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					indiana state university
  college of technology
      department of the
       built environment




      cida par fall 2010
Institutional and Program Data


Recommended page limit: 8 (including the Institutional and Program Data Form)

1) List the names, titles, addresses, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses of administrators who will receive
   copies of the final Accreditation Report. CIDA distributes a limit of 6 complimentary copies of the
   Accreditation Report to the institution. Additional copies may be requested for a fee of $25 per report. Be sure
   to include the following individuals:

Chancellor, president,    Name and title    Dr. Daniel J. Bradley, President
provost, or chief         Address           PH 208
academic officer of the   Address
university or school      City, State Zip   Terre Haute, IN 47809
                          Phone             812.237.4000
                          E-mail            Dan.Bradley@indstate.edu

Dean of the college or    Name and title    Dr. Bradford L. Sims, Dean of Technology
school                    Address           101 North Sixth Street
                          Address
                          City, State Zip   Terre Haute, IN 47809
                          Phone             818.237.3166
                          E-mail            Bradford.Sims@indstate.edu

Chair of the department   Name and title    Dr. Jeffery G. McNabb, Associate Dean of Technology
                          Address           TC 101C
                          Address
                          City, State Zip   Terre Haute, IN 47809
                          Phone             812.237.2987
                          E-mail            Jeffery.McNabb@indstate.edu

Head of the interior      Name and title    Mary Sterling, Program Coordinator
design program            Address           FCS 104C
                          Address
                          City, State Zip   Terre Haute, IN 47809
                          Phone             812.237.3311
                          E-mail            Mary.Sterling@indstate.edu

Other                     Name and title    Dr. Jack C. Maynard, Provost
                          Address           PH 212
                          Address
                          City, State Zip   Terre Haute, IN 47809
                          Phone             812.237.2309
                          E-mail            Jack.Maynard@indstate.edu




Report submitted by (signature and date)
                                                                                  Dean
                                                                          Dr. Bradford Sims




                                                                                           Director of Academic
                                                             Associate Dean
                                                                                             Student Services
                                                            Dr. Jeffrey McNabb
                                                                                              Dr. Kara Harris




                                                         Ph.D. Program Director              Dean's Admin
                                                          Dr. George Maughan             Ms. Joy Throckmorton



      Dept.                  Dept. Human Resource             Dept. Applied                                              Dept. Electronics and
                                                                                              Dept. Aviation                                              Military and ROTC
                               Development and                Engineering &                                              Computer Engineering
Built Environment                                                                              Technology                                                      Programs
                                 Performance             Technology Management                                               Technology
Dr. Gerald Cockrell              Technologies                                              Mr. Harry Minniear                                           (No Department Chair)
                                                             Dr. Affan Badar                                                 Dr. Joe Ashby
                               Dr. Cindy Crowder


                                                                                                                              Automation and Control
        Construction                                           Advanced Manufacturing           Aviation Management
                                                                                                                              Engineering Technology             Air Force ROTC
       Management (BS)               Human Resource               Management (BS)                        (BS)
                                                                                                                                        (BS)
                                     Development (BS)



     Interior Architecture                                     Automotive Engineering           Professional Aviation          Computer Engineering
                                                                                                                                                                   Army ROTC
          Design (BS)                Human Resource               Technology (BS)               Flight Technology (BS)           Technology (BS)
                                    Development (MS)



      Safety Management                                         Adult Career Education                                        Information Technology            Vetrens Center
              (BS)                   Textile, Apparel,                   (BS)                                                           (BS)
                                    Merchandizing (BS)



        Health & Safety
       Management (MS)                                           Career and Technical                                         Electronics Engineering
                                                                   Education (MS)                                                 Technology (BS)




                                                                                                                                 Electronics and
                                                                    Packaging (BS)                                             Computer Technology
                                                                                                                                      (MS)




                                                                   Technology and
                                                                Engineering Education
                                                                         (BS)



                                                                    Mechancial
                                                                    Engineering
                                                                  Technology (BS)




                                                                Technology Education
                                                                        (MS)




                                                               Technology Management
                                                                 (BS) (On Campus and
                                                                   Online for a 2+2)



                                                               Technology Management
                                                                (MS) (ONLINE DEGREE)
                                                                  Concetration Areas
                                                                 Across the Entire COT


                                                                Technology Management
                                                                (Ph.D.) (ONLINE DEGREE)
                                                               Concetration Areas Across
                                                                    the Entire COT
Institutional and Program Data Form


 Type of institution                                  Public
 (Check one)                                          Private, non-profit
                                                      Private, for-profit

 Size of population where the institution is          Population of 250,000 or more persons
 located                                              Population of 50-250,000 persons
 (Check one)                                          Population under 50,000

 Total enrollment for the institution on the
 campus where the program is located              10,534

 Academic year of this report                     2010

 Current Council for Interior Design                  Accredited
 Accreditation status                                 Not accredited
 (Check one)                                          On probation

 Check all institutional accreditation(s)            Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges of
                                                     Technology
                                                     Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools
                                                     Distance Education and Training Council
                                                     Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
                                                     North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
                                                     New England Association of Schools and Colleges
                                                     Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
                                                     Western Association of Schools and Colleges
                                                     National Association of Schools of Art and Design
                                                     Provincial Ministry of Education
                                                     Other (specify)
                                                     __________________________________________________

 Check other specialized accreditations or           National Association of Schools of Art and Design
 endorsements for the interior design                National Kitchen and Bath Association
 program and/or unit                                 American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences,
                                                     Council for Accreditation
                                                     National Architectural Accrediting Board
                                                     Other (specify)
                                                     __________________________________________________

 Which classification best describes your             Doctoral/Research Universities
 institution:                                         Master's Colleges and Universities
                                                      Baccalaureate Colleges and Universities
                                                      Baccalaureate/Associates Colleges
                                                      Associates Colleges
                                                      Not applicable

 Primary institutional mission                        Teaching
 (Check one)                                          Service
                                                      Research




January 2009                                   Program Name                          Institutional Program Data Form, page 1
                                 Applicants must use this form or duplicate format
Institutional and Program Data Form


 Academic unit housing program                         Architecture
 (Check one)                                           Art
                                                       Design
                                                       Fine Arts
                                                       Interior Design
                                                       Human Ecology
                                                       Engineering/Technology
                                                       Other (specify)
                                                       ___________________________________________________

 Name of College or School (within the
 institution that houses the program)             COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

 Division, if applicable, or unit name where
 the program is housed

 Department, if applicable, or unit name
 where the program is housed                      THE DEPARTMENT OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

 Identify the three most influential factors                  Administration
 impacting change to the program                              Facilities
 curriculum where 1 indicates the most
 influential                                       2          Faculty
                                                              Finances
                                                   1          Council for Interior Design Accreditation Standards
                                                   3          Industry trends
                                                              Societal trends
                                                              Student demographics
                                                              Practitioner feedback
                                                              Research
                                                              Advisory Board
                                                              Student assessment
                                                              Other (specify)

 Degree(s) offered by the accredited program
 or program seeking accreditation (list only
 those degrees eligible for accreditation
 review)                                          BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

 Degree(s) or certificate(s) offered by the
 program but not eligible for accreditation
 review

 Program length; total credit hours required       124        Semester hours
 for graduation, including liberal arts and                   Quarter hours
 electives. (Indicate in the units used by
 institution)                                                 Trimester hours




January 2009                                   Program Name                           Institutional Program Data Form, page 2
                                  Applicants must use this form or duplicate format
Institutional and Program Data Form



 Total liberal arts and sciences/general            48          Semester hours
 studies hours required to complete the                         Quarter hours
 program. (Indicate in the units used by
 institution)                                                   Trimester hours

 Of the total number of credit hours required       0           Semester hours
 for graduation, how many are elective                          Quarter hours
 credits in the program. (Indicate in the units
 used by institution)                                           Trimester hours

 How often do practicing professionals                  1-3 times per semester/quarter
 (including jurors, project critics, guest              4-6 times per semester/quarter
 lecturers, and mentors) participate in the             7-9 times per semester/quarter
 program?                                               more than 10 times per
                                                        semester/quarter

 Rate whether the number of practicing             Inadequate                             Adequate
 professionals who participate in the
 program is adequate                                     1        2        3        4         5
 (check one)

 Is work experience (internship, co-op)
 required?                                              Yes           No
    If yes, indicate the minimum number of
    clock hours needed to fulfill this             320 CLOCK
    requirement.                                   HOURS
    .
 If work experience (internship, co-op) is
 elective, what percentage of students
 complete this?                                    ___________ %

 Are students required to take business
 courses from units outside the program?                Yes           No
    If yes, indicate the number of credit
    hours needed to fulfill this requirement.

 Does the curriculum include a service
 learning or community service requirement?             Yes           No
    If yes, indicate the required clock hours
    or measure of participation.                   FIFTEEN (15)
                                                   CLOCK HOURS
                                                   FOR HABITAT
                                                   FOR HUMANITY.
                                                   INTERIOR
                                                   DESIGN STUDIO
                                                   PROJECTS ARE
                                                   OFTEN
                                                   COMMUNITY
                                                   SERVICE
                                                   PROJECTS.




January 2009                                    Program Name                             Institutional Program Data Form, page 3
                                 Applicants must use this form or duplicate format
Institutional and Program Data Form


 Is any of the curriculum provided through
 distance learning?                                      Yes            No
     If yes, list the courses and indicate
     whether required (R) or elective (E).         SOME GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
     Indicate with an * the courses that are
     also offered on site.

 If there is a maximum number of credit                N/A         Semester hours
 hours that may be taken by distance                               Quarter hours
 education, indicate the amount.
                                                                   Trimester hours

 What percentage of students transfer from
 other institutions into your program?             30%

 Do you have any formal articulation
 agreements in place with those institutions?            Yes            No


 Number of students who are enrolled in the interior design program in the current academic year:

                                   Full Time             Part Time
     First year/freshmen                 9                     0

     Second year/sophomores               11                   1

     Third year/juniors                   11                   0

     Fourth year/seniors                  9                    0

     Fifth year if applicable

     Total enrollment for the
     current academic year                40                   1

 Estimate the percentage of students enrolled (include all students for all years) in the interior design curriculum
 who fall into the following categories (each section should equal 100%):

     Residents of the state/province                73              %

     Nonresidents of the state/province            22               %

     Nonresident aliens (international
     students)                                     5                %

     Total                                                     100%

     Male                                          10               %

     Female                                        90               %

     Total                                                     100%




January 2009                                    Program Name                          Institutional Program Data Form, page 4
                                 Applicants must use this form or duplicate format
Institutional and Program Data Form



     Black, non-Hispanic                                    7    %

     American Indian or Alaskan Native                      0    %

     Asian or Pacific Islander                              0    %

     Hispanic                                               5    %

     White, non-Hispanic                                    83 %

     Other/Undisclosed                                      5    %

     Total                                                  100%

     Traditional age students                               98 %

     Returning adult students                               2    %

     Total                                                  100%

     Students with previous baccalaureate
     degrees                                                    2%

     Students with previous associate degrees                   0%


 How many students completed the program         10             2008-09
 and graduated in each of the last three         13             2007-08
 academic years?
                                                 12             2006-07

 How many graduates from the past year are                      Health care
 employed as interior designers? If known,                      Hospitality
 indicate in the specializations listed.
                                                                Retail
                                                                Corporate
                                                                Residential
                                                 5              Unknown, but interior design

 How many students who completed the                            Interior design
 program during the past academic year are                      Architecture
 continuing their education in a graduate
 program?                                                       Business
                                                 1              Other (specify)
                                                                HISTORIC PRESERVATION




January 2009                                 Program Name                              Institutional Program Data Form, page 5
                                 Applicants must use this form or duplicate format
Institutional and Program Data Form



 What is the average student to faculty ratio        ______13______________:_________1___________
 in interior design studios?                               Students             Faculty

 Total full-time faculty members for the
 interior design program                                 2 FULL TIME FACULTY MEMBERS

 Total adjunct, part-time, and support faculty
 members or instructional personnel for core
 courses of the program
 (If there is change from year to year,
 provide an average of the past three years
 and indicate that the total is an average.)             3 ADJUNCT FACULTY MEMBERS

 Salary range for full-time faculty in the
 program (annual salary)                           $__49,000________________ to        $53,500_________________


 Full-time faculty members
 Name                            Highest      Discipline of    Passed    Full-time practitioner         Professional
                                 Degree       degree           NCIDQ     and/or faculty experience      Society
                                 MA,                                     (specify number of years       Memberships
                                 MS,                                     for each)                      (list all)
                                 Ph.D.                                   FT Practice FT Faculty
 MARY STERLING                   MA           ID               YES       25             11              IDEC, IIDA,
                                                                                                        USGBC
 JUAN JURADO                     MS           ID               NO        11            6                IDEC




 Does the state or province in which the
 program is located regulate the interior
 design profession and/or require licensing
 of interior designers?
                                                       Yes          No




January 2009                                    Program Name                          Institutional Program Data Form, page 6
                                 Applicants must use this form or duplicate format
Introduction


Recommended page limit: 3 pages

1) State the mission of the institution

    Indiana State University combines a tradition of strong undergraduate and graduate
    education with a focus on community and public service. We integrate teaching, research,
    and creative activity in a engaging challenging, and supportive learning environment to
    prepare productive citizens for Indiana and the world.

2) State the program’s philosophy and mission. Clearly differentiate between philosophy and mission by using the
   following headings.

    Program Philosophy
       to combine rigorous professional preparation with creative problem-solving to improve
       the quality of life through the built environment for individuals and communities

    Program Mission
       to empower program graduates to become innovative, environmentally and socially
       conscious designers
       to be involved in the community and public engagement
       to focus on the world of design and all its complexity in relation to its effect on people as
       well as their social interactions and behavior

3) Describe the impact of significant institutional characteristics on the teaching and learning environment.

    The significant institutional characteristics on the teaching and learning environment is:
    community engagement and experiential learning. In essence Indiana State University is
    infusing experiential learning as a core component in all of its academic programs. In terms
    of community engagement ISU is creating a coordinated community engagement
    program. The primary practicum projects selected for FCS250, FCS260, FCS497I, FCS355,
    FCS351, FCS352, and FCS451 are on the basis of their community engagement and/or
    experiential learning value.

4) Describe the impact of significant program characteristics on the teaching and learning environment.

    The Interior Design program strives to integrate and implement the advice and opinions of
    the professional community and alumni in determining the direction of the program. The
    program also strives to establish a learning environment that fosters and supports creativity.

    The program is a studio-based design curriculum in the Department of the Built Environment
    in the College of Technology effective 01 July 2010. The primary format of teaching and
    learning environment is the design/lighting studio in three hour units meeting twice a week
    per studio course. Of the 22 required courses in the major, 15 use the studio format with the
    internship using a distance based format and the other seven (7) using lecture (traditional)
    classroom format.

    The teaching and learning environment is structured to cross over between some courses.
    For example, in the FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design the practicum project
    uses the rendering knowledge and skills developed from FCS252 Interior Design Graphics
    II. Grading of the rendering qualifies for credit in both the FCS252 and FCS250 courses.
    Knowledge of historic preservation and adaptive reuse in FCS455 American Interiors and
    Furniture is applied in the FCS352 Interior Design Studio III historic preservation project.


                                                         1
Introduction


    The FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing and FCS497I CAD Fundamentals teach
    students the knowledge and skills for preparation of a technical set of working drawings and
    specifications and CAD respectively. The students produce one hard copy and one digital
    copy of the documents for grading by the professors. The ARTD400K or ARTD490 Portfolio
    course is team taught by the coordinator of the Graphic Design Program, Professor
    Anderson and coordinator of the Interior Design Program, Mary Sterling.

5) Briefly describe significant events in the program’s history, including the program’s origins and rationale and
   impact of significant changes in:

    -the program’s academic unit

    Historically in 1963-65 Interior Design first appeared as housing courses in the Department
    of Home Economics, in the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1978, the Interior Design
    Program was granted provisional accreditation by FIDER. In 1980 full accreditation was
    granted. The ID Program was revisited in spring 1986, and the program was notified of
    revocation of FIDER accreditation. In 1990-91, the ID Program reapplied to FIDER but was
    not granted accreditation. Since August 2000, the program has been endorsed and
    accredited by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA). In 2002, the National
    Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) accredited the Art Department and for
    the first time, the Interior Design Program at ISU. In October 2004, the program was
    accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA). As of 01 July 2010, the
    Interior Design Program is now a program in the Department of the Built Environment (with
    programs in Construction Management and Safety), in the College of Technology.

    -philosophy, mission, and goals

    Current philosophy, mission, and goals are more concise and measureable than in the past.

    -curriculum content and/or sequence

    The ISU ID Program complies with CIDA eligibility requirements.
       The Interior Design Program has awarded 53 Bachelor of Science Degrees since
       earning accreditation from the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) in
       October 2004.
       The Interior Design Program requires the completion of the following, which total 124
       semester hours and when successfully completed, is the equivalent of a Bachelor of
       Science in Interior Design from Indiana State University.
          o 54 credits of Foundational Studies which include:
                   9 credits of freshmen and junior composition
                   3 credits of communication
                   3 credits of math or quantitative literacy
                   2 credits of health & wellness
                   6 credits of non-native languages
                   4 credits of laboratory science
                   3 credits of social or behavioral science
                   3 credits of historical studies
                   3 credits of literacy studies
                   3 credits of fine & Performing arts
                   3 credits of global perspective & cultural diversity
                   3 credits of ethics & social responsibility
                   9 credits of upper division integrative elective


                                                        2
Introduction


            o   53 credits of interior design courses which consist of the following (first,
                sophomore, junior, and senior years are designed sequentially):
                     FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design
                     FCS151 Design Fundamentals
                     FCS152 Interior Design Graphics I
                     FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design
                     FCS251 Interior Design Studio I (residential + Bath)
                     FCS252 Interior Design Graphics II
                     FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing
                     FCS351 Interior Design Studio II (Kitchen +Restaurant)
                     FCS355 Interior Lighting & Color theory (Product + Restaurant)
                     FCS352 Interior Design Studio III (Competition + Restoration)
                     FCS455 American Interiors and Furniture (Restoration)
                     FCS353 Internship
                     FCS354 Traditional Interiors
                     FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV (Healthcare)
                     FCS452 Interior Design Studio V (Thesis/Senior pPoject)
                     FCS454 Contemporary Interiors & Furniture
                     FCS458 Professional Practices & Procedures
                     FCS497I CAD Fundamentals
            o   12 credits of out-of-area requirements:
                     ARTS102 Art Fundamentals: 2-D Design and Color
                     ARTS101 Art Fundamentals: Beginning Drawing
                     ARTH271 or 272 Survey of Art History I or II
                     ARTD400K or ARTD490 Portfolio
            o   05 credits of either additional foundational studies or a minor in marketing (18
                credits), or graphic design (15 credits) or study abroad (up to 18 credits) or
                university honors in major (15 additional credits)

    Since spring 2004, the curriculum has expanded to include ARTS101 Art Fundamentals:
    Beginning Drawing; ARTD490 or ARTD400K Interior Design Portfolio; and FCS497ICAD
    Fundamentals. Since fall 2010, the curriculum has eliminated FCS107, 109, 410, and 217.
    Curriculum revisions are in the development phase and are anticipated in place by fall 2011.
    Three additional courses (technical design in residential construction, 3-D digital
    visualization, and sustainable practices) will be added to the curriculum. The four year
    program will be expanded to a five year program with the inclusion of two six month co-op
    experiences.

6) If the program is currently accredited by CIDA, review CIDA’s eligibility requirements and briefly describe
   how the program complies with them (CIDA’s Professional Standards 2009, pages 3-5).

    The program has been accredited by CIDA since October 2004 and complies with CIDA’s
    Professional Standards 2009 as follows:
       Indiana State University is recognized by the US Department of Education
       The program of study culminates in a Bachelor of Science
       The program requires a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of diverse college-level
    liberal arts and sciences for graduation (Foundational Studies 2010)
       A minimum of two classes has graduated from the BS interior design program




                                                      3
Introduction



7) If the program is seeking accreditation for more than one degree under this CIDA accreditation review (for
   example, a Bachelor’s and a Professional Level Master’s), describe any differences in admission requirements
   or completion requirements. Note: If the degree programs are required to undergo separate site visits to seek
   accreditation, do not provide this information.
   N/A

8) If the program is taught at more than one site (for instance the senior year is taken at a different campus),
   briefly describe the sites and the distribution of program requirements, faculty members, and students among
   the sites. Note: If the programs offered at the different sites are required to undergo separate site visits to seek
   accreditation, do not provide this information.
   N/A




                                                          4
Analysis of the Program’s Success in Meeting its Goals


Recommended page limit: 2 pages

Briefly describe the self-study process your program undertook in preparation for the CIDA accreditation review.
Describe the measures and methods used to determine whether criteria are being met–not only CIDA Standards, but
also program goals. Describe which individuals or groups (e.g., faculty members, students, advisory boards, or
employers) were engaged in assessing the program and analyzing results and how they were involved. Highlight any
unique characteristics of your self-study process (e.g., any overlap with a self-study activity undertaken for
institutional or other purposes.)

Overview of Self-Study Process

See Advisory Board Meetings, Internship Evaluations, Alumni Surveys, and Sophomore
and Senior Portfolio Reviews in Standard 15.

Faculty Review of Curriculum: Faculty (full time and adjunct) are charged with identifying the
CIDA standards that are addressed in each of their courses with those standards included in the
syllabus. Students are informed of these standards and are asked to sign a contract each
semester after having reviewed which standards are being addressed in which courses. Faculty
meet once a week to review the progress taking place in each of the courses being taught that
semester. Projects are reviewed and discussed with outcomes in mind. CIDA Standards are
updated such as the 2006 to 2009 standards within the curriculum.

Student Representative: The student body has an Advisory Board Representative who bridges
the connection between the students and Advisory Board Members by attending and
participating in the spring and fall board meetings. The student representative serves a two year
term and is typically a junior. The student representative brings results from an informal survey
to the attention of the Advisory Board and faculty in the spring meeting in Indianapolis. Some
examples of concerns are: only offering the FCS353 Internship every second summer, offer
more residential studios/courses, and offer more courses in software such as Photoshop,
Illustrator, and 3-D.

A Self-Study Process in determining the new location for the Interior Design Program began in
earnest in the fall of 2009. The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) advised the
Interior Design Program Coordinator that the program was to decide its own fate as to whether
the ID Program would be best served by remaining in the CAS and being relocated into the
Department of Art and Design or to consider other options. At that same time, a new Dean of
the College of Technology (COT) had been hired and had voiced a desire to the other Deans to
have the ID Program relocate to the COT. Also the Dean of the College of Nursing, Health, and
Human Services (CNHHS) expressed their desire to have ID relocate to that college. The option
of moving to the CNHHS was quickly eliminated as all the students, advisory board members,
alumni and faculty agreed that the program would be lost amongst all the health specializations.
The fall semester of 2009 was spent considering only two options in meetings with the Dean of
COT and the Chair of the Department of Art and Design and the Dean of CAS. These meetings
involved as many students, advisory board members, alumni and faculty as feasible. A formal
survey was then conducted of the students, advisory board members, alumni and faculty. The
results of the vote (only one vote favored CAS, the Department of Art and Design) were to move
to the COT and be relocated into the new Department of the Built Environment. Currently the
program remains in the old FCS Building with offices, storage, exhibition areas, and
design/drafting/lighting studio in tact until renovations are completed to the second floor of the
Technology Annex Building with a scheduled move in of August 2011.




                                                       5
Analysis of the Program’s Success in Meeting its Goals


Recommended page limit: 2 pages

    1) State the program’s educational goals.

    Educational Goals
       to instill in the students a global perspective, and an awareness of diverse cultures,
       traditions, and worldviews
       to academically prepare the students for the National Council for Interior Design
       Qualification (NCIDQ) exam
       to promote a sense of teamwork, tolerance, and humanitarian values among the
       students through appropriate design projects
       to achieve 100% LEED GA for students upon graduation by 2011
       to encourage Study Abroad
       to retain the 95% job placement upon graduation

    Program goals:
       to successfully receive re-accreditation by CIDA in 2010
       to implement a selective admissions process by accepting a maximum of 30 students
       each year by 2011
       to gain recognition as one of the top five regional interior design programs according to
       Design Intelligence—by 2015
       to implement a liaison person between high schools and the program by 2015
       to change the degree awarded from the B.S. to the Bachelor of Interior Architecture
       Design (B.I.A.D.) by 2015
       to change the program from a 4-year to a 5-year program with a one year co-op
       experience by 2015
       to gain recognition by Design Intelligence as one of the top 20 national undergraduate
       interior design programs by 2020

2) Briefly describe the results of the program’s self-study in relation to the program’s ability to achieve its stated
   goals. The program’s self-study should address the goals in broad terms.

    The program’s self-study resulted in identified strengths such as three-dimensional design
    (FCS151Design Fundamentals 3-D [full size chair models], FCS251 Interior Design Studio I
    [birdhouse], FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color theory [luminaire working models], and
    FCS452 Interior Design Studio V [scaled conceptual models][senior thesis projects]); and
    human factors and universal design (FCS351 Interior Design Studio II [a research document
    accounts for the theories of human factors and universal design with applications in the
    restaurant project] and FCS451 Interior Design Studio III [healthcare project]. We believe
    that the strengths resulted from the research focus of the faculty who teach these courses.

    Principles of thermal design [12e] and how thermal systems impact interior design solutions
    [12f]; and energy, security, and building control systems [13d] and interface of furniture with
    distribution and construction systems [13e] are addressed with only secondary evidence
    provided in FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing, 351 Interior Design Studio II, and
    452 Interior Design Studio V. Gaps may have resulted from the lack of field trips to
    construction job sites and guest speakers such as contractors and trades people. The
    inclusion of a studio dedicated to corporate/commercial office design will address the
    interface of furniture and building systems. Also students most times demonstrate a
    preference for pure design over technical design



                                                          6
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards
Standard 1. Mission, Goals, and Curriculum
       The interior design program has a mission statement that describes the scope and purpose of the
       program. Program goals are derived from the mission statement and the curriculum is structured
       to achieve these goals.


Program Mission Statement:
      to empower program graduates to become innovative, environmentally and socially
      conscious designers
      to be involved in the community and public engagement
      to focus on the world of design and all its complexity in relation to its effect on people as
      well as their social interactions and behavior

Educational Goals
      to instill in the students a global perspective, and an awareness of diverse cultures,
      traditions, and worldviews
      to academically prepare the students for the National Council for Interior Design
      Qualification (NCIDQ) exam
      to promote a sense of teamwork, tolerance, and humanitarian values among the
      students through appropriate design projects
      to achieve 100% LEED GA for students upon graduation by 2011
      to encourage Study Abroad
      to retain the 95% job placement upon graduation

Curriculum:
       The program follows a logical sequence and content increases in degree of difficulty
       Four sequential history courses provide a source of inspiration for design projects and
       global perspective (ARTH271/272, FCS354, 455, and 454)
       Five design studios (studio I, II, III, IV, and V) focus on residential design, bath and
       kitchen design, restaurant design (hospitality and diverse cultures),
       restoration/preservation design, healthcare design, and thesis project provide range and
       depth to the sequential design problem experiences.
       Studio projects are 50% teamwork contributing to teamwork and tolerance experiences
       with 50% individual work
       Sophomores in spring semester work on site for Habitat for Humanity developing
       humanitarian values
       Internship provides professional design work experience for all students and in many
       instances becoming senior’s first full time position
       Professional etiquette is practiced in all studio classes in preparation for employment in
       the profession
       Manual drafting, drawing and model building are balanced with the use of software such
       as AutoCAD, Illustrator, Photoshop, In Design, Sketch Up, and Revit in first through four
       years in the program.
       Students are advised of Study Abroad opportunities in the spring semester of their junior
       year as well as optional summer Study Abroad between junior and senior years
       Student membership in Interior Designers Embrace Amplification (IDEA), ASID, IIDA,
       and NKBA is a program requirement.




                                                   7
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 2. Global Context for Design
       Entry-level interior designers have a global view and weigh design decisions within the
       parameters of ecological, socio-economic, and cultural contexts.

2a) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The Practicum Assignment in 2009 for
the Kitchen Project identified and employed concepts from Cradle to Cradle. In weeks one or
two the students are introduced to the Hanover Principles as conceived by William McDonough.
FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. The Birdhouse project must work within its environment.
Materials used for the project must be sustainable. The LG Surfaces competition was restricted
on the amount of material used for the project. The Final Project LEED for Homes involved
research and application of LEED principles into the final design solution.
 FCS351 Interior Design Studio II and FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Sustainability
is addressed through the recycling of an existing building and specifying LEED supportive
materials and products. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students are required to work on a
historic preservation project using green materials and work on LEED points certification chart.
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. As a requirement for the healthcare project the students have
to work with sustainable materials to show how many LEED points they accumulate for their
projects. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. The concepts, principles and theories of
sustainability are evidenced in Phase I Programming and Phase III Design Development
through LEED documentation and material and product selections.

2b) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. Students participated in the Field trip to Jasper JSI
Furniture Manufacture. Students also participated in a field trip to Chicago Merchandise Mart
with guided tours of the following showrooms: Knoll, Stark, Maharam, and Holly Hunt. FCS250
Materials and Finishes of Interior Design addresses the issues of global sourcing such as the
energy consumed to ship materials from a greater than 500 mile radius and specifying local
materials and labor whenever possible. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Globalization is
addressed on the Restaurant Project with material research and specification. In 2008 teams
worked on a restaurant in Hong Kong and another restaurant in India; in 2009 teams worked on
a restaurant in Australia and another in Turkey; random selections will be also used for country
selections in the 2010 Restaurant Project. Students are responsible for comprehensive research
into the global context for their restaurant theme. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Students
understand the impact of globalization when considering their design model in its application to
other countries.

2c) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. The Jasper field trip allowed students to see the
different lines of furniture produced for different markets. The Chicago Field trip to the
Merchandise Mart allowed students to discover products available for the various market
sectors. Discussion around powerpoint presentations illustrated many examples of design
through the ages and for various cultures and economic backgrounds. FCS352 Interior Design
Studio III. The preservation project includes residential design that could range from low to
medium-high income for individuals and/or families. The IDEC student competition includes
projects located in different areas of the USA. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. The healthcare
project deals with the overall conception of the interior space for healing to be adequate and
inviting for all age groups as well as different socio-economical populations. FCS452 Interior
Design Studio V. In phase I Programming, students identify the socio-economic population to
which their thesis project applies.

2d) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. Students question and seek evidence
supporting sustainable and green characteristics of specified materials. Students are required to
attend the annual Indianapolis CSI Trade Show to meet and interact with manufacturers.
Students are assigned to collect and present to the class their material selection of a ―current‖


                                                   8
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 2. Global Context for Design
       Entry-level interior designers have a global view and weigh design decisions within the
       parameters of ecological, socio-economic, and cultural contexts.

product and provide evidence as to why it is a worthy product to consider specifying for future
projects. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students are encouraged to seek out current and
relevant sustainable materials for their projects. Students are introduced to contemporary issues
such as water efficiency in the NKBA bathroom project. In the LEED for Homes Project students
addressed the issue of building green. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Contemporary issues
such as energy efficiency (green roofs) and sustainability (recycled content) are applied in the
design solutions for the Restaurant Project. FCS355. Students study such contemporary lighting
issues as the energy efficiency of compact fluorescent and LED lamps and use of natural light.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. The programming report records the results of researching
contemporary issues affecting interior architecture and design.

2e) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. Students participated in field trips to MMS/AE an
Architectural and Interior Design Practice, to Jasper JSI Furniture Manufacture and to Chicago
Merchandise Mart with guided visits of the showrooms. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II.
Students are exposed to the private sector of hospitality through the eyes of restaurateurs.
FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Students participated in a field trip to Chicago in
2010 to experience a variety of lighting installations such as Lightology, two car showrooms,
retail stores, and a boutique hotel. The Restaurant Project encompasses the restaurateur
business and many of its day to day operations issues. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Students are required to provide organizational charts of the business on which their thesis is
based.

2c) and 2f) FCS354 Traditional Interiors. Students are exposed to art, architecture, interior
design and decorative arts from cave dwellings through ancient Greece to the beginning of the
industrial revolution. All of the major historical movements are addressed through lectures. The
students are exposed to as many as twelve different cultures as we follow design movements
through time and around the world. Each lecture begins with an examination of the political
activities of the period and the economic and social conditions of the period. Ruling class
structure is juxtaposed with middle and lower classes. Special social, political and religious
needs are shown to drive the art and architecture of each country and time studied. FCS454
Contemporary Interiors and Furniture . This course examines art, architecture, interior design
and decorative arts from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution to contemporary times.
Students are again exposed to many different countries and cultures as well as the social,
economic and political atmosphere of a time and place. The class focus is on history for interior
designers, it shows the students how environment shapes design and how interdependent most
styles are through history. FCS455 American Interiors and Furniture. This course is a series of
lectures that deals with design in the United States from 1604 to the present. FCS150.
PowerPoint presentations and discussions focused on different cultural references with respect
to color, construction methods, and architectural monuments. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II.
Research on the cultures found in the selected country is a required component of the
Restaurant Project. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Students are required to identify and
research those cultures occupying the geographic vicinity from which their client draws its
clientele to better create an environment attracting their patronage.




                                                   9
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 3. Human Behavior
       The work of interior designers is informed by knowledge of behavioral science and human
       factors.

3a) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. PowerPoint presentations showed the evolution of
interior design from igloos and yurts to rococo churches and modern constructs. FCS351
Interior Design Studio II. The restaurant research results of the social and cultural ways of their
assigned country are evidenced in the design solution and oral presentation. FCS352 Interior
Design Studio III. With the inclusion of the IDEC student competition, students are challenged
to conceive of a project that must work in many social and cultural groups understanding that
people may see every element of design differently. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory.
Based on the country of random selection, students will research the social and cultural norms
as related to lighting standards and apply aesthetic considerations as well to their lighting
design solutions. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. When approaching the healthcare project
students are challenged to design interior spaces with the appropriate use of colors, textures,
and materials that will work for different social and cultural groups.

3b)FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design addresses human behavior in issues such
as checking dimensional placements of kitchen appliances as they relate to the work triangle
and to multiple guests within the kitchen space. Placement of furniture such as bar stools or
chairs for eating or socializing in the space is addressed as they relate to functional and social
comfort. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. The LG Surfaces competition required the study of
hotel guests and their related use of space. The NKBA Bathroom competition provided a client
profile for students to incorporate the client’s needs into the project. The Final Project LEED for
Homes encouraged the students to conceive and design interior environments that work
appropriately according to how people generally use the space. FCS351 Interior Design Studio
II. Country specific theories of human behavior are applied in the planning components of the
Restaurant Project. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. With the preservation project and the
inclusion of a residential space, students are encouraged to conceive and design interior spaces
that will work appropriately according to how people generally use the spaces. FCS355 Interior
Lighting and Color Theory. Theories of human behavior as stated by Edward Hall are
researched for differences between North America and the country of random selection.
Lighting solutions can then reinforce these findings of more intimacy or less intimacy than N.A.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Theories of human behavior such as Edward Hall’s theories
of spatial distances are identified in the Programming report and applied in the student’s design
development phase.

3c) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The Bathroom Project in 2009 addressed
issues of fixture placement including such matters as physical placement of toilet to wall and
sink placement for ease of washing. Students in 2009 were provided with an existing 1950s
bathroom and asked to evaluate its fixtures for ergonomic and anthropometric correctness.
FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. For the Birdhouse project students were required to research
specific bird ergonomics and anthropometric data. In the LG Surfaces competition students
designed furniture with related human factors. The NKBA design addresses human behavior in
issues such as checking dimensional placements of bathroom fixtures as they relate to client
ergonomics, anthropometric data and NKBA standards. The formation of residential spaces for
the Final Project LEED for Homes considered all the required areas as needed to perform daily
living activities, functional and social comfort. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The research
report identifies human factors with references to their applications. FCSS352 Interior Design
Studio III. Conception of the residential part of the preservation project is done having
considered all the spaces needed to perform a range of activities. FCS355 Interior Lighting and
Color Theory. Lighting solutions consider ergonomic and anthropometric data such as the


                                                 10
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 3. Human Behavior
       The work of interior designers is informed by knowledge of behavioral science and human
       factors.

placement of wall sconces and heights of pendants from the finished floor. FCS451 Interior
Design Studio IV. The healthcare project includes the use of anthropometrics and ergonomic
parameters in every aspect of the design solution, for example from simple door swings to
complicated equipment and space needs in a specific therapy room. FCS452 Interior Design
Studio V. Students select and interpret ergonomic and anthropometric data and apply in the
design development phase of their thesis.

3d) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Universal design concepts are identified in the research
report and selected concepts are then applied to the Restaurant Project solution. FCS352
Interior Design Studio III. Student work demonstrates understanding and the ability to
appropriately apply universal design concepts. Students follow the codes and regulations for
accessibility in residential buildings. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Universal
design concepts are reinforced through lighting solutions such as the restaurant entrance and
way finding methods. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Every space in healthcare design must
be accessible. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Universal design concepts are identified in the
programming phase and applied in the design development phase of their thesis project.




                                                 11
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 4. Design Process
       Entry-level interior designers need to apply all aspects of the design process to creative problem
       solving. Design process enables designers to identify and explore complex problems and generate
       creative solutions that support human behavior within the interior environment.

4a) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The Bath and Kitchen Projects require
students to apply performance criteria in justifying material selections. FCS251 Interior Design
Studio I. Goals and concepts were established for each project. FCS351 Interior Design Studio
II. The research component of the Restaurant Project states the design problem. FCS352
Interior Design Studio III. Students are required to analyze programs from competitions as well
as develop a detailed program for the preservation project with the model client, Andrew
Conner, Terre Haute Downtown Development. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory.
Goals, objectives, and performance criteria were listed as a part of the creation of a design
concept for the Restaurant Project. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. The students must
develop a program according to the healthcare project they are designing. Goals, objectives,
and performance criteria are addressed by every student group. FCS452 Interior Design Studio
V. Students state goals, objectives, and performance criteria for their thesis project in the
Programming Report.

4b) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Researched based design was implemented in all projects
(Birdhouse, LG Surfaces competition, NKBA, and LEED for Homes) and applied in the
schematic design and space planning and design development phases. LEED for Homes
required the students to write a 500 word research summary based on their project.
FCS351 Interior Design Studio II and 355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. The research
phase of the Restaurant Project collected data for evidence based design. FCS352 Interior
Design Studio III. The IDEC Student Competition as well as the Historic Preservation project are
both required to have a research phase that included but not limited to architectural style, use of
space and space requirements for every task as well as technology, codes and regulations.
FCS451 interior Design Studio IV. Every project and especially the healthcare project require
students to start with comprehensive research on the topic and its special use of the space, for
example, physical therapy and rehabilitation areas. Research included equipment and finishes.
Students also prepare and submit a preliminary budget. 4b) and 4c) FCS452 Interior Design
Studio V. Evidence based design is collected in the programming phase and applied in the
schematic design and space planning and design development phases.

4c) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. Students researched bath and kitchen
solutions through the internet, classroom readings, and current design magazines. FCS251
Interior Design Studio I. Students were required to apply their research findings in developing
their projects. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Application of research findings are shown on
the floor plans, perspectives, and material selections. FCS352 Interior Design Studio II and
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students are required to apply their research findings when
developing their projects. FCS355 interior Lighting and Color Theory. Lighting design solutions
for both the Luminaire Design and Restaurant Project demonstrate student ability to evaluate,
select, and apply information and research findings to their designs.

4d) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. The Birdhouse, NKBA Bathroom, and Final Project
generated at least two different design solutions each. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II.
Multiple concepts and responses are developed as the students narrow options for their final
design solution. FCS353 Internship. Intern supervisors asked interns for multiple design
solutions for each project. Interns commented that this task could be daunting. FCS355 Interior
Lighting and Color Theory. Multiple design responses are evidenced in the preliminary




                                                   12
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 4. Design Process
       Entry-level interior designers need to apply all aspects of the design process to creative problem
       solving. Design process enables designers to identify and explore complex problems and generate
       creative solutions that support human behavior within the interior environment.

Luminaire Designs and preliminary plans for the Restaurant Project. FCS352 Interior Design
Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students are required to develop at least three
different design solutions to each design problem which is later presented in booklet form.
FCS452 interior Design Studio V. Students produce multiple design solutions addressing
programming issues demonstrated in the schematic design and space planning phase.

4e) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The Bath and Kitchen Projects required a
concept statement and material selections with supportive evidence. FCS251 Interior Design
Studio I. Each of the projects progressed from preliminary sketches and ideation drawings to
final presentation documents. Rip-tear models, final models, concept boards, material boards,
sketches, and NKBA documents were produced for the relevant projects (Birdhouse, LG
Surfaces competition, NKBA, and LEED for Homes). FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Students
create an ideation/inspiration panel to accompany plans, perspectives, axonometric, and
material selections. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. The Luminaire Design
progresses through multiple ideas using preliminary sketches, trashy models, and then a final
working model. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV.
Students develop design concepts in order to make the projects unique. Students may decide
their designs should be modern and contemporary or classic and historic even though they all
are working on a historic preservation-restoration project. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Students present a variety of ideas through techniques such as sketches on trash, preliminary
digital wire frame perspectives, and rough trashy models in the design development phase of
their thesis.

4f) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The Bath and Kitchen Projects addressed
the careful and justified selection of materials. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I included a small
project such as the LG Surfaces competition and a larger project such as the Final Project
LEED for Homes. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The Kitchen Competition is typically 1,000
sf with an emphasis on the specification of appliances and cabinetry. Whereas the Restaurant
Project typically is 12,000 sf with a focus on human factors and universal design. FCS352
Interior Design Studio III starts with a simple design problem (usually the IDEC student design
competition) and students are introduced to an extensive historic preservation project that
includes residential and commercial spaces (15,000 to 20,000 sf). FCS355 Interior Lighting and
Color Theory. Students solve a luminaire design problem then create an overall lighting solution
for their restaurant design. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV starts with a simple design
problem usually the ASID student design competition and later the healthcare project (maximum
20,000 square feet). FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. The capstone studio for the seniors
consists of a thesis project of their choosing for a minimum of 20,000 sf. Each student will have
an advisory team of at least one design mentor (specialist in the field) and a model client who
owns or manages the type of facility they are designing.

4g) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. Students apply the concepts of
performance evaluation as presented in the Reznikoff text in material evaluations. FCS251
Interior Design Studio I. Each project allowed students to approach the design problem in
different ways by allowing them to find their own inspirations, concept statements and
programming specifics. FCS351 Interiro Design Studio I. The Kitchen Competition applies
kitchen planning guidelines with access standards to the design process whereas the
Restaurant Project applies the research findings as the design development proceeds. FCS352



                                                   13
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 4. Design Process
       Entry-level interior designers need to apply all aspects of the design process to creative problem
       solving. Design process enables designers to identify and explore complex problems and generate
       creative solutions that support human behavior within the interior environment.

Interior Design Studio III. Students find their own inspirations, develop concept statements and
programming in the IDEC competition and preservation project. In the preservation project
students select between four different approaches: rehabilitation, restoration, adaptive reuse or
preservation. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. For the Luminaire Design, students
focus on the use of manual models in developing their design solution partially since it is an
industrial design problem. The design research aspect for the Restaurant Project involves
interviewing international students on campus to better understand the country of origin for their
restaurant theme. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. The student competition as well as the
healthcare project allow students to explore their design approach and problem solving methods
by defining their own inspirations, concepts, and design development approach. FCS452
Interior Design Studio V. Each student brain storms and welcomes critiques from their mentor
and model client on a bi-weekly basis as they proceed with solving their thesis problem.

4h) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. All projects expose students to opportunities for innovation
and creative thinking by requiring them to generate multiple design solutions and conceptual
sketching. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The Kitchen Competition encourages students to
produce a comprehensive design solution for a specific client whereas the Restaurant Project
allows students to explore unique cultural environments for a North American restaurant.
FCS355 Interior lighting and Color Theory. The Luminaire Design is seen as creative and
innovative since students have an opportunity to experiment with an industrial design object as
opposed to interior spaces. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design
Studio IV. Students are continuously encouraged to explore multiple innovative and creative
solutions to their design problems. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. The IDEC student design
competition and healthcare project both inspire students to explore creative design solutions.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Seniors are to produce innovative and creative solutions not
evidenced previously on their other four design studios. Originality is encouraged particularly in
the planning and design development phases.

4i) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Guest critiques by Patricia Redenbarger for the NKBA bath
project and guest judges Scott Tillman, University Architect and Connie Hotovec, LEED AP for
the final presentation provided opportunities to develop critical listening skills. FCS351 Interior
Design Studio II. Critical listening skills are particularly necessary for the redesign of the HMSU
Gallery Lounge (2010) since the assignment is dependent upon an interview/meeting session
with the HMSU Director. FCS353 Internship. Interns experienced ample opportunities to
develop critical listening skills through directions from their supervisor, meetings with clients,
manufacturers, and site meetings. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior
Design Studio IV. Critical listening skills are developed as students receive critiques of their
work at different stages of design development for each project. For design competitions,
students receive critiques from a jury of professionals chosen to evaluate the projects. The
preservation project introduces a model client to give the students a sense of realism and a
different point of view. At the end of the restoration project students present their solutions to
professionals from different areas of design and construction expertise giving feedback to the
students. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Opportunities to develop critical listening skills occur
when students meet and exchange ideas with their mentors, model clients, and typical
classroom critiques. FCS458 Professional Practices and Procedures. Critical listening skills are
required in the preparation of the Ethics Paper assignment. Each student interviews a
professional on the subject of ethics and writes a ten page referenced paper.



                                                   14
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 5. Collaboration
       Entry-level interior designers engage in multi-disciplinary collaborations and consensus building.

5a) FCS151 Design fundamentals 3-D. Students have awareness of team work structures and
dynamics. Towards the completion of the course, students are required to prepare the final
project in teams (research, design and construction of a full size cardboard chair). Team size
depends on the number of students enrolled in the course but the rule of no more than three (3)
students per team is applied. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students have awareness of
team work structures and dynamics. The LEED for Homes was worked upon in teams of two
(2) students per design solution. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Since the 2010 junior cohort
is small, the only team work project this year will be the HMSU Gallery Lounge in which team
work structures and dynamics will be addressed. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. The IDEC
student design require a team work approach to be eligible to participate. The preservation
project is also approached using a team structure because of the project’s size and scope. All
teams have a maximum of three (3) students. FCS353 Internship. Interns had many
opportunities to observe team dynamics and participate in team work. FCS355 Interior Lighting
and Color Theory. The Restaurant Project is a team project invoking challenges of team work
structures and dynamics. Teams most often are composed of three (3) team members and
selections are based upon personality types. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. The ASID
student design competition required team formations to be eligible to participate. The
healthcare project used teams because of the size, complexity and extend of the requirements.
All teams have a maximum of three (3) students.

5b) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. In the LEED for Homes Project students learned about
LEED and the multiple disciplines that LEED incorporates. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II.
The Kitchen Competition serves as a opportunity for the students to work closely with kitchen
design specialists with varied backgrounds. An advisory board member with CKD credentials
will advise and assist with design critiques (Patricia Redenbarger, CKD), cabinetry
specifications, and budget preparation. A plumber/renovator will review the State Competition
Rules with the students making herself available for consulting as their designs proceed (Sandi
Perlman, CKD, CR). FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. The historic preservation project
includes a guest speaker, Director Indiana Landmarks, Western Regional Office, to not only
guide the students on what is acceptable and how to approach the project but also to give them
feedback throughout the project design (Tommy Kleckner). FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color
Theory. Students are advised and assisted by an Electrical Engineer, Pat Teeters, from ISU’s
Facilities Management in the development of their Luminaire Design. Students come to
understand the interdependence between form and function. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV.
Students are encouraged to interview professionals in healthcare professions to help them not
only develop their programming but also to narrow their design solutions because of the
complexity of the project. The healthcare professionals act as clients giving students the
requirements for the space being designed. All this information is summarized in the research
book that accompanies the healthcare project. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Students
experience integrated design practices as they work with their architect or design mentor with
whom any aspect of the design problem is explored.FCS458 Professional Practices and
Procedures. Integrated design practices are addressed in the preparation of the Professional
Services and Fees Document and in the attendance to the spring advisory board meeting,
exams, and guest speakers.

5c) FCS151 Design Fundamentals. The interior design program includes learning experiences
that engage students in collaboration, consensus building, leadership, and team work. Through
the full size cardboard chair Project all students must play a role in the team to find the best
solution to the design problem. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Classroom discussions and


                                                   15
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 5. Collaboration
       Entry-level interior designers engage in multi-disciplinary collaborations and consensus building.

team structures for example in the Final Project LEED for Homes allow students to collaborate
and develop their leadership abilities when finding a final design solution. FCS351 Interior
Design Studio II. Collaboration, consensus building, and leadership will be applied in the
teamwork necessary to solve the design issues for the HMSU Gallery Lounge. FCS352 Interior
Design Studio III. The structure of the teams needed to work on the IDEC student design
competition and the healthcare project allow students to collaborate and develop their
leadership abilities to find design solutions. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Student
teams for the Restaurant Project come to understand collaboration, consensus building,
leadership, and team work in 2009 and 2008. In 2010, this team experience will occur on the
lighting design for the HMSU Gallery Lounge. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. The structure
of teams needed to work on the healthcare project allow students to collaborate and develop
their leadership abilities while developing a design solution. The groups are formed with no
more than three students per team letting them learn from each other and collaborate towards
the common objective (their design solution). FCS452 interior Design Studio V. Collaboration
and team work and a variety of points of view occur with the contributions of the mentor(s),
model client, faculty advisor, and student as their thesis project proceeds.

5d) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The collaboration that occurs between
manufacturers and designers and between other consultants is investigated and encouraged
through such exercises as guest speakers from paint and gypsum board manufacturers, field
trips to CSI Trade Show and a Cabinet Manufacturer; and a presentation by a project manager
on the topic of Life Cycle Costing or Value Management for projects. FCS351 Interior Design
Studio II. Critiques and feedback will occur during the Kitchen Competition (kitchen specialists),
HMSU Student Lounge (gallery director), and Restaurant Project (practicing professionals).
FCS353 Internship. Depending on the internship placement, students interacted with many
disciples such as electrical, structural, mechanical engineers, landscape architects, architects,
and contractors and sub-trades, manufacturers and suppliers. FCS355 Interior Lighting and
Color Theory. During the Luminaire Design assignment, students come to appreciate the
viewpoint of the electrical engineer versus that of the designer. During the design development
of the luminaire, a professional lighting designer critiques their designs and they come to
appreciate the differences and similarities between interior design and lighting design. FCS452
Interior Design Studio V. Each design student must have a minimum of one mentor who is
typically an architect or designer practicing in the field of specialization of their thesis.




                                                   16
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 6. Communication
       Entry-level interior designers are effective communicators.

6a) ARTS101 Art Fundamentals: Beginning Drawing. The fundamentals of hand drawing are
studied. FCS252 Interior Design Graphics II. Students learn to accurately color render materials
for plans, elevations and perspectives using color pencils and markers, and create digital
renderings of plans and elevations using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. FCS351 Interior
Design Studio II. In the Kitchen Competition, students produce self explanatory technical
drawings; in the HMSU Gallery Lounge design student teams will informally present their ideas
and design solutions; and the Restaurant Project will be a formal presentation to a jury of
practicing professionals. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. A variety of techniques and
technologies are applied for the presentation of the programming, schematic design and space
planning, design development, and working drawings and specification phases. ARTD400K Art
Workshop or ARTD490 Portfolio. Portfolios are prepared using Adobe InDesign. Content has
been prepared using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, Auto CAD, SketchUp, and Revit.

6b) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students verbally present their Final Project LEED for
Homes as well as a 500-word research summary. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students
are required to present their Historic Preservation Project as well as create a codes summary
that accompanies the project. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students present their
Healthcare Project with descriptions on boards and/or PowerPoint presentations. Students
create narratives explaining their design concept-abstracts for both the IDEC competition and
the healthcare project. For the healthcare project, students present their projects to a panel of
professionals in the construction and healthcare industry. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Written and oral communication are woven within each phase of their thesis project. FCS458
Professional Practices and Procedures. The Ethics Paper requires students to orally (interview)
and in written communication (ten page paper) express themselves clearly. 6b) and 6f)
ARTD400K Art Workshop or ARTD490 Portfolio. Minimal copy identifies each project within
student portfolios. Students present portfolios to four or five professional architectural/design
firms as well as the advisory board members in Indianapolis for critiques.

6c) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students create a binder with sketches containing all their
design ideas, possibilities as well as design options as explored during the development of each
project. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Ideation sketches are produced for all three projects.
FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. During the design process both for the Luminaire
Design and Restaurant Project students use hand sketches to convey design ideas. Ideation
sketches are incorporated into some of the presentations. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students submit a binder containing all their ideation
sketches explored during the development of the Historic Preservation and Healthcare Projects.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Ideation drawings are particularly evidenced in phases 2
schematic design and space planning and 3 design development of the thesis project.

6d) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students present their projects using a variety of media
according to project needs including but not limited to presentation boards, Power Point
presentations, rip tear models and process binders. FCS252 Interior Design Graphics II.
Students learn to manually and digitally render presentation drawings so they can choose which
techniques and media to appropriately use in future presentations. FCS351 Interior Design
Studio II and FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Presentation drawings for the Kitchen
Competition, HMSU Lounge Gallery and Restaurant Project consist of computer generated line
drawings with a rendered perspective and material panel; informal sketches, catalogue cuts,
and material samples; and computer generated furniture and lighting plans, elevations, a
section, several perspectives with an axonometric, luminaires, and labeled material panels


                                                  17
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 6. Communication
       Entry-level interior designers are effective communicators.

respectively. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Presentations for the Luminaire Design
require photographs of the final model, elevations and a section, perspectives, and the final
working model. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV.
Students are required to do verbal presentations of their projects using a variety of media
including but not limited to presentation boards, models, and/or Power Point presentations.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Presentation drawings in appropriate media are evidenced in
phase 3 of the design development phase.

6e) FCS152 Interior Design Graphics I. Students are required to prepare two sets of residential
architectural drawings (one in metric and one in imperial measurements). One set is expedited
in pencil and the second set in ink showing appropriate line weights. The drawings include floor
plans, exterior elevations, interior sections, interior elevations, one and two point perspectives
and an exterior wall section. FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing and FCS497I CAD
Fundamentals. Students work with different projects each year for example in 2008 the 940
Chestnut Street Building, in 2009 the 318 N 6th Street Building and in 2010 the second floor of
the Technology Annex (TA) Building. Each year the students produce a representative set of
contract documents including a cover sheet, ADA sheet, furniture plan, partition plan, wall
details, reflected ceiling plan, power and communication plan, interior elevations, reception desk
details and specification documents. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior
Design Studio IV. Students create a complete set of presentation drawings for the Historic
Preservation and Healthcare Projects that include: floor plans, communication and lighting plans
for the Healthcare Project only, elevations and building sections of the spaces-building as well
as millwork and woodwork details (healthcare project). Presentations include multiple
perspective views and specification document and a preliminary project budget. FCS452 Interior
Design Studio V. Students produce a representative set of technical drawings and specifications
in phase 4 of their thesis project.

6f) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students present their projects using presentation boards
to a panel of practicing professionals Scott Tillman, University Architect; Connie Hotovec, LEED
AP; and Patrica Redenbarger, CKBD. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Students present their
design solutions for the HMSU Gallery Lounge to the Director and their Restaurant Project to a
jury of practicing professionals. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Students present
their Luminaire Design to a jury of lighting specialists. Student teams present their Restaurant
Project to a jury of practicing professionals. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451
Interior Design Studio IV. Students present their projects through the use of design boards and
a Power Point presentation to a panel of practicing professionals. FCS452 Interior Design
Studio V. Students present their thesis design development presentation to their mentors, model
clients, professor and family and friends for phase 3.




                                                  18
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 7. Professionalism and Business Practice
       Entry-level interior designers use ethical and accepted standards of practice, are committed to
       professional development and the industry, and understand the value of their contribution to the
       built environment.

7a) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. PowerPoint presentations and ensuing discussions
on what is Interior Design and the evolution of the interior design profession allows students to
understand the contributions of interior design to contemporary society as well as the growing
responsibility of the Interior Designer. FCS353 Internship. Interns retuned from their internship
experience with a better sense of the contributions of interior design to society as a whole and a
renewed sense of their discipline. FCS 454 Contemporary Interiors and Furniture. Students
understand the contributions of interior design to contemporary society through in depth
discussion of the social , political and economic mindset and the design industries’ response.
Students see the evolution of the profession around the world from the Industrial Revolution to
the beginning of the 20th century and discuss the changing roles that designers play in society.
The role of women in the early 19th century design field is examined and the emerging female
professional. The student will identify examples of architecture, furnishings and decorative art
that have had an impact on society. They will be able to relate how styles impacted each other
and how styles changed one another. FCS458 Professional Practices and Procedures. Three
exams address the contents of the required text, Professional Practice for Interior Designers.

7b) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. Students understand various types of design
practices. PowerPoint presentations and ensuing discussions about what is an interior designer
and more specifically the differences between residential design and contract design. FCS458
Professional Practices and Procedures. In addition to the exams on the content of the required
text, a field trip visiting four to five professional firms critiquing portfolios includes a mini-
presentation by each firm on their practice.

7c) and 7d) FCS458 Professional Practices and Procedures. The elements of business practice
and project management are studied and examined based on the contents of the required text,
Professional Practice for Interior Designers.

7d) FCS353 Internship. Interns experienced project management and project delivery methods
through site visits, preparation of minutes for meetings, and meetings with clients and
contractors.

7e) FCS353 Internship. Many of the interns experienced proper procedures for awarding of
contracts to contractors or furniture suppliers. FCS458 Professional Practices and Procedures.
Professional ethics are studied through the use of a series of in-class exercises and discussions
including the Ethics Paper.

7f) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. The Jasper field trip allowed students to see the
different lines of furniture produced for different markets. The Chicago Field trip to the
Merchandise Mart allowed students to discover products available for the various market
sectors. Discussion around PowerPoint presentations illustrated examples of projects designed
for the residential and contract sectors and client types varying from the self designed project to
clients such as the President of the United States. FCS353 Internship. Interns worked on
multiple client projects over the summer of 2010 and 2008. FCS458 Professional Practices and
Procedures. Client types and market sectors are studied from the contents of the required text,
Professional Practice for Interior Designers.




                                                   19
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 7. Professionalism and Business Practice
       Entry-level interior designers use ethical and accepted standards of practice, are committed to
       professional development and the industry, and understand the value of their contribution to the
       built environment.

7g) FCS353 Internship. Interns experienced some insights into the legal recognition of the
profession since the internship requires that interns work under the direct supervision of a
licensed architect or registered interior designer. FCS458 Professional Practices and
Procedures. Legal recognition of the profession is addressed in the contents of the required
text, Professional Practice for Interior Designers. Since Indiana has just passed legislation
legally recognizing designers. The title, Registered Interior Designer (RID) is discussed in the
classroom.

7h) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. The interior design program provides exposure to
the role and value of professional organizations. The professional organization project and
presentations by each student addressed this standard. Students studied a different
professional organization, made a presentation to the class, and were then held responsible on
the final exam for knowing about all of the organizations AIA, NCIDQ, ASID USGBC among
others. FCS353 Internship. The interns were employed by architects or designers with
memberships in AIA, IIDA, or ASID.

7h) and 7i) FCS458 Professional Practices and Procedures. Professional organizations and
lifelong learning are studied in the contents of the required text, Professional Practice for Interior
Designers.

7i) FCS353 Internship. Life long learning was addressed in the internships through attendance
either to Neocon, lunch with manufacturers presenting new products or processes, and visiting
showrooms of suppliers bidding on projects. FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. The
interior design program provides exposure to the role and value of public and community
service. Students in the fall semester of 2010 will be required to participate in the Habitat for
Humanity fall project.

7j) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing. All the students in the 260 course are required
to sign up and serve a total of 15 hours on site constructing a Habitat for Humanity home. In
addition to these students, IDEA volunteers each spring on the same two Saturdays. FCS353
Internship. Many of the interns were part of their firm’s efforts in public service in the local
community. FCS458 Professional Practices and Procedures. The topic of public and community
service is addressed through conversations in the classroom as well as assigned readings from
the content in the required text, Professional Practice for Interior Designers.




                                                   20
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 8. History
       Entry-level interior designers apply knowledge of interiors, architecture, art, and the decorative
       arts within a historical and cultural context.

8a), 8b), 8c), 8d) and 8e) FCS354 Traditional Interiors, 454 Contemporary Interiors, and 455
American Interiors and Furniture.

Students understanding is gauged by several determining factors including: depth of
understanding through test answers, interaction in class and accuracy in graphically relating
their knowledge through their special assignments.

The students are able to identify the movements discussed in class through the development of
several assignments. Each class a timeline is developed from the beginning of the discussion to
its conclusion at finals. Students are required to keep the timeline updated in their note books.
Special assignments include designing and presenting a space based on a particular period of
time. Graphics and a rationale are required. This encourages students to become more
immersed in a particular style while using skill sets from other design courses. Students are
required to design a book illustrated with photographs and rationale of classical and historical
architectural elements and furniture, similar to a photo essay scavenger hunt. This last is
particularly important as it helps the student become more visually acute regarding the built
environment and aware of the historical elements in their surroundings.

8c), 8d) and 8e) ARTH271/272 Survey of Art History I or II. Art from the prehistoric period to the
close of the Middle Ages/Art from the Renaissance to the present. Students only occasionally
select ARTH271 whereas the overwhelming majority select ARTH272.

8a) FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Student research and analyze the building (time period/
year it was built) used for the Historic Preservation Project to understand the many changes and
uses the building went through before they start developing their design solutions.

8b) FCS352. Students must establish and focus on a specific time period when important
changes may have happened to the building (including its interiors and furnishings) to help them
decide which of the of the four historic preservation approaches they will use. Example:
rehabilitation, restoration, adaptive reuse or preservation. If they decide to go back in time to a
specific moment in time they are using restoration.




                                                    21
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 9. Space and Form
       Entry-level interior designers apply the theories of two- and three-dimensional design, and spatial
       definition and organization.

9a) ARTS102 Art Fundamentals: Two-Dimensional Design and Color. Students effectively apply
the elements, principles, and theories of design to two-dimensional design solutions. FCS150
Introduction to Interior Design. In the ―Design Elements‖ assignment the students created four
design ―booklets‖ on the themes of line; shape or form; texture, pattern, ornament; and opacity,
translucency, transparency. In the ―Color Problems‖ assignment the students painted color
squares and composed panels expressing hue – primary & secondary colors; hue – tertiary
colors; and value; and intensity. In the ―Color Schemes‖ assignment the students prepared three
color scheme panels illustrating what they had learned about monochromatic color schemes;
analogous color schemes; and complementary color schemes. In the ―Concept, Design
Elements, & Design Principles‖ assignment after choosing a photo of an interior space, the
students created two boards to show their understanding of the topic. FCS251 Interior Design
Studio I. Students effectively apply the elements, principles and theories of design to 2D design
solutions evidence is shown through plans, sections, elevations and presentation boards.
FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The Kitchen Competition, HMSU Gallery Lounge, and
Restaurant Project evidence 2-D design solutions through plans, elevations, and sections.
FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Student must show knowledge of the different theories of 2D
and 3D design through their design solutions for every project developed in this course such as
color theories used in the interior of the building and on their presentation boards. 9a) and 9b)
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Two-D and 3-D design are evidenced in the design
development phase of the thesis project. ARTD400K Art Workshop or ARTD490 Portfolio. Two
and three dimensional design is evidenced in the contents of the portfolio.

9b) FCS151 Design fundamentals 3-D. Students effectively apply the elements, principles, and
theories of design to three-dimensional design solutions. Students create 3D models while
exploring the organization and conception of 3D spaces using both design elements and design
principles. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Each student created a 3D model of their Birdhouse
Project. Students used many of the elements and concepts of design in the project to conceive
of their spaces and to define their concept statements. Students created 3D digital perspectives
for their LEED for Homes Project. The perspectives explored the organization and conception of
their project. FCS351. The design solutions for the Kitchen Competition, HMSU Gallery Lounge,
and Restaurant Project evidence 3-D through perspectives either digitally or manually produced
as well as an axonometric for the restaurant. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. The
Luminaire Design must be presented as a 3D working model. The Restaurant Project must have
rendered perspectives demonstrating the functionality and creativity in the design solution.
FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students are
encouraged to use the elements and principles of design in every project to conceive their
interior spaces and define their concept statements. Concept statements are presented as
organizational and character concepts. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Study models are
employed to visualize the space in 3-D during the schematic design and space planning phase
with multiple rendered perspectives of feature spaces in the design development phase.

9c. FCS151 Design Fundamentals. Students explain to the professor their design ideas and
concepts used for every model. At the end of the course a series of exercises in flexion and
compression using cardboard which must be presented and thoroughly explained to the class
prepares them for the final project presentation (real size cardboard Chair). FCS251 Interior
Design Studio I. Students were required to verbally present and describe their design solutions
to a panel of two professionals Scott Tillman, University Architect, Connie Hotovec, LEED AP
for their Final Project LEED for Homes. Students analyzed and discussed their spatial



                                                   22
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 9. Space and Form
       Entry-level interior designers apply the theories of two- and three-dimensional design, and spatial
       definition and organization.

organization through one on one critiques in the classroom. Also through professional critique
by Patrica Redenbarger, CKBD for the NKBA Project. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Oral
presentations include descriptions of spatial definitions and organizations for the HMSU Gallery
Lounge and Restaurant Project. FCS353 Internship. The ability to analyze spatial organization,
space planning was considered one of our interns’ strengths. FCS352 interior Design Studio III
and FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students verbally present and describe their design
solutions for the Historic Preservation and Healthcare Projects to a panel of professionals.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Spatial definition and organization are verbally presented and
demonstrated in the concept statement and in the design development phase of the thesis
project.




                                                   23
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 10. Color and Light
       Entry-level interior designers apply the principles and theories of color and light.

10a) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. In the ―Color Problems‖ assignment the students
painted color squares and composed panels expressing hue – primary & secondary colors; hue
– tertiary colors; value; and intensity. In the ―Color Schemes‖ assignment the students prepared
three color scheme panels illustrating what they had learned about monochromatic color
schemes; analogous color schemes; and complementary color schemes. FCS251 Interior
Design Studio I. Students apply color not only in accordance with their individual design
solutions but also in accordance with client needs and research findings for each project.
FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Oral reference to hue, value, and intensity as well as color
theories such as the standard color wheel, Munsell , Ostwalk, Itten or Albers theories occur
during the presentations for the HMSU Gallery Lounge and the Restaurant Project. FCS352
Interior Design Studio III. Students apply color patterns not only according to their individual
design solutions but also according to building history and historic of the Historic Preservation
Project. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Color principles, theories, and systems are
evidenced through exams and design solutions for both the Luminaire Design and lighting plans
and specifications for the Restaurant Project. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students apply
color schemes according to the use and the kind of space being designed for the Healthcare
Project and for the IDEC project. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Color principles, theories,
and systems are evidenced in the oral presentation and design development phase 3 of each
thesis project.

10b) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Student projects integrate light and color especially
evidenced on the Restaurant Project since the FCS351 and 355 Interior Lighting and Color
Theory project is merged into one design solution and studied as an integrated design studio in
the second half of the semester. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students address how
lighting and color create the unique environment they envision. Students learn that if either of
these elements are changed the whole design will be compromised. FCS355 Interior Lighting
and Color Theory. The interaction of light and color is demonstrated in the Luminaire Design
and luminaire selections combined with lighting plans for the Restaurant Project. FCS451
Interior Design Studio IV. Students study how important lighting and color is in the conception of
interior spaces for a healthcare facility and address these issues in their design solutions.
FCS452 Inteiror Design Studio V. The interaction of light and color is demonstrated in phase 2
design development in the presentation material and during the oral presentation.

10c) FCS150 Introduction to Interior Design. In the ―Color Problems‖ assignment the students
painted color squares and composed panels expressing hue – primary & secondary colors; hue
– tertiary colors; value; and intensity. In the ―Color Schemes‖ assignment the students prepared
three color scheme panels illustrating what they had learned about monochromatic color
schemes; analogous color schemes; and complementary color schemes. FCS251 Interior
Design Studio I. Color application will be unique to each project in accordance with its design
message, its concept and development of the interior space in every design solution. FCS252
Interior Design Graphics II. Students learn basic theories of color rendering including what color
and how to use them. Students learn that darker renderings are harder to read and that lighter
renderings lack character. Students also learn how to appropriately apply color to accurately
represent materials used in projects. Lighting, shadowing and reflection are also studied in this
class. FCS351 interior Design Studio II. The Kitchen Competition, HMSU Gallery Lounge, and
Restaurant Project develop in a progressive manner as studies addressing color and lighting
proceed throughout the semester. The Restaurant Project is the more sophisticated color
selection since its integration with lighting design which both support or reinforce the overall
design concept for the project. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design


                                                    24
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 10. Color and Light
       Entry-level interior designers apply the principles and theories of color and light.

Studio IV. Color application will be unique for every project according to its message, concept
and development of the interior space in each design solution. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
The multiple purposes of color are explained during the oral presentation of phase 2 design
development.

10d) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students created presentation boards for every project
that had to be readable and visually pleasant. A monochromatic 3D model was created for their
Birdhouse Project. FCS252 Interior Design Graphics I. Students learn how to select color
appropriately not only for their renderings but also for their presentation boards and PowerPoint
presentations. Students also learn that good definition between positive and negative forms is a
must for readability and clarity on their presentations. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The
application of color within presentations for the Kitchen Competition, HMSU Gallery Lounge,
and Restaurant Project reinforce a hierarchy within each presentation and for the overall
support of the concept for each design solution. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451
Interior Design Studio IV. Students create color rendered presentation boards for every project
that must be readable and visually pleasant as well as a monochromatic 3D model for the
Historic Preservation and Healthcare Project. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Effective use of
color in their visual presentation reinforces the students’ design concept for the thesis project.
ARTD400K Art Workshop or ARTD490 Portfolio. Color is applied effectively to the portfolio
contents as well as the overall graphic design of the portfolio.




                                                    25
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 11. Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment, and Finish Materials
       Entry-level interior designers select and specify furniture, fixtures, equipment and finish materials
       in interior spaces.

11a) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design focuses primarily on selecting and
specifying finish materials for the floors, walls, and ceilings. Students are assigned different
projects each year such as in 2008 the Net Zero Energy Healthy House Project, 7th street, Terre
Haute, IN.; 2009 the Bath and Kitchen Projects for an existing house in Windsor, Canada; and
2010 the Healthy House Project on Lafayette Street, Terre Haute, IN. FCS251 Interior Design
Studio I. Each project requires students to research and specify a wide range of materials and
finishes from different sources. These materials are specified in their design solutions in
responcse to client needs, sustainability, and aptness to the project. FCS351 Interior Design
Studio II. Students work with kitchen cabinetry, residential appliances and residential finishes for
the Kitchen Competition; lounge furniture and finishes for the HMSU Gallery Lounge suitable for
student use; and hospitality furniture and finishes for the Restaurant Project. FCS352 Interior
Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students use a wide range of materials
and furnishings not only to satisfy client needs but also to achieve LEED certification for these
projects. FCS353 Internship. Most of the interns (80%+) expressed enthusiasm for the exposure
to new materials and products they had not experienced in the program. FCS451 Interior
Design Studio IV. The healthcare project requires students to research and specify a wide range
of materials and finishes from different sources. These materials are specified in their design
solutions in response to the complexity and variety of activities found in a healthcare space.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Students are evaluated on the basis of their exploration of
appropriate materials and products specified on their thesis project.

11b) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. Students are required to provide data
on the installation and maintenance procedures of each specified material for the Practicum
Project. Whenever possible the fabrication methods are also to be included in the research
documentation. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Technical drawings and NKBA installation
forms for the NKBA Bath Project demonstrate understanding of fabrication. FCS351 Interior
Design Studio II. Technical installation drawings for the Kitchen Competition demonstrate
awareness of fabrication. Furniture and lighting plans for the HMSU Gallery Lounge show
installation of furniture and lighting products. Plans, perspectives, axonometric, and material
selections suggest fabrication and installation methods for the Restaurant Project. FCS353
Internship. All interns experienced fabrication and installation conditions on the job sites.
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students must identify materials and finishes used in the
space depending on the specialty of the rooms-spaces in their designs. Per example a surgery
room will require a different flooring material than a consultation room. These equipment,
furniture and materials are also specified according to how they are manufactured, installed and
used in the healthcare project. Example: resilient floorings with antibacterial-antimicrobial
inhibitors. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Typical fabrication and installation methods of
feature items are revealed in phase 4 working drawings and specifications while maintenance of
these same items are orally addressed in phase 3 design development.

11c) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. Property and performance criteria are
researched and provided for each specified material. Data is submitted in a research binder.
Material content and life cycle viability are also addressed in the research report. FCS251
Interior Design Studio I. Students identify, analyze, and include products and materials
according to their use, installation, wear and tear for each specific project. FCS351 Interior
Design Studio II. Students select and specify appropriate materials and products in accordance
with the use of the space. For example, students visit an appliance showroom each fall to




                                                    26
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 11. Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment, and Finish Materials
       Entry-level interior designers select and specify furniture, fixtures, equipment and finish materials
       in interior spaces.

understand the range of appliance choices for the Kitchen Competition. In accordance with
maintenance factors and client profile, appliance selections are then made. See specification
booklets/binders accompanying each 351 project. FCS353 Internship . Interns experienced
material and product selection on the basis of their attributes and costs related to a project.
FCS352 Interior Design Studio III and FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students identify,
analyze, and include products and materials according to their use, installation, wear and tear
for commercial and residential spaces of the Historic Preservation and Healthcare Projects. The
specifications are present in a form of a book that accompanies the project. FCS451 Interior
Design Studio IV. Students complete thoughtful research on the properties and performance of
materials and finishes. Due to the special needs of a healthcare environment, students specify
fabrics with class A flame resistance. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Documentation
accompanying phase 3 design development addresses properties and performance criteria of
feature materials and products justifying their selection and specification. Life cycle costing
issues are addressed in budget considerations.

11d) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I and FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students design
interior spaces that include all the furnishings according to their design solutions for all projects
in this course. Furniture specifications are included on presentation boards and binders.
FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Students prepare plans and specify fixtures and equipment for
the Kitchen Competition; prepare plans and specify furniture and fixtures for the HMSU Gallery
Lounge; and prepare plans and specifications for furniture, fixtures, and equipment for the
Restaurant Project. FCS353 Internship. Intern skills at preparing layouts were positively rated
but interns felt underprepared when specifying furniture, fixtures, and equipment. FCS451
Interior Design Studio IV. Students design interior spaces that will include all the furnishings
according to their design solutions for all projects in this course, particularly for Healthcare
Project that includes specialized furniture, fixtures and equipment. Furniture, fixtures and
equipment specifications are included on presentation boards and in binders.
FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Students are able to layout and specify furniture, fixtures, and
equipment (F.F.& E.) as shown in phase 3 design development, see floor plans and
presentation panels.




                                                    27
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 12. Environmental Systems and Controls
       Entry-level interior designers use the principles of lighting, acoustics, thermal comfort, and
       indoor air quality to enhance the health, safety, welfare, and performance of building occupants.

12a) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The combination of natural and artificial lighting design is
evidenced on both the Kitchen Competition and Restaurant Design. Window placement is
studied and considered in Kitchen Competition layout and lighting solutions; the Restaurant
Project most often includes skylights and careful orientation maximizing natural light sources
from its vertical planes. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students understand the principles of
natural and electrical lighting design. Students design lighting and ceiling planes for the first
floor (commercial) of the Historic Preservation Project. Each design team must take into
consideration existing natural and artificial lighting needs for every space. The upper floor of
project usually includes the use of skylights and other natural lighting according to codes and
regulations. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. In the Restaurant Project students
combine the use of natural and artificial light sometimes using vertical planes or ceiling planes
(skylights) to mix these sources. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students analyze and
design the interior spaces for the Healthcare Project considering different lighting levels for
activities and welfare of patients and staff. Lighting design is shown on the lighting plan and
luminaire specifications are included in the research book. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Principles of natural and electrical lighting design are illustrated on the lighting plan(s) of phase
3 design development and phase 4 reflected ceiling plan(s) and power and communication
plan(s).

12b) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Luminaire specifications for the Kitchen Competition and
the HMSU Gallery Lounge both serve spaces of specific needs. Students research and apply
successful solutions based upon lighting manufacturer’s recommendations. In the Restaurant
Project, luminaire specifications allow for more creative and varied solutions supporting the
design concept. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Specific luminaries and light sources are
selected according to design and application needs. All luminaries are shown on the boards
along with FF&E. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. The Restaurant Project
demonstrates competence in selecting and applying luminaire and light sources as evidenced
by lighting calculations and lamp choices. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Specific luminaries
and/or light sources are selected according to the design and related application needs
(activities in every healthcare space. All luminaries used in the project are shown on the boards
along with the FF&E. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Students select and apply luminaires
and light sources for their lighting plan(s) in phase 3 design development of their thesis project.

12c) and 12d) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing. Principles of acoustical design and
appropriate strategies for acoustical control are discussed and demonstrated through material
specifications and wall sections. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students understand the
principles of acoustical design and appropriate strategies for acoustical control. Students
understand that every apartment in the Historic Preservation Project must be designed
considering acoustical control between apartments and/or tenants. This is shown and
represented on the drawings using different wall symbols. 12c) FCS451 Interior Design Studio
IV. Students understand that acoustics are very important for the healing and recovery of
patients as well as with privacy issues in the Healthcare Project. Every project shows
differentiation when using acoustical partitions. 12c) and 12d) FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Principles of acoustical design and appropriate strategies for acoustical control are evidenced in
research for the programming phase 1, material selections and wall and ceiling construction in
both phases 3 and 4. 12d) FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students must design every space
and select appropriate materials (shown on materials boards) for the healthcare project with
acoustical consideration in mind.


                                                   28
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 12. Environmental Systems and Controls
       Entry-level interior designers use the principles of lighting, acoustics, thermal comfort, and
       indoor air quality to enhance the health, safety, welfare, and performance of building occupants.

12e) and 12f) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing. Principles of thermal design and how
thermal systems impact interior design solutions are addressed through such concerns as
insulation types and sun control methods as it relates to physical comfort within any interior
space. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The principles of thermal design are supported
aesthetically through carefully space planning, sufficient circulation within the space, and
material selections for each of the 351 projects. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Principles of
thermal design and how thermal systems impact design solutions are evidenced by HVAC
considerations on lighting and reflected ceiling plans phases 3 and 4, insulation methods on wall
sections for phase 4, and increasing energy efficiency of the selected building as stated in
research for the programming phase 1.

12g) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The principles of indoor air quality are
addressed in an elemental way in conversations and project discussions. A reading assignment
such as Lean Green Preservation Machine generated lots of conversation on IAQ and green in
general. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I and FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Indoor air
quality is addressed in the selection of materials and products for the design of every project.
Students provide information about their materials and use that supports the goals of IAQ. 12g)
and 12h) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. IAQ principles are supported on each of the 351
projects through the maximization of reused materials from each existing site and considerate
material selection and specifications including installation and maintenance procedures.
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students are required to research and provide information
about the materials used in their design to create a LEED points chart that must be included in a
booklet accompanying the project. 12g) and 12h) FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Principles of
indoor air quality ( IAQ) and how the selection and application of products and systems
addresses IAQ is evidenced through the selection of materials and products in phase 3 and
installation methods as specified in phase 4 of their thesis project.

12h) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. The principles of indoor air quality are
addressed as it relates to specified materials as well as installation and maintenance
procedures for these same materials. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students search for
sustainable materials for every project to give better indoor air quality to the user. Students have
to prepare the LEED points checklist for the LEED for Homes final project and provide a
research binder with the materials listed. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students research
sustainable materials for every project in this course to provide better indoor air quality.
Students are also asked prepare the LEED checklist for the Historic preservation project.
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students are encouraged to search and work with
sustainable - green materials for every project in this course to achieve better indoor air.
Students are also asked to prepare the LEED checklist for the Healthcare Project.




                                                   29
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 13. Interior Construction and Building Systems
       Entry-level interior designers have knowledge of interior construction and building systems.

13a) FCS152 Interior Design Graphics I. Students are introduced to both basic construction
systems (column-beam and wood studs) through the creation of architectural drawings. One
project uses the column and beam system and the other project uses a wood stud system.
FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. A PowerPoint lecture introduces residential construction.
Lectures and professional feedback are provided by Scott Tillman, University Architect, Connie
Hotovec, LEED AP, and Patricia Redenbarger about basic constructions systems (wood + steel
studs) for the LEED for Homes and NKBA project, respectively. FCS260 Interior Construction
and Detailing. Students identify structural systems and methods within the project building such
as steel columns and beams or wood columns and beams with structural wall systems.
Students develop the building’s invisible grid system for all wall and ceiling system placements.
FCS497I CAD Fundamentals. Students produce a complete set of construction drawings in
conjunction with FCS260 (in 2009 the 318 6th street building and in 2010 the Technology Annex
building). These buildings both had a column-beam grid system made of steel and concrete.
FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The Kitchen Competition 2010 is a condominium with very
strict construction restrictions for the building; the HMSU Gallery Lounge is located on the first
floor of a concrete and steel high-rise with no channeling allowed into the floor or deck above;
and the Restaurant Project is located in an old warehouse building constructed of wood
columns and beams with structural brick support walls. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III.
Students work on the historic preservation project where the structural system includes a
combination of load bearing walls and heavy timber construction (columns and beams). FCS452
Interior Design Studio V. Each student in phase 1 identifies structural systems and methods
through a careful review of the architectural, structural, and engineering drawings for the
building. Mentor input verifies their interpretation of the building structures and systems.

13b) FCS152 Interior Design Graphics I. Students learn how all the elements in interior spaces
are to be represented and work together to create an interior environment. FCS251 Interior
Design Studio I. Students learn about limitations when working with load bearing walls through
the use of power point lectures on residential construction. FCS260 Interior Construction and
Detailing. Students design and detail the majority of the non structural systems such as ceilings,
walls, and flooring systems. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Non-structural systems are
modified or built new to respond to the design solution for each of the 351 projects. FCS352
Interior Design Studio III. Students are fully aware that many design decisions directly affect the
building shell and the overall exterior of the building. Students are encouraged to contact
Tommy Kleckner from the Historic Landmarks Foundation (guest speaker for the class) to have
critiques of their design decisions. Examples: Students may decide to add a green roof or to add
additional window openings to a historic building to maximize the use of the interior space.
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students approach the Healthcare Project having in mind
that there are limitations with partitions, floors and ceilings because of all the specialized
equipment and other elements such as oxygen and electrical connections and valves. FCS452
Interior Design Studio V. Students identify non-structural systems within the presentation and
technical drawings for the building. Mentor input verifies their interpretation of these non-
structural systems.

13c) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students create a mechanical plan for the bath project
that depends on the equipment/fixtures being used and the profile of the project. FCS260
Interior Construction and Detailing. Understanding of distribution systems are evidenced
through the production of a floor plan, reflected ceiling plan, and power and communication
plan. FCS497I CAD Fundamentals. Students create a power and communication plan as part of
a set of construction drawings in conjunction with FCS 260. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II.



                                                   30
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 13. Interior Construction and Building Systems
       Entry-level interior designers have knowledge of interior construction and building systems.

Power, mechanical and plumbing drawings are produced for the Kitchen Competition; plans
indicate power, mechanical, HVAC, and lighting drawings for the HMSU Gallery Lounge; and
lighting plans for the Restaurant Project show mechanical, HVAC, sprinklers, and luminaires.
FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students create a power and communication plan for the
Healthcare Project that depends on the equipment being used and the type of healthcare
project. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Students identify distribution systems through a
careful review of the architectural, structural, and engineering drawings for the building. Mentor
input verifies their interpretation of these distribution systems.

13d) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing. Energy efficiency is addressed through the
reflected ceiling plan and related lighting controls. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. The
Restaurant Project has research and plans which include energy, security, and building controls
systems. FCS451 interior Design Studio IV. Student work demonstrates understanding that
design solutions affect and are impacted by energy, security, and building controls systems. The
Healthcare Project has in mind energy savings and security systems not only in case of
emergencies but also for patient safety. Students explore and include these systems in their
healthcare design. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Energy, security, and building controls
systems are addressed in the design solutions as evidenced in phase 3 design development.
The programming phase 1 does include reference to many of these matters in the research for
the project. Building controls are often referenced in phase 4 in power and communication and
reflected ceiling plan(s).

13e) FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Student work demonstrates understanding that design
solutions may affect and are impacted by the interface of furniture and equipment with all the
building systems such as electrical systems or building structure (shown on power and
communication plans).

13f) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Vertical circulation systems are evidenced in the layout of
the Restaurant Project through its use of stairs and elevators. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III.
Student work demonstrates understanding that design solutions affect and are impacted by
vertical circulation systems. Students identify vertical circulation systems and design around
them or add additional ones according to regulations and needs for each Historic Preservation
Project. FCS353 Internship. Vertical circulation systems were integrated into space planning
exercises assigned to an intern. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Vertical circulation systems
are featured in phase 1 for the building codes graphic presentation.

13g) FCS152 Interior Design Graphics I. Students are given a set of plans that must be redrawn
to a larger scale to show their understanding of architectural prints. FCS260 Interior
Construction and Detailing. In 2010 and 2009, students were required to read and interpret the
working drawings for the Technology Annex project and the 318 6th street building respectively.
In 2008, students were required to site measure and research the existing building systems for
940 Chestnut Street Building. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Drawings and documents are
provided for the students for the Kitchen Competition, HMSU Gallery Lounge, and Restaurant
Project excepting the building in 2009 (no drawings were available so site measurements were
necessary). FCS353 Internship. Interns were considered competent at reading and interpreting
construction drawings and documents. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students base their
projects on a set of construction drawings provided either by IDEC in the case of the IDEC
student design competition or by the client in the case of the healthcare project. FCS452 Interior
Design Studio V. Students are required to locate and work with the original construction



                                                   31
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 13. Interior Construction and Building Systems
       Entry-level interior designers have knowledge of interior construction and building systems.

drawings and documents for their thesis building particularly during phases 1 programming, 2
schematic and space planning, and 4 working drawings and specifications.




                                                   32
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 14. Regulations
       Entry-level interior designers use laws, codes, standards, and guidelines that impact the design of
       interior spaces.

14a) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design introduces the students to the concepts
of federal, state, and local laws which impact design, building codes, and standards (such as
ASTM, CRI) through assigned readings and exams from the Reznikoff text. Students must
address standards for each of the specified materials for their Practicum Project. FCS251
Interior Design Studio I. Students used the LEED points checklist to design the LEED for Homes
final project. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Since ISU is now a ―green campus‖ the HMSU
Gallery Lounge must meet sustainably guidelines and one of the goals of the Restaurant Project
is to achieve a high degree of sustainability. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students use
LEED points checklist to design all the projects in this course in particular the Historic
Preservation Project. FCS355 Interior Lighting and Color Theory. Sustainability guidelines are
followed in the specifications of the luminaires as well as the selection of the lamps. FCS452
Interior Design Studio V. Sustainability guidelines are identified and recorded in phase 1
programming. Sustainability guidelines such as using environmentally preferable products and
materials, conserving water, and enhancing indoor environmental quality are applied in phases
3 and 4.

14b) FCS250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design. Industry specific regulations such as
OSHA and EPA are discussed as it relates to IAQ. FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students
were required to follow the NKBA Kitchen and Bathroom Planning Guidelines for the Bath
Project. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Students are required to follow the NKBA Kitchen
Planning Guidelines with Access Standards in the Kitchen Competition. Students are required to
follow ISU recycling guidelines in the redesign of the HMSU Gallery Lounge for example
recycling of the carpet (CRI). FCS353 Internship. Intern awareness of industry-specific
regulations allowed them to quickly pick up on regulation impact on design decisions. FCS355
Internship. Industry specific regulations such as the minimization of glare, light trespass, and
misdirection of lights is discussed after reading articles such as The Value of Lighting. FCS452
Interior Design Studio V. Student awareness of industry-specific regulations are studied such as
lighting regulations for safety when calculating appropriate foot candles for different
occupancies; and safety and health regulations on construction sites are experienced by
students when visiting construction sites.

14c) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing and FCS497I CAD Fundamentals. The
furniture plan and floor plan/partition plan address compartmentalization: fire separation and
smoke containment.14c) and 14d) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Compartmentalization and
egress is studied as it occurs on the Restaurant Project. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III.
Students are create a summary of The Codes Guidebook for Interiors and apply all the fire
safety regulations including fire separation and smoke containment especially for the Historic
Preservation Project where multiple tenants and/or multiple occupancies are present. FCS451
Interior Design Studio IV. Students apply fire separation and smoke containment in every
project in this course especially evidenced in the Healthcare Project where fire doors are
required to isolate sections of the building. 14c) and 14d) FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Compartmentalization and movement is best illustrated in phase 1 for the building codes
graphic presentation and report.

14d) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing. Furniture and partition plans demonstrate
movement as it relates to access to stairwells, corridors, and exit ways. FCS352 Interior Design
Studio III. Student work demonstrates understanding of laws, codes, standards, and guidelines
that impact fire and life safety, including means of egress such as stairwells, corridors, exitways.



                                                    33
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 14. Regulations
       Entry-level interior designers use laws, codes, standards, and guidelines that impact the design of
       interior spaces.

FCS353 Internship. Interns’ understanding of the means of egress supported their successful
production of space plans. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. In the Healthcare Project,
students create graphics that represent patient and staff circulation patterns and uses of the
spaces in comparison with occupancy and fire safety codes.

14e) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing and FCS497I CAD Fundamentals.
Floor/partition plans indicate a detection system usually in the form of an alarm system. FCS351
Interior Design Studio II. Detection devices are indicated on the Kitchen Competition and the
Restaurant Project. 14e) and 14f) FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Information regarding fire
detection and alarm systems is introduced to the students in the form of a codes summary that
accompanies the Historic Preservation Project. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. For the
Healthcare project, students create a reflected ceiling plan showing fire detection and alarm
systems as part of the final presentation. 14e) and 14f) FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Detection and suppression devices are evidenced on the lighting and reflected ceiling plans in
phases 3 and 4.

14f) FCS260 Interior Construction and Detailing and FCS497I CAD Fundamentals. The
reflected ceiling plan indicates a suppression system usually in the form of sprinklers. FCS351
Interior Design Studio II. The floor plan for the Kitchen Competition indicates the location of a
fire extinguisher. Suppression devices are indicated on the lighting plans for both the HMSU
Gallery Lounge and Restaurant Project. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Fire suppression
systems are shown on all presentation drawings and boards.

14g) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Building codes are addressed in the redesign of the
HMSU Gallery Lounge and the Restaurant Project. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III. Students
research and identify all codes and regulations that affect their project and apply these codes
and regulations to their design solutions such as the Daycare Facilities spring 2009. FCS353
Internship. Interns understood federal and state building codes and quickly grasped local codes
and their impact upon planning. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students research and
identify all codes and regulations that may affect their projects by location and use (Healthcare
Facilities (2008, 2009, and 2010) and apply these codes and regulations to their design
solutions. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V. Applicable building codes for the student’s thesis
project are identified and recorded in the programming report in phase 1. Phases 2, 3, and 4
demonstrate the application of these identified codes.

14h) FCS351 Interior Design Studio II. Standards such as ASTM, CRI, and UL are referenced
as they relate to materials and products specified for the HMSU Gallery Lounge and Restaurant
Project typically located in the project documentation. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III.
Students select and apply appropriate standards such as ADA and Building codes into every
aspect of their design solutions. An accompanying report contains all such data. FCS353
Internship. Standards were most often applied to fabrics and furniture. Interns needed to learn
the implications of these standards for each project. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV.
Standards such as ASTM and UL are included in all aspects of the design solutions and
presented with their research and process work. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V Standards
such as ANSI, ASTM, or NFPA are all organizations that produce fire-related standards and are
evidenced in the material and product specifications produced in phase 4 for the thesis project.




                                                    34
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 14. Regulations
       Entry-level interior designers use laws, codes, standards, and guidelines that impact the design of
       interior spaces.

14i) FCS251 Interior Design Studio I. Students followed the NKBA Kitchen & Bathroom Planning
Guidelines with Access Standards for the Bathroom Competition. FCS260 Interior Construction
and Detailing. Accessibility guidelines are demonstrated on the furniture and partition plans
particularly in the restroom layouts and general corridors. FCS351 Interior Design Studio II
Accessibility is applied to the Kitchen Competition, HMSU Gallery Lounge, and Restaurant
Project. FCS352 Interior design Studio III. As part of the codes and regulations summary and
analysis, students applied accessibility guidelines in the ASID student competition and the
historic preservation project. FCS353. Interns applied accessibility guidelines to their space
planning solutions. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV. Students apply all accessibility guidelines
particularly evidenced on healthcare and daycare projects. FCS452 Interior Design Studio V.
Accessibility guidelines are identified in phase 1 and applied in phases 3 and 4 of the thesis
project.




                                                    35
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 15. Assessment and Accountability
       The interior design program engages in systematic program assessment contributing to ongoing
       program improvement. Additionally, the program must provide clear, consistent, and reliable
       information about its mission and requirements to the public.

Juried Competitions (juried winners or juried non winners):
      Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC):
       o Library Project (FCS352 Interior Design Studio III spring 2010) Juried as top three (3)
           regional winners and as top 15 national winners.
       o Healthcare (FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV fall 2010)
      American Society of Interior Designers (ASID):
       o Luxury Skybox Design (FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV 2008 fall)
       o Harbor House (FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV 2009 fall)
       o Wellness Project (FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV 2010 fall)
      Institute of Store Planners (ISP):
       o Store Design and Prototype Development. High-end Jeweler Inc. (FCS352 Interior
           Design Studio III spring 2008)
      LG Surfaces Competition spring 2010 (FCS251 Interior Design Studio I).
      NKBA Bath and Kitchen Student Design Competitions fall and spring 2010, 2009, and
       2008 (FCS251 Interior Design Studio I and FCS351 Interior Design Studio II).

      NeoCon Student GREENlife Competition March 2009 featured at NeoCon World’s Trade
       Fair in June 2009 (FCS452 Interior Design Studio V):
       o Kristen Bergman, Danielle Hefner, Casie Orr, Caitlin Teeters, Brittany Workman

      ISU March 2009 Research Symposium Celebration of Student Scholarship (based on
       restaurant multicultural projects in FCS351 Interior Design Studio II). Submissions
       awarded to:
       o Michael Walker and Laurie Wojak.
       o Angela Miller and Kylie Suddarth.

      ISU Department of Art Juried Student Exhibition (17-27 February) 2009-2010:
       o Kylie Suddarth and Brooke Gephart. FCS352 Interior Design Studio III IDEC Historic
          Preservation in Downtown St. Louis. Retail Store 2009.
       o Angela Miller and Kylie Suddarth. FCS451 Interior Design Studio IV Healthcare
          Project 2009.
       o Sarah Stetter and Rebecca Smith. FCS151 Design Fundamentals Chair Design
          2008.

Advisory Board Meetings: The ID Program Advisory Board is a team of architects, interior
designers, and one construction manager. Advisors are chosen based on their expertise and
knowledge in the field. Twice annually the faculty meets with the board. The board updates the
faculty and students on the state of the economy, internship potential, and employment capacity
in the greater Indianapolis area. Throughout the year, Advisory Board Members are asked often
to evaluate student work, judge student competitions, and provide feedback to the program
relative to the state of the profession. The majority of the advisory board members serve as
mentors to the students. Each fall (Fall Orientation) an advisory board member is typically
assigned 4-5 students whom they mentor for that year. Most recently the Dean of the College of
Technology has requested that the Advisory Board spearhead fund raising activities.

Alumni Surveys: The ID Program intermittently contacts alums but an annual survey would
better assess job status and placement statistics of graduates. The ID Program conducted an



                                                 36
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 15. Assessment and Accountability
       The interior design program engages in systematic program assessment contributing to ongoing
       program improvement. Additionally, the program must provide clear, consistent, and reliable
       information about its mission and requirements to the public.

alumni survey in preparation for the CIDA report and site visit and will be incorporating
curriculum changes correcting the stated gaps in the program. Alumni suggested that the
program strengthen residential design; update the web site more often; knowledge of InDesign,
SketchUp, Photoshop, Illustrator, AutoCAD, Revit, 3D Studio Max; production of contract
documents; LEED; and time management.

Sophomore Portfolio Review: Each spring the Interior Design Program requires that the
sophomores submit an exhibit of the body of work accumulated to date for faculty review. All
sophomores are required to comply. Sophomore students are admitted into the Junior Level of
the Interior Design Program of Study ONLY after submission and approval of visual projects and
academic work. Faculty members consider both of these in determining admission; ordinarily,
students registering for a studio course will have earned an average GPA of 2.50 or higher in
the core interior design courses and have demonstrated ability in visual projects. Students
receiving conditional acceptance will have to improve and resubmit deficient projects. Students
receiving an unacceptable evaluation will be required to retake those courses deemed
UNACCEPTABLE FOR COURSE CREDIT.

Senior Portfolio Review: Each year the Senior Interior Design students travel to Indianapolis
for individual review, critiques, comments, and feedback from a minimum of four professional
architectural/design firms as well as members of the Advisory Board. Students finalize their pre-
professional portfolios after the site visits and submit for evaluation by faculty. Reviewers are
asked to evaluate the portfolios. Final portfolios are used for applications for full time
employment in the field or for graduate school.

Student Instructional Reports (SIRs): Every semester students are asked to evaluate their
current course’s content, delivery, and relevance to the curriculum. The evaluations inform the
faculty member of their ability to impart information in a timely, professional, consistent and
logical manner. Evaluations are reviewed by the faculty member teaching the course and the
department chair.

Internship Evaluations (FCS353 Internship, summer 2008, 2010): All ID students are
required to participate in the 320 hour paid internship course. Due to economic conditions in
2010, not all interns were paid but many unpaid interns applied for a $1,000 scholarship offered
through Focus Indiana and were successful in security these funds. All internship students are
required to be supervised on site by an NCIDQ Certified Professional or a state licensed
Architect. During the internship, students are required to submit weekly journal entries
documenting, reflecting upon, and analyzing their experiences. After the internship, students are
required to present their experience to their peers. Intern Supervisors fill out an intern
preference form which determines what knowledge and skills that employer is seeking in an
intern. Both intern and intern supervisor review and sign a learning contract in week one guiding
the goals for the 320 hours of experience. Intern Supervisors evaluate the intern at the end of
the internship experience. The collected information indicates how well the current curriculum
does in preparing interns and new hires for the interior design profession.

Web site information to the public: www.indstate.edu/interior




                                                 37
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 16. Support and Resources
       The interior design program must have a sufficient number of qualified faculty members, as well
       as adequate administrative support and resources, to achieve program goals.

Faculty:
 The number of faculty members and other instructional personnel is sufficient to implement
   educational and program goals. The program has two full time faculty members (Juan
   Jurado and Mary Sterling) and two part-time adjunct professors (Denise Conrady and Steve
   Arnold) and one graduate assistant (Jessica Simmons). In addition to her teaching
   responsibilities (three courses in the fall semester and four courses in the spring semester),
   Mary Sterling serves as Program Coordinator and advisor for the student organization
   (IDEA) and academic advisor to all the registered students in the program (42 students).

Administration:
 One administrative person serves both the Department of the Built Environment and
  Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology with a total of 16 regular faculty and 4
  adjunct faculty and two chairs. The current administrative assistant, Ann Mitchell, is on
  temporary assignment to the Department of the Built Environment. Next year, it is
  anticipated that the department will have its own full time administrative assistant and full
  time chair.
 The educational and program goals of the Interior Design Program are fully supported by
  the Department of the Built Environment and the COT Dean’s office. This is reinforced by
  their support for CIDA accreditation.
 The interior design program has one work study student who helps to operate the resource
  library.
 The coordinator, faculty members, and other instructional personnel collaborate in
  developing, implementing, and modifying the program. The faculty members meet each
  week to collaborate and solve problems within the program. Discussions include curriculum
  issues, student issues, committee reports and goals.

Resources:
 Purchase of computer peripherals such as printers (no funding anticipated 2010-11) and
   plotters (anticipated private funding of $5,000.00 by MMS-AE in October 2010)
 Purchase of additional shelving for library samples and catalogues (no equipment funding
   anticipated 2010-11)
 Purchase of current software such as AutoCAD, Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, SketchUp,
   BIM, Revit, 3-D Max and Maya. (no funding anticipated 2010-11)

Facilities:
    Planning meeting #1 was held on 20 September with MMS-AE; Scott Tillman, University
Architect; Dean Brad Sims, COT; Jerry Cockrell, Interim Chair, Department of the Built
Environment; Jeff McNabb, Assoc Dean COT;Juan Jurado; Mary Sterling and the following
facility requirements were reviewed:
 Design/drafting/lighting studio       1,750 sf
 Secondary Studio                      1,250 sf
 Faculty Offices (3)                     375 sf
 Storage Room                            500 sf
 Design Library                          500 sf
 Work Room (cut samples)                 500 sf
 Display area                            125 sf
 Exhibit (gallery) space               1,500 sf
 Critique space                          500 sf



                                                  38
Analysis of the Program’s Compliance with CIDA Standards

Standard 16. Support and Resources
       The interior design program must have a sufficient number of qualified faculty members, as well
       as adequate administrative support and resources, to achieve program goals.

   Break Room with Kitchen/Lounge             500 sf
   Bathroom                                   200 sf
   Circulation (35%)                        2,695 sf
   Grand Total                                         10,395 sf




                                                  39
Recommended page limit: 2

1) Provide a brief description of the conclusions you have drawn about overall program quality. In what ways are
   your students especially well prepared to enter professional practice as interior designers?

        Curriculum that presents students with a broad range of design concentration options
        including residential design (bath and kitchen), hospitality design, healthcare design, and
        restoration/preservation design.
        A high percentage of graduates obtain permanent positions in the field as a direct result
        of the required internship experience.
        Full time and part-time faculty members have diverse educational backgrounds and work
        experience and are dedicated to the long term success of the program
        The Department of the Built Environment was the vision of the Dean of the College of
        Technology. The Dean demonstrates strong support for growing student numbers and
        the reputation of the department’s programs.

    What areas could be further strengthened to support current or future preparation of program graduates?

        Collaboration with Construction Management on design/build projects
        Higher percentage of male student – currently only one male student
        Low percentage of graduates pursuing the NCIDQ exam
        Low percentage of graduates pursuing the LEED exam
        Low percentage of alumni in touch with program upon graduation

2) Provide a brief description of your plans for future program development.

        Implement a selective admissions process by (accepting a maximum of 30 students
        each year) by 2011 with a minimum GPA of B- (80%)
        Change the degree from Bachelor of Science (BS) to Bachelor of Interior Architecture
        Design (BIAD)
        Change the program from a four year to five year program with a one year co-op (two six
        month units) experience
        Add a course in Construction + Detail: Residential
        Add a course in Digital Visualization (Digital Rendering + 3-D Modeling)
        Add a course in Sustainable Practices including studying for LEED GA
        Add a Master in Fine Arts Interior Design (MFA)

    What changes to curriculum or resources have been planned and/or implemented to improve gaps in the
    educational program identified through self-study?

        Eliminate the FCS core courses (107, 109, 410) and FCS217 Textiles I
        Initiate a self-study instrument whereby students evaluate the extent to which relevant
        CIDA standards are achieved upon completing a course (all courses at all levels)
        Students participate in evaluating the overall quality of the program through graduate
        exit surveys
        Develop FCS354 Traditional Interiors, FCS454 Contemporary Interiors and Furniture,
        and FCS455 American Interiors and Furniture as on-line courses
        Emphasize communication and interdisciplinary experiences

    When are these changes likely to occur?
        August 2011


                                                       40
What changes in the program, institution, higher education, the profession, or society may impact the program
in the future?

Issues such as sustainability and the integration of technology will impact the program
profoundly. The program will need to be teaching and applying BIM and LEED standards to
most of the studio projects. Globalization will mean that students need to learn at least one
second language, develop proficiency in the metric system, and apply multicultural
expertise.

What is being done to address emerging issues, trends, or challenges?

The ID Program has been reassigned to the College of Technology to have ready access to
emerging software and cutting edge technology such as Revit and BIM. The relocation into
the Department of the Built Environment will include proximity to the Construction
Management Program assisting with understanding and applying the concept of
design/build.




                                                   41
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                               First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                      ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ARTD 490
                                                                                                                    ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                              ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 497I
                                                                                                FCS 150
                                                                                                          FCS 152




                                                                                                                                    FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 458
Standard 2. Global Context for Design - Entry-level interior designers have a global view and weigh design
decisions within the parameters of ecological, socio-economic, and cultural contexts.
Student Learning Expectations
Student work demonstrates understanding of:
  the concepts, principles, and theories of sustainability as they pertain to building                                                                            P                                       S                               S                   S               P                      S                               P
  methods, materials, systems, and occupants.                                              2a

Students understand:
  globalization and the implications of conducting the practice of design within a world        S                                                                 S                                                                       P                                                                                          S
  market.                                                                                  2b

  how design needs may vary for different socio-economic populations.                      2c S                                                                                                                                                     P                         P                      S         P                     S          S

Program Expectations
The interior design program provides:
  exposure to contemporary issues affecting interior design.                               2d                                                                     S                                       S                               S                   S                                                                      P

  exposure to a variety of business, organizational, and familial structures.              2e S                                                                                                                                           P                   S                                                                      S

  opportunities for developing knowledge of other cultures.                                2f S                                                                                                                                           P         P         S                                                P                     S          S

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               1
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                              First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                               Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                     ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   ARTD 490
                                                                                                                   ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                             ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 497I
                                                                                               FCS 150
                                                                                                         FCS 152




                                                                                                                                   FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                 FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 458
Standard 3. Human Behavior - The work of interior designers is informed by knowledge of behavioral
science and human factors.
Student Learning Expectations
  Students understand that social and cultural norms may vary from their own and are           S                                                                                                                                         P                   S               P                      S
  relevant to making appropriate design decisions.                                        3a

Student work demonstrates:
                                                                                                                                                                 S                                       S                               P                   S               S                                                      P
  understanding and the ability to appropriately apply theories of human behavior.        3b
  the ability to select, interpret, and apply appropriate ergonomic and anthropometric                                                                           S                                       S                               P                   S               S                      P                               P
  data.                                                                                   3c

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         P                   S               S                      P                               P
  understanding and the ability to appropriately apply universal design concepts.         3d

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                                  First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                   Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                         ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       ARTD 490
                                                                                                                       ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                                 ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 497I
                                                                                                   FCS 150
                                                                                                             FCS 152




                                                                                                                                       FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 458
Standard 4. Design Process - Entry-level interior designers need to apply all aspects of the design process
to creative problem solving. Design process enables designers to identify and explore complex problems and
generate creative solutions that support human behavior within the interior environment.
Student Learning Expectations
Students are able to:
  identify and define relevant aspects of a design problem (goals, objectives,                                                                                       S                                       S                               S                   S               P                      P                               P
  performance criteria).                                                                      4a
  gather appropriate and necessary information and research findings to solve the                                                                                                                            S                               S                   S               P                      P                               P
  problem (evidence-based design).                                                            4b

  evaluate, select, and apply information and research findings to design.                    4c                                                                     S                                       S                               S                   S               P                      P                               P

  synthesize information and generate multiple concepts and/or multiple design                                                                                                                               P                               S                   S               P            S         S                               P
  responses to programmatic requirements.                                                     4d
  demonstrate creative thinking and originality through presentation of a variety of ideas,                                                                          S                                       P                               S                   S               P                      S                               P
  approaches, and concepts.                                                                   4e

Program Expectations
The interior design program includes:
  opportunities to solve simple to complex design problems.                                   4f                                                                     S                                       P                               S                   S               P                      S                               P

  exposure to a range of design research and problem solving methods.                         4g                                                                     S                                       S                               P                   S               P                      S                               P

  opportunities for innovation and creative thinking.                                         4h                                                                                                             P                               S                   S               P                      S                               P

  opportunities to develop critical listening skills.                                         4i                                                                                                             S                               S                                   P            S         P                               S                    P

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  3
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                              First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                               Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                     ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   ARTD 490
                                                                                                                   ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                             ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 497I
                                                                                               FCS 150
                                                                                                         FCS 152




                                                                                                                                   FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                 FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 458
Standard 5. Collaboration - Entry-level interior designers engage in multi-disciplinary collaborations and
consensus building.
Student Learning Expectations
Students have awareness of:
  team work structures and dynamics.                                                      5a                                       S                                                                     S                               P                   S               P            S         P

  the nature and value of integrated design practices.                                    5b                                                                                                             S                               S                   P               S                      S                               P                    P
Program Expectations

The interior design program includes learning experiences that engage students
in:
  collaboration, consensus building, leadership, and team work.                           5c                                       S                                                                     S                               P                   S               P                      P                               S
  interaction with multiple disciplines representing a variety of points of view and
                                                                                                                                                                 P                                                                       S                   P                            S                                         S
  perspectives.                                                                           5d

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              4
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                               First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                      ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ARTD 490
                                                                                                                    ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                              ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 497I
                                                                                                FCS 150
                                                                                                          FCS 152




                                                                                                                                    FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 458
Standard 6. Communications - Entry-level interior designers are effective communicators.
Student Learning Expectations
  Students apply a variety of communication techniques and technologies appropriate                                                           S                             S                                                             P                                                          S                               P                              P
  to a range of purposes and audiences.                                                    6a

Students are able to:
  express ideas clearly in oral and written communication.                                 6b                                                                                                             S                                                                   S                      S                               P                    P         P

  use sketches as a design and communication tool (ideation drawings).                     6c                                       S                                                                     S                               S                   P               P                      S                               P

  produce competent presentation drawings across a range of appropriate media.             6d                                                                               S                             S                               S                   S               P                      P                               P

  produce competent contract documents including coordinated drawings, schedules,
  and specifications appropriate to project size and scope and sufficiently extensive to                  S                                                                                                          P         S                                              S                      P                               P
  show how design solutions and interior construction are related.                         6e

  integrate oral and visual material to present ideas clearly.                             6f                                                                                                             S                               S                   S               P                      S                               P                              P

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               5
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                                First Year                                                            Second Year                                                        Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                 Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                            Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                       ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ARTD 490
                                                                                                                     ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                               ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 497I
                                                                                                 FCS 150
                                                                                                           FCS 152




                                                                                                                                     FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                   FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 458
Standard 7. Professionalism and Business Practice - Entry-level interior designers use ethical and
accepted standards of practice, are committed to professional development and the industry, and understand
the value of their contribution to the built environment.
Student Learning Expectations
Students understand :
  the contributions of interior design to contemporary society.                             7a S                                                                                                                                                                                           S                   P                                          P

  various types of design practices.                                                        7b S                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          P

  the elements of business practice (business development, financial management,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          P
  strategic planning, and various forms of collaboration and integration of disciplines).   7c
  the elements of project management, project communication, and project delivery                                                                                                                                                                                                          S                                                              P
  methods.                                                                                  7d

  professional ethics.                                                                      7e                                                                                                                                                                                             S                                                              P

Program Expectations
  The interior design program provides exposure to various market sectors and client             S                                                                                                                                                                                         S                                                              P
  types.                                                                                    7f

The interior design program provides exposure to the role and value of:
  legal recognition for the profession.                                                     7g                                                                                                                                                                                             S                                                              P

  professional organizations.                                                               7h P                                                                                                                                                                                           S                                                              P

  life-long learning.                                                                       7i                                                                                                                                                                                             S                                                              P

  public and community service.                                                             7j S                                                                                                                      P                                                                    S                                                              S

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               6
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                                First Year                                                            Second Year                                                        Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                 Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                            Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                       ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ARTD 490
                                                                                                                     ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                               ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 497I
                                                                                                 FCS 150
                                                                                                           FCS 152




                                                                                                                                     FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                   FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 458
Standard 8. History - Entry-level interior designers apply knowledge of interiors, architecture, art, and the
decorative arts within a historical and cultural context.
Student Learning Expectations
  Students understand the social, political, and physical influences affecting historical                                                                                                                                                            P                        P                                P                                S
  changes in design of the built environment.                                               8a

Students are able to identify:
  movements and periods in interior design and furniture.                                   8b                                                                                                                                                       P                        S                                P                                P

  movements and traditions in architecture.                                                 8c                                                                                         S                                                             P                                                         P                                P

  stylistic movements and periods of art.                                                   8d                                                                                         S                                                             P                                                         P                                P

  Students are able to use historical precedent to inform design solutions.                 8e                                                                                         S                                                             S                                                         S                                P

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               7
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                              First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                Fall                             Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                     ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   ARTD 490
                                                                                                                   ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                             ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 497I
                                                                                               FCS 150
                                                                                                         FCS 152




                                                                                                                                   FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                 FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 458
Standard 9. Space and Form - Entry-level interior designers apply the theories of two- and three-
dimensional design, and spatial definition and organization.
Student Learning Expectations
Students effectively apply the elements, principles, and theories of design to:
  two-dimensional design solutions.                                                       9a P                     P                                                                                     S                               S                                   S                                                      S                              P

  three-dimensional design solutions.                                                     9b                                       P                                                                     S                               S                   P               S                      S                               P

  Students are able to analyze and discuss spatial definition and organization.           9c                                       S                                                                     S                               S                                   P            S         P                               P

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              8
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                                 First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                  Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                        ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      ARTD 490
                                                                                                                      ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                                ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 FCS 497I
                                                                                                  FCS 150
                                                                                                            FCS 152




                                                                                                                                      FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 458
Standard 10. Color and Light - Entry-level interior designers apply the principles and theories of
color and light.
Student Learning Expectations

Student work demonstrates understanding of:
  color principles, theories, and systems.                                                  10a P                                                                                                           S                               S                   P               S                      S                               P

  the interaction of light and color and the impact they have on one another and interior                                                                                                                                                   S                   P               S                      P                               P
  environments.                                                                             10b

Students:
  appropriately select and apply color with regard to its multiple purposes.                10c P                                                                             S                             S                               S                                   S                      P                               P
  apply color effectively in all aspects of visual communication (presentations, models,
                                                                                                                                                                              S                             S                               S                                   S                      P                               P                              P
  etc.)                                                                                     10d

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 9
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                                First Year                                                            Second Year                                                        Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                 Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                            Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                       ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ARTD 490
                                                                                                                     ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                               ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 497I
                                                                                                 FCS 150
                                                                                                           FCS 152




                                                                                                                                     FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                   FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 458
Standard 11. Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment, and Finish Materials - Entry-level interior designers select
and specify furniture, fixtures, equipment and finish materials in interior spaces.
Student Learning Expectations
Students have awareness of:
  a broad range of materials and products.                                                 11a                                                                     P                                       S                               S                                  S            S         P                               P

  typical fabrication and installation methods, and maintenance requirements.              11b                                                                     P                                       S                               S                                               S         S                               P

  Students select and apply appropriate materials and products on the basis of their
  properties and performance criteria, including environmental attributes and life cycle                                                                           P                                       S                               S                                  S            S         P                               P
  cost.                                                                                    11c
  Students are able to layout and specify furniture, fixtures, and equipment.              11d                                                                                                             S                               S                                  S            S         P                               P

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               10
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                               First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                      ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ARTD 490
                                                                                                                    ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                              ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 497I
                                                                                                FCS 150
                                                                                                          FCS 152




                                                                                                                                    FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 458
Standard 12. Environmental Systems and Controls - Entry-level interior designers use the principles of
lighting, acoustics, thermal comfort, and indoor air quality to enhance the health, safety, welfare, and
performance of building occupants.
Student Learning Expectations
Students:
  understand the principles of natural and electrical lighting design.                    12a                                                                                                                                             P                   S               S                      P                               P

  competently select and apply luminaires and light sources.                              12b                                                                                                                                             S                   P               S                      P                               P

Students understand :
  the principles of acoustical design.                                                    12c                                                                                                                        P                                                        P                      P                               S

  appropriate strategies for acoustical control.                                          12d                                                                                                                        P                                                        P                      P                               S

Students understand :
  the principles of thermal design.                                                       12e                                                                                                                        S                    S                                                                                          S

  how thermal systems impact interior design solutions.                                   12f                                                                                                                        S                    S                                                                                          S

Students understand :
  the principles of indoor air quality.                                                   12g                                                                     P                                       S                               S                                   S                      P                               P

                                                                                                                                                                  P                                       S                               S                                   S                      P                               P
  how the selection and application of products and systems impact indoor air quality.    12h

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               11
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                               First Year                                                            Second Year                                                        Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                            Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                      ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   ARTD 490
                                                                                                                    ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                              ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 497I
                                                                                                FCS 150
                                                                                                          FCS 152




                                                                                                                                    FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FCS 458
Standard 13. Interior Construction and Building Systems - Entry-level interior designers have knowledge
of interior construction and building systems.
Student Learning Expectations
Student work demonstrates understanding that design solutions affect and are
impacted by:
  structural systems and methods.                                                         13a             P                                                                                               S          P         S          S                                  S                                                      P

  non-structural systems including ceilings, flooring, and interior walls.                13b             P                                                                                               S          P                    S                                  S                      S                               P

  distribution systems including power, mechanical, HVAC, data/voice                                                                                                                                      S          P         S          S                                                         S                               P
  telecommunications, and plumbing.                                                       13c

  energy, security, and building controls systems.                                        13d                                                                                                                        S                    S                                                         S                               S

  the interface of furniture with distribution and construction systems.                  13e                                                                                                                                                                                                       S

  vertical circulation systems.                                                           13f                                                                                                                                             P                                  P            S                                         S

  Students are able to read and interpret construction drawings and documents.            13g             P                                                                                                          P                    S                                               S         S                               P

Notes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              12
Curriculum Matrix - Indiana State University
                                                                                                                               First Year                                                            Second Year                                                         Third Year                                             Fourth Year
P - Primary evidence. Limit: 3 'P's per expectation. 1 'P' per expectation is mandatory                                Fall                              Spring                            Fall                                Spring                             Fall            Spring    Summer                       Fall                             Spring
unless the program does not address the expectation in the curriculum.




                                                                                                                                                                                      ARTH 271/272
S - Secondary evidence. Limit: 4 'S's per expectation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ARTD 490
                                                                                                                    ARTS 102




                                                                                                                                              ARTS 101




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 497I
                                                                                                FCS 150
                                                                                                          FCS 152




                                                                                                                                    FCS 151




                                                                                                                                                                  FCS 250
                                                                                                                                                                            FCS 252




                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 251
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 260




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 351
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    FCS 354
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 355




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FCS 352




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           FCS 353




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FCS 451
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               FCS 454




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      FCS 452
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FCS 455
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          FCS 458
Standard 14. Regulations - Entry-level interior designers use laws,
codes, standards, and guidelines that impact the design of interior
spaces.
Student Learning Expectations
Students have awareness of:
  sustainability guidelines.                                                              14a                                                                     P                                       S                               P                   S               S                                                      S

  industry-specific regulations.                                                          14b                                                                     P                                       S                               P                   S                            S                                         S

Student work demonstrates understanding of laws, codes, standards, and
guidelines that impact fire and life safety, including:
  compartmentalization: fire separation and smoke containment.                            14c                                                                                                                        S         S          S                                   P                      S                               P

                                                                                                                                                                                                                     S                    S                                   P            S         S                               P
  movement: access to the means of egress including stairwells, corridors, exitways.      14d
  detection: active devices that alert occupants including smoke/heat detectors and                                                                                                                                  S         S          S                                   P                      S                               P
  alarm systems.                                                                          14e
  suppression: devices used to extinguish flames including sprinklers, standpipes, fire                                                                                                                              S         S          S                                   P                      S                               P
  hose cabinets, extinguishers, etc.                                                      14f

Students select and apply appropriate:
  federal, state/provincial, and local codes.                                             14g                                                                                                                                             S                                   P            S         P                               P

  standards.                                                                              14h                                                                                                                                             S                                   P            S         P                               P

  accessibility guidelines.                                                               14i                                                                                                             S          S                    P                                   S            S         P                               P




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               13
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Mary C. Sterling                              X full-time      ___adjunct          part-time       support
                                                        other (please indicate):

                                                                                                     Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                     X Yes  No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                                X Yes  No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                       X Yes No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
40 % of time spent in administration
40 % of time spent in teaching
20% of time spent in research

Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Master of             Interior Design, Central Michigan University, Mt Pleasant, MI
Arts:                 1998

Bachelor of           Interior Design, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Interior Design:      1968


Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Coordinator, Associate Professor, Interior                                                            1999-present
Design Program                                                                                        Tenure track
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Courses taught in the past two years:
Fall Semester - FCS 250 Materials and Finishes of Interior Design
Spring Semester - FCS 260 Interior Construction and Detailing
Fall Semester - FCS 351 Interior Design Studio II
Fall Semester - FCS 355 Interior Lighting and color Theory
Spring Semester - FCS 353 Internship (summers only)
Spring Semester - FCS 452 Interior Design Studio V
Spring Semester - FCS 458 Professional Practices and Procedures
Spring Semester - ARTD 490 Interior Design Portfolio (team taught)
Summer - GH 199 Interior Architecture/Design Summer Honors

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):
Principal:                                  Sterling Design Group Inc,               1978-97
                                            (SDGI)

Project Manager:                            Office Planning Services                 1974-78

Senior Designer:                            Marani, Routhwaite & Dick                1969-74
                                            Architects


January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form



Interior Designer:                         Abram, Nowski & McLaughlin              1968-69


Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):
         Sterling, M. C. (2007). Service-learning and interior design: A case study. Journal of
         Experiential Education, 29(3), 331-343.
         Sterling, M. C. (2005). Rochon Residence. [Interior design project]. Peer reviewed with
         3-0 votes for appropriate and acceptable creative scholarship.
         Sterling, M. C. (2004). Universal design problem solving. Journal of Family & Consumer
         Sciences, 96, 40-44.
         Sterling, M. C. (2004). Professional legitimacy in interior design {Abstract}. Proceedings
         of the Interior Design Educators Council International Conference. Pittsburgh, PA, 37-
         38.
         Sterling, M. C. (2003). Education: Interior Design Studio Space. Interior Design
         Educators Council (IDEC), Pittsburgh, PA, March 2004. Notification of “accepted for
         show” received 18 December 2003.
         Sterling, M. C. (2003). Ness Residence. [Interior design project]. Peer reviewed with 3-0
         votes for appropriate and acceptable creative scholarship.

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:
         LEED AP (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional).
         June 2009.
         GREENlife NeoCon Competition, Chicago, IL proposal awarded $3,660.00 by the Lily
         Endowment, Focus Indiana, and ISU Center for Public Service and Community
         Engagement (June 2009)
         Selected as one of Indian State University’s Promising Scholars. Net Zero Energy
         Healthy House Project approved for $13,675.65 in funding (01 August 2008 – 31 July
         2010)
         International Travel Grant Fall 2008, to investigate University of San Francisco Quito,
         Ecuador for Study Abroad Interior Architecture/Design Program awarded $2,000.00.
         International Travel Grant Spring 2006, to investigate Lorenzo de Medici and Florence
         University of the Arts schools in Florence, Italy for Study Abroad Interior Design
         Program awarded $2,000.00.

Professional memberships and service:
         Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC), Professional Member (1996-present)
         International Interior Design Association (IIDA), Professional Member (1996-present)
         Registered Interior Designer (RID00230), State of Indiana (2010-present)
         Appointed Visiting Team Co-Chair for future CIDA site visits November 2008.

Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):
         Attended 20-20 Technologies Version 6.4 and 8.1 Training Class in Grand Rapids, MI
         (fall 2007 and May 2008)
         Attended LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations Technical Review,
         Cleveland, OH 13 Nov 2008
         Attended LEED for Commercial Interiors Technical Review, Chicago, IL 22 May 2007
         Attended Healthcare and Medical Lighting Workshop, 5-6 March 2007



January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Juan A. Jurado                                X full-time         adjunct          part-time         support
                                                       other (please indicate):

                                                                                                     Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                     X Yes  No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                                X Yes  No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                        Yes X No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
10        % of time spent in administration
70        % of time spent in teaching
20        % of time spent in research

Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Master of             Graphic Design, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN
Fine Arts:            Degree expected: Spring 2012

Master of              Family and Consumer Sciences with specialization in Interior Design,
Sciences:              Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN
                       Degree received December 2003, Overall GPA 4.0/4.0

Bachelor:              Architecture, Central University of Ecuador
                       Degree received in 1998 from a 6 year program, Overall GPA: 3.45/4.0


Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Assistant Professor (TT), Interior Design Program                                    fall 2007 – present
Indiana State University, Terre Haute-Indiana

Continuing Lecturer, Interior Design Program                                         fall 2006 - spring 2007
Purdue University, West Lafayette-Indiana

Assistant Professor, Interior Design Program                                         fall 2004 - Spring 2006
Indiana State University, Terre Haute-Indiana


Courses taught in the past two years:

        Fall Semesters
        FCS 152, Interior Design Graphics I
        FCS 252, Interior Design Graphics II
        FCS 451, Interior Design Studio IV
        Spring Semesters
        FCS 151, Design Fundamentals
        FCS 352, Interior Design Studio III
        FCS 497I, Design Fundamental

January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):

Design                  Department of design and budgeting               2000 - 2002
Supervisor:             PRODASFALT S.A. (Roofing Construction Company), Quito-Ecuador

Owner and             ARQUI-Tk,                                                              1998 - 2002
Manager:              Quito-Ecuador

Design and
Construction          Inmobiliaria Helvetia S.A. (Conauto-Texaco),                           1998-2000
Supervisor:            Quito-Ecuador

Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):

N/A




Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:


N/A




Professional memberships and service:

Membership:             IDEC: 2007 to present
                        NCIDQ: Eligible to take the exam since 2007

Volunteer               Improving Kids Environment: Indianapolis, IN (2009)
Work:                   Habitat for Humanity: Central Indiana, Indianapolis region (2009)
                        Partners in Housing Development Corporation: Indianapolis, IN (2009)


Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):

N/A




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form
Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                                           Check one:
Name: Steve Arnold, AIA, Registered Interior Designer                      full-time x adjunct           part-time
                                                                           ___support other (please indicate):

                                                                                                    Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                     Yes x No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                                Yes x No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                       Yes X No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
          % of time spent in administration
          % of time spent in teaching
          % of time spent in research

Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Bachelors Degree: Ball State University, College of Architecture and Planning 1980

Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):
Adjunct Professor - 2004 – 2010, Indiana State University, Interior Design Program, FCS
Currently teaching History of architecture and design (4 years)
Taught studio and construction documents (2 years)

Courses taught in the past two years:
History: FCS 354, 454, 455

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):
John C. Curry            Intern 1979                                     CSO Architects: Architect, Project
and Associates:                                                                          Manager 1988-1993
Charles                  Architect 1980 – 1983                                MMS-A/E: President, Architect,
Womack and                                                                               Registered Interior
Associates:                                                                              Designer 1993-2010
Fields – Arnold          Principal Architect 1983 –
and Associates:          1988
Architect Registrations: Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin
Interior Design registrations: Indiana

Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):
Over 1,000 Architectural Designs in the last 30 years including:




Indiana State University                       Stalker Hall                          Stalker Hall      Terre Haute
                                                                                                Children’s Museum

   January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form




901 Wabash, Terre Haute                          Riddell National Bank




                                              Mid Town Dentistry, Terre Haute

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:
Nominated for AIA “Julliet Peddle Award” past two years
1998 IESNA Illumination Design Award for ISU Signature Feature
2007 Downtown Terre Haute Heritage Award for ISU Stalker Hall
2001 ABC Award of Honor
2003 ABC Award of Excellence for 901 Wabash
2004 ABC Award of Excellence for Glabber Girl Museum
Professional memberships and service: American Institute of Architects, Rotary International, Vincennes
University Advisory Board, Indiana State University Interior Design Program Advisory Board

Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):
Hours          Date                 Course
1              3.18.2009            Storage Design: Alternatives for Today’s Workplace (SDA2)
1              3.24.2009            Rolling door Products: Design Types
1              4.2.2009             Roofing and Buyilding Maintenance Division
1              7.7.2009             Upward Acting Commercial Sectional Door Systems
1              7.15.2009            Track & Sports Field Design
1              8.14.2009            Vertical Transportation Design
1              11.4.2009            The Renaissance of Steel Windows
1              11.4.2009            Controlling Light & Heat with Architectural Glazing Systems
1              11.4.2009            MCM101: An Introduction to Metal Composite Material (MCM)
3              11.4.2009            Rainscreen Design, Guardrail/Handrail Safety Regulations
1              11.4.2009            The Benefits of Daylighting
1              11.5.2009            Air, Water and Moisture Management in Commercial Building
Envelopes
1              11.5.2009            Healthy Indoor Air Quality
1              11.17.2009           Design Alternatives to the Enclosed Elevator Lobby: Fire and Smoke
Safety Solutions
1              11.17.2009           Window Replacement Solutions for Commercial and Institutional
Buildings

   January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Denise Conrady                                   full-time    X adjunct           part-time        support
                                                       other (please indicate):

                                                                                                    Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                     Yes X No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                                Yes X No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                       Yes X No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
          % of time spent in administration
          % of time spent in teaching
          % of time spent in research



Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Bachelor of          Architecture/Art/Art History, Rice University, Houston, TX
Arts:

Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Adjunct Professor, Interior Design Program                                                          Fall 2009, 2010
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Courses taught in the past two years:

Fall Semester - FCS 150, Interior Design Studio I

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):

Owner & Managing Director:                  Atelier Oz S.A.R.L.                      2004-2008
                                            Paris, France

Office & Project Manager                    Naco Architecture                        1998-2004
                                            Paris, France

Freelance Designer                          Paris, France                            1992-1998

Designer (Interiors &                       Studio Naco                              1987-1992
Furniture)
                                            Paris, France

Exhibition Designer                         Museum of Fine Arts                      1984-1987
                                            Houston, TX




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):

N/A

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:

N/A

Professional memberships and service:

N/A

Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):

N/A




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Jessica N. Simmons                               full-time    X adjunct            part-time       support
                                                       other (please indicate):

                                                                                                     Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                     X Yes  No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                                X Yes  No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                        Yes X No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
          % of time spent in administration
          % of time spent in teaching
          % of time spent in research



Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Master of            Graphic Design, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN
Fine Arts:           Degree Expected: Spring 2012

Bachelor of          Interior Design, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN
Science:             Overall GPA 3.83/4.0


Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Adjunct Professor, Interior Design Program                                                       Spring 2009,2010
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Graduate Assistant, Interior Design Program                                              Summer 2009 – present
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Courses taught in the past two years:

Spring Semester - FCS 251, Interior Design Studio I

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):

Design Intern:                              Designplan Inc.                          August 2007 – July 2008
                                            Indianapolis, IN




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):




Starfish Initiative, Indianapolis, IN

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:

Outstanding Graduate Assistant 2010

Professional memberships and service:

Membership:               IIDA: 2006 - present
                          USBGC: 2010


Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):

LEED Workshop: Technical Review                                                                            May 2008




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Alma Mary Anderson (SAMy)                     X full-time      ___adjunct              part-time       support
                                                        other (please indicate):

                                                                                                         Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                         X Yes  No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                                    X Yes  No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                           X Yes No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
40 % of time spent in administration
40 % of time spent in teaching
20% of time spent in research

Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Master of             Graphic Design, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY
Fine Arts:            1987

Bachelor of           Graphic Design and Photography, Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, IN
Fine Arts:            1965


Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Professor, Graphic Design Program                                                                         2002-present
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Courses taught in the past two years:
ARTD 220 - Introduction to Graphic Design
ARTD 321 - Principles of Graphic Design
ARTD 323 - Illustration for Layout
ARTD 400K - Graphic Design Workshop
ARTD 420 - Web Page Design
ARTD 422 - Marketing Graphics
ARTD 423 - Advanced Applications in Graphic Design
ARTD 490 - Graphic Design Portfolio
ARTD 600 - Art Workshop, Graduate
ARTD 601 - Creative Research, Graduate
ARTD 620 - Advanced Graphic Design I, Graduate
ARTD 621 - Advanced Graphic Design II, Graduate
ARTD 622 - Special Problems in Graphic Design, Graduate
Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):
N/A

Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):
   •    Spring 2009, Popular Culture Association, New Orleans; part of panel–paper, Online
        Viruses—[When] Will They Cross the Species Barrier? A Study in Could Be and May Be


January 2009                                                                                              Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form


   •    Spring 2007, Popular Culture Association, Boston; part of panel– paper–Designing a
        Book: The Jewish People of Pinellas County
   •    Spring 2006, Judged Student Art Show at University of Evansville– gave presentation,
        Does Graphic Design Have a Sense of Humor?
   •    Histories of the Jewish People of Pinellas County, Florida. Temple B'nai Israel,
        publisher 2006. 720 pages. Cover, page design, layout, photography.
   •    Indiana Historical Markers. Alan McPherson, 2006. Cover, design and layout with
        graduate students Judy Wu and Pat Linehan.
   •    Illustrated Dictionary of Environmental Health; Herman Koren. Lewis/CRC Publishers,
        Inc., Boca Raton, , NY, London, Tokyo. 2nd edition. 2004.

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:
   •    2010, Presidential Medal (mostly for Service)
   •    2000-2003, Presidential Teaching Fellow
   •    1996, Caleb Mills Distinguished Teaching Award–Indiana State University
   •    1995, Nominated to and accepted for inclusion in Strathmore's Who's Who
   •    1994, 1995, 2000, 2002, 2006 Nominated to/accepted in Who's Who Among America's
        Teachers

Professional memberships and service:
   •    American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) national
   •    AIGA, Indianapolis Chapter(Board Secretary 1990-1993)
   •    National Association of Photoshop Professionals
   •    Popular Culture Association
   •    ISU MacUser's Group (President 1989-1992), co-coordinator 1993-1996
   •    OurGreenVallley Alliance for Sustainability 2009 to present

Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):
N/A




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Glenn Dunlap                                  X full-time      ___adjunct              part-time       support
                                                        other (please indicate):

                                                                                                         Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                          Yes  No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                                     Yes  No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                            Yes X No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
0         % of time spent in administration
75        % of time spent in teaching
25        % of time spent in research



Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Master of            Graphic Design, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 1973
Arts:

Bachelor of          Commercial Art, Arkansas Technology University, Russellville, AR, 1970
Arts:

Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Professor, Graphic Design                                                                                2006 - present
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN                                                                       tenured

Courses taught in the past two years:
ARTS 102 - Two Dimensional Design/Color
ARTD 322 - Layout Design
ARTD 323 - Illustration for Layout
ARTD 421 - Advanced Layout Design
ARTD 422 - Marketing Graphics

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):
Company Director,                           Aspen Direct, (Formally                  1980-1991
Creative/Art Director:                      Direct Marketing
                                            London, England

Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):

N/A

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:

         2008 - International Travel Grant, Indiana State University
         2006 - Invitational Group Show, Washington Pavilion of Arts and Sciences

January 2009                                                                                              Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

         2003 - College of Arts and Sciences, Travel Grant, Indiana State University
         2001 - International Travel Grant, Indiana State University
         2000 - Arts Endowment Award, Indiana State University

         SIGMA NU (Honors Society) and KAPPA PI (International Honorary Art Fraternity)

Professional memberships and service:

         1992 – present, Board Member, Member, The American Institute of Graphic Arts,
         Indianapolis chapter. Member of this international professional design organization and
         have just completed my fourth term on the Board of Directors. My responsibilities
         consist of fund raising, budgeting,and organizing the College Student Careers Day /
         Portfolio Review.
         1992 – 1998, Graphic Design Education Association. Member of this professional
         organization dealing with development of Graphic Design programs in colleges and
         universities across the nation and internationally. The organization terminated in 1998
         1992 - present , Foundation In Art, Theory and Education. Member of this national
         education organization devoted to the further development of foundation art from the
         theoretical to the applied.
         1980 – 1991, British Direct Mail Association
         1981 – 1991, European Direct Mail Association
         1985 – 1991, Art Directors Club, London
         1972 – 1980, Direct Marketing Association, USA
         1972 – 1980, Smithsonian Residence Association
         1975 – 1980, Art Directors Club of Washington D.C.

Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):

2008 - Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University; Bangkok, Thailand
        Gave 4 lectures on the Direction of Graphic design and two, four day workshops on
        design
2002 - 2009 Visual Arts institute; Terre Haute, Indiana
        Gave a two day workshop dealing with digital art and design
2006 - In Pursuit of Quality - Quality Printing Workshops; Indianapolis, Indiana
2006 - Press Checks - Quality Printing Workshops; Indianapolis, Indiana




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Stephen Smithers                              X full-time      ___adjunct       part-time       support
                                                        other (please indicate):

                                                                                                  Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                   Yes  No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                              Yes  No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                     Yes X No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
20 % of time spent in administration
40 % of time spent in teaching
40 % of time spent in research



Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Ph.D.                Art History, University of Iowa, 1988

Master of            Art History – Ancient Area, Northern Illinois University, 1982
Arts:

Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Associate Professor, Art History                                                             Fall 1994 - present
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Assistant Professor, Art History                                                             Fall 1988 - present
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Courses taught in the past two years:

ARTH 271 – Survey of Art History I
ARTH 272 – Survey of Art History II
ARTH 470 – Ancient Art, Undergraduate/Graduate
ARTH 471A – The Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece, Undergraduate/Graduate
ARTH 471B – Etruscan/Roman Art, Undergraduate/Graduate
ARTH 472 – Early Medieval Art, Undergraduate/Graduate

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):

N/A




January 2009                                                                                       Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form


Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):

Publications:                      “Terracotta Figurative Sculptures,” Ceramics Technical, Vol. 28
                                   (2009)
                                   Art of the Western World Survey Guide, Chancellor’s Learning
                                   Systems (2008)
Papers:                            “Christ as Curotrophos: The Development of Early Christian
                                   Iconography in Rome as Seen in the Vatican Sarcophagi”
                                   presented at the 1996 Medieval Association of the Midwest
                                   Meeting, Terre Haute, IN
                                   “… And Then Came the Dipylon Vase” presented at “Odyssey of
                                   the Mind: Civilization and Thought,” an inter-disciplinary symposium
                                   held at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, 1996
Exhibitions                        “Neo-Classicism and Other Trends: Turn of the Century Fine and
Organized and                      Decorative Arts at the Crossroads of America,” University Art
Curated:                           Gallery, Indiana State University, Terre Huate, IN (March 8-April 7,
                                   2006)
Project                            “Etruria and the Etruscan Woman: An Interactive, Multi-Media CD
Demonstrations:                    Collaboration” presented jointly with Yunsun Chung-Shin at the
                                   1998 Midwest Art History Society Annual Meeting, the University of
                                   Illinois at Chicago

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:

         Indiana State University Arts Endowment Grant (1999)
         Indiana State University Research Grant (1997)
         Kress Foundation Scholarship (1984-85)
         Kress Foundation Travel Grant (1986)

Professional memberships and service:

N/A

Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):

N/A




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form

Not to exceed 2 pages per faculty member

                                                    Check one:
Name: Nancy Nichols-Pethick                         X full-time      ___adjunct       part-time         support
                                                        other (please indicate):

                                                                                                   Check one:
Individual has been responsible for studio supervision in past 2 academic years:                    Yes  No
Individual has completed a degree in interior design:                                               Yes  No
Individual has passed the complete NCIDQ exam:                                                      Yes X No

If this individual is a full-time faculty member, please indicate:
30        % of time spent in administration
40        % of time spent in teaching
30        % of time spent in research



Educational background (degrees, discipline, university/school, and year of completion):

Master of Fine       Painting, Indiana State University, 2000
Arts:

Bachelor of          Drawing, University of Southern Maine, 1996
Fine Arts:

Positions held in academic institutions (title of position/rank, year and tenure):

Associate Professor, Painting                                                              August 2010 - present
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Assistant Professor, Painting                                                                     Fall 2004 - 2010
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Full-time Temporary Instructor                                          August 2001 – May 2003; August 2003
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

Courses taught in the past two years:

         Undergraduate and Graduate Painting,                           Undergraduate and Graduate Drawing,
         all levels                                                     all levels
         Introduction to Painting for Non-Art                           Introduction to Painting for Non-Art
         Majors                                                         Majors
         Introduction to the Visual Arts (majors                        Art and the Artist in a Context of
         course)                                                        Society (major capstone)
         Special Topics in Painting                                     Graduate Teaching Seminar

Positions held in design practice (firm name, title, and year):

N/A


January 2009                                                                                         Faculty Data Form
Faculty Data Form


Significant publications, creative projects, and/or paper presentations (up to six items):

Solo Exhibitions:                  New Work (upcoming), Halcyon Contemporary Art, Terre Haute,
                                   Indiana, February 2011
                                   Asleep with My Eyes Open, Marian University Art Gallery,
                                   Indianapolis, Indiana, September 20 – October 14
                                   Nancy Nichols, Halcyon Contemporary Art, Terre Haute, Indiana,
                                   November 4 – 29, 2008
Group                              66th Annual Wabash Valley Juried Exhibition, Sheldon Swope Art
Exhibitions:                       Museum, Terre Haute, Indiana, July 10 – September 4, 2010
                                   Beyond Audubon, Womanmade Gallery, Chicago, Illinois, May 7 –
                                   July 1, 2010
                                     th
                                   65 Annual Wabash Valley Juried Exhibition, Sheldon Swope Art
                                   Museum, Terre Haute, Indiana, July 11 – August 29, 2009.

Awards, recognitions, grants, competitions:

         2008 Bravo! The Arts Art Educator of the Year Award, Arts Illiana, Regional Partner of
         The Indiana Arts Commission (2008)
         Terre Haute Community Arts Support Grant (Co-Pi: Dr. Brad Venable, assistant
         professor) awarded by the city of Terre Haute: $5000 to support the ongoing Gilbert
         Wilson Memorial Mural Project (2007)
         Focus Indiana Initiative Award (with Dr. Brad Venable, assistant professor) awarded by
         the Center for Public Service and Community Engagement: $35,000 for the period 2005
         - 2008 to develop the Gilbert Wilson Memorial Mural Project. Students will work with
         nationally-recognized muralists to create public artwork in the Terre Haute community
         (2005)

Professional memberships and service:

Departmental                       Member, Ad Hoc Art History Search Committee, 2008 - present
Committee:                         Member, Ad Hoc Chair Search Committee, 2007 – 2008
Other                              Graduate Coordinator, 2005 – present
Departmental                       Faculty Mentor to Graduate Teaching Assistants in Drawing, 2005 –
Service:                           present
Graduate                           Derrick Burnett, 2008 - present
Committees:                        Margaret Gohn, 2008 – present
Faculty Advisor                    Jason Gorcoff, 2009 - present

Professional development (meetings/conferences attended, continuing education courses, etc., in the last five years):

N/A




January 2009                                                                                          Faculty Data Form

				
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