor business.

• All of these scores have different scales.  A “650” score on 
  one does not mean the same thing as a “650” score on 
  another.
  Another Reason a Consumer Would Have Multiple 
  Scores:   Credit Reporting on the Part of Lenders is 
 Voluntary  =>  Information About Your Past Payment 
 Experience May Not Go to All Three Credit Bureaus.
• Because the data that each of the three major credit 
  reporting agencies compiles about you may be different, 
  your credit scores built on that data will differ, too.

• This is true for FICO scores, VantageScores, the bureaus’ own 
  generic scores, etc.

• Implication:   To get a complete picture of what lenders see 
  about you, check credit reports AND scores from all 3 
  bureaus

• Qualifier:  If the information across your 3 credit reports is 
  very similar, so will be your scores
   How Can You See/Buy Your VantageScore?

• Experian example:  From the Experian.com homepage, go to:
   –   Personal Services
   –   Products
   –   Credit report and score
   –   VantageScore personal credit rating
        • Price is $7.95


• Equifax and Trans Union do not appear to offer 
  VantageScores to consumers on their websites
 Reminder:  All of these “generic” bureau scores are 
built solely on data available from a U.S. credit report 

• Account information
   –   Industry/account type 
   –   Date reported
   –   Date account opened (month and year)
   –   Highest balance or account limit
   –   Current balance
   –   Current payment status
   –   Delinquency history (up to 7 years)

• Inquiries
   – Date (day, month, year)
   – Industry and company

• Public record items (only credit‐related, e.g., bankruptcy, 
  foreclosure, tax liens, legal collection judgments)
• Collection items  (accounts referred to collection agencies)
    Factors That Are Not Included in Your Credit 
                       Score

•   Income
•   Age
•   Address, or anything about where you live
•   Employment information
•   Gender
• Classic FICO score product:   scale 300 – 850, where higher 
  number indicates lower risk
     New Disclosure Rules Mean That Many More 
     Consumers will be Exposed to Credit Scores

Two new regulations took effect this year from the Federal 
  Reserve Board and the Federal Trade Commission
•    January 1, 2011:  “Risk Based Pricing Rule”

•    July 21, 2011:  Dodd‐Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection 
     Act  (section 1100F)

Together these expand consumer disclosures in 2 important 
  ways:
1.    Consumers must be given the credit score that influenced a decision to 
      reject a loan application

2.    Similar disclosure if a lender approves a loan or line of credit but with 
      an interest rate (or other terms) less favorable than those offered to the 
      lender’s “best” customers
   So, Faced With the Prospect of So Many Different 
    Score Disclosures, What Do Consumers Need to 
        Understand About Their Credit Score(s)?
• What’s most important to remember about a score is not its 
  absolute level, but its relation to other scores from the same 
  model
   – All of these scores have different scales.  A “650” score on one does 
     not mean the same thing as a “650” score on another.
   – Check the score provider’s website for how your score compares to 
     other consumers
   – Understand where in the range of risk you fall
      • e.g.,  The best 5%;  the worst 1/3, etc.
Where Does Your FICO Score Fall in the 
 National Distribution of Consumers?
           (FICO Score Distribution)
                            How your VantageScore Compares to 
                                Scores of Other Consumers
                                        (as of September 2011)
                      30%


                      25%
% of U.S. Consumers




                      20%


                      15%


                      10%


                      5%


                      0%
                              500‐590   600‐690       700‐790    800‐890   900‐990
                                 F         D             C          B         A

                                                  Score Range
    So, Faced With the Prospect of So Many Different 
     Score Disclosures, What Do Consumers Need to 
         Understand About Their Credit Score(s)?
•   What’s most important to remember about a score is not its absolute level, but 
    its relation to other scores from the same model
      – All of these scores have different scales.  A “650” score on one does not 
         mean the same thing as a “650” score on another.
      – Check the score provider’s website for how your score compares to other 
         consumers
      – Understand where in the range of risk you fall
           • e.g.,  The best 5%;  the worst 1/3, etc.

• Know the factors that influence the score, and adjust your 
  behavior accordingly
Categories of predictive characteristics, Classic 
    FICO Score  (for more details go to myfico.com)
             Sample risk‐based pricing credit score disclosure 




To view or download a clearer version of this notice and other risk‐based pricing notices, visit the Philadelphia Federal Reserve’s website at: 
http://www.philadelphiafed.org/bank‐resources/publications/consumer‐compliance‐outlook/2010/fourth‐quarter/risk‐based‐pricing.cfm
    So, Faced With the Prospect of So Many Different 
     Score Disclosures, What Do Consumers Need to 
         Understand About Their Credit Score(s)?
•   What’s most important to remember about a score is not its absolute 
    level, but its relation to other scores from the same model
     – All of these scores have different scales.  A “650” score on one does 
        not mean the same thing as a “650” score on another.
     – Check the score provider’s website for how your score compares to 
        other consumers
     – Understand where in the range of risk you fall
          • e.g.,  The best 5%;  the worst 1/3, etc.

•   Know the factors that influence the score, and adjust your behavior 
    accordingly
• Your score could be low due to inaccurate data:  Check your 
  credit report (from each bureau) at least once a year
Do’s and Don’ts In Managing Your Credit Score

• DO:
  – Order credit report and search for errors
  – Pay all bills on time  (credit and utilities and all other 
    accounts)
  – Be patient if you do slip and have a late payment
        • All negative items roll off credit report after 7 years (except 
          bankruptcy, which stays for 10 years)
        • Importance in credit score can decline after as little as 2 years


  – Maintain a mix of credit (blend of credit cards, 
    installment loans, mortgage loans) 
Do’s and Don’ts In Managing Your Credit Score

• DON’T

  – Max out your available credit lines 
  – Open multiple accounts in short period just to establish a 
    credit history or boost available credit
  – Close old credit card accounts  (unless you do so as self‐
    discipline to avoid using them)
  – Dally when shopping for credit
     • Shop for a good deal on a loan when you need it, but 
       don’t apply multiple times over an extended period 
       (more than 30 days)
             Lesson Facilitation
YOUR MISSION:
Help Isabella, a future college graduate in extreme debt 
who is looking for a job, understand her credit report. 
Identify what she did to get into this situation, and  decide 
what she can do to improve her credit report.




                                          Lesson instruction pages 7‐11
                                        Support materials also available
Assessment Options
   Create a jingle!




                 Assessment Option pages 11‐12
             Lesson also includes a grading rubric
      Assessment Options
                Create a comic!


• By hand
• Use PowerPoint and print in note format
• Use a FREE online comic creator!
   • Many online comic creators are included in the lesson as well 
     as on the FEFE website
   • GoAnimate.com – creates animated comics!


                                          Assessment option pages 11‐12
                  Lesson also includes a grading rubric and sample comic
    Sample Comic 
Created with GoAnimate.com
      Help with GoAnimate
1. Tutorial videos‐ From our screen to yours!
                      OR
2. Step‐by‐step guide and tips in the FEFE 
   Technology Integration Options 1.0.9

                           Assistance with other 
                           online comic creators 
                             is available in the 
                          Technology Integration 
                          Options 1.0.9 resource
Do you have a limited amount 
of time to teach this concept?

  Use the Understanding Credit Reports 
    Essentials Lesson Plan 7.4.3 which 
 condenses the content to 45‐60 minutes!


Go to the FEFE website, Credit Scoring Webinar 
page for additional ideas including activities and 
         websites for teaching this topic
QUESTIONS?
PARTICIPATE IN THE FEFE FORUM
Learn More
Continue the             Access          Tell us what 
 discussion            resources          you think

                                           For the chance to 
   Available on the       On the FEFE 
                                            win a free FEFE 
     FEFE forum            website
                                           answer key binder

             fefe.arizona.edu/webinars/credit‐scoring
Stay Tuned for More


                     Credit Cards       FEFE National 
    Contests
                       Webinar            Training
• Additional       • Available this    • June 25‐28, 
  contests will      fall                2012
  be launched                          • Tucson, AZ
  this spring 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:2
posted:5/16/2012
language:English
pages:49
fanzhongqing fanzhongqing http://
About