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CPE Course Handbook 2011-12

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CPE Course Handbook 2011-12 Powered By Docstoc
					University of Brighton
Brighton Business School




        Brighton Business School


                PGDip.Law/CPE


              Course Handbook




                           September 2011
                                         PREFACE


The purpose of this course handbook is to provide you with key information about your
course, including administrative and academic procedures, and to give you some practical
advice on how to make the most of your studies and to explain what to do if you experience
any difficulties. Please read the handbook very carefully and keep it at hand for future
reference.

Other key documents that you should be familiar with are:

       the University of Brighton Student Handbook;

       the University of Brighton Plagiarism Awareness Pack;

       the Brighton Business School Referencing Handbook;

       the University of Brighton General Examination and Assessment Regulations
        (GEAR).

Copies of all these documents are accessible in electronic format on the University’s
student intranet, Studentcentral (see 7.6 below), via your Course Area. You will also be
provided with paper copies of the University Student Handbook and the University
Plagiarism Awareness Pack.
Because of increasing incidents of cases of plagiarism both in this university and others,
you are strongly urged to carefully read the Plagiarism Awareness Pack. Penalties for
plagiarism can be very harsh and ignorance is no defence! The University has access to
special software which can detect plagiarism and we will be using this at random throughout
the year at all levels, so you have been warned. *

If you would like to see any other items included in your course handbook please contact
the course leader, whilst we cannot promise to change things straight away, we will do our
best to improve the handbook in future years.




*PLEASE NOTE that all students who wish to enter legal practice either as a barrister or a solicitor
have to sign a declaration confirming that there are no issues of academic misconduct. Similarly,
academic staff have to give such confirmation when they provide references. A finding of academic
misconduct (which includes plagiarism) makes it much more difficult to enter the legal profession in
any capacity
                                               Page 2
                              CONTENTS



1.     COURSE LEADER INTRODUCTION

2.     BRIGHTON BUSINESS SCHOOL

3.     COURSE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
3.1    Course management team, course board and examination board
3.2    Communications between staff and students
3.3    Where to turn for advice and guidance
3.4    Student representation and feedback
3.5    Annual academic health process

4.     COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

4.1    Course aims and learning outcomes
4.2    Course structure and content
4.3    Teaching and learning methods
4.4    Professional body accreditation
4.5    Title of course and awards
4.6    Mode of study and duration
4.7    Time commitment
4.8    Maximum period of enrolment
4.9    Careers support


5.     COURSE ASSESSMENT
5.1    Nature of assessment
5.2    Coursework marking guidelines
5.3    Coursework presentation
5.4    Referencing your work
5.5    Coursework word limit and word ranges
5.6    Coursework submission
5.7    Late coursework
5.8    Coursework extensions
5.9    Return of coursework
5.10   Examination timetables
5.11   Examination past papers
5.12   Use of dictionaries in examinations
5.13   Examination results
5.14   Mitigating circumstances
5.15   Plagiarism, collusion and cheating in examinations
5.16   Appealing the decision of an examination board



                                    Page 3
6.     COURSE SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

6.1 Admissions
6.2 Postgraduate diploma in law course specific regulaltions

7.     LIBRARY, COMPUTING AND MEDIA SERVICES

7.1    The library service
7.2    Library services to part-time students
7.3    The Online Library
7.4    Computing services for students based at Moulsecoomb
7.5    Media Centres
7.6    Studentcentral
7.7    ASK Study Guide
7.8    Useful web addresses


8.     STUDENT SERVICES

9.     STUDENT ENTITLEMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
9.1    Entitlements
9.2    Responsibilities
9.3    Brighton Business School – Attendance and Engagement policy
9.4    Disability statement
9.5    Fire evacuation
9.6    Observing copyright laws

10.    MISCELLANEOUS
10.1   Student support
10.2   References
10.3   Attendance
10.4   Communication
10.5   Prizes and graduation


APPENDIX
Submitting Assignments through Studentcentral




                                    Page 4
1.     COURSE LEADER INTRODUCTION


Welcome to Brighton Business School.

The purpose of this course handbook is to give you essential information about the
Postgraduate Diploma in Law. It incorporates all the key information you need to know about
being a student at the University of Brighton but you need also to look at the Studying Law at
Brighton Business School handbook which will be distributed very early in your course.

The two year part-time Postgraduate Diploma in Law award has been running at the
University since September 2000 and this year we are running the course in full-time mode
for the third time. The course is recognised by the law professional bodies as a Common
Professional Examination (CPE) course, the principal route by which non-law graduates may
complete the ‘Academic Stage’ of legal training and progress to the ‘Vocational Stage’ i.e.
the Bar Vocational Course for would-be barristers and the Legal Practice Course for would-
be solicitors.

I sincerely hope you have a successful, rewarding and enjoyable time studying law at the
University of Brighton.

Sarah Field

Postgraduate Diploma in Law Course Leader
August 2011




                                           Page 5
2.     BRIGHTON BUSINESS SCHOOL
Your school is Brighton Business School. The Head of Brighton Business School is
Professor Aidan Berry. More information about the work of the School may be found on the
school web site at: www.brighton.ac.uk/bbs

Brighton Business School is part of the Brighton Business Faculty alongside the Centre for
Research and Innovation in Management. The Acting Dean of the Faculty is currently
Professor Aidan Berry.

Brighton Business School is one of five Faculties at the University of Brighton, in addition to
the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The Vice Chancellor of the University is Professor
Julian Crampton.

The Business School’s contact details are:

Brighton Business School
University of Brighton
Mithras House
Lewes Road
BRIGHTON
BN2 4AT

Tel:   (01273) 600900 (Switchboard)
Fax:   (01273) 643597




                                             Page 6
3.       COURSE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
3.1      Course management team, course board and examination board
3.2      Communications between staff and students
3.3      Where to turn for advice and guidance
3.4      Student representation and feedback
3.5      Annual academic health process

___________________________________________________________________

3.1      Course management team, course board and examination board

3.1.1    Course management team

Responsibility for the day-to-day running of your course lies with the course management
team, comprising your course leader, your course administrator, and the members of staff
teaching on the course. Their contact details are as follows:

Responsibility      Staff               Room no   Tel no            E-mail address
Course Leader       Sarah Field         148       (01273) 642136    s.field@brighton.ac.uk
Course              Steve Sutcliffe     139       (01273) 642571    s.r.sutcliffe@brighton.ac.uk
Administrator
Personal Tutor      Sarah Field         148       (01273) 642136    s.field@brighton.ac.uk
LegalSystem         Gilliane Williams   147       (01273) 642596    gw84@brighton.ac.uk
Method and Skills
Module Leader
Contract Law        Alison Bone         148       (01273) 642174    a.bone@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader
Project             Jonathon Black-     118       (01273) 642987    j.l.black-branch@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader       Branch
Land Law            Lin Povey           124       (01273) 642582    l.povey@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader
Criminal Law        Sarah Field         148       (01273) 642136    s.field@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader
Public Law          Lucy Jones          148       (01273) 642585    l.jones@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader
Law of Torts        Charles Barrow      128       (01273) 642591    c.a.barrow@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader
EU Law              Hedley Christ       141       (01273) 642154    h.christ@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader
Equity and Trusts   Judith Riches       148       (01273) 642136    j.b.riches@brighton.ac.uk
Module Leader

Profiles of academic staff may be found on the School website at:

http://www.brighton.ac.uk/bbs/contact/academic.php

3.1.2    Course board

Each course within the School has a course board. The responsibilities of course boards
include:

•       ensuring the smooth operation of the course;
•       reviewing syllabus content, teaching methods, assessment and resources and
        generally monitoring the course in operation;
•       supervising the administration of the assessment procedures in accordance with the
        assessment regulations and the aims of the course;
•       liaising with the Examination Board and advising when necessary;


                                              Page 7
•       maintaining effective feedback arrangements between the lecturers and the course
        members;
•       planning and recommending policy with regard to the operation of the course;
•       exercising such other functions as may be requested by the School Board.

The membership of course boards is as follows:
Course Leader
Student Representative(s)
Course Administrator(s)
Module Leaders
Information Adviser (or nominee)
Programme Leader
Assistant Head (Professional Programmes)
School Quality Director

Each course board will normally meet three times a year to hear reports on the progress of
each year and mode of the relevant course. The board will discuss both students' and
tutors’ reports and take action where appropriate. If an issue arises which is clearly beyond
the scope of the course board and requires further consideration, then it will be referred to
the School Board. Copies of the minutes of course boards will normally be published on the
school area on studentcentral within three weeks of each board on the “My School: Brighton
Business School” area.

3.1.3    Examination boards

Each course within the School is allocated to an examination board, which considers each
student’s overall performance and makes decisions on awards and progression (see section
6 of this course handbook).

3.2      Communications between staff and students

Effective communication between staff and students is very important, and the School
facilitates this in a range of ways.

3.2.1    We contact you

              Through the student notice boards
              Through the plasma screen in the student lounge
              Through the professional courses student mailboxes
              Through Studentcentral
              By e-mail – using your University e-mail address (see 3.2.6 below)
              By mobile phone

The notice-boards, plasma screen and student mailboxes are all in Mithras House, close to
the Professional and Partnership Office (M139). Through them you will be told about
changes in timetables, cancellations and re-locations, the membership of groups, notes
about examinations and essays, internal and external mail. Changes are frequent at the start
of the academic year so please check them daily. It is your own responsibility to keep up with
any announced changes.

You must complete the personal information form which will be given to you during induction
and return it within two weeks of starting your course. Please ensure that we have taken a
digital photograph of you. If you change your personal details (address, name etc) you must
notify the Professional and Partnership Office immediately in writing (by letter or e-mail) and
change your personal details on-line on Studentcentral.

                                            Page 8
3.2.2        You contact us
            By knocking on the doors of academic and administrative staff
            By calling us by phone
            By e-mail. E-mail addresses of all staff are readily available (see above).
            Important messages and official documents can be handed in to the
             Professional and Partnership Office (M139)

3.2.3   Professional and Partnership Office

The professional courses administrative team is located in the Professional and Partnership
Office (M139) and is staffed by Hazel Brown and her team of course administrators. They
have responsibility for all initial enquiries: for most queries you should see them first (what to
do, where to go, requests for freely available handouts, information sheets, etc).

Opening times during term time
Professional and Partnership Office:
             08.30 – 17.00 (Monday to Thursday)
             08.30 –16.30 (Friday)

Mithras House:
            07.00 – 21.00 (Monday- Thursday)
            07.00 – 19.00 (Friday)

3.2.4   How to locate an office or lecture room

Most University room numbers are in two parts each of which convey information. For
example, to find room M160, you need to go to Mithras House, then the first floor (the first
digit is a “1”) and then look for room M160. Similarly the computer pools will have numbers
such as MA201, signifying Mithras Annexe, on the second floor and W321, somewhere on
the third floor of the Watts Building. Outside the Professional and Partnership Office (M139)
you will find on the wall a list of all the staff with their telephone numbers, e-mail addresses
and office numbers. Next to the list is a display of all the staff photographs some of which
vaguely resemble the people themselves and some of whom left years ago – but we’re fond
of it….

3.2.5   University telephone numbers

The standard University telephone exchange number is 01273 600 900. To directly reach a
member of staff, once you know their internal extension number you need to add 64 before
the internal extension number. For example, the Course Leader’s extension is 2136. To
reach her from outside you would need to dial 01273 642136). Alternatively dial 01273 600
900 and ask for a particular member of staff.

3.2.6   Your email address

Every member of the university has a central email address usually in the form
A.N.Other@uni.brighton.ac.uk. This is the address that we will use to contact you and it is
your responsibility to ensure that the Professional and Partnership Office is kept fully
informed of any changes. If you do not receive messages which we have sent to your
university email address – some of which may be urgent – this could have serious
consequences

3.2.7 Proof of enrolment

If you need a letter confirming your enrolment on a University course (e.g. for the purposes
of a career development loan from your bank) you must request this from the University
                                            Page 9
Student Office (Registry), Mezzanine Floor, Cockcroft Building.       Please note that your
School staff are not permitted to produce these letters

3.3          Where to turn for advice and guidance

Although every effort is made by staff to ensure that your course runs without problems we
recognise that these do occasionally arise. The following notes provide guidance on the
procedures to be followed in the event of problems arising during the course or with
assessment. At each stage it is expected that the staff involved will try to find a solution to
the difficulty. However, you should bear in mind that in some cases it is not within their power
to solve them and, as such, it may need to be referred on to another body. It is permissible
to miss out a stage in these procedures when a problem is urgent and the appropriate
lecturer/tutor is unavailable, or where for other reasons it may be appropriate.

3.3.1    Administrative problems

In the first instance, you should contact your course administrator about problems of an
administrative nature. If the problem still remains unresolved then you should contact your
course leader.

3.3.2    Personal problems

You should contact your course leader as soon as possible.

3.3.3    Academic problems (unrelated to coursework and examinations)

        Stage 1    Discuss with lecturer
                   concerned



                                 Not Resolved             Resolved      No     further   action
needed



        Stage 2    Bring to attention of
                   course leader



                                Not Resolved              Resolved      No     further   action
needed


        Stage 3    Bring to attention of
                   the Course Board
                   through your year
                   course representative


                                Not Resolved              Resolved      No     further   action
needed

        Stage 4    Bring to the attention of the Head of School


                                           Page 10
The Head of School will take appropriate action directly or if necessary refer the problem on
to the School Board, Examination Board or other appropriate body.




                                         Page 11
3.3.4     Problems associated with completing coursework and/or sitting
examinations

Problems completing coursework should follow the pattern below:

                          Stage 1        Discuss with lecturer concerned



                          Stage 2        If necessary complete an Assignment Extension
                                         Form, getting the approval of your Course Leader
                                         and/ or Mitigating Circumstances Form and notify
                                         your course leader in writing of the
                                         nature of the problem and its potential effect



                          Stage 3        Lodge copies of the document outlined in Stage 2
                                         with the Professional and Partnership Office marked
                                         for the attention of the lecturer concerned and the
                                         Chair of the Examination Board.
                                         Please make sure that you obtain a copy from the
                                         Office staff when submitting these forms


For problems relating to sitting examinations the normal pattern should be as follows:

                          Stage 1        (If the problem occurs during the examination) Bring
the                                      problem to the attention of the invigilator



                          Stage 2        Bring the problem to the attention of your course
                                         leader. This should be in writing with, wherever
                                         possible, an assessment of the effect the problem
                                         had on performance




                          Stage 3        Lodge a copy of a mitigating circumstances form
                                         with the Professional and Partnership Office marked
                                         for the attention of the Chair of the Examination
                                         Board. Again, please make sure that you obtain a
                                         copy from the Office staff when submitting this form


For further information about obtaining coursework extensions see 5.9 (below), and for
further information about submitting a mitigating circumstances form see 5.15 (below)
below.




                                          Page 12
3.4     Student representation and feedback

3.4.1   Student representation

Each year student representatives are elected for each course, and they are an important
formal channel of communication between students and staff. The names and contact
details of student representatives are published on studentcentral from early November each
year.

All students are urged to consider standing for election as a student representative. It can be
a very rewarding role, is an excellent personal development opportunity, and looks great on
your CV. All newly elected student representatives are offered training for the role by the
School, in conjunction with the University of Brighton Students Union, and support is
available during the year as required. For further information about standing as a student
representative, please contact your course leader.

3.4.2   Student feedback

The School recognises the importance of formally obtaining and responding to the views of
students in a systematic, consistent and transparent manner, taking action where necessary,
and “closing the loop” by giving students feedback on resultant action, and the outcomes of
student participation in decision making.

Feedback is formally obtained from students via annual course feedback forms, the student
representative system (see 3.4.1 above), and operation of the School’s policy for resolving
academic problems (see 3.3. above)). Formal mechanisms for obtaining student feedback
are inevitably, and often usefully, supplemented by informal channels and contacts with
students.

Feedback from students is formally considered and responded to, at course boards and at
the School Board, and as part of the annual academic health process (see 3.5 below).
Copies of the minutes of course boards will normally be published on the school area on
Studentcentral within three weeks of each board.

3.5     Annual academic health process

The basic building block of the University’s quality assurance system, is the Annual
Academic Health process, which ensures that all courses and their constituent modules are
reviewed annually, drawing upon a range of data as appropriate. Reports are produced from
module through to course level, and are synthesized into school reports which consider the
range of courses within their portfolio. Schools’ reports are considered at faculty and
university level. External examiner reports and student feedback are a vital part of this
process.

Within Brighton Business School, all course academic health reports are considered and
approved at the School’s Annual Academic Health Afternoon in October, to which student
representatives are invited to attend and participate. Copies of all approved academic health
reports and the School Academic Health Report will normally be published on the school
area by mid-November.




                                          Page 13
4.       COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

4.1      Course aims and learning outcomes
4.2      Course structure and content
4.3      Teaching and learning methods
4.4      Professional body accreditation
4.5      Title of course and awards
4.6      Mode of study and duration
4.7      Time commitment
4.8      Maximum period of enrolment
4.9      Careers support


4.1 Course aims and learning outcomes

4.1.1. Aims of postgraduate diploma in law

To provide the non-law graduate (or equivalent) with an academically rigorous,
postgraduate-level programme of education in law which will enable them to acquire a
detailed knowledge and critical understanding of the law, legal system, reform proposals,
and current research in the discipline, as well as developing the range of skills necessary to
engage in effective, advanced legal research and successfully pursue a career in legal
practice.

The course is also specifically designed to fulfil the requirements of the ‘Academic Stage’ of
legal training, enabling successful students to proceed to the ‘Vocational Stage’, and
ultimately pursue a career in legal practice (see below at 4.3)

4.1.2 Learning outcomes of postgraduate diploma in law

On successful completion of this award a student will be able to:

Knowledge

      1. describe, in detail, the sources of law and the principal features of the English Legal
          System, including institutions, personnel and procedure;
      2. explain, with precision, and in detail, the doctrines, principles and rules of the
          substantive areas of law studied;
      3. identify and expound upon, with reference to scholarly opinion, key areas of
          ambiguity and doctrinal dispute in the substantive areas of law studied;
      4. accurately state the legal authorities for given legal propositions and scholarly points
          of view;
      5. define precisely legal terminology relevant to the topics covered;
      6. illustrate and explain the inter-relationship and dynamic between different areas of
          law, in both a national and a European context;
      7. identify and explain social, economic and political pressures which have shaped the
          development of the law;
      8. describe and explain, in detail, proposals for reform of the law, their source and
          impetus; and
      9. explain and discuss contemporary legal issues and recent developments in the law.
      10. Show originality in the application of knowledge and demonstrate understanding of
          how the boundaries of legal knowledge are advanced through research.



                                            Page 14
Cognitive and skills

   1. identify, with precision, the ratio decidendi of a given case and effectively interpret a
       given piece of statutory material;
   2. analyse and critically evaluate the law, legal system, contemporary legal issues,
       proposals for reform and advanced scholarship in the discipline, demonstrating some
       originality of thought and/or fresh insights;
   3. effectively and rapidly assimilate and analyse the facts of complex legal problems,
       accurately identify relevant legal issues and the applicable law, apply and manipulate
       the law to the facts in a well-reasoned, systematic and creative fashion, and generally
       make sound judgements in the absence of clear law and complete facts;
   4. communicate legal information effectively, fluently and concisely, in a structured
       fashion, both orally and in writing, and in a form appropriate to the intended
       audience, and also use legal terminology accurately;
   5. reference legal scholarship in a recognised and thorough fashion;
   6. effectively and efficiently identify, locate and use a wide range of relevant primary
       and secondary sources of legal and other information (including electronic sources)
       to assist in legal study and support legal argument; and to accurately extract the
       essential points from that information;
   7. use information and communication technology with a high degree of proficiency, in
       particular word-processing, internet research and the retrieval of information from on-
       line and other electronic databases;
   8. work co-operatively and constructively in a team;
   9. demonstrate initiative, self-direction and personal responsibility in planning and
       managing academic tasks, and an ability to reflect critically on learning; and
   10. demonstrate an ability to take personal responsibility for the continuing development
       of legal knowledge and skills competence.
   11. Able to deal with complex legal issues both systematically and creatively
  12. Show originality in tackilng and solving problems

4.2 Course structure and content

The curriculum of the Postgraduate Diploma in Law Years 1 & 2 comprises nine modules:

Code        Module                                         Credit
LW390       Legal System, Method & Skills                  10 ‘Level 3’ credits
LWM01       Contract Law                                   20 ‘M’ Level credits
LWM02       Law of Torts                                   20 ‘M’ Level credits
LWM03       Public Law                                     20 ‘M’ Level credits
LWM10       European Union Law                             20 ‘M’ Level credits
LWM05       Criminal Law                                   20 ‘M’ Level credits
LWM06       Equity and Trusts                              20 ‘M’ Level credits
LWM07       Land Law                                       20 ‘M’ Level credits
LWM08       Project                                        20 ‘M’ Level credits

This course runs in both part-time and full-time mode. The structure of the part-time
course is outlined below. The full-time course will do both at the same time!

Year 1/Stage 1
September               October – June
LW390                   LWM01 Contract Law
Legal System, Method    LWM02 Law of Torts
and Skills              LWM03 Public Law
                        LWM10 European Union Law


                                          Page 15
Year 2/Stage 2
September                    October – June
LWM08            (Identify   LWM05 Criminal Law
possible project titles      LWM06 Equity and Trusts
and do initial reading)      LWM07 Land Law
                             LWM08 Project

Content of the individual modules can be found in the module specifications on
studentcentral.

4.2.1 The Academic Year 2011/12

Term dates
The Academic year dates for the School are:

PRE COURSE:
6 September 2011 – 27 September 2011: Legal System, Method and Skills (LSMS) module
6 September 2011 – 27 September 2011: Project pre- reading (Identify possible project
titles; do initial reading)

AUTUMN TERM
26 September 2011 – 16 December 2011

SPRING TERM
9 January 2012 – 23 March 2012

SUMMER TERM
16 April 2012 – 8 June 2012




                                           Page 16
4.2.2 Timetables


AUTUMN TERM Year 1
Date            9.00 – 10.00     10.00- 10.50    11.10– 12.00     12.00 - 1.00    1.00 – 2.00      2.00 –2.50      3.10 – 4.00

27 Sept 2011    LSMS             LSMS            INDUCTION*       LUNCH           INDUCTION        INDUCTION       INDUCTION
                                                 DAY                              DAY              DAY             DAY
4 Oct 2011      Contract         Contract        Contract         LUNCH           Tort             Tort            Tort

11 Oct 2011     Public Law       Public Law      Public Law       LUNCH           EU Law           EU Law          EU Law

18 Oct 2011     Contract         Contract        Contract         LUNCH           Tort             Tort            Tort

25 Oct 2011     Public Law       Public Law      Public Law       LUNCH           EU Law           EU Law          EU Law

1 Nov 2011      Contract         Contract        Contract         LUNCH           Tort             Tort            Tort

8 Nov 2011                                                      READING WEEK

15 Nov 2011     Public Law       Public Law      Public Law       LUNCH           EU Law           EU Law          EU Law
                                                                  Course Board
22 Nov 2011     Contract         Contract        Contract         LUNCH           Tort             Tort            Tort

29 Nov 2011     Public Law       Public Law      Public Law       LUNCH           EU Law           EU Law          EU Law

6 Dec 2011      Contract         Contract        Contract         LUNCH           Tort             Tort            Tort

13 Dec 2011     Public Law       Public Law      Public Law       LUNCH           EU Law           EU Law          EU Law

Notes:
1) TEACHING STAFF:
LSMS= Gilliane Williams; Contract Law = Alison Bone; Tort = Charles Barrow; Public Law = Lucy Jones; EU = Hedley Christ
2) ROOMS. All classes will take place in G4
3) Course Board will be held on Tues 15 Nov at 12-1pm.
4) Careers workshop will be held on Tues 18 Oct, 4-5pm. Attendance is optional but highly recommended. These will be held with Robert Prosser.

*Please see separate Induction Day timetable

                                                                         Page 17
AUTUMN TERM Year 2
Date          9.00 - 9.50        10.00-            11.10–            12.10 –           1.00–             2.00 –             3.10 –
                                 10.50             12.00             1.00              1.50              2.50               4.00
28 Sept       INDUCTION*         INDUCTION         INDUCTION         LUNCH             INDUCTION         INDUCTION          INDUCTION DAY
2011          DAY                DAY               DAY                                 DAY               DAY
5 Oct 2011    Land Law           Land Law          Land Law          LUNCH             Eq and Trusts     Eq and Trusts      Eq and Trusts

12 Oct 2011   Private study      Project           Project           LUNCH             Criminal Law      Criminal Law       Criminal Law

19 Oct 2011   Land Law           Land Law          Land Law          LUNCH             Eq and Trusts     Eq and Trusts      Eq and Trusts

26 Oct 2011   Private study      Project           Project           LUNCH             Criminal Law      Criminal Law       Criminal Law

2 Nov 2011    Land Law           Land Law          Land Law          LUNCH             Eq and Trusts     Eq and Trusts      Eq and Trusts

9 Nov 2011
16 Nov 2011   Private study      Private study     Private study     LUNCH             Criminal Law      Criminal Law       Criminal Law

23 Nov 2011   Land Law           Land Law          Land Law          LUNCH             Eq and Trusts     Eq and Trusts      Eq and Trusts

30 Nov 2011   Private study      Private study     Private study     LUNCH             Criminal Law      Criminal Law       Criminal Law

7 Dec 2011    Land Law           Land Law          Land Law          LUNCH             Eq and Trusts     Eq and Trusts      Eq and Trusts

14 Dec 2011   Private study      Private study     Private study     LUNCH             Criminal Law      Criminal Law       Criminal Law


Notes:
1) TEACHING STAFF: Land Law = Lin Povey; Criminal Law = Sarah Field; Equity and Trusts = Judith Riches; Project = Jonathon Black Branch
2) ROOMS. All classes will take place in G6.
3) Course Board will be held on Tues 15 Nov at 12-1pm.
*Please see separate Induction Day timetable




                                                                      Page 18
AUTUMN TERM Full-Time

Date           9.00 – 10.00    10.00- 10.50    11.10– 12.00    12..00 - 1.00   1.00 – 2.00     2.00 –2.50      3.10 – 4.00     4.00 – 5.00

27 Sept 2011   LSMS            LSMS            INDUCTION*      LUNCH           INDUCTION       INDUCTION       INDUCTION
                                               DAY                             DAY             DAY             DAY
28 Sept 2011   INDUCTION*      INDUCTION       INDUCTION       LUNCH           INDUCTION       INDUCTION       INDUCTION
               DAY             DAY             DAY                             DAY             DAY             DAY
4 Oct 2011     Contract        Contract        Contract        LUNCH           Tort            Tort            Tort

5 Oct 2011     Land Law        Land Law        Land Law        LUNCH           Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts

11 Oct 2011    Public Law      Public Law      Public Law      LUNCH           EU Law          EU Law          EU Law

12 Oct 2011    Private study   Project         Project         LUNCH           Criminal Law    Criminal Law    Criminal Law

18 Oct 2011    Contract        Contract        Contract        LUNCH           Tort            Tort            Tort            Careers
                                                                                                                               Workshop
19 Oct 2011    Land Law        Land Law        Land Law        LUNCH           Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts

25 Oct 2011    Public Law      Public Law      Public Law      LUNCH           EU Law          EU Law          EU Law

26 Oct 2011    Private study   Project         Project         LUNCH           Criminal Law    Criminal Law    Criminal Law

1 Nov 2011     Contract        Contract        Contract        LUNCH           Tort            Tort            Tort

2 Nov 2011     Land Law        Land Law        Land Law        LUNCH           Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts

8 & 9 Nov                                                              Reading week
2011
15 Nov 2011    Public Law      Public Law      Public Law      LUNCH           EU Law          EU Law          EU Law
                                                               Course Board
16 Nov 2011    Private study   Private study   Private study   LUNCH           Criminal Law    Criminal Law    Criminal Law




                                                                       Page 19
Date            9.00 – 10.00     10.00- 10.50    11.10– 12.00     12.00 - 1.00    1.00 – 2.00      2.00 –2.50      3.10 – 4.00      4.00 – 5.00

22 Nov 2011     Contract         Contract        Contract         LUNCH           Tort             Tort            Tort

23 Nov 2011     Land Law         Land Law        Land Law         LUNCH           Eq and Trusts    Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts

29 Nov 2011     Public Law       Public Law      Public Law       LUNCH           EU Law           EU Law          EU Law

30 Nov 2011     Private study    Private study   Private study    LUNCH           Criminal Law     Criminal Law    Criminal Law

6 Dec 2011      Contract         Contract        Contract         LUNCH           Tort             Tort            Tort

7 Dec 2011      Land Law         Land Law        Land Law         LUNCH           Eq and Trusts    Eq and Trusts   Eq and Trusts

13 Dec 2011     Public Law       Public Law      Public Law       LUNCH           EU Law           EU Law          EU Law

14 Dec 2011     Private study    Private study   Private study    LUNCH           Criminal Law     Criminal Law    Criminal Law


Notes:

1) TEACHING STAFF:
LSMS= Gilliane Williams; Contract Law = Alison Bone; Tort = Charles Barrow; Public Law = Lucy Jones; EU = Hedley Christ; Land Law = Lin Povey; Criminal
Law = Sarah Field; Equity and Trusts = Judith Riches; Project = Jonathon Black-Branch
2) ROOMS. Tuesday classes will take place in G4 and Wednesday classes in G6
3) Course Board will be held on Tues 15 Nov at 12-1pm.
4) Careers workshop will be held on Tues 18 Oct, 4-5pm. Attendance is optional but highly recommended. These will be held with Robert Prosser.

*Please see separate Induction Day timetable


Individual timetables for the spring and summer terms will be distributed termly to students.




                                                                        Page 20
4.3 Teaching and learning methods

4.3.1 Pre-course

Students are expected to complete a programme of pre-course reading to prepare for the
introductory Legal System, Method and Skills module and for the Project module. Details of
the pre-course reading are generally dispatched during August.

4.3.2   The seven foundations of legal knowledge

The seven modules which cover the ‘Foundations of Legal Knowledge’ (Contract Law, the
Law of Torts, Public Law, European Union Law, Criminal Law, Equity and Trusts and Land
Law) will be delivered in three-hour blocks (with appropriate breaks) consisting of lectures
and seminars and occasional workshops. Also, for each module, there will be a 3-hour
revision workshop towards the end of the year.

The lectures will be used to outline the theoretical framework and basic principles of law,
including key case law and statutory provisions and provide a basis for further, in-depth
study. You will be expected to consolidate the lectures and prepare for seminars by
reading law reports, statutes, textbooks, casebooks, journal and periodical articles
etc. Guidance on reading material will be provided by the module leader.

The seminars will be used:
 to underpin understanding of the theoretical framework and principles of law by
   application to and analysis of problem scenarios;
 to develop capacity for critical assessment of the law; and
 to develop ability to listen effectively and to communicate orally efficiently and effectively.

Although the learning strategies adopted in seminars may vary (e.g. discussion, debate,
mini-moots, role-play), they will usually be student-led, with an expectation that everyone
actively participates.

The workshops will be a flexible learning forum, with the nature and the content of the
sessions often being negotiable between module leaders and students. The workshop
sessions may, for example, be used in the following ways :

   to discuss the implications of a recent development in the subject e.g. a case, a piece of
    legislation, a Law Commission Consultation Paper or Report;
   to consider aspects of other areas of legal study which may particularly enhance
    understanding of the Foundations of Legal Knowledge e.g. consumer protection law,
    family property law, international law and human rights;
   to consider themes which are common to more than one of the Foundations of Legal
    Knowledge e.g. concurrent liability, fault/strict liability, the implications of the Human
    Rights Act 1998;
   to develop skills e.g. oral skills via mooting, debates and presentations;
   to explore, in greater depth, topics which students are experiencing particular difficulty
    with or are particularly interested in;
   to invite guest speakers to participate in group discussion on topics of particular interest;
   for mock examinations and revision.




                                           Page 21
Legal system, method and skills

The Legal System, Method and Skills module (LSMS) will be delivered in the format of
lectures, seminars, and workshop sessions.

The project

The Project module will commence with some introductory workshops to discuss the
requirements of the module and consider the appropriateness of various research
methodologies. Thereafter, you will be allocated a project supervisor who will be available
for private consultation throughout the year.

Study groups

Students are encouraged to establish study groups to meet outside normal contact hours.

4.4 Professional Body accreditation

The Joint Academic Stage Board (JASB) is the body which has responsibility, among other
things, for validating and monitoring CPE courses on behalf of the law professional bodies,
The Law Society of England and Wales and The General Council of the Bar.

The University of Brighton Postgraduate Diploma in Law award is recognised by the JASB
as a CPE course.

The contact details of the JASB are:

Address               :      The Joint Academic Stage Board
                             (General Council of the Bar)
                             Education and Training and Records
                              289-293 High Holborn
                             LONDON
                             WC1V 7HZ

Telephone             :      0207 242 0082 and ask for Steve Behr or Lucy Mersh

Fax                   :      0207 611 1332


4.5 Title of courses and awards

A student who successfully completes the course is awarded a University of Brighton
Postgraduate Diploma, with the title Postgraduate Diploma in Law.

A student who either fails the Postgraduate Diploma in Law or who fails to complete the
course but nevertheless successfully completes all the Stage 1 modules or the equivalent of
90 credits (see course structure above) may be awarded a University of Brighton
Postgraduate Certificate, with the title Postgraduate Certificate in Law.

This course is one of the very few CPE courses offered at postgraduate level in the UK, so it
is possible for a student who has successfully completed the Postgraduate Diploma and
achieved a merit in their Project and (normally) a merit overall, to complete a 60 credit
dissertation and be eligible for the award of LLM Master of Laws. Further details can be
found online or in the separate course handbook.


                                         Page 22
4.6 Mode of study and duration

The Postgraduate Diploma in Law is available in both part-time and full-time mode.

The part-time Postgraduate Diploma in Law Years 1 & 2 runs on two days per week from
9.00 am to 4.00 pm with Year 1 classes running on a Tuesday and Year 2 on a Wednesday.
Full-time students attend on both days.

Each of the academic years including pre-course reading comprises 36 weeks commencing
in September and includes approximately 3 weeks of examinations.

4.7 Time commitment

On average, you should spend at least 20 hours per week studying for the Postgraduate
Diploma in Law Years which includes time spent in class if you are a part-time student.
Full-time means full-time so we are assuming you are working at least a 40 hour week!

4.8     Maximum period of enrolment

A student shall be required to complete satisfactorily all the assessments for the taught
elements of the course within four years (part-time) or two years (full-time) of initial
enrolment.

4.9     Careers support

The Postgraduate Diploma in Law award has a Career Planning Agreement in place, agreed
between the Course Leader and a University Careers Adviser, which is designed to ensure
that students on the course are achieving four career planning outcomes:

     competencies in self-assessment and personal review;
     competencies in researching job ideas and occupational information;
     competencies in decision making, goal-setting and action planning; and
     competencies in presenting oneself effectively in the transition to work, self employment,
      further study and training.

We ensure that these competencies are developed through a range of mechanisms,
including careers workshops and events especially designed for you and other law students
at the University.

More detailed information about law careers provision may be found in the Law Careers
Handbook.

However, whilst the University and its staff are very keen to assist you in achieving your
career aspirations, you must not lose sight of the fact that there are limitations on the extent
to which we are able and willing help you, and that you must take primary responsibility for
the development of your own career.

As can be seen from the career planning outcomes detailed above, the help and assistance
which the University is able and willing to provide tends to focus on ensuring that you are
equipped with the necessary competencies to be an effective manager of your own career.
We do not, for example, routinely research job opportunities on behalf of students.
Therefore, law students have to take the initiative in terms of securing relevant work
experience placements, and obtaining a training contract if they wish to qualify as a Solicitor
or pupillage if they wish to qualify as a Barrister.


                                            Page 23
5.     COURSE ASSESSMENT

5.1    Nature of assessment
5.2    Coursework marking guidelines
5.3    Coursework presentation
5.4    Referencing your work
5.5    Coursework word limit and word ranges
5.6    Coursework submission
5.7    Late coursework
5.8    Coursework extensions
5.9    Return of coursework
5.10   Examination timetables
5.11   Examination past papers
5.12   Use of dictionaries in examinations
5.13   Examination results
5.14   Mitigating circumstances
5.15   Plagiarism, collusion and cheating in examinations
5.16   Appealing the decision of an examination board


5.1    Nature of assessment
5.1.1 Preliminary reading

It is a condition of entry onto the course that you complete a programme of preliminary
reading. This reading will be relevant to, and assessed as part of, the Legal System, Method
and Skills module.

5.1.2 Legal system, method and skills

The Legal System, Method and Skills will be assessed by a piece of written coursework
(1500 words) which will be set at the start of the Module. In line with the other modules on
the Course, the pass mark is 50%.

You are simply required to pass this module, and only a PASS/FAIL is recorded; the module
mark does not contribute to the final mark achieved for the CPE.

5.1.3 Seven foundations of legal knowledge & the project

The seven modules which cover the seven ‘Foundations of Legal Knowledge’ (Tort,
Contract, Public law, EU Law, Criminal Law, Land Law, Equity and Trusts) will be assessed
as follows:

Tort                  Coursework 30%                       Examination 70%
Contract              Coursework 30%                       Examination 70%
Public Law                                                 Examination 100%
EU Law                Oral assessment 30%                  Examination 70%
Criminal Law                                               Examination 100%
Land Law                                                   Examination 100%
Equity & Trusts       Coursework 30%                       Examination 70%
Project               Coursework 100%

Each examination will be a 3 hour unseen paper. There will be a selection of questions
including both essay-style and problem questions. You will be required to answer a total of 3
questions.


                                         Page 24
Each coursework assignment (except EU Law which is an oral assessment) will be an
individual written work task (approximately 2000 words) which involves critical analysis (e.g.
an essay, casenote, report) or problem-solving (e.g. a mini-case study).

The Project module will be assessed by the submission of a project proposal (approximately
500 words) and a project (approximately 4,500 words). The project proposal will account for
5% of the final mark of the module and the project 95%.


5.1.4   Assignment schedule

Submission dates: Full Time
Assignment                Submission Date
Law of Torts              8 November 2011
Project Proposal          16 November 2011
Contract Law              13 December 2011
Equity & Trusts           8 Feb 2012
European Union Law        6 March 2012
Project                   25 April 2012

Submission dates: Part Time, yr 1
Assignment                Submission Date
Law of Torts              8 November 2011
Contract Law              13 December 2011
European Union Law        6 March 2012

Submission dates: Part Time, yr 2
Assignment                Submission Date
Project Proposal          16 November 2011
Equity & Trusts           8 Feb 2012
Project                   25 Apr 2012


Please note that assignments must be submitted by 10.00 am on the specified date.


5.1.5 How to approach assessment

General guidance on how to approach law coursework will form part of the Legal System,
Method and Skills module.

Also, the Studying Law at Brighton Business School Handbook includes information on the
following:

   types of law question – essays v problems questions;
   understanding essay questions and problem questions;
   gathering material for your answer;
   answering essays and problem questions;
   presenting your answer;
   referencing your answer; and
   checking your answer.

General guidance on how to approach law examinations will also form part of the Legal
System, Method and Skills module. Guidance is also included in the Studying Law at
Brighton Business School Handbook, a copy of which can be found on studentcentral.
                                          Page 25
During the year students will be given opportunities to sit mock examinations (usually take-
away versions that students do in their own time under exam conditions or online versions
that students can submit for lecturer feedback and grading).


5.2       Coursework marking guidelines

The following are general marking guidelines for coursework. You should seek to ensure
that your piece of work meets the minimum pass requirements set down. These guidelines
will also be found in the Assignment Tasks booklet. Guidance on how to deal with various
types of question is covered in induction and also in the Studying Law at Brighton Business
School handbook.

To obtain a PASS (50%+) for a PROBLEM QUESTION:

     Effective assimilation and analysis of the facts of the problem.
     Accurate identification of relevant legal issues and applicable law, with relevant legal
      doctrines, principles and rules explained accurately and precisely, and relevant areas of
      legal ambiguity and doctrinal dispute identified and expounded upon with reference to
      scholarly opinion.
     Application and manipulation of the law to the facts of the problem in a well-reasoned,
      systematic and creative fashion, with generally sound judgments made in the absence of
      clear law and complete facts.
     Legal authorities for given legal propositions and scholarly points of view accurately
      stated.
     Use of a range of relevant primary and secondary source material to support legal
      argument, with accurate extraction of the essential points from that material.
     Legal terminology defined and deployed accurately.
     Generally, well-structured and written fluently and concisely .
     Referenced in a recognised and consistent fashion.
     Good level of presentation.

To obtain a PASS (50%+) for an ESSAY QUESTION :

     High degree of analysis, synthesis and/or critical evaluation of the relevant area of the
      law, informed and supported by relevant scholarship, and with reference, where
      appropriate, to relevant social, economic and political perspectives, comparative legal
      material, and/or proposals for reform.
     Relevant legal doctrines, principles and rules explained accurately and precisely, and
      relevant areas of legal ambiguity and doctrinal dispute identified and expounded upon
      with reference to scholarly opinion.
     Legal authorities for given legal propositions and scholarly points of view accurately
      stated.
     Use of a range of relevant primary and secondary source material to support legal
      argument, with accurate extraction of the essential points from that material.
     Legal terminology defined and deployed accurately.
     Generally, well-structured and written fluently and concisely .
     Referenced in a recognised and consistent fashion.
     Good level of presentation.

Additional guidelines for a DISTINCTION (70%+):

     Full command of the subject-matter, informed by wide and varied reading and research.
     Synthesis of material from varying sources, and rigorous, in depth critical evaluation.

                                            Page 26
     Advanced and deep understanding of relevant social, economic and political
      perspectives, comparative material and proposals for reform.
     Exceptional degree of accuracy and precision in explaining legal doctrines, principles and
      rules, and relaying scholarly points of view and propositions.
     Creativity and/or originality of thought.
     Excellent organisation, presentation and referencing

5.3       Coursework presentation

These guidelines are based on our requirements for placement projects and dissertations,
but should be valid for most written work produced during your course. Please note,
however, that special conventions apply to the presentation and referencing of legal
scholarship. Therefore, if you are submitting a piece of law coursework please refer to the
detailed guidance in the Studying Law at Brighton Business School Handbook. An electronic
copy of the Handbook is available on the School area of Studentcentral.

Your paper copy should normally be word-processed and bound, but you are requested not
to enclose each page in a plastic envelope, since this usually makes marking extremely
difficult.

The report should be on A4 paper with one-and-a-half spacing between the lines, single or
double sided. Appendices may be single-spaced. Each page in the main report should be
numbered with page numbers at the foot of the page.

There should be a margin of at least 1.5 inches (4 cm) on the left side of the page, both for
the text and for any diagrams. Top, right and bottom margins should be at least 1.25 inches
(3 cm). The right margin should be unjustified (i.e. left 'ragged') to aid readability.

The main text should be in a single 12-point font, e.g. Times New Roman or similar. An
alternative font such as Arial in a smaller point size may be more appropriate in diagrams
and tables. Use bolding for emphasis within the text and for section headings.

Any material copied directly from another author must be enclosed in quotation marks,
followed immediately by a reference to the source. Individual quotations should not normally
exceed one paragraph, and quotations should not exceed 5% of the length of the report.

Colour printing may be used for charts, screen-shots etc. Clarity is more important than
fancy graphics. Avoid clip-art except where required for drawing diagrams.

You are responsible for the accuracy of the finished work so after it has been completed you
should use the spell-checker to catch any typographical and spelling errors. You should also
proof read it yourself (and ideally have it read by someone else), as the spell-checker is not
likely to catch every error.

5.4       Referencing your work

It is important in academic writing to reference all the important ideas and facts in your work.
It is also the best way to avoid any risk of plagiarism (see 5.15 below). You should do this:

         When you quote directly using others’ words in quotation marks

         When you paraphrase the arguments or theories of others in your own words

         When you use evidence from the work of others to support your own arguments

         When you rework published data or use it as the basis of your own calculations.
                                            Page 27
Please refer to the detailed guidance in the Studying Law at Brighton Business School
Handbook. An electronic copy of the Handbook is available on the School area of
studentcentral.

Therefore, no student has any excuse for not referencing properly, and poor referencing
may have a negative impact on the mark that you receive for your work. Non-referencing
will constitute plagiarism, which is considered a very serious form of academic
misconduct (see 5.15 below).

5.5 Coursework word limits and word ranges

Every piece of coursework you are set will either have a word limit or a word range, which
you should make sure you observe. Normally, if your coursework has a word limit e.g. 2,000
words, then the marker will stop reading the work once you exceed the word limit by 10%. If
you write less than the word limit you risk not maximising your potential mark. If your
coursework has a word range e.g. 1,500-2,000 words, then the marker will stop reading the
work once you have exceeded the upper figure. If you write less than the lower word limit
you risk not maximising your potential mark. For the purpose of calculating the word count
footnotes are excluded, as are contents pages, executive summaries, tables, appendices,
case and statute lists and reference lists/bibliographies.

You are required to declare a word count for every piece of work you submit.

5.6 Coursework submission

The date by which your assessed coursework has to be handed in is stated in this handbook
(above), and your lecturer will remind you of this date. You must keep to this deadline unless
you have been granted an extension by the course leader (see later sections).

You are required to submit two copies of each assignment – a paper copy and a digital
copy. The only exception is in the case of the project where we require two paper copies
and one digital copy to be handed in. We shall only accept coursework for marking if we
have both the printed AND the digital versions and reserve the right to scan either
version for plagiarised material.

5.6.1 Submission of paper copy

The paper copy should be posted in the box outside the Professional and Partnership Office
(Room 139) by the date specified, accompanied by one Assignment Report Form (available
from the Professional and Partnership Office). It should NOT be handed in to the Office or to
your tutor. The office staff will empty the post box and date stamp the work submitted.

Please ensure that you complete an Assignment Report Form showing:

Your Student Number (all CPE assignments apart from the Project are anonymously marked
so your name should NOT appear anywhere!)

                                  Module Lecturer’s Name
                                       Course Name
                              Module Name and Module Code
                                      Assignment Title
   1st submission/ submission on referral/ examination re-work/ submission on extension

                                          Page 28
                                   (delete as appropriate)
                                        Date Due in
                                     Number of pages

                                        Word count

The front page of your assignment should also contain this information in case the cover
sheet becomes separated.

Your paper copy should normally be word-processed and stapled or bound, but you are
requested not to enclose each page in a plastic envelope, since this usually makes marking
extremely difficult.

5.6.2 Submission of digital copy

Details on how to submit the digital copy, which must be done via the Assignments box
facility on Studentcentral can be found in the Appendix. When submitting your work via the
Studentcentral module Assignments box please make sure that your work is named in the
following manner for ease of identification:
                                    LWM01_coursework

                                  Or, if in multiple parts

                            LWM01_assignment_header_page
                               LWM01_table_of_contents
                             LWM01_assignment_main_doc
                                 LWM01_bibliography
                                 LWM01_appendices

The above uses the module LWM01 Contract Law as an example.

We would encourage you to try and submit your coursework as one digital file. Only when
the file gets too large, because of the extensive use of graphics, should you then consider
submitting it in multiple parts. Please make sure that you label the component parts clearly
so that the main part of the assignment can be easily identified. Please note that submission
by e-mail or fax is not permitted.

Be very careful. The software allows you to SAVE various versions and parts of your
assignment but it normally only allows you to SUBMIT your work ONCE. So do make
sure that you have all that work ready before pressing that SUBMIT key. If you submit the
wrong work then you should contact your course administrator and ask them to remove it.
You can then submit the correct work.

Although you do not receive confirmation of receipt from Studentcentral, you do get a
“Submission History” page displayed when submitting assignments which you can
use to check that documents have successfully been submitted.

5.7 Late coursework

Submission deadlines are sacrosanct. Students who fail to submit their work on time will be
penalised by having a mark of ZERO awarded for this work. Individual members of staff
cannot waive these penalties as it is University policy. However, in exceptional
circumstances students may apply for an extension to the submission date (see 5.8 below).



                                         Page 29
5.8       Coursework extensions

An extension is granted in order that an assignment can be submitted as if on time i.e. the
deadline for students with extensions is effectively put back to a later date.

5.8.1 Grounds

It is not possible to give a full list of reasons for which extensions may be granted. The
typical case is where you have been ill during the time when an assignment was due to be
written. However, any unforeseen circumstances which disrupt your study may represent an
appropriate reason.

If the standard of your work has been affected by the circumstances which caused you to
apply for an extension, you should also submit mitigating circumstances at the end of the
semester (see 5.15 below) and explain, in your supporting documentation, both the nature of
the circumstances and the reason that the extension was not sufficient for you to produce
your best work.

In considering whether or not an extension to a deadline should be granted, the designated
signatory will be mindful of the following points:

         When applying for an extension you are normally required to submit documentary
          evidence of the reason for the application.

         The nature of coursework is such that minor illnesses during the time when you
          would be expected to be working on the assignment will not constitute good grounds
          for granting an extension, even if these occur within the final few days before the
          deadline. Serious illness or injury, where supported by documentary evidence, will
          normally be appropriate reason for an extension to be approved.

         Computer failure, or the loss of data from a computer disk, will not normally be
          deemed a satisfactory reason for late submission.

         Paid employment commitments do not constitute grounds for an extension, or
          mitigating circumstances, for full-time students. Part-time students who are in full-
          time employment are expected to prioritise University deadlines. Exceptionally, such
          as where work commitments change at short notice through circumstances beyond
          your control, an application will be appropriate. In such cases , and especially where
          the course is undertaken as professional development, it is anticipated that the
          designated signatory will consider applications sympathetically where they are
          supported by evidence in the form of, for example, a letter from your line manager.

         In considering an application for an extension, the designated signatory will have
          regard to the other students on the programme who have not requested an
          extension, and will ensure that these students would not be unfairly disadvantaged by
          the granting of the extension.

5.8.2 Procedure

Students should complete an Assignment Extension Form, obtainable from the
Professional and Partnership Office, attaching any medical certificate or other written
evidence, and return it to the Course Administrator. Students must normally apply as soon
as possible but no later than one full working day before the submission date. All such
applications will be dealt with by the Course Leader who will reply in writing, setting a new
submission date where appropriate.
                                            Page 30
5.9    Return of coursework

Your module tutors will indicate when you should receive feedback on your coursework,
which will normally be within 15 working days of the submission date but your tutors will
try and return your work to you earlier than this. Note that the Project, which is the last piece
of work to be submitted, will not be returned until after the Examination Board has met and
you have received your results for all the other modules. Occasionally, due to unforeseen
circumstances, there can be a delay in returning your coursework. If this happens your
module tutor will let you know and provide you with a revised date for return of the work .

However, please note that all coursework marks returned prior to the relevant
examination board are provisional, and are subject to approval of the examination board.

Examination scripts are not returned to students.

5.10   Examination timetables

Examination timetables will be published on Studentcentral. It is your responsibility to
obtain the details of your examinations, and make sure that you attend at the right
location, on the correct day and at the correct time. If you arrive late for an examination,
you will not necessarily be given extra time, and if you arrive more than 30 minutes after the
start of the examination you will not be permitted to enter the examination room. If you are
unable to attend an examination you should submit a Mitigating Circumstances (see 5.14
below).

5.11   Examination past papers

Copies of the past two years examination papers for all modules are available on the “My
School: Brighton Business School” area on Studentcentral. However, answer guidelines are
not available.

5.12   Use of dictionaries in examinations

Students (for whom English is a second language) may take a translation dictionary into
examinations (apart from language examinations unless specified otherwise). The dictionary
must not be subject specific e.g. an Economics or Business & Management dictionary, and
there must be no handwritten annotations or notes on the dictionary. Any translation
dictionary taken into an examination will be examined by the invigilator to check that
it meets the requirements above, and if it does not, it will be immediately confiscated
and disciplinary action may follow.

5.13   Examination results

A pass list will be published as soon as possible after the Examination Board and a letter will
be sent to you detailing your results within two weeks of the Board. You will also be sent an
email notifying you when the pass list is available online. Due to current data protection
legislation, examination pass lists identify students by their University student number rather
than their name. Therefore if you attend the University to consult the pass lists it is important
to bring along your student number. Administrative staff will be very busy at this time
preparing results letters and will not be able to look up student numbers.

Please do not ask the tutors, course leader or course administrator for your results. They are
under a lot of pressure to get the results out to you as speedily and as accurately as possible
and any such requests just slow them down. Under no circumstances will results be given by
telephone or e-mail.
                                           Page 31
5.14    Mitigating circumstances

Where you consider that your performance in an assessment has been adversely affected
by circumstances beyond your control and you wish the Examination Board to take this into
account you should complete a Mitigating Circumstances form. If you are unable to attend
an examination you should also submit a Mitigating Circumstances form. Full details on
mitigating circumstances can be found in GEAR. However, the following should be noted:

5.14.1 Grounds

In considering claims for mitigating circumstances, your Course Examination Board (or other
appropriate body) will consider:

       the severity of the mitigating circumstances, and the reasonableness of a claim that
        such circumstances might have affected performance;
       the documentary evidence;

       the time period affected, and the likelihood that performance may have been
        affected;

       whether it is reasonable to suppose that the circumstances should have been
        foreseen by the student, or were avoidable.

The following are indicative of the kinds of circumstances which will normally be considered
valid, where the evidence and timing are available to support the claim:

       personal illness;
       illness of a family member;
       death of a family member or close friend;
       personal/psychological problems.

The following are indicative of the kinds of circumstances which will NOT normally be
considered valid, even when they can be supported by independent documentary evidence:

       paid employment;
       other University deadlines;
       car breakdown;
       lateness of lift to the University;
       missing a bus or train;
       oversleeping;
       misunderstanding timetable, or not knowing about times;
       computer problems (including corrupted disks or printing problems);
       job interview;
       any ongoing situation known to the student;
       other circumstances which it is reasonable to suppose might have been foreseen.

5.14.2 Procedure

If you believe that your mitigating circumstances should be considered you must
complete and submit a Mitigating Circumstances form, via the Professional and Partnership
Office, to the Chair of the Course Examination Board explaining:

              (i)       Which assessments were affected
              (ii)      How the circumstances affected your performance.

                                          Page 32
You need to ask the Professional and Partnership Office staff if you do not know who the
Chair of the Course Examination Board is. The form and any supporting letter must be
accompanied by third party documentary evidence, e.g. medical certificates. Self
Certification of Illness notes will NOT be accepted- you must produce a doctor’s
certificate.

The form and any supporting letter together with supporting evidence must be handed into
the Course Administrator as soon as possible and certainly no later than 5 working
days after the assignment/ examination to which they relate. Students should try and
consult their Course Leader before submitting their forms and supporting evidence so that
the Course Leader can speak on their behalf when mitigating circumstances are considered.

Any Mitigating Circumstances not submitted in this way will not normally be
considered by a Course Examination Board. See also the section on appealing
against an Examination Board decision where it warns that late submission of
mitigating circumstances is not normally allowable.

5.15   Plagiarism, collusion and cheating in assessment

If you attempt to gain a grade by fraudulent means you can be severely punished by the
Course Examination Board – see GEAR.

5.15.1 Plagiarism

Plagiarism is essentially presenting (directly or indirectly) another person's thoughts, writing,
etc. as your own. Quoting directly without quotation marks and attribution is plagiarism.
Copying material from a textbook, lecture material, article, digital file or another student,
even if you paraphrase, may be considered plagiarism.

It is your responsibility to be fully aware what constitutes plagiarism and what does not. As a
starting point, you should read the University’s Plagiarism Awareness Pack – you will be
provided a paper copy of this pack when you start your course, and electronic copies are
available on the “MY School: Brighton Business School” area and all Course Areas on
studentcentral. Also, a short Powerpoint presentation showing the sort of copying our
plagiarism software can detect can be found on the School Area and all Course Areas
Studentcentral. By properly referencing all your work, you can avoid a plagiarism allegation,
so you should also be fully conversant with the Brighton Business School Referencing
Handbook .

Plagiarism is an issue facing all universities across the world and strikes at the heart of
academic standards. We shall be insisting that wherever possible all assessed coursework
is submitted to us in printed form AND also in digital form. Most of your lecturers will ask you
to submit your digital copy via the Studentcentral module assignment box, others will ask for
a copy on disk. We shall only accept coursework from you for marking if we have both the
printed AND the digital versions. Be warned we shall be sampling this work with highly
effective software designed to detect copying.

5.15.2 Collusion

Copying the work of a fellow student is also treated very seriously as it is unlikely to happen
inadvertently. Don’t lend your notes, computer disks or assignments to other people,
particularly if you suspect they may copy them. You may find it difficult to prove that you
were the originator of the work if it is copied.

It should be noted that in cases of copying between students these penalties may also have
to be applied to the original author as well as the author who copied the original piece of
                                            Page 33
work if it cannot be established which was the copy and which was the original.

If the assignment is an individual piece of work make sure that it is your own work and not
that of a group. Presenting a piece of work as yours when it is, in fact, the work of a group is
collusion and is a form of fraud.

5.15.3 Cheating

Cheating in examinations by whatever means, including copying from unauthorised material
or from another student’s script, consulting information or individuals while absent from the
examination room, or attempting to gain a higher grade by fraudulent means, is also strictly
forbidden.

Recently a small number of students were caught bringing into the examination hall illegal
material that could have been of benefit to them when answering questions. In all cases the
students were heavily penalised. The default for most modules is that you are not allowed to
take any material into the examination room apart from pens and pencils. Many law lecturers
permit the use of unannotated statute books. If you are allowed to take material into the
examination room please make absolutely certain that you have checked with your lecturer
exactly what you are and are not allowed to take in long before the date of your examination.
As each module is likely to have different forms of assessment you will need to check with
the lecturer for each module. Ignorance of the rules is not a defence that we will listen to.

5.15.4 Penalties

Penalties for plagiarism and collusion include being marked as zero for the
assignment, zero for the module or even harsher penalties. A similar penalty is
applied for cheating in examinations. Repeat offences carry stiffer penalties.

5.16        Appealing the decision of an examination board

Examination Boards are conducted under the University of Brighton’s General Examination
and Assessment Regulations (GEAR), a copy of which is available on the “My School:
Brighton Business School” area on studentcentral.

Before formally entering an appeal you are required to discuss the matter informally
with the chair of the examination board and give notice in writing of your attention to
appeal to the Secretary to the Academic Board within 15 working days (within three
weeks of the pass list being posted on the student notice board). If this informal
discussion fails to resolve the matter, you must lodge your appeal in writing with the
secretary to the Academic Board within thirty working days of the date of publication of the
pass list notifying you of the decision. Normally, appeals submitted outside the specified
time scale will be ruled invalid. You must state the decision against which you are
appealing and the grounds for your appeal; you must also submit documents supporting
your claim.

Grounds for appeal

A request for a review of an Examination Board decision may only be made on one or more
of the following grounds:

   1. That a student has submitted evidence of mitigating circumstances which were not
      considered by the Examination Board;

   2. That the Examination Board was not aware of mitigating circumstances affecting the
      student’s performance because the candidate had been unable, or for valid reasons
                                           Page 34
       unwilling, to divulge them before the Examination Board reached its decision; (It is
       only in exceptional circumstances that an appeal will be heard on the basis of
       evidence submitted after the meeting of an Examination Board, and the
       attention of students is drawn to the importance of notifying the Chair of the
       Examination Board and/or Course Leader, in writing, of any circumstances
       extraneous to the course which might be prejudicial to their performance, as
       soon as possible, preferably before the examination and in any event before
       the examination board meets)

   3. That the examination procedures were not followed in accordance with the
      regulations, resulting in an error in the candidate’s assessment;

   4. That some other material irregularity had led to a breach of the procedures or
      regulations resulting in a decision detrimental to the student.

These are the ONLY grounds for appeal. There is no right of appeal against decisions of an
Examination Board, which are matters of academic judgement. Similarly a student may not
lodge an appeal on the grounds of dissatisfaction with the design, curriculum or delivery
(teaching, departmental support, etc.) of a course.

Note in particular that marks awarded are matters of academic judgement, i.e. you cannot
ask for an examination script to be re-marked.




                                        Page 35
6.      COURSE SPECIFIC REGULATIONS
6.1 Admissions
6.2 Postgraduate diploma in law course specific regulations
_______________________________________________________________

6.1 Admissions

6.1.1. Minimum entry requirements

To be admitted onto the course a prospective student must fall into one of the following two
categories prior to the commencement of the course:

    they must be a graduate, holding an undergraduate degree that has been conferred by
     an institution with degree awarding powers in the UK or the Republic of Ireland. This
     does not include foundation degrees;

OR

    they must have been granted a Certificate of Academic Standing by The Law Society or
     The General Council of the Bar.

Prospective students are also required to have a sufficient command of spoken and written
English to follow the course to a successful conclusion. To meet this requirement,
international applicants whose first language is not English are required to hold an
appropriate English language qualification. For example, International English Language
Testing System (IELTS), 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6 for the written element.

6.1.2    Selection criteria and admission process

Selection of applicants is based upon the following criteria:

    academic ability, including sufficiently developed analytical and writing skills;
    ability to cope with the course and see it through to a successful conclusion; and
    motivation to study law.

Applications are considered by the Course Leader, and students will be selected, in
accordance with the selection criteria, on the basis of:

    the information supplied on the application form (e.g. previous academic achievements,
     paid and un-paid experience);
    an interview with the Course Leader; and
    the academic reference(s);

6.1.3    Late enrolments

A student will not normally be admitted onto the course more than 2 weeks after the formal
commencement of the course.

A student will not be admitted onto the course more than 4 weeks after the commencement
of the course.




                                           Page 36
6.1.4   Transfers

The University may accept a student transferring from another CPE course provider in the
following circumstances only:

   the student is studying the CPE by part-time mode; they have successfully completed all
    the assessments on the first year of the course; there are genuine mitigating
    circumstances which justify the transfer; and they have obtained the permission of the
    JASB.
OR
 the student is studying the CPE by full-time mode; they have not failed any assessments
   on the course; there are genuine mitigating circumstances which justify the transfer; and
   they have obtained the permission of the JASB to transfer.

Mitigating circumstance which may justify the transfer include the following:

   a relocation to a different part of the country or overseas for domestic or occupational
    reasons;
   serious financial hardship, which necessitate the transfer;
   illness or a disability of a nature which necessitate the transfer;
   illness or disability of a dependent for whom the student is the primary carer, which
    necessitate the transfer; and
   a significant change in the student’s circumstances, which is sufficiently beyond the
    control of the student which necessitate the transfer.

NB Because the Brighton course is at postgraduate level it may not be possible to award a
transferring student a postgraduate diploma in law since they may not have completed
sufficient M level credits. A CPE equivalent award will however be available for successful
completion of the relevant modules.


6.1.5   Advanced standing

Accreditation for Prior Learning (APL) is only available to students who have been granted
subject 'exemptions' by The Law Society and/or The General Council of the Bar prior to
commencement of the course and who demonstrate that the learning outcomes of their prior
learning are consistent with the postgraduate level of the award (i.e. APL will not be granted
on the basis of equivalent subject modules studied on an undergraduate programme).

Further, it is noted that The Law Society and/or The General Council of the Bar will not grant
exemption from fewer than four CPE subjects, including 'the other area of legal study,' and
that the University of Brighton's General Examination and Assessment Regulations (GEAR)
will not normally permit credit to be given for more than 50% of the modules which comprise
a course. Therefore, students may only be exempted from (or be given credit for) exactly
four of the modules (excluding Legal System, Method and Skills).

6.2 Postgraduate diploma in law course specific examination regulations

6.2.1 General Examination and Assessment Regulations (GEAR)

These assessment regulations set out below conform to the University's ‘General
Examination and Assessment Regulations’ (GEAR). A copy of GEAR can be downloaded
from studentcentral via the “My School: Brighton Business School” area.



                                          Page 37
6.2.2 Interpretation

In these regulations:

"JASB" means the Joint Academic Stage Board established by the General Council of the
Bar and the Law Society to oversee the ‘Academic Stage’ of legal training.

"Stage 1" of the part-time course means that part of the course comprising the following
modules: Legal System Method and Skills (LSMS), Contract Law, the Law of Torts, Public
Law and European Union Law.

"Stage 2" of the part-time course means that part of the course comprising the following
modules: Criminal Law, Equity and Trusts, Land Law and the Project.

"Referral" means a provisional failure of a module that can be overturned as a result of the
student providing additional satisfactory evidence of achievement of the objectives of the
module. To present the evidence the student shall be re-assessed by undertaking additional
assessments, as specified by the Course Examination Board. A referral shall only be
awarded to students who at the first attempt have demonstrated that they could achieve a
pass by undertaking additional assessment in that subject. A referral shall not constitute a
requirement to undertake complete re-assessment or a full diet of assessment equivalent to
the original. A complete re-assessment shall constitute a repeat of a module corresponding
to an initial failure.

"Retake" means a complete re-assessment of all components of assessment. A capped
pass mark of 50 per cent will be awarded for a retake.

"The University" means the University of Brighton.

6.2.3 Course Examination Board

6.2.3.1 There shall be a single tier examination board structure, comprising a Course
        Examination Board (CEB).

6.2.3.2 The membership of the CEB shall comprise:

       (i) the Head of Brighton Business School’s Postgraduate Programmes

       (ii) the Course Leader;

       (iii) the Dean of the Faculty of Business;

       (iv) the academic staff responsible for the teaching and assessment of the course;

       (v) the external examiners; and

       (vi) a nominee of the JASB, should the JASB choose to nominate a person.

6.2.3.3 The Assistant Head of Brighton Business School’s Postgraduate Programmes shall
        normally chair the CEB.

       In the absence of the Assistant Head of Brighton Business School’s Postgraduate
       Programmes, an appropriate senior member of the University with the exception of
       the Course Leader shall chair the CEB.



                                           Page 38
6.2.3.4 The responsibilities of the CEB shall be those laid down in Section D of the GEAR,
       as they apply to CEBs in a single tier system.
6.2.4    External examiners

6.2.4.1 There shall be more than one external examiner.

6.2.4.2 The appointment of external examiners shall be in accordance with the criteria
       established by the University of Brighton and by the JASB and their appointment shall
       be subject to the approval of the JASB.

6.2.4.3 The term of office of an external examiner shall not exceed four years.

6.2.4.4 External examiners shall be involved in all stages of the formal assessment
       processes.

6.2.4.5 On any matter that relates to the standard of marking for all students taking a module
       the decision of the external examiners shall be accepted as final by the CEB, subject
       to the decision of the CEB to refer any such matter to the Academic Board. Where
       this is done, the University shall make a report on the reference to the JASB.

6.2.4.6 The external examiners shall submit a written report each year to the University on all
       aspects of the assessment processes employed on the course and on other matters
       relating to the quality of the course. This report should be separate from any other
       such report relating to e.g. undergraduate law courses. A copy of the report shall be
       made available to the JASB.

6.2.4.7 The external examiners shall have the right to make a written report to the JASB,
       with a copy of their report being sent to the Vice Chancellor of the University, on any
       matter of serious concern arising from the conduct of the course or its assessment
       processes.

6.2.5 Course components that will be assessed

       Each of the modules that comprise the course shall be assessed i.e.

       Part-time course

       Year 1/Stage 1

       (i)            LSMS;
       (ii)           Contract Law;
       (iii)          Law of Torts;
       (iv)           Public Law;
       (v)            European Union Law;


       Year 2/Stage 2

       (vi)           Criminal Law;
       (vii)          Equity and Trusts;
       (viii)         Land Law; and
       (ix)           Project.

       Full-time course

       (i)            LSMS;
       (ii)           Contract Law;
                                           Page 39
          (iii)          Law of Torts;
          (iv)           Public Law;
          (v)            European Union Law;
          (vi)           Criminal Law;
          (vii)          Equity and Trusts;
          (viii)         Land Law;
          (ix)           Project

6.2.6     Nature of assessment

6.2.6.1 The LSMS and Project modules shall be assessed by 100% coursework.

          The remaining seven modules shall each be assessed as follows:

          Tort                  Coursework 30%                        Examination 70%
          Contract              Coursework 30%                        Examination 70%
          Public Law                                                  Examination 100%
          EU Law                Oral assessment 30%                   Examination 70%
          Criminal Law                                                Examination 100%
          Land Law                                                    Examination 100%
          Equity & Trusts       Coursework 30%                        Examination 70%

6.2.6.2
          The pass mark for each module shall be 50%.

          Where the final mark for a module is a composite mark made up of examination and
          coursework, candidates shall, subject to Regulation 6.2.6.3, be required to obtain at
          least 50% in each of the components of the assessment.

6.2.6.3 In respect of one module only, the CEB may award a pass to a student who has only
        achieved between 45% and 49% for one of the components of assessment where
        the examination board is satisfied that there is sufficient strength elsewhere in the
        student’s performance.

          Normally, for part-time students, this discretion should only be exercised in respect of
          a student’s final year of assessment.

6.2.6.4 There may be no condonation of marks.

6.2.7     Timing of assessment

6.2.7.1 The submission date for the LSMS coursework shall be no later than Week 7
       (‘teaching week’ on Academic Calendar)

          The submission date for the Project shall be no later than Week 28.

          The submission dates for other coursework shall be staggered evenly throughout the
          year.

          At the beginning of each year the Course Leader shall prepare a schedule of
          coursework submission dates and distribute it to the students (see 5.1 above for the
          schedule).

6.2.7.2 The principal diet of examinations shall be held each year in May and/or June.



                                             Page 40
       The examination of candidates who have been referred shall be held at such time as
       the CEB determine being not less than 3 weeks after the publication date of the
       results of the principal examination.

       If there are any mitigating circumstances, such as illness or severe personal
       problems, which students feel may have affected their performance and which they
       wish to be taken into account by the examination board, they are required to submit a
       mitigating circumstances form explaining which assessments were affected and how
       these circumstances affected their performance. This form must be accompanied by
       supporting evidence and handed in to the course administrator as soon as possible
       and certainly no later than ten working days after the assignment/examination to
       which they relate.

       A student who is prevented by sufficient cause from sitting or completing all or part of
       the principal examinations may, at the discretion of the CEB, be allowed to sit or
       complete the examination(s) as a first attempt. This would take place in the referral
       examinations of that year in respect of each part not previously attempted or at the
       first available full diet of examinations as appropriate

6.2.8 Awards

6.2.8.1 A student shall pass the Postgraduate Diploma in Law if, in accordance with
       Regulations 6.2.6.1 – 6.2.6.4 he or she passes all the modules that comprise the
       course.

6.2.8.2 A student shall be awarded a pass with Merit where he or she has passed all
       assessment at the first attempt, without any subject being compensated; and he or
       she has obtained an overall average of at least 60% in all the modules.

6.2.8.3 Subject to 6.2.8.2, a student shall not otherwise be awarded a pass with Merit.

6.2.8.4 A student shall be awarded a pass with Distinction where he or she has passed all
       assessment at the first attempt, without any subject being compensated; and he or
       she has obtained an overall average of at least 70% in all the modules.

6.2.8.5 Subject to 6.2.8.4, a student shall not otherwise be awarded a pass with Distinction.

6.2.8.6 The CEB may not award an aegrotat pass.

6.2.9 Maximum Number of Attempts

       No student may be assessed in any module on more than three occasions. A sitting
       of an examination at any institution counts for this purpose.

6.2.10 Failure and referral

       A student who fails to pass a module may be failed or referred in that module.

6.2.11 Referral

6.2.11.1 A student who is referred in a module shall be given the opportunity to be re-
        assessed by undertaking supplementary assessments, the requirements for the re-
        assessment to be determined by the CEB. Note that in relation to Legal System
        Method and Skills (LSMS), a referral will be required to be taken and passed before
        Week 10.


                                          Page 41
6.2.11.2 A student who passes a referral assessment shall be awarded a pass mark (i.e. a
        maximum of 50%) and be credited with the module.

6.2.11.3 Subject to Regulation 9, a student who does not pass the referral in a module may
         be allowed to retake that module normally with tuition. The CEB may at its
         discretion allow a retake of a module without tuition.

6.2.12   Failure

         Subject to regulation 6.2.9, a student who fails a module may be allowed to retake
         that module      normally with tuition. The CEB may at its discretion allow a retake
         of a module without tuition.

6.2.13 Progression

6.2.13.1 Subject to Regulation 6.2.13.2, a part-time student may not normally proceed to
         Year 2/Stage 2 of the course until passing all the modules which comprise Year
         1/Stage 1.

6.2.13.2 A student who has obtained partial exemption from one of the professional bodies
         may, subject to timetabling constraints, complete Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the course
         in one year.

6.2.14   Plagiarism and Collusion

         Where plagiarism or collusion is alleged the procedures outlined in the GEAR shall
         be followed.

6.2.15   Cheating

         Where cheating is alleged the procedures outlined in the GEAR shall be followed.

6.2.16    Non-attendance at formal examinations

6.2.16.1 Students must present themselves for formal examination at such time and in
         such place as previously notified to them. Registers of examination attendance
         shall be maintained.

6.2.16.2 Failure to attend for a formal examination shall normally be deemed to constitute
         failure in that examination, unless the student can produce acceptable reasons for
         this absence. Such reasons shall be provided, using the appropriate form
         accompanied by third party evidence where appropriate, as soon as possible and
         at least ten working days before the formal meeting of the examination board.

6.2.17    Late and non-submission of assessed work and extension deadlines

6.2.17.1 Students are required to submit all work for assessment in the manner and by the
         date previously notified to them, unless an extension of time has been granted in
         accordance with Regulation 6.2.17.3.

6.2.17.2 The Course Leader shall be responsible for ensuring that all formally assessed
         work submitted by students is recorded.

6.2.17.3 The Course Leader shall have sole responsibility for granting extensions to
         deadlines for submission of assessed work.

                                          Page 42
            Applications for extensions must be made at least one working day before the due
            date for the assignment. They should be made in writing using the University pro
            forma and shall only be granted on production of acceptable reasons.

            Where extensions have been granted, copies of the pro forma shall be available to
            the CEB.

6.2.17.4 Failure to submit or undertake assessed work by the due time and date (including
         any extensions granted) shall normally be deemed to constitute failure in that
         work.

            Any work submitted after the deadline without valid reason shall have a mark of
            zero.

            The member of staff recording the work submitted late shall attach to the work a
            University pro forma. A copy of the pro forma shall be made available to the CEB.

            Where work is submitted late, the mark or grade reflecting the actual level of
            performance may be awarded to the student by the CEB if it is the decision of the
            CEB that late submission was due to documented illness or other valid cause.

            The evidence shall be presented to the CEB that shall make decisions
            accordingly.

6.2.18      Intercalation or suspension of studies

6.2.18.1    A student shall be required to complete satisfactorily all the assessments for the
            course within four years of initial enrolment.

6.2.18.2 Subject to Regulation 6.2.13.2, the minimum period of enrolment for the part-time
         course shall normally be two years.

6.2.18.3 If a student wishes to intercalate or suspend his or her studies, he or she shall
         apply in writing to the Course Leader who shall decide whether such a request can
         be granted. Any intercalation or suspension of studies can be permitted only at an
         appropriate stage of the course (as determined by the Course Leader).

           Where it appears that an intercalation or suspension of studies will prevent the
           student from gaining the final qualification within the maximum period of study
           allowed under Regulation 6.2.18.1, the student's request shall require the
           agreement of the JASB.

6.2.19 Reviews and Appeals

         Where a review of an Examination Board decision is requested the procedures
         outlined in the GEAR shall be followed.




                                           Page 43
7.       LIBRARY, COMPUTING AND MEDIA SERVICES

7.1      The library service
7.2      Library services to part-time students
7.3      The Online Library
7.4      Computing services for students based at Moulsecoomb
7.5      Media Centres
7.6      Studentcentral
7.7      ASK Study Guide
7.8      Useful web addresses

_________________________________________________________________

The Information Services department provides library, computing and media services in
support of learning, teaching, research and administration at the University of Brighton.


7.1      The library service

7.1.1 The University of Brighton libraries

     There are six libraries at the University of Brighton; the Aldrich, Falmer and St Peter’s
      House libraries in Brighton, the Queenwood and Health Sciences libraries in Eastbourne
      and the Hastings Campus Library.
     You will be issued with a student identity / library card (Unicard) when you enrol, which
      will enable you to borrow material from all University of Brighton libraries. Your Unicard
      will also allow you reference access to the University of Sussex library.
     The Aldrich Library is located in the Cockcroft Building on the Moulsecoomb site. It
      stocks a broad range of books and other materials relevant to your studies, covering all
      aspects of business studies, management and law.

7.1.2 Opening hours

Full, up to date information the about opening hours for all site libraries can be found at
www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Libraries > Opening hours.

Opening hours for Aldrich Library (on the Moulsecoomb site):

Term time:            Monday – Thursday             08.30 – 21.00
                      Friday                        08.30 – 19.00
                      Saturday & Sunday             13.00 – 17.00

Vacations:            Monday – Friday               09.00 – 17.30
                      Saturday                      Closed
                      Sunday                        13.00 – 17.00 (except August)

The Ground Floor of the Aldrich Library, which contains a Computer Pool Room and Social
Study Space, remains open until 02.00 every night during term time. After the library closes,
entrance to the Ground Floor is via the entrance in Queensdown School Road and you will
need your Unicard to gain entrance.

In addition the upper floors of Aldrich Library have extended opening hours during exam
revision periods. For more information about this look out for posters displayed in the library
or visit www.brighton.ac.uk/is/aldrich.


                                            Page 44
7.1.3 Borrowing entitlements

You may borrow up to 20 items at any one time. The standard loan period is three weeks but
items in heavy demand are seven day loan or for use in the library only (Desk Loan
Collection). Desk Loan items can be booked in advance for use in the library or overnight
loan. You will normally be charged a fine if you return a short loan item late or retain an item
which has been reserved by another user and recalled by the library.

7.1.4 Renewing items

It is not always necessary to bring items which you have on loan into the library to renew
them. Provided that it has not been requested by another user, any item may be renewed:
 in the library on production of your Unicard
 by telephoning the library (the Aldrich Library renewals line number is 01273 642770).
     Outside of library opening hours there is an answerphone where you can leave a
     message requesting a renewal.
 online using the My Account tab in the library catalogue (via the Online Library at
     http://library.brighton.ac.uk). You will need to log in using your Unicard number.

7.1.5 Returning items

   If the library is open, take your items to the library so that they can be discharged from
    your record.
   When the library is closed, you can use the secure book-drop bins situated at the site
    libraries. At Aldrich there is one on the ground floor adjacent to the computer pool room
    and a second one outside the main library entrance. These can be used for returning
    books only when the library is closed.
   Items can be returned by post; however, they remain your responsibility until received by
    the library.

7.1.6 The library catalogue

The library catalogue is available on dedicated terminals in each library and is also
accessible online via the Online Library (http://library.brighton.ac.uk). The catalogue has
information about the all material held in all of our site libraries. You can use the catalogue
to search for books, print journals and audio-visual items and to access your own borrower
record for renewing books and to see your current loans. You can also use the catalogue to
reserve items when all copies are on loan.

7.1.7 Requesting items from other libraries

If you would like an item sent to your local site library from one of our other site libraries you
can fill out a request card at your library enquiry desk. If you are a final year undergraduate
or a postgraduate student, you are entitled to inter-library loans. This means that we can
obtain books or articles from other libraries for you (usually the British Library) when we do
not hold them in stock. For more information about inter-library loans, please see
Information Services document 434: An Aldrich guide to requesting inter-library loans or ask
at your library Help Desk.

7.1.8 Photocopying

All the libraries offer self-service photocopying facilities - you should read the notices about
copyright to ensure you stay within the legal limits of copying from printed materials. For

                                            Page 45
colour photocopying on the Moulsecoomb site please use the Reprographics Unit on the
ground floor of the Cockcroft Building.


7.1.9 Audio-visual material

All the libraries have relevant collections of videotapes, DVDs and CDs which you can use in
the library or borrow for home use. You can use the library catalogue to search for audio-
visual items.

7.1.10 Communications

The library uses your university UniMail address for all correspondence (e.g. recalled, loans
or notification of reserved items awaiting collection). It is possible to set your UniMail to be
forwarded to a personal email account of your choice. This can be done within
StudentCentral by clicking on UniMail for full instructions.

7.1.11 Enquiries and further help

A Help Desk can be found in each of our libraries. You can also contact the Aldrich Library:

By phone:

Aldrich Library Help Desk:                     01273 642760
Aldrich Library renewals line:                 01273 642770

By email:

General enquiries:                         AskAldrich@brighton.ac.uk
Subject support team for Business and Law: AldrichBBS@brighton.ac.uk.

If you have special needs, ask about the services that can be provided to enable you to use
the libraries effectively.

7.2 Library services for part-time students

If you are studying part time and living away from the university, please ask at your
University of Brighton home library about using another university library under the SCONUL
Access scheme. Ask at your home library Help Desk for more information and you can also
visit http://www.access.sconul.ac.uk/ to check whether the library you want to use is part of
the scheme.

Part time students may also be eligible to join the University of Brighton’s Extended Library
Scheme (ELS), whereby items can be posted to you. For more information go to
http://www.brighton.ac.uk/is/els.

7.3 The Online Library

The Online Library (available via the Online Library tab in StudentCentral or at
www.library.brighton.ac.uk) contains:

   Library Catalogue: Links to our library catalogue, the catalogues of other local libraries
    and the British Library’s catalogue.

   Journal Title Search: search facility for finding the electronic and print journals that we
    subscribe to.
                                           Page 46
   Browse by subject area. This contains collections of links by subject, eg Business or
    Law, that have been selected by the library subject team supporting your course. These
    links include databases, Internet gateways, government websites and professional
    organisations

   Online databases with descriptions in alphabetical order. Use the databases to search
    for articles and papers relevant to your subject. Many of the databases have a user
    guide which you can access by clicking on the View user guide link. Many of these
    databases contain the full text of the documents and this is indicated by the words Full
    Text in red next to the description. The non-full text databases provide bibliographic
    detail and often an abstract.

    A selection of the databases you may find useful are:

    Business Source Premier
    Emerald
    FAME (Financial Analysis Made Easy)
    GMID (Global Market Information Database)
    Lawtel
    LexisNexis
    Newspapers (covers UK broadsheets back to 1996)
    Westlaw

   CrossSearch, which allows searching across multiple databases using a single search
    box.

   Reference Shelf, which contains links to online reference resources, for example,
    National Statistics Online, the UK Government statistical service.

   From the Online Library homepage you will find useful links to Information Services,
    library opening times, library and computing documents, etc.

The majority of these resources are available both on and off campus using your university
username and password. Full instructions for access are available beneath each database
description or from your library Help Desk.

If you would like more information or assistance with using the Online Library please ask at
your library Help Desk or email AldrichBBS@brighton.ac.uk.

7.4 Computing services for students based at Moulsecoomb

7.4.1 Locations and opening hours for computer access

Aldrich library computer poolroom*

Term-time         Monday - Friday           08.30 – 02.00
                  Saturday – Sunday         13.00 – 02.00

Vacation          Monday – Friday           09.00 – 17.30
                  Sunday                    13.00 – 17.00 (closed during August)

*When the main library is closed the computer poolroom can be accessed from the
Queensdown School Road entrance. You will need your Unicard to gain entrance.
Mithras Annexe computer poolroom*

                                          Page 47
Term-time         Monday – Friday           08.30 – 02.00
                  Weekends:                 Closed

Vacation          Monday – Friday           08.30 – 19.00

*An access card is required after 17.30 for Mithras Annexe and these can be obtained from
the Aldrich Library Help Desk.

The Aldrich Library

The Aldrich Library has a number of computers on each floor and the majority of study
spaces have connection points for laptops. The ground floor and designated areas of the
Aldrich Library are wireless enabled. For the opening hours of Aldrich Library see section 7.1
above or go to www.brighton.ac.uk/is/aldrich.

NB. LIBRARIES AND COMPUTER POOL ROOMS ARE CLOSED ON ALL PUBLIC
HOLIDAYS

The information above was correct at time of going to press., However as opening hours can
be subject to change, for latest information please check the Information Services website at
www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Computing > Opening hours.


7.4.2 Usernames and passwords

When you have completed your online enrolment / activation, your university username and
password will be generated. This can be used to access all the open access computers in
libraries and poolrooms, StudentCentral and the majority of resources available via the
Online Library. If you wish to change your password to something easier to remember, you
can do this in StudentCentral by clicking on Personal Settings.

7.4.3 Student email

You will be provided with your university email address when you activate your computer
account. You can read your email at https://uni.brighton.ac.uk/

Email is used as the primary means of communication throughout your course of study. Your
lecturers and other staff and students will send email to your Brighton University address.
You may wish to look at Information Services document is917: A guide to studentmail

If you have another, personal, email account, which you would prefer to use, you can
arrange for emails sent to your university account to be forwarded automatically. Full
instructions can be found in Information Services document is084: Forwarding your
university email. You may also wish to setup unimail on your iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad,
instructions on how to do this can be found in the document number is088

7.4.4 Connecting your own computer

You can connect your own computer via the network sockets in libraries and most halls of
residence using an Ethernet cable or via wireless in some areas on each site. Once
connected, your computer is part of the university network and is therefore subject to our
conditions of use. Please see Information Services document 907: Conditions of Use of
University of Brighton Computing Facilities including Networks. One of these conditions is
that Sophos anti-virus software be installed and this can be downloaded from the Information
Services website by going to www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students and choosing Anti-virus
software from the Quick Links for students box.
                                          Page 48
In order to connect your laptop to the network in one of the university libraries you will need
to follow set up instructions. You can ask for these at the library enquiry desk or download
them from www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Using your own computer > In libraries.

For more information on connecting your computer in halls of residence and computer clinics
go to www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Computing > Using your own computer.

Wireless connection is also available on the Moulsecoomb and other sites in selected areas.
We are expanding the areas in which wireless connectivity is available so please go to
www.brighton.ac.uk/is/wireless for up to date information. Set up instructions for connecting
your laptop to the university’s wireless network can be obtained from your library enquiry
desk or from www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Using your own computer > Wireless.

7.4.5 The Computer Store

The Computer Store in the Watts Building at Moulsecoomb sells blank CDs, USB sticks,
cables, software, computers etc. Many items are available at special educational discount
rates. The computer store is open 9am – 4.30pm daily during term-time.

7.4.6 Printing

Information Services provides a variety of high quality networked laser printers throughout
the university. You can use them from computer pool rooms, from libraries and from your
laptop on all main sites of the university.

A printing account is automatically set up for you once you activate your computer account
and you can add credit to your account using the blue Printer Credit Stations which you will
find located in the open access computer pool rooms. For more information on using the
networked printers see Information Services document number 003: Using the networked
printers.

To print from your own laptop you will need to be connected to the university network and
working inside the university. You will also need to install the correct printer drivers on your
laptop which are available for download from www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students and then from
the Quick links for Students box choose Printing > Mobile printing service.

7.4.7 Scanners

Scanners are located in all open access computer pool rooms.

7.4.8 Software available in the open access computer poolrooms

      Adobe Reader
      EndNote (bibliographic software)
      InfoZip
      Internet Explorer
      MS Office 2007 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher and Access 2007)
      MindGenius (mind-mapping software)
      Minitab
      PhotoShop Elements (on machines connected to scanners only)
      Sophos (anti-virus software)
      SoThink (HTML editor)
      SPSS
      TextHelp Read & Write Gold (screen reading and reading/writing tool)
                                           Page 49
In addition there is specialist software available as relevant in the different poolrooms /
libraries. For a full, up to date list go to www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Computing >
Software information

7.4.9 Computing help

Online help is available in StudentCentral (see below) and a wide range of guides and help
sheets are available in computer poolrooms. Technician help is also available in the
poolrooms at advertised times. For help with username and password problems you can
contact your local library enquiry desk. All our guides are also available online from our
documents catalogue at http://www.brighton.ac.uk/isdocs.

See also www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Getting help.

7.5    Media Centres

Media Centres offer a range of media services at each site for staff and students including
lending a range of equipment such as camcorders, digital audio recorders, digital cameras,
overhead projectors etc. The site media centres also sell a range of IT and a/v
consumables. On the Moulsecoomb site, the Media Centre is located in the Watts Building.

For full details go to www.brighton.ac.uk/is/students > Media Centres.

7.6    Studentcentral




studentcentral is the student intranet for the University of Brighton; it is a one-stop-shop for
online information whilst studying here.

What's in studentcentral?



                                           Page 50
When you login to studentcentral your personalised home page gives you access to
academic and other resources wherever you have internet access – at home, at work,
abroad or in the university. Once logged in studentcentral will give you access to information
about your school, your course and each of the modules you take. If you have a special
need to have your home page personalised even further, please contact the studentcentral
team.

Content areas for your school, your course and your individual modules, containing:

      Key course information such as your course handbook (see course area) and module
       descriptors (module areas).
      Timetables and examination schedules (see school area)
      School, course and module announcements – these appear in the home page too
      Course material – module handbooks, other documents, powerpoint slides images,
       audio or video in the module areas (see module areas).
      A Learning Resources section with your Reading Lists (see module areas)
      Revision quizzes, test and surveys (see module areas)
      "Assignments" items for submitting the electronic copy of your assignments (see
       module areas).
      Past 2 years of examination papers (school area).
      Communications tools so you can email everyone in a module, discuss online,
       communicate in real time (video conferencing), share files in small groups, etc.
      Student rep contact details, course board minutes, and annual academic health
       reports (see school area).

On your home page you will also see the ASK Study Guide and Student Life. Please have
a look around these areas plus the school area when you first log in.
Useful links to
     the Online Library (see section 7.3, above)
     unimail (see section 7.4 above and IS document is917: A guide to studentmail )
     Community @ Brighton – see below for more information.

To find out more


Click on the Help icon           for information about studentcentral and community. To get
started, search for "help" or "started".




Social networking and blogging service

Once described as an online school playground, Community @ Brighton is a full social
networking and blog service for students and staff at the University of Brighton.

Community@Brighton is shaped by the people who use it. It is available to all staff and
students via studentcentral or directly by visiting https://community.brighton.ac.uk/. Staff and
students are equal members and everyone can contribute in the same way.
Community@Brighton may also be used to support your tutors to support learning, so it’s
worth logging on and taking a look.




                                           Page 51
                        Your Blog (weblog) is your online diary – simply click "post an new
                        entry" and fill in the boxes.
                             You can make your blog private, university-only or public.
  Keep a blog                You can add links and pictures.
                             Unless you make posting private, you will become famous for
                                five minutes as the latest blog tops the list!


                        Your Profile is your public face, what you want people to know about
  Present your          you. Add keywords / tags for your interests and they become links for
  profile               you to find out who else used them. Then you can make like-minded
                        people into your online friends.
  Find online           Add people to "Your Friends" so you can find their blog more easily.
  friends               Find your friends list in the right-hand panel.
                        Keep your files on Community to use in your blogs and share with your
  Store your files
                        friends; you can store up to 10MB.
  Create and     Buy and sell books and equipment, look for accommodation
  browse adverts
                        Join an existing community such as Environmental Action Network,
                        New Students, Gig-Addicts or Chaplaincy. Choose whatever matches
                        your interests and use the community blogs to discuss things.
  Join                  Communities can be public or closed.
  communities
                        Set up your own Community to share a group blog (and wiki) with like-
                        minded people, for
                            a club or society - to announce events meetings or discuss
  … or create                  topics of special interest
  your own                  a special interest group - to advertise or comment upon related
                               external events or ideas
                            a school, course, module or project group - to share ideas,
                               arrange meetings
  RSS feeds             Use Community to manage your RSS feeds
  Portfolios and        Draw together information to present your CV, your Portfolio or simply
  CVs                   a small web site. Make it public if you like.


7.7       ASK Study Guide

In addition to course-specific guidance, online resources to help you study effectively are
available through the ASK Study Guide on Studentcentral. You will find the link in the “My
tools” menu on the homepage. The ASK Study Guide offers advice on how to make the
most of seminars and lectures, reading and notemaking, preparing for exams, tackling
stress, essay writing, oral presentations, group work and many other topics. You will also
find information about the weekly Study Support workshops held at all university sites, how
to book tutorials or groups and specialist services such as the Maths & Stats Support Unit
and English Language Support Programme.


7.8       Useful web addresses

         Information Services web site       http://www.brighton.ac.uk/is/
         Online Library                      http://library.brighton.ac.uk
                                            Page 52
   student mail           https://uni.brighton.ac.uk/
   studentcentral         http://studentcentral.brighton.ac.uk/
   studentcentral help    http://student.brighton.ac.uk/help/faq.php
   Help Documents         www.brighton.ac.uk/is/docs




                          Page 53
8.      STUDENT SERVICES

Opportunities and support to help you get the most out of your time at university.

Student Services is a central department providing a range of services to support you
through university and to make sure you get the most from the student experience. We’re
separate from your school and are here to help with all kinds of academic and non-academic
issues.

Our experienced and supportive staff offer advice on a range of issues, including:
   - Advice about money worries and how to live on a budget.
   - Support in finding jobs and volunteering opportunities.
   - Help accessing academic support if you have a disability, learning difficulty or long-
      term medical condition.
   - One to one support for students with worries or concerns in a safe, confidential
      space.

Here for you, whatever the issue

Below is an outline of some of the ways in which we can help you during your time here.

Career development                                     Disability and dyslexia support
Build your employability skills and boost              If you’ve got a disability, specific learning
your graduate potential, with careers                  difficulty or long term-health condition and
guidance, enterprise skills and                        choose to disclose it in confidence to the
employment and volunteering                            Disability and Dyslexia team, you’ll
opportunities.                                         discover the wide range of academic and
www.brighton.ac.uk/careers                             personal support available.
                                                       www.brighton.ac.uk/disability
Chaplaincy
There’s more to the Chaplaincy than you                Health and wellbeing
think with social events, retreats, worship,           Looking after yourself whist at university
discussion, support and listening.                     helps you to get the most of your
Childcare                                              experience. Our links to local surgeries
                                                       give you access to a doctor, while our
With two nurseries, both rated as                      health and wellbeing workshops and
‘outstanding’ by Ofsted, the University of             information help you to keep everything in
Brighton is an excellent choice for high               balance – so look after your mind and
quality, affordable and flexible childcare.            body.
www.brighton.ac.uk/childcare
Counselling                                            Student Advice Service
                                                       When it comes to your finances at
Whatever the reason, if you are finding                university it pays to be money wise; so for
academic life is causing you concern, or               expert advice on financial issues, including
for personal reasons you need someone                  fees, grants, bursaries, loans, and money
to talk things over with, you don't need to            management, contact the Student Advice
feel that you are all alone with your                  Service. They can also help if you are an
worries. Talk to one of our trained                    international student needing immigration
counsellors in a safe and confidential                 advice, or support if you’re experiencing
space.                                                 culture shock and home sickness.
                                                        www.brighton.ac.uk/moneymatters



                                               Page 54
Get in touch
You can find further information about our services and answers to your student life queries at
www.brighton.ac.uk/studentlife

You can also access our services at each campus, by visiting our offices or call us to find out more or
book an appointment.

Eastbourne - Trevin Towers                                 T: 01273 643845
Falmer – E354, Checkland Building                          T: 01273 643584
Grand Parade – First Floor, main building                  T: 01273 643187
Moulsecoomb - Manor House, Moulsecoomb Place               T: 01273 642895
Hastings – Havelock Road Building, Room 6.06               T: 01273 644636

We can also help answer your questions via email at studentservices@brighton.ac.uk




                                               Page 55
9.      STUDENT ENTITLEMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
9.1   Entitlements
9.2   Responsibilities
9.3   Brighton Business School – Attendance and Engagement policy
9.4   Disability statement
9.5   Fire evacuation
9.6   Observing copyright laws

___________________________________________________________________________

9.1 Entitlements

You are entitled to:

       guidance and support throughout your time at the University, including referral to Student
        Services if and when necessary (see 8 above);

       information about the assessment of your programme of study, including any assessed
        supervised work experience; which or how many elements must be passed to obtain an
        award and what weighting each assessment carries, the deadlines for submission of course
        or other work; and any elements that may in no circumstances be the subject of
        compensation for failure (see 5 and 6 above);

       information about the regulations for progressing through your programme of study and
        achieving the award (see 6 above);

       express your views about your course or other services you receive (see 3.4
        above)(although this must be balanced by your responsibility to do so without being
        defamatory or derogatory to or about individuals whether online, in writing or in person);

       procedure for raising issues and obtaining help and guidance when things go wrong (see
        the University Student Handbook and 3.3. and 3.4 above);

       have the right to confidentiality, and compliance with data protection laws (see University
        Student Handbook) for any personal information, unless you wish it to be communicated
        further (e.g. to a Course Leader, Exam Board etc).

9.2 Responsibilities

It is your responsibility to:

       make yourself aware of University policies and abide by them (see the University Student
        Handbook);

       make yourself aware of the regulations around plagiarism (see the University Student
        Handbook);

       be regular and punctual in your attendance and if you have missed a session find out what you
        have missed (see the University Student Handbook) ;

       be aware of the safety rules applying to your course or School; read the safety notices and
        know what to do in the event of a fire; familiarise yourself with escape routes; and be aware of
        at least two escape routes from your place of study or any other area you may occupy (see the
        University Student Handbook);


                                               Page 56
      do not smoke in university buildings, including Halls of residence (see the University Student
       Handbook), and abide by the terms of any Halls of Residence tenancy agreement;

      make your self aware of and abide by intellectual property laws (see the University Student
       Handbook and 9.3.4 below);

       ensure that you are fully conversant with the rules and regulations governing your course;

      make contact with your Course Leader should the need arise;

      attend any meetings with tutors at the time agreed;

      regularly check the post trays, notice board and your university e-mail;

      notify your Course Leader of any circumstances which may affect your performance on the
       programme in advance of any deadlines;

      inform the Administrator of any change of address, workplace or contact number including
       where you will be living in vacation periods (see 3.2.1 above).

9.3 Brighton Business School – Attendance and Engagement policy

Engagement with your studies

You are expected to engage with all the learning activities which form part of your programme and attend
all scheduled course workshops, lectures and seminars. Attendance registers will be maintained by your
course team and should your individual attendance fall below an average of 75%, this may be taken into
consideration by Examination Boards when deliberating on the granting of referrals.
You may however be unable to attend scheduled workshops, lectures and seminars from time to time
due to exceptional circumstances (for example personal illness, family bereavement, hospitalisation
etc.). In such cases, it is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the course management team
are informed at the time and that such absence is discussed with and recorded by the course team.
Where possible, students are expected to provide evidence supporting their absence and a lack of
evidence may limit the decision making options of the course leader and/or examination board.

Should your record of attendance be consistently poor (i.e. fall below the 75% minimum requirement),
you may be required to attend a meeting with your Course Leader to discuss your absences. In the
event you fail to attend the meeting without due notice, you will receive a further letter inviting you to a
re-arranged meeting. If you do not attend this meeting, you will then be considered to have withdrawn
from the course.

Your responsibilities as a student

We encourage you to make use of all the facilities and resources available to you, including libraries
and ICT facilities, to enable you to pursue your studies diligently and take responsibility for your own
learning. You should familiarise yourself with University and Brighton Business School Rules and
Regulations including any relating to your course and should be aware of the requirements of your
course. Your course programme team, including the course administrators are available to clarify any
questions you may have. Contact details of all the course team are available in your course handbook.
9.4 Disability Statement

The University of Brighton is fully committed to the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Act
2001 (SENDA), which extended to educational institutions the provisions of the 1995 Disability
Discrimination Act. The booklet entitled Access and Support for Disabled Students summarises the
University’s approach to and provision for students with all types of disability, including long-term
conditions, mental health difficulties, sensory impairments and specific learning difficulties. A copy of
the booklet is available from Student Services, and a reference copy is held in the Professional and

                                                 Page 57
Partnership Office. Fuller information            about    relevant    services    can    be    found    at:
http://www.brighton.ac.uk/disability/

Staff who co-ordinate support for students with disabilities or specific learning needs are based in the
Disability & Dyslexia Team in Student Services located in the Manor House. They can be contacted by

phone           01273 643799
fax             01273 643669
email           disability@brighton.ac.uk

If you have disability or specific learning needs please also raise this with Donna Clark in the
Undergraduate Office (M160) who can make you aware of student support available.


9.5     Fire evacuation

On hearing the fire alarm
Leave the building by nearest route
Close all doors behind you.
Report to assembly point as shown on nearest fire action notice.

At all times:
Use the nearest available exit.
Do not stop to collect personal belongings.
Do not run or try to pass the person in front.
Do not use the lift.
Do not re-enter the building.
Do not congregate outside the main entrance.

NB These are generic procedures; please refer to any additional specific procedures
associated to individual buildings.

Students with a disability or mobility problems should notify their personal tutor, course
leader or course administrator so that evacuation arrangements can be set up for them.

For further information on health and safety procedures at the University go to:
http://staffcentral.brighton.ac.uk/safety/

9.6 Observing copyright laws

Under UK copyright law, you must not copy someone else’s copyright material unless (a) you have
their permission or (b) it falls within the limits of what is known as ‘fair dealing’. Most works remain in
copyright for 70 years after the death of the author/creator.
‘Fair dealing’ for ‘private study or research for a non-commercial purpose’ permits you to make a
 single copy of a ‘reasonable proportion’ of a copyright work. ‘Reasonable’ is not legally defined but it is
 recommended that you keep within the following limits:
•     one complete chapter or up to 5% of a book;
•     one article from any one issue of a periodical or set of conference
      proceedings;
•     up to 10% (up to a maximum of 20 pages) per short book (without chapters), report,
      standard or pamphlet;
•     one poem or short story (maximum 10 pages) from an anthology;
•     one separate illustration or map up to A4 size;
•     short excerpts only from musical works (not whole works or movements) and no
      copying for performance purposes.

                                                 Page 58
In all cases, you should acknowledge the source of the work.

9.6.1   Multiple photocopies

Should you need to make multiple copies of copyright material for classroom use, please first read the
notice ‘Copyright – multiple copies’ which should be on display near each university photocopier and is
also available online at http://www.brighton.ac.uk/is/copyright.

9.6.2   Copyright and the internet

Do not assume that just because something appears on the internet, it must be in the public domain.
All material on the internet is protected by copyright. Look for a copyright statement (often on the
website’s home page under ‘copyright’, ‘terms and conditions’, ‘disclaimer’ or similar) and unless
copyright has been explicitly waived, seek permission before re-using it in any publicly-accessible
document (web page, poster, etc). Taking a single paper copy of a ‘reasonable proportion’ for ‘private
study or research for a non-commercial purpose’ (using the fair dealing limits outlined under ‘single
photocopies’ above) is OK but cutting and pasting from someone’s web page to add to your own
website or to send to a group is not. For more guidelines on electronic fair dealing, see
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/services/elib/papers/pa/licence/fairnote

If you are looking for an image to use in your coursework, remember that images retrieved from
Google, Yahoo, etc are often subject to copyright. Start by checking the sources listed on the Online
Library’s ‘film, image and sound sources’ page on the Reference Shelf
http://library.brighton.ac.uk/pages/Film__Image_and_Sound_Sources/index.php
Many of these collections are available for non-commercial use without payment.

9.6.3   Scanning

You may scan a ‘reasonable proportion’ of a printed document for ‘private study or research for a non-
commercial purpose’ (using the fair dealing limits outlined under ‘single photocopies’ above) but it must
remain for your personal use only. Do not put scanned copyright material on a computer network and
do not distribute it by email. If you use any scanned copyright material in your course work, do not alter
it, always put text between quotation marks, and always acknowledge your source. Remember,
unacknowledged use of scanned material in your course work could make you liable to accusations of
copyright theft and plagiarism.


9.6.4   For further information on copyright

The UK Intellectual Property Office website (http://www.ipo.gov.uk/) is a useful starting point for
copyright information but much of the university’s use of copyright material is determined by individual
licence agreements covering material such as print materials, digitised texts, OS maps, newspapers,
t.v. and radio programmes, e-journals etc. If you need any further information on this subject, please
check out the documents on copyright at http://www.brighton.ac.uk/is/copyright .




                                                Page 59
10.    MISCELLANEOUS

10.1   Student support
10.2   References
10.3   Attendance
10.4   Communication
10.5   Prizes and graduation


10.1 Student support

Each student is allocated a personal tutor, who will be a member of the academic staff who teaches on
the course. If you have a problem of a personal nature, you should normally first discuss it with your
personal tutor.

In the current academic year, Alison Bone will be the personal tutor to all students on the course, in
addition to her role as Course Leader.

Even if your personal tutor is unable to help they should be able to refer you to someone within the
University who can.

The role of the personal tutor is not just reactive but occasionally proactive. If you appear to be having
difficulties with the course or have been absent without explanation it is likely that you will be asked to
meet with your personal tutor to try and resolve any issues.

10.2 References

References from the Course Leader are required to support applications for the Legal Practice Course,
Bar Vocational Course and further academic study (eg an LLM at another University). Applications for
these courses all have deadlines which are fixed months in advance eg 1 December for the full-time
Legal Practice Course at the College of Law. Please manage your time appropriately. The Course
Leader is very happy to provide a reference but does not appreciate being asked to write one ‘by the
end of today as it has to be with them by tomorrow…’

10.3 Attendance

You are expected to attend punctually all classes. This is in your interest as you can expect aspects of
coursework and examination questions to be based upon the material covered during this contact time.
Examination questions in particular may be based upon material presented in a single lecture, or issue
discussed in a seminar.

Students who are absent from the course for longer than two weeks without good reason may be
deemed to have withdrawn. Therefore, should you be away, you must let your personal tutor (the
Course Leader) know at the earliest possible opportunity, preferably by e-mail.

10.4 Communication

E-mail is the preferred means of communication for almost all aspects of the course. The Course
Leader and other staff will normally use the e-mail facility on studentcentral to let you know of
important announcements e.g. cancellation or rearrangement of a class so please ensure you access
your mail regularly. We will normally write to you with formal communications to your home address so
do remember to notify us promptly of any changes by contacting the Course Administrator, Steve
Sutcliffe (room 140, tel 01273 642571, e.mail s.r.sutcliffe@brighton.ac.uk).

10.5 Prizes and graduation

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A prize of £50 in book tokens is awarded by Oxford University Press to the best first year Postgraduate
Diploma in Law/ CPE student.

A prize of £50 in book tokens is normally available to the best second year Postgraduate Diploma in
Law/CPE student.

In the event of more than one student achieving the same highest average mark, the prize will go to
the student with the highest number of marks of 70% and over with respect to individual coursework
tasks and examination papers for the year of study in question.

Prizes are awarded at a special ceremony held on graduation day. Students are encourage to attend
graduation to meet up with fellow students and staff and also to consolidate the important networking
contacts!




                                              Page 61
                                                                                       APPENDIX

Assignment Submission via Studentcentral
There are two different tools that are used to submit assignments in studentcentral.

The first is a Turnitin submission point and will have this icon      next to the submission
point.
Turnitin is used for ‘Essay’ type submissions, in other words if your assignment is a written
paper then you will be submitting to a Turnitin submission point, e.g. a Word file



Figure 1 - example Turnitin submission point



The second is a Blackboard submission point and will have this icon         next to the
submission point. This type of submission point will be used if you are required to submit a
file other than a written paper file, e.g. an Excel file.




Figure 2 - example Blackboard submission point

In order that you online submission is successful please follow the correct instructions for the
type of submission point you have in your module area on studentcentral.
Before you submit your assignment...
        When you hand in an assignment you will be able to submit it online – your tutor will
         discuss the details with you so that you know what to expect.

        Don’t forget that it’s always a good idea to keep a backup copy of all your work.

        The filename should not be more than 25 characters long (preferably shorter) and avoid
         using spaces – distinguish separate words by using capital letters, for example:
         ThisIsMyFile.doc or use underscores, like this This_is_my_file.doc

        In Turnitin only the following file types are acceptable: MS Word, WordPerfect, PDF,
         HTML, RTF, and plain text. Zip (compressed) files are not acceptable.

        If you have created your file using Microsoft Works, you must save it first in Rich Text
         Format (.rtf) before submitting it to Turnitin.

        Your file should not be larger than 20MB if submitting to Turnitin.


How to submit your assignment to a Blackboard submission point
    1. Go into the appropriate module or course area from your Home Page on studentcentral

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2. Click the menu link where your tutor has told you to submit the assignment (this is
   usually named Assignments or Assessments)

3. Click the appropriate assignment (there should be instructions under the link so you
   know you’re choosing the right one but if in doubt, check with your tutor)




4. The screen will look something like the one below. Your tutor may have written some
   instructions for you in the Assignment Information section, so make sure you read
   them carefully before submitting your work. The Due Date should be visible there too.




5. In the Assignment Materials section write some comments in the Comments box – e.g.
   your name, cohort, date file submitted etc (DO NOT use the Submission box)

6. Click the Browse My Computer button and browse to the file on your computer or USB
   stick that you wish to upload electronically and click Open




                                       Page 63
7. Once you have attached a file the screen should look like the picture below.




8. If you have another file to submit, click Browse for Local File again and repeat as
   above. Your filenames should indicate the order in which the files should be opened
   and the number of files in total, for example:
          Myfile1of3.doc
          Myfile2of3.doc
          Myfile3of3.doc
9. Continue until you have added all your files

10. When you have added all your files and want to send them to your tutor, click Submit
    at the top or bottom of the screen (NOTE : clicking Save as Draft does NOT actually
    send the file but simply uploads it so that you can send it at a later date if you wish)




                                        Page 64
   11. You’ll see a receipt on the screen showing the time and date the file was submitted.
       You could print this out if you wish




   12. Click OK to exit that screen
   13. Note that you only have one attempt, i.e. you can only submit your assignment once
   14. When the assignment has been marked by the tutor, which may be some weeks later,
   you        will find that clicking that link again will allow you to see their feedback – but
   until then you will simply see the file you sent them
   15. If something goes wrong, speak to your tutor as soon as you can




About Turnitin
Turnitin is a Web-based service that can find and highlight matching or unoriginal text in a
written assignment.
Turnitin checks any papers submitted against its database of materials to look for matches or
near-matches in strings of text. Turnitin then generates an Originality Report. The Originality
Report summarizes and highlights matching text. If submitting your assignment through
Turnitin you will be able to submit your paper as many times as you choose up until the
assignment deadline when that submission will be final, each time you submit your paper you
will be able to view your paper‘s originality score.
For details of how to interpret the originality score we would recommend you visit the
following link to view a short video: http://tinyurl.com/6d62bbd

                                            Page 65
How to submit your assignment to a Turnitin submission point
   1. Go into the appropriate module or course area from your Home Page on studentcentral
   2. Click the menu link where your tutor has told you to submit the assignment (this is
      usually named Assignments or Assessments)
   3. Click View/Complete (under the assignment title)




You’ll need to wait a few seconds (longer if you have a ‘slow’ internet connection) as the
submission area is on a different server outside of the University. It does sometimes look like
nothing is happening – but be patient!
   4. Click the Submit button at the bottom right.




      You may need to wait a bit again

   5. Once in, you should find the system knows who you are and will have entered your
      first and last names in the appropriate boxes

   6. Don’t worry if your names have not already been entered into the boxes, just type them
      in yourself

   7. Type the title of your assignment in the submission title box

   8. Click the Browse button and find the file on your computer that you wish to submit
   Remember, the system only supports the following file types: Word, WordPerfect, pdf,
   html, rtf and plain text. The total file size must be less than 20MB




                                            Page 66
9. When you have found the file, click Open to attach it
The name of the file you have uploaded will then appear in the upload box




10. When you are ready to submit the file click the upload button

11. Wait a few moments while your work is processed

12. Eventually Step 2 appears which displays a preview of the submitted work so you can
    review it and make sure it is the correct file that you wish to submit.




NOTE: that this is not the formatted view – just the text but be assured your tutor will see
the fully formatted work
NOTE: If it is incorrect, click Return to Upload page and browse to the correct one.

                                        Page 67
   13. If it is correct, click Submit.




   14. Wait for the final time.

   15. You will now be able to view your formatted work (first page only) with a success
       receipt if all is well and an email will be sent to your Unimail account.




That’s it! Turnitin will send you a confirmation email to your UniMail account.
The email will be sent from jisc_help@turnitin.com with the Subject heading TurnitinUK
Digital Receipt
This could be printed or used as evidence of posting so you should not have to contact your
school to check the assignment has gone through.




                                          Page 68
Recommendations in preparation for e-submission
If you choose to submit your assignment online from outside of the university we recommend
that you do a trial submission, well before the assignment deadline, from the computer that
you plan to use for the final submission. This will give you will have plenty of time to rectify
any problems that occur, which will ensure that you meet the required deadline.
If using Turnitin for your submission you will be able to submit as many times as you choose
up until the deadline, you can use this to test the submission process.
For details of the system requirements if using Turnitin please see the details on their website:
http://turnitin.com/static/support/system.php




                                            Page 69

				
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