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Hoover WASC Self-Study Report 03-20-12

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					                                                   Hoover High School
                                                 5550 North First Street
                                                     Fresno, CA 93710
                                                       (559) 451-4000
                                                  FAX: (559) 451-4072
                                                  Home of the Patriots


                                Fresno Unified School District


Herbert Hoover High School
WASC Self-Study Report 2012




                                                          Submitted to:

                     Western Association of Schools and Colleges

                                                                  and

                            California Department of Education
                                            Lori Grace, Principal
                              Wendy DenBesten, WASC Co-Chair
                              Oliver Valenzuela, WASC Co-Chair

                                            February 6, 2012
WASC/CDE Focus on Learning Accreditation Manual, 2011 Edition
                                                                      1
         Fresno Unified School District

                      Board of Education



  Tony Vang, Ed.D            Valerie F. Davis     Michelle A. Asadoorian
     President                   Clerk                   Member




Larry Moore         Carol Mills, J.D.       Janet Ryan              Cal Johnson
  Member              Member                  Member                 Member


               District Administration




                    Michael E. Hanson          Chris Evans
                     Superintendent      Associate Superintendent
                                            School Leadership



                                                                                  2
          Visiting Committee
                Representing the

Western Association of Schools and Colleges
                      CHAIR:
                 Dr. Ronald J. Estes
                  Superintendent
                   Stockton, CA

                   MEMBERS:

            Ms. Annaliese Elam, Student
                   Alamo, CA

               Mr. Alex Lee, Teacher
                   Newark, CA

          Mr. Scott Meyers, Vice Principal
                   Rio Linda, CA

            Mr. Scott Peterson, Teacher
                  Stockton, CA

         Mrs. Adriana Rangel, Administrator
                  Santa Clara, CA

          Ms. Tiffany Singh, Administrator
                   King City, CA


                                              3
                        WASC Leadership Committee
      Lori Grace                    Principal
      Blair Campbell                Vice Principal
      Lauren Lemons                 Vice Principal
      Mony Ward                     Head Counselor
      Wendy DenBesten               Mathematics Teacher, WASC Co-Chair
      Oliver Valenzuela             Foreign Language Department Chair, WASC Co-Chair
      Mary Estelle Anderson         Teacher on Special Assignment, SLC
      Curtis Sisk                   Science Department Chair
      Jeremy Wright                 Social Studies Department Chair
      Ysabel Oliva                  Mathematics Teacher
      Johnny Stafford               Fine Arts Department Chair
      Shannon Creviston             Science Teacher
      Jan Trotter                   English Language Arts Teacher
      Barbara Rios                  Counselor
      Dara Johnson                  Physical Education Teacher
      Chong Thao                    English Language Arts Department Chair
      Rachel Quinto                 Mathematics Department Chair, AVID Coordinator
      Micki Plummer                 Physical Education Department Chair
      Christina Nelson              Special Education Department Chair
      Sheldon Schlesinger           Music Department Chair
      Philip Ureno                  Technology Department Chair, ACE Magnet Teacher

                   WASC Parents and Student Participation
All parents/guardians were invited to attend monthly School Site Council meetings to
review the school’s progress on the WASC self-study and to participate in the revision
process. The chapters were reviewed and submitted for publication. Parents also
participated in Focus Groups and were invited to take the WASC Parent Survey.
Student participation took place through survey participation, classroom based teacher
direction during ZAP, and in leadership classes. Students also served on Focus Groups.

                      WASC Focus Group Chairpersons
   Group A             Group B             Group C           Group D            Group E
 Leadership &         Curriculum          Instruction      Assessment &     School Culture &
 Organization                                              Accountability       Support
  Mary Estelle         Wendy              Ysabel Oliva,       Shannon         Dara Johnson,
Anderson, Oliver      DenBesten,        Johnny Stafford,   Creviston, Jan     Barbara Rios
  Valenzuela          Curtis Sisk        Jeremy Wright         Trotter

                                                                                           4
                                          TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1: Student/Community Profile and Supporting Data and Findings .......... 6
Chapter II: Student/Community Profile — Overall Summary from Analysis of
     Profile Data ................................................................................................... 29
Chapter III: Progress Report ................................................................................. 43
Chapter IV: Self-Study Findings ......................................................................... 55
 A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff,
   and Resources .................................................................................................. 56
 B: Standards-based Student Learning: Curriculum ........................................... 69
 C: Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction ............................................ 89
 D: Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability ......... 106
 E: School Culture and Support for Student Personal and
   Academic Growth ......................................................................................... 128
 Prioritized Areas of Growth Needs from Categories A through E .................... 153
Chapter V: Schoolwide Action Plan .................................................................. 154
Appendix.............................................................................................................. 165




                                                                                                                             5
  HOOVER
HIGH SCHOOL




  Chapter 1
School Profile
Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                                     HISTORY AND BACKGROUND

The Fresno Unified School District (FUSD) is the 4th largest school district in California, serving more than
73,000 students. The area is distinguished by its diversity and tradition as one of the nation’s largest
agricultural regions. Hoover High School (HS) is one of eight comprehensive high schools in FUSD and reflects
the diversity of the Fresno area that is home to 90 different nationalities. Hoover HS, home of the Patriots, has
been a fixture in the Northeast Fresno community since it opened in 1961. Since its opening, nearly 50 years
ago, the ‘Hoover Family’ has created a special learning environment for both students and staff. The student
population has evolved in the last decade to mirror the changing community it serves, and the staff at Hoover
High, with the support of FUSD, continues to seek ways to address these changes in its pursuit of a high quality
education for ALL students.

In 2006, Hoover HS was granted a 6 year accreditation term by Western Association of Schools and Colleges
(WASC), with a 3 year follow-up visit in 2009. In 2007, Hoover HS received a 5 year federal grant to create
Small Learning Communities (SLC). The Architecture, Construction, and Engineering (ACE) Magnet program was
also established in 2007 with additional grant funding. Significant technological upgrades to classrooms
occurred during the 2004-2005 school year which resulted in 46 ‘smart’ classrooms that provide the tools for
teaching in the twenty-first century. The 2011-2012 school year has brought a significant change in the Hoover
HS Administration with the addition of a new Principal, two new Vice Principals, new Head Counselor and two
new Counselors. The new leadership has invigorated staff and provided significant support both in and out of
the classroom in a relatively short time. In addition, long-range modernization plans funded by Measure Q will
start in January of 2012. These plans include the construction of a new instructional wing with state of the art
science labs, all new athletic fields, and a comprehensive aquatics center for swim and water polo teams.

                                           VISION AND MISSION

The FUSD Board of Trustees in 2007 recognized the need for dramatic changes and improvements throughout
the district. They believed that it was necessary to increase the expectations and significantly improve the
opportunities for all learners. All FUSD student achievement improvement initiatives since the adoption of
this philosophy have been derived from the FUSD Board of Education Core Beliefs and Commitments:

                                         FUSD CORE BELIEFS
    Student Learning:
                Every student can and must learn at grade level and beyond.

    High Quality Instruction:
                 Teachers must demonstrate the ability and desire to educate each child at a high level.

    Leadership:
                     Leaders must perform courageously and ethically to accomplish stated goals.

    Safety:
                     A safe learning and working environment is crucial to student learning.

    Culture:
            Fresno Unified is a place where:
                 Diversity is valued
                 Educational excellence and equity are expected
                 Individual responsibility and participation by all is required

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Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                    Collaborative adult relationships are essential
                    Parents, students and the community as a whole are vital partners

                                               COMMITMENTS
    Student Learning
         We will provide all students access to high quality options and a variety of activities.
         We will implement, continue or expand practices proven to raise student achievement; and
           eliminate practices that do not.

    Quality Instruction
        We expect all students to achieve their personal best; differences in achievement among ethnic
            groups are not acceptable.
        We expect effective teacher performance toward desired results.

    Leadership
        We will require the timely delivery of high quality services to every site.
        We will sustain and monitor a financial plan that ensures the viability of the district.
        We will provide clear expectations and regularly support professional growth.

    Safety
         We will provide a safe, clean, and orderly learning and working environment.

    Culture
         We will establish collaborative relationships with staff, parents, students, and the community.
         We strongly encourage and welcome the valuable contributions of our families.
         We expect and depend upon individual responsibility.

In addition to the Core Beliefs and Commitments, the FUSD Board developed four district goals that define the
path of success for all students:

                                 FRESNO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT GOALS

    1.   All students will excel in reading, writing, and math.
    2.   All students will engage in arts, activities, and athletics.
    3.   All students will demonstrate the character and competencies for workplace success.
    4.   All students will stay in school on target to graduate.

In order to support the core beliefs and accomplish district goals, four critical board policies were drafted to
guide the work at the district level. These board policies have guided the direction of the district and the
change efforts over the last four years at the site level. The four board policies are:

        Theory of Action
        School Accountability
        Data Dashboard
        Professional Learning

These policies are included in the Appendix and discussed in greater detail in Chapter 4.


                                                                                                                   8
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Hoover High School’s Mission and Vision Statements are directly aligned with the Board’s Core Beliefs and
Commitments. Our Mission and Vision statements serve as a framework for the teaching and learning
environment at Hoover:

                                 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL MISSION AND VISION

                                                    Mission
                         Provide a positive environment that inspires students to grow
                                     as individuals, learners, and citizens.

                                                  Vision
               An enduring community of learners where every student succeeds at high levels,
                     and where every teacher, administrator, parent, and staff member
                                  gives and receives ongoing support.

In preparation for the 2011-2012 WASC Self-Study, Hoover HS faculty and staff took the opportunity to revisit
the Hoover HS Expected School-wide Learning Results (ESLRs) to ensure their alignment with the Board’s Core
Beliefs and Commitments, District Goals, and our Mission and Vision statements. Multiple focus groups in the
Spring of 2011 including faculty, staff, students, and parents reviewed the existing Hoover HS ESLERs. The
expressed goal of the revision process was to maintain alignment with district vision while supporting the
unique needs of our students. Upon review by stakeholder groups including staff, students and parents, the
current Hoover HS ESLRs support high levels of achievement for all learners and the preparation of college and
career ready graduates. These statements of belief and goals, along with the California Standards for leaders,
teachers, and content, provide the foundation for instruction at Hoover HS.

                     HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL EXPECTED SCHOOL-WIDE LEARNING RESULTS

College and Career Ready Graduates who
     Meet the State / National Standards.
     Read, comprehend, and write about information from various sources.
     Strive and achieve at our highest potential.
     Work collaboratively while establishing and accomplishing objectives.

Critical Thinkers who
       Find solutions to problems by using a variety of sources and strategies.
       Use application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation to communicate our learning.
       Select and apply appropriate strategies, tools, and technologies for a specific learning task.

Effective Communicators who
       Write and speak appropriately to the topic and audience.
       Speak confidently within a group and to an audience.
       Listen effectively and respectfully.

Responsible Citizens who
       Demonstrate caring, tolerance, respect, and empathy for our diverse school and community.
       Behave appropriately and ethically in the work, social, and academic environment.
       Demonstrate a basic knowledge of our civic duties.
                                                                                                             9
Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

      Resolve conflicts through positive, non-violent actions.
      Respect the property of others.
      Practice and maintain appropriate hygiene, proper nutrition, and physical fitness.

Self-Directed Learners who
      Create and pursue educational, vocational, and personal goals.
      Engage actively in learning experiences.
      Value and reflect upon learning experiences.
      Exhibit personal independence.
      Actively participate in co-curricular activities such as clubs, music, etc.
      Behave in ways that aid in our own personal growth.

Technological Learners who
      Use technology at appropriate times and for identified purposes.
      Use social technology in safe and respectful ways.
      Understand the ethical responsibility when using technology for personal, professional, and academic
       use.




                                                                                                          10
Hoover High School                                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                                   HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS

Enrollment at Hoover HS has declined over the last three years, from a total of 2,366 students in 2005 to 1,826
in 2010. Hoover HS feeder schools are experiencing a similar decline as there are no new housing
developments located within the school’s attendance boundary and the neighborhood is comprised of largely
of aging residents whose children have graduated from Hoover HS in previous years. In the 2010-2011
academic year, 29% of students attended Hoover High School through various transfer programs. Hoover’s
A.C.E. Magnet Program draws 176 students to our school. Additionally, there are 162 “open enrollment”
students. Special Education students comprise 14% of Hoover’s student population, which attend through
various transfer programs.

The demographic composition of the population is 47.5% Hispanic, 22.8% White, 12.7% Asian, 14.4% African-
American, and 2.7% Other.

                                     Hoover High School Student Demographic Data
                                                Gender                                                      Ethnicity
       Point in Time      Enrolled                                                                          Afri ca n-
                                       Fema l e           Ma l e          whi te          Hi s pa ni c                   As i a n    Other
                                                                                                           Ameri ca n
      CBEDS 2000           2293         48.5%             51.5%           41.8%             28.3%             9.9%       17.6%       2.4%
      CBEDS 2001           2454         47.8%             52.2%           39.7%             31.2%            10.3%       16.6%       2.2%
      CBEDS 2002           2421         48.4%             51.6%           37.8%             32.7%            10.5%       17.2%       1.8%
      CBEDS 2003           2438         47.0%             53.0%           37.9%             32.8%            10.4%       16.9%       2.1%
      CBEDS 2004           2357         48.5%             51.5%           35.5%             35.5%            11.4%       15.4%       2.2%
      CBEDS 2005           2366         48.8%             51.2%           32.8%             38.8%            11.7%       15.0%       1.8%
      CBEDS 2006           2248         50.3%             49.7%           30.4%             39.4%            12.3%       15.7%       2.2%
      CBEDS 2007           2099         51.3%             48.7%           28.0%             42.9%            12.4%       14.6%       2.1%
      CBEDS 2008           2038         50.0%             50.0%           25.3%             43.7%            14.0%       14.5%       2.5%
      CBEDS 2009           1974         49.4%             50.6%           23.0%             45.6%            14.7%       14.1%       2.6%
      CBEDS 2010           1978         47.8%             52.2%           22.8%             47.5%            14.4%       12.7%       2.7%
      Cha nge s i nce
                            -315        -0.7%             0.7%            -19.0%            19.2%            4.5%        -4.9%       0.3%
      CBEDS 2000

                                        Hoover High School Student Demographic Data
                                             Special Education                                                                        Non-
                                                                               Project            Foster
      Point in Time     Enrolled                                                                                    EL     Migrant   Diploma
                                     RSP           SDC             DIS         Access             Youth
                                                                                                                                      Track
      CBEDS 2000         2293        7.1%          5.8%            0.7%            1.7%                          16.8%      3.2%
      CBEDS 2001         2454        7.3%          6.2%            0.5%            1.8%                          16.2%      3.2%
      CBEDS 2002         2421        6.3%          5.6%            0.4%            1.5%                          17.3%      4.2%
      CBEDS 2003         2438        6.0%          4.8%            0.3%            1.8%                          16.8%      3.7%
      CBEDS 2004         2357        5.9%          5.2%            0.3%            2.3%                          13.5%      3.0%      3.4%
      CBEDS 2005         2366        5.5%          5.1%            0.3%            2.1%            1.5%          11.7%      2.7%      3.1%
      CBEDS 2006         2248        5.1%          6.3%            0.6%            1.5%            2.1%          10.8%      2.0%      1.5%
      CBEDS 2007         2099        5.3%          6.5%            0.6%            1.7%            2.1%          11.2%      1.3%      1.3%
      CBEDS 2008         2038        6.0%          7.4%            0.7%            2.3%            2.1%          11.8%      1.9%      1.5%
      CBEDS 2009         1974        5.9%          8.3%            0.6%            1.8%            2.5%          12.5%      2.0%      1.6%
      CBEDS 2010         1978        6.1%          7.2%            0.7%            1.4%            1.9%          12.8%      2.7%      1.5%
      Cha nge s i nce
                         -315        -1.0%         1.4%            0.0%           -0.3%                          -4.0%      -0.5%     -1.9%
      CBEDS 2000


Socioeconomic Status (SES)

In 2006, the percentage of students eligible for Title 1 funding was 54.9%. This has increased to 71.3% of total
enrollment at Hoover HS as of October 2010. As the economic outlook of our community changes, the staff at

                                                                                                                                               11
Hoover High School                                                  WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Hoover HS is exploring new ways to provide ongoing support to students eligible for Title 1 support services, as
well as improving identification of eligible students.
                                                  HHS vs FUSD Free Reduced Lunch

                                           100




                       Eligible Students
                                           80

                           Percent of
                                           60
                                           40
                                           20
                                            0
                                                  2006    2007    2008     2009     2010
                                           HHS    54.9    53.2    57.9      68      71.3
                                           FUSD   79.2    79.9     80.7    81.7     82.4


English Learners (EL)/RFEP

In 2010, 12.8% of the students were English Learners (EL). This increase from a low of 10.8% in 2006 is
attributable to the growth in Hispanic and other ethnic groups that do not use English as their primary
language. In the last few years, we have experienced an influx of students from Arabic or Mandarin speaking
countries. These students tend to be highly educated in their primary language and will move through ELD
quickly, but are coming into the school at ELD levels 1-3. At the same time, there has been a decrease in the
number of EL students with a South-East Asian language as their primary language. Counts by ELD levels show
our current EL student population is less fluent in English than in previous academic years, with many more
testing at ELD levels 1, 2, and 3. In 2008, Hoover HS served 43 students at ELD levels 1 and 2. That number
increased to 62 in 2010. The number of English Learners at ELD level 3 increased from 56 in 2008 to 70 in 2009
while the number of students at levels 4 and 5 decreased.

Number of English Learners




                                                                                                              12
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Counts by ELD Levels




Program support for EL students is provided by 2 periods of ELD instruction and placement into core classes
whose teachers are certified in SDAIE strategies. The number of SDAIE designated sections of core classes has
increased to meet the needs of our EL students. Teachers of English Learners have participated in SIOP
training. From 2009 to 2011, an EL Instructional Coach provided support for teachers of English Learners by
guiding curricular decisions, providing training and demonstration lessons. This year, we have a full-time, on-
site instructional coach on campus to support teachers of English Learners to support teachers in
implementing the SIOP methodologies.

Hoover HS EL students are being redesignated at a faster rate than before, with 11.4% redesignated in 2010-
2011 (Source March 2011 R-30). This rate is higher than the district average and an increase from the 2009-
2010 rate of 9.6%. As students are redesignated, counselors are working to updraft these students into Gate,
AP and more rigorous courses. Analysis of CELDT scores show that 61 (29.47%) of EL students advanced at
least one level on the CELDT from Fall 2009 to Fall 2010.

                          HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL REDESIGNATION DATA 2007-2010




                                                                                                              13
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


                     HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CELDT PROFICIENCY LEVEL GAINS 2009 to 2010




Mobility and Stability

The District tracks student transiency using two measures: mobility and stability. The stability index of Hoover
HS in the 2010 -2011 academic year was 0.807. This number has remained relatively stable since 2006. The
mobility index of Hoover HS in the 2010-2011 academic year was 0.343 and represents an improvement since
2006.




                                                                                                               14
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


Attendance, Suspensions and Expulsions

Hoover HS average daily attendance is slightly higher than the district numbers and shows a slight
improvement since 2008.


                                          HHS vs FUSD 9-12 ADA
                            Average   96.00%
                                      94.00%
                                      92.00%
                                      90.00%
                                                 2008           2009        2010
                                      HHS       93.40%         93.40%      95.10%
                                      FUSD 9-12 92.10%         92.20%      93.20%

In the 2010-2011 school year, the total number of students suspended and number of incidents decreased
from 2009 but was still higher than the totals for 2008. Students were most frequently suspended for injury to
person, defiance or disruption, possession of drugs or alcohol or obscene acts/profanity. African American
students have nearly double the suspensions per one hundred students of Hispanic and White sub-groups

          2008-2011 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL THREE-YEAR SUMMARY: SUSPENSIONS BY ETHNICITY
Group by Year          Total               Total # of    Total # of      Suspensions      Total Days
                       Enrollment          Students      Suspensions     Per Hundred      Suspended
                                           Suspended                     Students
White
08-09                  470                 37            54              11.5             146
09-10                  417                 49            64              15.3             166
10-11                  413                 46            63              15.3             158
Hispanic
08-09                  805                 104           137             17.0             441
09-10                  840                 99            141             16.8             386
10-11                  873                 114           153             17.5             371
African American
08-09                  268                 45            69              25.7             185
09-10                  248                 76            117             47.2             344
10-11                  261                 48            72              27.6             195
Asian
08-09                  288                 10            12              4.2              42
09-10                  271                 19            23              8.5              50
10-11                  237                 11            14              5.9              32
Other
08-09                  45                  8             11              24.4             34
09-10                  50                  2             4               8.0              12
10-11                  49                  3             5               10.2             13
Overall
08-09                  1876                204           283             15.1             848
09-10                  1826                245           349             19.1             957
10-11                  1833                222           307             16.7             768

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Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


In 2010-2011, of the 17 students referred for expulsion, 14 were actually expelled from the school, and the
total number of students expelled at Hoover HS has decreased from 17 in 2008-2008 to 14 in 2010-2011
(additional data available at http://rea.fresnounified.org/ReaHmpg.cfm)

Staffing

For the 2011-2012 school year, there are 81 classroom teachers (10 new to the school), an athletic director, a
campus culture director, an instructional coach, and a Teacher on Special Assignment (TSA) assigned to
oversee implementation of the SLC grant.

Campus Climate and Safety

Hoover HS provides a safe and clean environment for student learning. The school is scheduled for a major
facelift to commence in January 2012 funded by Measure Q. Significant technology upgrades to classrooms
have been ongoing since 2006. Staffing for school safety related issues include the Principal, 3 Vice Principals
and 6 counselors, 1 police officer, 1 probation officer, 5 school safety assistants, 1 school nurse, a SAP
counselor and a school psychologist. Sixteen security cameras were installed in 2006, and access to the campus
has been restricted by limiting access to a single entry gate during school hours.

Professional Development

Four Board of Education policies guide professional learning at a district and site level. The first policy, Theory
of Action, provides for a purposeful, aligned instructional system that delineates the profound and dramatic
improvements needed to accelerate learning for all students. The Theory of Action includes powerful
instruction aligned to standards and a sound assessment system to provide quality feedback and support to all
stakeholders. The second policy, Data Dashboard, establishes strategic indicators that are used to regularly
assess and communicate progress with stakeholders. The Data Dashboard provides a clear and common focus
for staff necessary to propel our students to highest levels of achievement. The third policy, School
Accountability, establishes a system of accountability focusing on the total student experience including
learning, teaching, safety, culture and leadership. This policy provides a means to measure success at the
organizational level. It is tightly aligned with the fourth Board of Education policy, Professional Learning. FUSD
is committed to creating and sustaining a meaningful system of professional learning to support all employees.
Professional learning goes beyond professional development to empower employees to engage in a cycle of
continuous improvement and extend learning for all. All professional learning opportunities at Hoover HS are
directed and aligned to the FUSD Board Policies.

The district’s Classroom Foundations Initiative, grounded in the board policies described above, is the
cornerstone of professional learning at Hoover HS. Classroom Foundations provides a model for classroom-
level best instructional practices throughout the district. The model has four tight components: (1) A
standards-based, clearly defined learning objective; (2) Instruction aligned to the objective, (3)
Assessment/Check for Understanding, and (4) Closure. This new model is based on previous district initiatives
based The Skillful Leader and The Skillful Teacher and 3-Phase Lesson Design. To support teachers
implementing Classroom Foundations, the FUSD provides regular time for teachers to meet in Accountable
Communities and supports Lead Teachers with extra-pay contracts to facilitate the work of these Accountable
Communities. Plans for 2011-2012 also include department sub-release days for teachers to collaborate on
aligning instruction to standards and continued staff development of site pacing-guides and common
assessments.


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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Other major faculty staff development initiatives over the last few years have included AVID training, College
Board sponsored Advanced Placement workshops, Structured Instructional Observation Protocol (SIOP)
training, Capturing Kids Hearts, and Discipline in the Secondary Classroom. Hoover HS is an AVID certified
school. There are currently 11 trained AVID teachers and 9 AVID tutors on campus working with students. A
majority of the staff have participated in SIOP training since it began three years ago. English-Language Arts
and Social Studies teachers have attended training provided by the College Board through a district-wide
Advanced Placement Initiative. A total of 27 staff members have participated in either Capturing Kids Hearts
or Discipline in the Secondary Classroom workshops as well. This year, an instructional coach is released from
the classroom full time to support teacher implementation of SIOP strategies and Classroom Foundations. She
is providing demo lessons, in-class coaching and professional development to various departments.
Administrative walk-throughs and teacher evaluations (both formal and informal) are also focusing on the
teacher implementation of Classroom Foundations.

Co- and Extra-Curricular Activities

Many staff and students participate in extra- and co-curricular activities. Each club/program must have a
faculty sponsor. For athletics, 18 of 25 head coaches work on campus with a total of 30 coaches employed at
Hoover HS as a classroom teacher or support personnel. There are currently 62 active clubs and program on
campus overseen by the Associated Student Body. The school offers 25 athletic programs with 47 teams at
Freshman, JV and Varsity levels, a marching band, symphonic orchestra, jazz band, winter percussion, winter
color guard, and choir along with a drama program, A.C.E magnet and fine arts electives including
photography, art, yearbook, and 3-D design. There is also a Building Trades ROP course on campus. Juniors and
Seniors also have the option of enrolling in the district’s Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART)
which provides for high-tech, hands-on learning and career preparation programs.

Special Education

Hoover HS is home to 9 Special Education programs designed to meet the diverse needs of students with
disabilities throughout the Fresno Unified School District. Due to the success and quality of these special
programs, Hoover HS has both the most special programs and the largest percentage of high school students
with disabilities in FUSD. Hoover HS houses two deaf education programs, a visually impaired program
supported by a comprehensive Braille library, an Orthopedically Impaired program, classes designed for
students with Emotional Disturbances, a Severely Disabled program, four Special Day Classes, and a Resource
Program to support students fully included in general education classes. The special education program
employs 19 faculty, including two Individual and Small Group Instructors (ISGI). Additionally, 35
paraprofessionals and instructional aides support the needs of Special Education students on the Hoover
campus.

As a Patriot tradition, we actively promote inclusive programs and activities for all students. Every student that
receives Special Education services has the opportunity to be fully included in any academic and extra-
curricular activity, just as there are many opportunities for students not receiving special education services to
interact, support, tutor, and learn from our special students. Hoover has a long, rich tradition of participation
in the Special Olympics originating in 1988. Furthermore, Hoover was the first school in FUSD and Northern
California to establish an active “R” word campaign designed to raise the consciousness of society and
supporting the elimination and use of the word ‘retard’ from every day speech and promote the acceptance
and inclusion of people with Intellectual Disabilities.




                                                                                                                17
Hoover High School                                                     WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                       HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Hoover HS is a Title I targeted assistance school currently in Year 3 of Program Improvement. The school did
not meet its Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) targets for the previous two school years. In 2011, the school met
16 of 24 AYP criteria. The school met all of its participation rate targets. Significant groups in 2011 included
Hispanic, White, Socioeconomically Disadvantaged and English Learners. The school wide performance targets
were not met with 47.8 % at or above proficient in English-Language Arts and 44.4% at or above proficient in
Mathematics. Asian and English Learner subgroups met their performance targets in both subjects through
alternative methods. The 2011 Growth Academic Performance Index (API) of 686 represented a 20 point
growth over the 2010 API of 666. The 2011 graduation rate of 84.08 exceeded that of 2010 by just over 5
percentage points.
                                  HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL 2011 AYP SUMMARY

                   Made AYP:                                                No

                   Met AYP Criteria:                English-Language Arts Mathematics
                   Participation Rate                        Yes              Yes
                   Percent Proficient                         No              No
                   Academic Performance Index (API)
                                                                         Yes
                   - Additional Indicator for AYP
                   Graduation Rate                                       Yes

  3*200 2*300 1*   /reports/Acnt201
                                 The percent of students at or above proficient on English-Language Arts has
increased slightly since 2007, while the numbers for mathematics have remained relatively stable. A slight
upward trend is also apparent for the Hoover HS Academic Performance Index (API) from the 2007 to 2011.


                                                               Hoover High AYP Trends
                                                                English-Language Arts
                                                   100
                                                   80
                              Percent Proficient




                                                   60         50.6               47    47.8
                                                         42          39.7
                                                   40
                                                   20
                                                    0



                                                                     Year




                                                                                                               18
Hoover High School                                                                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                                                                                                     Hoover High AYP Trends
                                                                                                          Mathematics
                                             100
                                                                            80



                        Percent Proficient
                                                                            60              44.9   48.8            45.7
                                                                                                          42.2               44.4
                                                                            40
                                                                            20
                                                                                      0



                                                                                                          Year




                                                                                                   Hoover High School API Growth
                                             Academic Performance Index (API) Score




                                                                                      800
                                                                                      750
                                                                                                   697    683                686
                                                                                      700   679                    666
                                                                                      650
                                                                                      600
                                                                                      550
                                                                                      500




                                                                                                          Year


Hoover High school faculty and staff continue to address the needs of all students to meet AYP targets with
support of the district through improvement initiatives. The school experienced considerable growth in API
between 2007 and 2008 and then declined to a low of 666 in 2010 and has begun to rebound in 2011. The
recent incorporation of professional development learning, supported by district efforts, has shown
improvement in the 2011 API. As we look to the coming years, our faculty and staff expect continued gains in
API that will exceed past successes.




                                                                                                                                                   19
Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

A trend analysis of AYP scores through 2009 indicate that the percentage of students scoring proficient or
above in ELA fell below the AYP target for the first time in 2009. The red line indicates the federal target for
percent at or above proficient each year.

                               HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL AYP TREND ANALYSIS: ELA




The chart below indicates the 2011 ELA Schoolwide and Subgroup AYP. No groups exceeded the federal AYP
target. The achievement gap between white and other subgroups is apparent when examining this chart.
Lowest performing groups included students with disabilities and English learners.

                             2011 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL AYP BY SUBGROUP: ELA




                                                                                                                   20
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

A trend analysis of AYP scores through 2009 indicate that the percentage of students scoring proficient or
above in Mathematics fell below the AYP target for the first time in 2009.

                        HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL AYP TREND ANALYSIS: MATHEMATICS




The chart below indicates the 2011 Mathematics Schoolwide and Subgroup AYP. No groups exceeded the
federal AYP target. The achievement gap between White and Asian subgroups and the other subgroups is
apparent when examining this table. The lowest performing subgroup was African American students who
scored well below other subgroups.

                      2011 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL AYP BY SUBGROUP: MATHEMATICS




                                                                                                             21
Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Academic Performance Index (API)

The 2011 Growth API for Hoover High School was 686. There was a 20 point school-wide growth over 2010 and
the schoolwide growth target was met. Of the numerically significant subgroups, only the Black or African
American subgroup failed to meet the growth target. Several subgroups experienced significant gains from the
2010 Base API including Hispanic or Latino, English Learners and Students with Disabilities. In the prior two
years, Hoover HS did not meet its schoolwide API targets with all subgroups experiencing a decline. As a result
the 2010 statewide and similar schools rankings decreased. The 20 point API growth for 2010-2011 should
improve the schools statewide and similar schools rankings for the current year.

                                  Hoover HS API for SIGNIFICANT SUBGROUPS

Group           2011     2010       10-11        2010     2009         09-10     2009       2008     08-09
                Growth   Base       Growth       Growth   Base         Growth    Growth     Base     Growth
Schoolwide      686      666        20           667      687          -20       683        698      -15
African         615      616        -1           621      635          -14       634        647      -13
American
Asian           722      704        18           706      715          -9        712        723      -11
Hispanic        671      639        32           638      662          -24       658        666      -8
White           743      727        16           727      735          -8        732        751      -19
Soc. Disadv.    667      646        21           646      657          -11       653        673      -20
EL              640      600        40           600      635          -35       633        640      -7
SPED            449      386        63           398      420          -22       414        451      -37


                                   Hoover HS BASE API and RANKING

                Year            Statewide Rank            Similar Schools Rank            Base API

         2006                         3                            2                        657
         2007                         4                            3                        679
         2008                         4                            3                        698
         2009                         4                            4                        687
         2010                         2                            2                        666




                                                                                                              22
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

California Standards Test

English Language Arts
The tables below indicate the percentage of students in each performance band over a 4 year period. Overall
scores in English-Language Arts have remained relatively stable since 2008. Most students are clustered in the
Basic and Proficient categories. Comparing 2008 to 2011, slightly fewer students scored Far Below Basic and
slightly more scored Proficient or Advanced. (see Appendix: Hoover High CST Trend Charts 2008-2011)

                                  HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST TRENDS:
                           PERCENT OF STUDENTS IN EACH PERFORMANCE BAND
                              HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST ELA: SCHOOLWIDE
                       Year       FBB      BB      BASIC     PROF     ADV
                       2008      12.3     16.4      34.1      24.7    12.5
                       2009      13.8     18.3      31.8      24.5    11.8
                       2010      14.9     18.4      30.4      22.7    13.7
                       2011      11.4     17.3      32.9      24.9    13.5

Examination of scores by grade level shows improvement in scores over time on the Ninth Grade CST.
Particularly when comparing 2010 to 2011, the combined percent of students scoring Far Below or Below Basic
decreased from 32.1% in 2010 to 26% in 2011. The percent of students scoring Basic increased from 27.3% to
32.6% while the Proficient and Advanced percentages increased from 40.6% to 41.3%. Tenth Grade and
Eleventh Grade CST score analysis reveals a similar trend. On the Tenth Grade CST, there was a 6% reduction
in the percent of students scoring Far Below Basic between 2010 and 2011. On the Eleventh Grade CST there
was a 6.5% increase in the percent of students scoring Proficient between 2010 and 2011.

                               HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST ELA: NINTH GRADE
                       Year       FBB      BB      BASIC       PROF              ADV
                       2008        7.4    17.6      35.9       27.3              11.7
                       2009       10.4    17.7      31.9       27.7              12.2
                       2010       14.1    18.0      27.3       27.7              12.9
                       2011       12.4    13.6      32.6       27.3              14.0

                               HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST ELA: TENTH GRADE
                       Year       FBB      BB      BASIC       PROF              ADV
                       2008       12.0    16.5      31.9       22.6              17.4
                       2009       14.8    18.5      33.8       21.9              10.9
                       2010       14.8    15.3      32.3       23.3              14.3
                       2011        8.8    19.8      34.3       23.6              13.4

                              HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST ELA: ELEVENTH GRADE
                       Year       FBB       BB     BASIC       PROF      ADV
                       2008       18.0     15.5     34.5        24.1      7.9
                       2009       15.9     18.8     29.5        23.5     12.3
                       2010       15.8     22.1     31.8        16.5     13.8
                       2011       12.6     19.6     31.9        23.0     12.9


                                                                                                            23
Hoover High School                                       WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Mathematics
In mathematics, the combined percent of students scoring proficient and advanced has hovered around 12%
since 2008. Schoolwide results show little change in the distribution of student scores across performance
bands when comparing 2008 to 2011. The percentage of students scoring Below Basic has decreased slightly
from 45.0% to 42.7%, and the percentage of students scoring Basic has increased slightly from 25.2% to 28.0%.

                                 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST TRENDS:
                          PERCENT OF STUDENTS IN EACH PERFORMANCE BAND
                        HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST MATHEMATICS: SCHOOLWIDE
                      Year       FBB      BB      BASIC     PROF     ADV
                      2008      17.3     45.0      25.2      11.0    1.5
                      2009      20.1     41.9      26.0      10.4    1.6
                      2010      19.2     39.8      28.3      11.5    1.2
                      2011      17.6     42.7      28.0      10.1    1.6

There are differences in achievement trends between the various mathematics subjects. In Algebra I, the
numbers of students scoring Far Below and Below Basic has increased since 2008 from a combined 52.3% in
2008 to a combined 61.3% in 2011. In Geometry and Algebra II, the percent of students scoring Far Below
Basic has decreased over time. More Geometry test-takers scored Basic in 2011 than in 2008, indicating
movement from the Far Below/Below Basic performance levels. The percent of students scoring Proficient or
Advanced on the High School Summative test has increased by 4.7%.

                         HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST MATHEMATICS: ALGEBRA I
                      Year      FBB      BB      BASIC     PROF     ADV
                      2008     10.2     50.7      31.2      7.6     0.3
                      2009     20.6     43.1      26.9      9.4     0.0
                      2010     18.3     41.4      32.8      7.5     0.0
                      2011     20.3     47.9      22.0      8.7     1.1
                         HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST MATHEMATICS: GEOMETRY
                      Year      FBB      BB      BASIC     PROF     ADV
                      2008     23.6     52.8      15.0      8.1     0.6
                      2009     20.0     46.9      24.0      8.8     0.3
                      2010     19.0     44.4      24.5     10.9     1.2
                      2011     14.8     48.5      29.0      6.9     0.8
                         HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST MATHEMATICS: ALGEBRA II
                      Year      FBB      BB      BASIC     PROF     ADV
                      2008     19.8     31.0      30.2     15.7     3.2
                      2009     25.7     35.6      23.8     12.3     2.7
                      2010     21.5     36.6      26.8     14.3     0.8
                      2011     15.8     32.5      36.3     13.7     1.7
                       HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST MATHEMATICS: HS SUMMATIVE
                      Year      FBB      BB      BASIC     PROF     ADV
                      2008      6.6     40.4      27.2     20.6     5.1
                      2009      5.9     35.3      34.6     17.6     6.6
                      2010     11.0     24.0      34.0     24.0     7.0
                      2011      7.1     30.3      32.3     25.3     5.1
                                                                                                           24
Hoover High School                                            WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


For the last two years, the district has used eighth grade CST scores and other multiple measures to identify
ninth grade students for placement into intervention programs in ELA and Mathematics. Prior to 2009-2010,
Hoover HS also used multiple measures to identify students for these intervention programs. For the last two
years, students in need of ELA intervention were placed into a Corrective Reading program in addition to their
regular English 9 class. The number of ELA intervention classes has decreased due to fewer students needing
placement as Corrective Reading is also implemented in feeder middle schools. The English department is
utilizing Priority English in all English I and II classes to better align instruction to critical standards and provide
on-going preparation for standards-based assessments. In Mathematics, struggling students are placed into a
double-period Algebra 1 class and earn both elective credit and Algebra 1 credit during their freshman year.
Due to budget cuts and staffing reductions, the number of sections of intervention offered in mathematics has
decreased steadily over the last few years. To compensate for reduced section of ninth grade intervention and
to address the needs of students in grades 10-12, the mathematics department has implemented a
mathematics tutoring calendar by course after school and at lunch that is available to all students in need of
additional help.

Social Science

The distribution of students across performance levels on the World History and US History CSTs have varied
from year to year. On the World History test, more students fell into the Far Below Basic level in 2010 and
2011 compared to 2008 and 2009. The percent of students scoring proficient or advanced on the World
History CST in 2011 was 32.1%, down from 36.1% the previous year. The number of students in the Far Below
Basic and Below Basic levels on the US History test decreased from 44.5% in 2010 to 32% in 2011. At the same
time, the number of students at the Proficient and Advanced levels increased from 30.3% to 44.7%.
Additionally, the number of students enrolled in European History AP and US History AP has increased with
more rigorous coursework leveraging the CST achievement gains.

                                    HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST TRENDS:
                             PERCENT OF STUDENTS IN EACH PERFORMANCE BAND

                                  HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST: WORLD HISTORY
                         Year       FBB      BB      BASIC      PROF                    ADV
                         2008       15.8    13.0      32.0      26.7                    12.5
                         2009       17.9    18.7      33.6      18.2                    11.6
                         2010       24.3     8.7      30.8      21.1                    15.0
                         2011       23.0    14.2      30.7      21.4                    10.7

                                HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST: US HISTORY GRADE 11
                         Year       FBB       BB     BASIC       PROF      ADV
                         2008       15.3     14.0     29.8        30.3      10.5
                         2009       11.6     12.7     30.9        28.5      16.3
                         2010       26.8     17.7     25.3        20.2      10.1
                         2011       16.6     15.4     23.3        27.0      17.7




                                                                                                                     25
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Science

Overall science scores in all subjects have risen steadily since 2009. At the same time, the number of students
enrolled in the UC Eligible subjects of Biology, Chemistry and Physics has increased as Earth Science began
phasing out as a standard ninth grade course starting in 2009. As Hoover HS has raised the rigor of its science
course offerings, science CST scores have maintained or improved. Comparison of 2009 to 2010 results show
more students scoring in the lower performance levels as teachers and students adjusted to the changes in the
course-taking sequence. However, consistent gains were made across the board in all tested subjects in 2011,
as the percent of students in lower performance levels decreased while the percent of students in the higher
levels increased compared to the 2010 score distribution.

                                  HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST TRENDS:
                           PERCENT OF STUDENTS IN EACH PERFORMANCE BAND

                                    HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST: BIOLOGY
                       Year         FBB     BB      BASIC       PROF             ADV
                       2008          9.9   12.2      38.7       31.5             7.7
                       2009         13.5   16.8      41.0       19.2             9.7
                       2010         19.0   18.5      35.9       18.0             8.7
                       2011         14.3   19.9      37.2       19.6             9.0

                                 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST: EARTH SCIENCE
                       Year        FBB      BB     BASIC       PROF              ADV
                       2008        19.2    18.2     45.3        13.8             3.5
                       2009        31.1    27.0     31.1         9.0             1.6
                       2010         na      na       na          na               na
                       2011         na      na       na          na               na

                                     HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST: PHYSICS
                       Year         FBB     BB      BASIC       PROF             ADV
                       2008         29.5   20.2      34.1       13.2             3.1
                       2009         10.4   17.7      38.5       24.0             9.4
                       2010         29.7   26.1      33.3        7.2             3.6
                       2011         20.1   24.1      42.4       12.1             1.3

                                   HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL CST: CHEMISTRY
                       Year         FBB     BB     BASIC       PROF              ADV
                       2008         17.2   13.1     45.7       16.5               7.6
                       2009         14.2   18.7     39.0       22.0               6.1
                       2010          8.9   17.5     44.3       20.3               8.9
                       2011          8.6   15.3     39.7       24.4              12.0




                                                                                                             26
Hoover High School                                      WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

CST English Language Arts: Disaggregated by Subgroup
Longitudinal disaggregated CST results for English-Language Arts indicate that there is an achievement gap
between White students and Socioeconomically Disadvantaged, Asian, African American and Hispanic
subgroups. Asian, Hispanic and Socioeconomically Disadvantaged subgroups have made small improvements
while the scores of White students have dropped slightly. Special education and English Learners have
significantly fewer students scoring proficient or advanced than other groups. However, these two groups have
made the largest gains since 2008.




The table below shows that the gap between the White subgroup and other subgroups decreased in size from
2008 to 2011. The gap columns show the difference between the white subgroup and other subgroups
percentages. The biggest gains in closing the achievement gap were made by the Asian, English Learners, and
Special Education subgroups. The Special Education, English Learner and African American subgroups had the
largest 2011 achievement gaps.

    Subgroup                               2008         2008 Gap to         2011          2011 Gap to
                                       % Proficient       White         % Proficient        White
                                       or Advanced       Subgroup       or Advanced        Subgroup
    White                                  51.1                             49.5
    African American                       29.9             21.2            30.1              19.4
    Asian                                  30.4             20.7            38.4              11.1
    Hispanic                               32.5             18.6            35.0              14.5
    English Learners                       13.1             38.0            19.2              30.3
    Socio-Economic Disadvantaged           30.0             21.1            33.3              16.2
    Special Education                       3.4             47.7            11.1              38.4




                                                                                                          27
Hoover High School                                      WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


CST Mathematics: Disaggregated by Subgroup
Longitudinal disaggregated mathematics CST results indicate a smaller gap between white and other
subgroups primarily due to the fact that overall a very small percentage of students score proficient or
advanced on the CST at Hoover High School. Since 2008, scores for the Asian, Hispanic and Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged subgroups have declined and Special Education, African American, and English Learner and
White student scores have increased slightly.




The achievement gap between White and other subgroups in 2008 and 2011 is detailed in the table below.
Comparing 2008 to 2011 results indicates that the gap between the White and the Asian and Socio-
Economically Disadvantaged subgroups has increased slightly, while the gap has narrowed between White and
other subgroups. African American, Special Education and English Learners reduced the achievement gap in
mathematics the most from 2008 to 2011. The English Learner and Special Education subgroups had the
largest 2011 achievement gaps.

    Subgroup                               2008         2008 Gap to         2011          2011 Gap to
                                       % Proficient       White         % Proficient        White
                                       or Advanced       Subgroup       or Advanced        Subgroup
    White                                  17.1                             17.2
    African American                        7.9              9.2            10.1              7.1
    Asian                                  16.8              0.3            12.6              4.6
    Hispanic                                8.4              8.7             9.2              8.0
    English Learners                        5.3             11.8             7.7              9.5
    Socio-Economic Disadvantaged           13.0              4.1             9.7              7.5
    Special Education                       3.0             14.1             7.1              10.1




                                                                                                          28
Hoover High School                                       WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

CST Science: Disaggregated by Subgroup
In science, analysis of disaggregated scores reveal a difference between the percent of white students scoring
proficient or advanced compared to other subgroups. The exception to this trend occurred in Science. In 2011,
the number of students scoring proficient or advanced in science was equal for White and Asian subgroups.
Over time, the Hispanic, Asian, English Learner, Special Education and Socio-economically Disadvantaged
subgroups have increased the percent of students scoring proficient or advanced while the achievement of
White and African American subgroups has decreased.




The table below details the gap between White and other subgroups based on the percent of students scoring
proficient or advanced on a science CST in 2008 and 2011. Comparing the 2008 Gap and 2011 Gap columns
below shows that all subgroups except African American are making significant progress in closing the
achievement gap. The Asian, English Learner and Hispanic subgroups have the most progress towards closing
the gap with the White subgroup. The subgroups that continue to have the largest achievement gap include
African American, English Learner and Special Education subgroups.

    Subgroup                               2008         2008 Gap to          2011          2011 Gap to
                                       % Proficient       White          % Proficient        White
                                       or Advanced       Subgroup        or Advanced        Subgroup
    White                                  42.9                              42.4
    African American                       27.5             15.4             20.7              21.7
    Asian                                  27.9             15.0             41.6              0.8
    Hispanic                               24.5             18.4             29.1              13.3
    English Learners                       12.5             30.4             23.5              18.9
    Socio-Economic Disadvantaged           26.0             16.9             28.4              14.0
    Special Education                      11.3             31.6             14.0              28.4




                                                                                                           29
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

CST History: Disaggregated by Subgroup

In social science, analysis of disaggregated scores reveal a difference between the percent of white students
scoring proficient or advanced compared to other subgroups. All subgroups made gains from 2010 to 2011 as
shown by the green bars in the table below. When comparing 2008 results (pink bars) to 2011 results (green
bars), all groups except for Asian and English Learners had a larger percentage of students scoring proficient or
advanced.




The table below details the gap between White and other subgroups based on the percent of students scoring
proficient or advanced on all history CST tests in 2008 and 2011. When comparing the 2008 Gap and 2011 Gap
columns below, the subgroups that had the largest distance to their White peers were the African American,
English Learner and Special Education subgroups. The subgroups that showed the most progress toward
narrowing the achievement gap were the African American, Hispanic, and Special Education subgroups.

    Subgroup                                 2008         2008 Gap to          2011           2011 Gap to
                                         % Proficient       White          % Proficient         White
                                         or Advanced       Subgroup        or Advanced         Subgroup
    White                                        26.8                              27.7
    African American                              9.6             17.2             13.5               14.2
    Asian                                        24.5              2.3             21.0               6.7
    Hispanic                                     16.3             10.5             21.7               6.0
    English Learners                             13.8             13.0             12.4               15.3
    Socio-Economic Disadvantaged                 17.9              8.9             19.6               8.1
    Special Education                             2.5             24.3              8.5               19.2




                                                                                                               30
Hoover High School                                                    WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

CAHSEE

Hoover HS has offered a variety of interventions over the years. For several years, state monies provided
staffing for 10th grade CAHSEE preparation courses in mathematics and ELA. Funds continue for CAHSEE
Intervention courses for 11th and 12th graders who are yet-to-pass one or both parts of the examination. For
2011-2012, 83 students are taking ELA CAHSEE Intervention and 57 are enrolled in a Mathematics CAHSEE
Intervention course during the school day. The ninth grade Algebra Intervention classes and English
Intervention classes also serve as additional preparation for the CAHSEE examination. To support 10th graders
to pass the CAHSEE the first time they take it, the CAHSEE 360 program was implemented starting in 2010-
2011. This program pulls targeted students out of their Physical Education classes and provides a research-
based online learning program tailored to their diagnosed content weaknesses.

Prior to testing, students have participated in interventions both during the school day and after school or on
the weekend. CAHSEE bootcamps were scheduled for students after school and on weekends for targeted
students who were on the bubble to pass or score proficient per AYP criteria. These programs used materials
developed by Princeton Review adopted by FUSD. Last year, tenth graders identified using CST and district
assessment data as being in danger of failing the examination were pulled out of their PE classes for a 6 week
period prior to the test and used an on-line targeted CAHSEE Revolution program provided by FUSD. The
mathematics and English departments also provide in class review for targeted courses prior to the test and 9th
graders are typically given a CAHSEE practice exam during other mandated testing windows such as during CST
testing while 10th and 11th graders are taking the Social Science exams or during district-wide PSAT testing in
the fall.

                HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL PERCENT PASSED BOTH CAHSEE ELA AND MATHEMATICS

       Point in Time                         Sophomores                       Juniors                    Seniors
       June 2006                                57.3%                          79.6%                      94.9%
       June 2007                                63.5%                          77.7%                      94.1%
       June 2008                                70.5%                          78.5%                      88.6%
       June 2009                                66.5%                          82.7%                      87.5%
       June 2010                                64.6%                          77.3%                      88.6%
       June 2011                                63.6%                          74.0%                      89.4%
       2-Year Difference                        -1.0%                          -3.3%                      0.8%
         *the color coding in the table indicates student cohorts as they progress through high school

                                 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL PERCENT PASSED CAHSEE ELA

       Point in Time                         Sophomores                       Juniors                    Seniors
       June 2006                                70.2%                          85.7%                      96.6%
       June 2007                                71.9%                          81.9%                      94.6%
       June 2008                                76.8%                          83.8%                      90.2%
       June 2009                                72.3%                          85.5%                      90.2%
       June 2010                                70.1%                          80.1%                      91.2%
       June 2011                                71.8%                          80.9%                      90.1%
       2-Year Difference                        1.7%                           0.8%                       -1.1%
         *the color coding in the table indicates student cohorts as they progress through high school




                                                                                                                   31
Hoover High School                                                 WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


                       HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL PERCENT PASSED CAHSEE MATHEMATICS

       Point in Time                      Sophomores                       Juniors                       Seniors
       June 2006                             64.5%                          83.4%                         95.9%
       June 2007                             72.6%                          81.0%                         95.4%
       June 2008                             77.2%                          82.8%                         91.3%
       June 2009                             75.8%                          87.2%                         90.2%
       June 2010                             72.7%                          83.1%                         91.1%
       June 2011                             72.1%                          77.8%                         91.9%
       2-Year Difference                     -0.6%                          -5.3%                         0.8%
                *the color coding in the table indicates student cohorts as they progress through high school

Over 60% of students pass both parts of the CAHSEE the first time they take the test as sophomores. The
percent of sophomores passing both parts has decreased 7 points since June 2008. Elective CAHSEE
intervention classes were phased out for 10th graders in 2010-2011. Other district level programs such as
Standards Plus in 10th grade ELA and math classes and the PE Pull-Out Online Review are now used to prepare
10th graders for the CAHSEE. By analyzing class trends as students progress from Sophomores to Seniors
(same color cells), progress is being made to improve the numbers of students who have passed both parts of
the examination by the time they complete four years of high school. In 2008, the state of California dropped
the requirement that special education students must pass both parts of the CAHSEE to earn a diploma, this
might account for the decline in scores the percent of seniors passed between 2007 and 2008 as fewer
students were under pressure to complete the examination.

CELDT and English Learner Redesignation

On the most recent CELDT comparing Fall 2009 to Fall 2010 results, nearly 50% of (1) Beginning and (2) Early
Intermediate students advanced at least one level. Thirty percent (30%) of (3) Intermediate students advanced
a level while 13% of (4) Early Advanced students scored (5) Advanced when comparing 2009 to 2010 test
results.




                                                                                                                   32
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Hoover High School’s annual redesignation rate has climbed steadily since 2008 with 10% of English Learners
moving to R-FEP status during the 2009-2010 school year. The rising trend of redesignation rates at Hoover
mirrors a similar trend at the district level.




Assessment of Critical Standards

FUSD requires quarterly progress monitoring assessments known as Assessments of Critical Standards (ACS).
The district administers benchmark ACS tests in English-Language Arts Grades 9-11, Algebra 1, Geometry,
Algebra II, World History, US History, Biology and Chemistry. Benchmark assessments are administered three
times per year and are aligned to key standards included on CSTs. Teachers examine benchmark assessment
results during their collaboration time and plan for re-teaching critical standards that students have yet to
master. All assessment results are posted within 24 hours on the districts web based Assessment Information
System (AiS) providing teachers with detailed information on student performance. ACS Summary reports are
included in the appendix.

The availability of ACS data provides staff with the ability to analyze trends across quarters, years and compare
progress with the average district progress. Departments utilize department specific ACS performance charts
to discuss subject specific progress in moving students toward proficiency. The ACS provides data that serves
as a predictor of CST performance. The ACS data is also utilized to provide the school with student
achievement data that allows the school to look at school-wide, department wide and subject area data to
move students toward proficiency and to provide data that identifies gaps in student learning. In addition to
the ACS, the school implemented the use of grade level and subject specific SMART learning goals to gauge
student progress toward mastery of the content standards. This process has served as a tool for teachers to
focus collaboration and instruction. While this is the first year of implementing the SMART learning goals, they
are regularly reviewed and refined to provide focused instruction to students with measurable outcomes in
key standards.




                                                                                                               33
Hoover High School                                              WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

College Placement and Advanced Placement Exams

The SAT percent tested has remained relatively stable with 34% testing in 2011. Average scores have risen
have varied slightly each year with 21% earning a combined score of 1500 or greater in 2010.

                                       HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL SAT SCORES
        Year             Percent        Reading           Math Average       Writing        Percent with Total
                         Tested         Average                              Average        Score >= 1500
        2008             35.46 %        431               437                420            18.0%
        2009             27.55%         452               459                441            26.8%
        2010             32.28%         444               455                436            21%
        2011             34.11%         429               433                420            *not available

The number of student and total number of exams given has increased dramatically since 2008. The
percentage of students earning a passing score of 3, 4, or5 dropped slightly for 2011. This year was the first
year Hoover HS offered AP Human Geography to ninth graders. Enrollment for 2011-2012 is also shown by
subject in the second table.

                         HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAM RESULTS
Year           Number      Exams       Exams        Exam           Exam          Exam        Total      Percent
               of Exam    Score = 1   Score = 2   Score = 3      Score = 4     Score = 5    Exams       Score 3+
                Takers
2008             205        155         117          67             17            8          364          25%
2009             279        180         131          81             26            21         439          29%
2010             369        258         142          75             36            31         542          26%
2011             466        364         166          78             31            20         659          20%

                   HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL 2011-2012 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENROLLMENT
        Subject Area                                                               Number Enrolled at
                                                                                            st
                                                                                    End of 1 Quarter
        Social Science (AP Courses grades 9-12)                                            451
        English Language Arts (AP Courses grades 11-12)                                    107
        Science (AP Courses grades 11-12)                                                   71
        Mathematics (AP Courses grades 11-12)                                               58

Hoover HS offers Advanced Placement courses in World Geography, European History, US History and
American Government so students have the opportunity to take at least one Advanced Placement course per
year. The World Geography class was mandated district-wide starting in 2010-2012. Juniors and Seniors are
eligible to take Advanced Placement courses in English Language Arts and the school offers 6 different
Advanced Placement science and mathematics courses (Chemistry, Biology, Environmental Science, Calculus
AB, Calculus BC and Statistics) to those students who have completed the required pre-requisite courses. Each
year, a small number of bilingual students also take the Spanish or Chinese AP Examinations.

The FUSD and Hoover HS have strategically focused on increasing the number of students who meet UC-
eligibility requirements and enroll in at least one Advanced Placement course. Social science and English AP
courses have been identified as the most viable for increasing student access to AP coursework. In addition,
the counseling staff and department leaders have worked hard to ensure that all students complete at least
Algebra II and a science sequence consisting of Biology, Physics or Chemistry, one other UC-eligible advanced
course and the 2-year foreign language requirement.


                                                                                                                   34
Hoover High School                                              WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Only a small percentage of students enrolled in the ninth grade do not take Algebra 1, guaranteeing all but a
few students have access to at least four-years of college prep mathematics with the option of an AP course
their senior year. The students not enrolled in Algebra 1 or higher as freshman are primarily special needs
student who are either not enrolled in a diploma track or who go on to take Algebra 1 during their 10th grade
year. Special education case managers consider Algebra 1 placement for 9th grade special needs students on a
case-by-case basis in accordance with the student’s achievement results and IEP. The science department has
replaced earth science with biology as the standard ninth grade science class, providing more students access
to a rigorous curriculum. The school offers Spanish or Chinese to meet foreign language requirements and
many of the magnet elective classes are considered P level courses in addition to meeting ROP requirements.

Graduation Requirements and Completion Rates

The number of students who meet University of California a-g requirements has increased since 2008. An
examination of D and F rates indicates that a majority of our students at all grade levels are earning Ds or Fs in
one or more courses. While fewer students are earning Fs in their classes, both numbers are alarming because
they are impacting not only students’ ability to graduate on time but also their college eligibility status. The
10th grade year appears to be particularly problematic for students. The support structures provided by the
Ninth Grade Academy, a dedicated 9th grade counselor, LINK Crew activities, and support classes in
mathematics and English language arts are not in place for 10th grade students. Students who are in danger of
not graduating due to failing required courses have the option to attend adult school, make-up courses during
an expanded district-wide summer school program or participate in credit recovery course options during the
school year. Help for struggling students during the school year is provided through the Zeros Aren’t Permitted
(ZAP) program , Link Crew activities to support ninth graders, the AVID program, Advanced Placement
tutorials, and other after-school tutorials.

                           HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL UC/CSU ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Indicator                                                                        2008         2009          2010
Students Enrolled in Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission                       74.5%        72.0%         72.0%
Graduates Who Completed All Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission                35.7%        42.8%         42.8%

                                 HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL GRADE SUMMARY
                2010-2011 Semester 1        2010-2011 Semester 2                             2011-2012 Semester 1
           At Least     At Least     At Least      At Least   At Least      At least     At Least     At Least   At Least
Grade       one D        one F       1 D or F       one D      one F        1 D or F      one D        one F     1 D or F
9th         47.7%        40.2%        59.4%         45.7%      48.8%         64.8%         Na*         56.0%      71.5%
10th        55.7%        45.0%        69.0%         53.7%      51.7%         69.5%         Na*         44.9%      65.3%
11th        53.9%        39.4%        64.4%         51.8%      44.4%         66.8%         Na*         39.8%      64.5%
12th        40.7%        25.1%        49.8%         48.8%      27.8%         58.0%         Na*         20.8%      44.4%
*2011-2012 Sem 1 data was not disaggregated by Ds only

According to the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS), the Hoover High School
class of 2009-2010 had a cohort graduation rate of 78.4 and a dropout rate of 13.6 with 5.8 percent still
enrolled. Detailed data is at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/. The AYP Graduation Rate for the last four years
is summarized below. It has increased since 2008. In 2011, Hoover HS met the graduation rate target criteria

                                   HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL AYP GRADUATION RATE
Year                    2008                     2009                    2010                  2011
Graduation Rate         78.4                     75.2                    78.65                 84.08

                                                                                                                       35
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                          HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL PERCEPTION DATA

As standard practice in FUSD to encourage the continuous cycle of improvement based on data various metrics
are collected annually. Students, parents and staff are surveyed each year on their perceptions of school
climate and safety. The results of these stakeholders’ Complete survey results are available at
http://rea.fresnounified.org/SchReports.cfm. Results of the most recent surveys are summarized below.

Student Survey

The California Healthy Kids Survey results for a three year period indicate fairly consistent perceptions
regarding school safety and climate. In 2010-2011, 42.8% of respondents indicated they feel safe or very safe
at school and approximately half indicated they were happy to be at this school and 41.9% felt like they were a
part of the school. Students responded more positively with regards to their experience of caring relationships
as the school with 74.6% indicating there is an adult who wants them to do their best.




Parent Survey

The annual district-wide Parent/Family Survey results for Hoover HS indicate that most parents feel satisfied
with the school (70.3%) and perceive it to be safe (76.2%).




                                                                                                                36
Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012




Parent responses to home to school communication questions are less favorable. Parents indicate a need for
more and better home to school communications regarding their child’s progress and tools to help their
children. During the 2010-2011 school year, the district replaced Powerschool with ATLAS as a means for
teachers and parents to track student progress and grades. As with any new program, there were significant
issues with access and use. The district is committed to improving the interface and Hoover HS is doing its part
to educate stakeholders on use of the new system.




Finally, only a small percentage of parents indicate that they participate in activities at school on a regular
basis.




                                                                                                                  37
Hoover High School                                           WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Staff Survey

Finally, a staff survey administered in early 2011 indicates a level of dissatisfaction on the part of certificated
staff regarding student behavior and discipline. Teachers indicated high levels of disrespect and defiance,
classroom disorder and failure to address inappropriate student behavior.




However, teachers indicated that they did not need additional training or support regarding classroom
behavior management, but could use some additional resources to address bullying prevention.




The 2011-2012 school year has brought many changes in both administration and teaching positions including
a new principal, three new vice-principals, three new counselors and 10 new teachers. The 2011-2012 school
year opened with a Student Responsibility Center (SRC) (alternative to suspension) to address minor behavior
issues, a new discipline plan, and a renewed emphasis on addressing problem behaviors both in and out of the
classroom. As a result of these changes, the WASC/CDE self-study leadership team is re-surveying students,
parents and staff during the Fall of 2011 to see if perception data has improved.




                                                                                                                      38
     HOOVER
   HIGH SCHOOL




      Chapter 2
Overall Summary from
Analysis of Profile Data
Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                                              INTRODUCTION

Since the last WASC visit in 2006, Hoover HS has increased its capacity to make instructional decisions based
on analysis of data. Teachers and staff on site have worked collaboratively to create common final and unit
assessments in core classes implement and use the results of district level benchmark assessments (ACS) in
planning instruction, and provide meaningful test preparation for students prior to high-stakes testing. The
FUSD has supported these efforts by providing an Assessment Information System (AiS) that is available to all
staff, funding for on-site staff to assist with data analysis and planning, and a teacher collaboration structure
based on the PLC model called Accountable Communities and the Online Assessment and Reporting System
(OARS) for teachers to use to create standards-based classroom level assessments. Taken together these
efforts have provided an atmosphere that is focused on student learning and data-based decision-making.
Hoover HS continues to grow in its capacity to understand data and plan meaningful instruction and
intervention as needed based on this analysis.

               IMPLICATIONS WITH RESPECT TO STUDENT PERFORMANCE

California Standards Test (CST)

Hoover’s API has varied since 2007 with a high of 697 in 2008 down to a low of 666 in 2010. The 2011 Growth
API of 686 is a sign of the reversal of a downward trend since 2008. The number of students scoring Far Below
Basic in English Language Arts increased until last year. The 2010-2011 school year marked the first year of a
new ELA intervention, Corrective Reading as well as an increase in the number of SDAIE sections offered in
core classes. English Language Arts teachers also made significant progress last year to align instruction to a
new district pacing guide. In mathematics, the number of students scoring Far Below Basic has decreased
steadily for all groups but Algebra 1 which experienced a slight increase. In 2011, the number of double-period
Algebra 1 intervention classes was reduced due to budget cuts so fewer students who may have needed
additional time to master Algebra 1 standards were not provided with the opportunity. The US History CST
scores improved in 2011 as teachers worked in Accountable Communities to align instruction and create
common formative assessments of key standards. Overall Science CST scores have been improving. In 2009,
Biology scores declined when all ninth graders were placed into Biology classes when Earth Science was
eliminated but when compared to Biology and Earth Science CST scores in previous year, students actually
performed better on the Biology CST. As a result of taking biology in the 9th grade, our students are meeting
UC/CSU eligibility requirements and succeeding in a more rigorous course. The 2011 Biology scores improved
with fewer students falling into the FBB category. In 2010, an increased number of students were placed into
Physics to continue updrafting them to meet UC/CSU eligibility requirements. The CST scores dropped as the
school moved from 4-5 sections of physics to 10-12 sections. However, the teachers and students have
adapted and scores for 2011 increased. In summary, the 2008-2010 downward trend in API scores has
coincided with efforts to updraft students into more rigorous coursework in Social Science and Science and a
reduction in intervention classes in mathematics. As evidenced by increases in nearly all tested subjects in
2011, this trend is reversing as both students and teachers adapt to the raised expectations and additional
support structures such as Corrective Reading classes, the Focus Five initiative, and SIOP training for teachers
that have been put in place. This data implies that Hoover HS is on the right path, but students and teachers
will need continued support both in the classroom and with appropriate interventions outside of the
classroom.
Significant subgroups continue to lag behind white students in nearly all core areas when examining
disaggregated CST data longitudinally. In English Language Arts the gap was the greatest for Special Education
students and English Learners. In mathematics, the gap is smaller, primarily due to the fact that only a small
percentage of students score proficient or advanced on the mathematics CSTs. Longitudinal trends in
disaggregated Social Science and Science data show subgroup performance below that of White students.
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
                                                                                                                40
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


Hoover HS made steady gains in AYP for both ELA and Mathematics until 2009. In 2011, 47.8% were proficient
in ELA, nearly back to the 2008 high of 50.6% proficient. In Mathematics, the percent proficient has not yet
risen above 50%. As the No Child Left Behind proficiency level increased, Hoover HS has not been able to
improve its scores to the required levels. The AYP data also give clear evidence of the achievement gap at the
school with White and Asian students out-performing other subgroups in mathematics and White students
out-performing all other subgroups in ELA. Particularly troubling is the achievement of our African American
student population which lags behind all other groups in mathematics except for students with disabilities and
behind all groups in ELA except for students with disabilities and English Learners. This data, taken with the
trends in CST scores for subgroups implies that Hoover HS needs to make a concerted effort to reach out to
under-performing subgroups and examine how to best provide support structures to raise their achievement
levels.

Academic Grades

An examination of the numbers of students receiving Ds and Fs at the first and second semester of 2010-2011
indicates that far too many students are struggling to pass their courses. Over half of all students had at least
one D or F last year in both Semester 1 and Semester 2. The rates for 1 or more Fs varied from a low of 25.1%
for seniors Semester 1 and a high of 51.7% for sophomores in Semester 2. While FUSD has implemented a
number of measures including an expanded summer school and on-line credit recovery courses and night
school, these numbers indicate efforts need to be expended on the part of staff to help students be successful
in their courses.

Advanced Placement Enrollment

The numbers of students enrolling in Advanced Placement courses has increased steadily, particularly in Social
Science and English Language Arts. Hoover HS added AP European History in 2009 and AP Environmental
Science and AP Human World Geography in 2010. A program is in place to provide a pipeline to AP Spanish for
Native Speakers. The district is also enrolling more students in Algebra 1 in 8th grade so the potential to
increase enrollments in AP mathematics exists in the future. A FUSD partnership with the College Board is
helping to train middle and high school teachers to better address the needs of students who may have not
typically enrolled in Advanced Placement as they begin this journey. On-going support for students and
teachers is needed to maintain this positive trend.

Graduates Completing UC/CSU Requirements

Hoover has maintained a fairly consistent percentage of students enrolled in courses required for UC/CSU
admission, but the number of students who completed all of the UC/CSU admissions requirements has
increased from 35.7% in 2008 to 42.8% in 2010. These data suggest that while many students may be
struggling (as evidenced by D and Fs), we are making strides with UC/CSU eligibility for our students. Great
efforts have been made by the counseling department to not only place students into required courses, but
also to make sure they take the necessary placement exams and complete their college applications and
financial aid paperwork.
Many support programs have also been initiated to support students to meet college entrance requirements.
The school’s AVID program, Upward Bound program, and the CSU Mentoring are all having a positive impact as
college-readiness initiatives. Students have also been provided with opportunities during summer school or
after school hours to make up D and F grades in required courses. This is part of a district-wide Summer
School Initiative.


                                                                                                               41
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                                     CRITICAL ACADEMIC NEEDS

Many schools in California are experiencing an achievement gap, as is Hoover HS. Staff has worked to close
this gap through intervention courses, tutorials, support classes like the Men’s Alliance, after school tutorials,
pull-out programs for CAHSEE, and professional development for staff. Still, the gap persists. It is important to
recognize and address the achievement gap as part of our self-study process.

Upon careful examination of the profile data, the following critical academic needs have been identified:

    1. Increase CST scores in all subjects, especially math which has the lowest percentage of students
       scoring proficient or advanced.

    2. Improve first time CAHSEE passing rates for 10th grade students to increase the numbers of students
       scoring proficient in both ELA and mathematics and decrease the numbers of students needing
       remediation.

    3. Narrow the achievement gap for underperforming subgroups, most notably African Americans,
       Students with Disabilities and English Learners.


                          QUESTIONS RAISED BY THE DATA ANALYSIS

    1. How can staff best address the needs of an increasingly diverse and at-risk student population in order
       to increase student achievement?

    2. How can staff focus collaboration time around student work and student achievement at the
       classroom level to better respond when students are struggling to learn?

    3. How can the school provide the necessary tiered levels of intervention to meet the needs of students
       not succeeding in standards-based coursework or who are at risk of not completing their high school
       graduation requirements?

    4. How effective are existing support structures for under-performing student sub-groups? What
       additional support structures are needed to raise achievement levels?

    5. How can the school increase levels of parent, student and community involvement in the school to
       support student achievement of critical standards and expected school-wide learning results?

    6. How can the school community work together as a team to better support the social and emotional
       needs of students and their families?




                                                                                                                42
HOOVER HIGH
  SCHOOL




   Chapter 3
Progress Report
Hoover High School                                            WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Hoover HS staff has worked since the last self-study to monitor and implement the action plan that includes the visiting
committee’s recommendations for improvement. Action plan implementation aligned with the development and
implementation of the Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA) and became a part of the Cycle of Continuous
Improvement that drove decision-making at the school-site. While site leadership and leadership structures have evolved
since 2006, the WASC Action Plan along the SPSA and district guidelines for addressing district goals and objectives has
provided a framework for staff discussions around what students should know and be able to do and how to best allocate
site resources to improve student achievement and attainment of the Expected School-Wide Learning Results.

                SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS SINCE THE LAST SELF-STUDY

Site Leadership

After the last full self-study in 2006, a new principal was hired along with several new counselors and vice-
principals. The new leadership team along with a cadre of lead teachers and a Data Teacher on Special
Assignment (TSA) formed the Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) charged with guiding the schools progress
implementing the action plan. This team met regularly over the years and planned school-wide and
department level collaboration around student learning and the action plan items. As time passed, additional
leadership groups formed eventually creating a group of administrators and teachers comprised of lead
teachers and department chairs known as HALO (Hoover Academic Leadership Organization). This group
charged itself with implementing district initiatives focused on data-based decision-making and the Cycle of
Continuous Improvement.

The 2011-2012 school year started with a new principal, two new vice-principals and three new counselors.
Several new teachers have been hired as well, and many veteran teachers have retired. The opportunity exists
for Hoover to carefully examine policies and procedures from the past, keep what worked, and address areas
for additional growth. The self-study process this year will be a vehicle for change and growth under the new
leadership.

Meaningful Teacher Collaboration Time

To support teachers in the alignment of instruction to the standards and the use of data to inform instructional
decisions, Hoover HS created teacher collaboration time within the school day starting with the 2009-2010
school year. The Ninth Grade Academy established in 2007-2008 had already provided a model for teacher
collaboration that needed to be integrated into the entire staff. Prior to that time, department meetings, buy-
back days and occasional sub-release days were used by departments to plan instruction and analyze data.

To support departments and leaders in the collaboration
process, training was provided to team members by the
district, at professional conferences and with a visit to
Nashville schools to learn about their Small Learning
Communities Grant. In 2008, using Dufour’s professional
learning community model the staff was provided
meaningful collaboration grounded in the principles and
procedures outlined in Learning by Doing: A Handbook for
Professional Learning Communities . At that same time,
district-level initiatives (Cycle of Continuous Improvement,
Three Phase Lesson Design, The Skillful Leader/The Skillful
Teacher, Classroom Foundations) were aligned with the
schools goals and objectives for collaboration.


                                                                                                                      44
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

During 2009-2010, teachers used collaboration time built into the school day to work in course-alike groups to
analyze assessment data (CST, ACS and teacher-made tests) and plan for re-teaching and best-practices
instruction. Lead teachers facilitated this process and were supported by site administrators who spent time in
classrooms as part of their district leadership training conducting Three-Minute Walkthroughs. We realized in
2010-2011 that we needed to provide teachers with a more lengthy time period in which to collaborate and
have therefore extended collaboration time for teachers by altering the bell-schedule for 2011-2012.

The collaboration time model has evolved since it started two years ago to an Accountable Community (AC)
model devised by the district. During this year’s AC meetings, staff is writing SMART goals, measuring student
progress towards those goals, creating common lessons and assessments aligned to district pacing guides, and
incorporating the District Classroom Foundations for high-quality instruction. The Classroom Foundations is a
guiding principal of quality lesson design that includes a standards-based objective, instruction aligned to that
objective, assessment (formal and informal), and closure. All teachers are expected to incorporate these
foundations into their daily instruction.

District Benchmarks/Common Assessments

The district has expanded and revised existing quarterly benchmarks since the last self-study. These
assessments are aligned to CA standards. At this time, Assessments of Critical Standards (ACS) tests exist in
Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, English Language Arts Grades 9-11, Modern World History, US History, Biology
and Chemistry. The mathematics assessments and grade 9-10 ELA assessments have been revised as new
curricula have been adopted and to incorporate more coverage of the standards. A district-benchmark for
English Learners, the (ELDA) has also been developed and is in use as of this school year. All of these
assessments were developed with teacher input and coincided with development of curriculum pacing guides.
Teams of teachers from across the district worked with curriculum specialists to create these assessments.
The assessments are administered and scored by FUSD’s Department of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment
(REA). Teachers can view benchmark assessment results in the AiS system within a few days of the testing
window closing. The summary and data analysis tools provided by the AiS system have been an integral part of
Hoover HS’s growth in using data to make decisions about instruction. During collaboration time, core
departments review the results and discuss which tested standards are in need of re-teaching. The
information provides a tool to potentially predict student performance on the CSTs allowing teachers to
address critical standards more effectively prior to state testing.

On-site, Hoover HS has created common semester final exams in all core subjects except for Physical Education
which has common unit exams. During Accountable Community collaboration time, teams of teachers have
worked to create common assessments in mathematics, social science and English language arts. Social
science and ELA have used the OARs program provided by the district to create their common assessments.
Other departments are focusing on the development of common lessons and teaching units.

Counseling

The counseling department at Hoover HS has expanded since the last self study to include 6 full-time
counselors with one dedicated to working with ninth grade students. At the time of the last self-study we only
had four counselors and our student body was larger. The increase in counseling staff has provided more
personalized support for students in terms of academic planning, progress monitoring and emotional support.
The district has worked with counselors to provide training with a focus on using district information systems
(Powerschool and ATLAS), to‘up-draft’ students to meet A-G requirements. District partnerships with the
College Board support counselors as they continue to move all students to be career- or college-ready
graduates. Counselors have made significant strides in preparing students for their post-high school options,

                                                                                                               45
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

particularly in terms of college entrance examinations, college and financial aid applications, and meeting
eligibility requirements resulting in an increase in the numbers of UC/CSU eligible graduates.

Small Learning Community Grant and A.C.E. Magnet Grant

In 2007-2008, the school utilized monies from a Small Learning Communities grant to establish a Freshman
Academy. Teachers in mathematics, English language arts and science were selected to become a part of the
academy and teach only freshman classes. The freshman teachers in the mathematics department and
counselors and support staff were housed in a single building on campus, Academic C. Smart classrooms were
installed and these teachers worked collaboratively to plan instruction in core areas. Teachers met in cross-
curricular teams to focus on students who were struggling in their classes and provided appropriate
interventions. The ninth grade counselors were an integral part of this intervention and met individually, with
whole classes, and in small groups to discuss graduation requirements, college-entrance requirements, quarter
and semester grades and credits, and connecting students to tutorial support available in Academic C.

As part of the Freshman Academy, students in need of significant intervention were enrolled in intervention
courses in mathematics and English language arts along with their core courses. Critical elements of the ninth
grade academy in place including a dedicated ninth grade counselor, ninth grade only classes in core subjects,
intervention classes in mathematics and English language arts (Corrective Reading), and LINK Crew activities
designed to engage ninth grade students.

A federal magnet grant supported the creation of the Hoover Architecture Construction and Engineering (ACE)
Magnet program. The program provided a model to update our shop areas with high-tech equipment related
to real-world skills needed in the 21st century. There are currently 198 students enrolled in the program.
Magnet students take a magnet elective each year and all take Mandarin Chinese as a foreign language
requirement. The magnet students are enrolled with the general student population for the rest of the day.

Engaging Students in the School Community

Many efforts have been made to improve campus culture at Hoover HS. A full-time campus activities director
works with an ever-growing cadre of leadership students providing an engaging environment for student
activities. There are currently 62 active clubs on campus—many with an academic (MESA, Math League,
Robotics, Academic Decathlon) focus and others with a service-learning element (Key Club, FCA, Junior LARCS,
Spark). There are clubs that promote diversity as well, including Chinese Culture Club, Asian Club, MECHA,
Latin Moves, and GSA (Gay Straight Alliance). One of the most active programs on campus is Link Crew. These
students have worked extensively with incoming freshman to welcome them to our school and support them
during freshman year. Link Crew activities include movie nights, tutorials, beginning-of-school freshman
orientation, end-of-the-year visits to feeder middle schools and many more.

One of the most powerful campus culture activities in recent years has been Breaking Down the Walls, which
has been provided to hundreds of students in the last three years. This program seeks to find common ground
between students with diverse backgrounds by helping kids to dialogue and reflect on the commonalities of
their experiences, their hopes and their fears.

Significant efforts have been made to honor students’ academic achievement as well, with annual assemblies
and rallies to honor academic achievers. This fall, students who made CST gains received an Academic All-Stars
t-shirt. Starting in 2010-2011, each teacher identified a Focus 5 group of students who were performing Far
Below Basic or Below Basic on CSTs. The goal was to provide more personalized attention and encouragement
to those students throughout the school year. The program continues for 2010-2011.

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Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

At the time of the last self-study, Hoover implemented a homeroom program. Since 2006, it was dropped and
then resurrected as weekly Patriot Relations/Zero’s Aren’t Permitted in 2009-2010. The Patriot Relations
portion focused on building meaningful relationships with a group of students that you followed from year to
year. On alternating weeks, students participated in ZAP. This provided time during the school day for
teachers and students to request additional support. For 2011-2012, the ZAP portion of the program is
continuing with an extended 3rd period which provides a longer time period for students to get help and less
time out of class travelling to ZAP rooms.

Declining Enrollment/Changing Demographic

Hoover HS is in a period of declining enrollment and the city of Fresno’s demographics have changed over
time. Feeder elementary and middle schools have also experienced a decline in enrollment. In 2006, there
were 2248 students enrolled at Hoover HS. For 2011-2012 we have 1829 student on campus. The
demographics of our school have changed as well. The percentage of students eligible for Free and Reduced
Lunch in 2006 was 56.3% and grew to 78% in 2010. Our white population and Asian populations have declined
while Hispanic and African American have increased. The demographic make-up of our English Learner
population has also changed since 2006. We currently provided services to increased numbers of students at
ELD levels 1-3 and have experienced an increase in both Hispanic-speaking and Arabic-speaking student
groups.

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)

Hoover HS began an AVID program five years ago. Since that time a total of 11 teachers have been AVID
trained and we currently have three sections of AVID (Grade 9, Grade 10, and Grade 11-12) elective to support
student achievement. Hoover HS is an AVID Certified School. The first class of AVID students graduated in
2010-2011. Nine AVID tutors support program students during the school day and after school.

Advanced Placement Enrollment

District efforts and school site efforts have resulted in a significant increase in the numbers of students taking
Advanced Placement courses. The up-drafting process began three years ago when lead teachers used
multiple measures (CST scores, grades, GPA and attendance) to target students for enrollment in AP courses.
At the same time, FUSD added sections of European History and World Geography as part of its partnership
with the CollegeBoard. We also offer Spanish for Native Speakers which will create a pipeline for AP Spanish
classes in the near future. District administrators and AP and pre-AP teachers have been provided training in
instructional strategies to ensure more students have access to and are successful in AP courses. This year, the
AP Calculus classes are participating in a College Board pilot program, APLifeline, that is investigating the use of
online-video tutorials to support student achievement of critical content. The district has also provided extra-
pay contracts for AP teachers to provide after-school and evening tutorials for students enrolled in Advanced
Placement courses.

    IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING OF THE SCHOOL-WIDE ACTION PLAN

After the 2006 WASC Review, Hoover HS was granted a 6-year term with a mid-term review. The Instructional
Leadership Team (ILT) consisting of the principal, program manager, data TSA, and subject-area lead teachers
took responsibility for implementation of the action plan. They meet weekly and worked with departments to
implement the plan.

In preparation for the mid-term review, focus groups were re-formed and the entire staff reviewed ESLRs and
examined progress towards addressing the action plan items and the recommendations from the visiting
                                                                                                                 47
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

committee provided three years earlier. The WASC Mid-term Review visiting committee provided no
additional recommendations for our school. Since that time, staff has continued to address the areas of growth
identified by the WASC visit in 2006.

In 2009-2010, a new leadership group was formed comprised of the principal, program manager/VP, Small
Learning Community Teacher or Special Assignment, department chairs and lead teachers. This group (Hoover
Academic Leadership Organization or HALO) met monthly after school through last year to monitor plan
implementation and progress on the critical areas for follow-up. In addition, the Single Plan for Student
Achievement (SPSA) School-Wide Action Plan, incorporates WASC Action plan items and is reviewed annually
with the School Site Council (SSC).

                                  PROGRESS ON THE ACTION PLAN

When Hoover HS completed the last full self-study six years ago, seven critical areas for follow-up were
identified by the staff and the Visiting Committee. Staff has worked diligently to embed these areas into school
improvement efforts. These critical areas focus the decisions and changes made to the school program since
2006.

                               Critical Area for Follow-Up #1
 To improve academic achievement, Hoover staff needs to become more proficient at accessing,
        analyzing, and applying data to drive the instructional and support programs.

Since 2006, Hoover HS with support from the district has worked to become more proficient in the use of data
to drive instruction and support programs. The efforts focused on the following areas:
     Professional development and site-leadership development and the allocation of resources to support
         staff to become more data-driven
     Creation and administration of quarterly district-level benchmark assessments
     Time for staff to examine data through the Cycle of Continuous Improvement Model
     Using data to target students in need of additional academic support

Since 2006, FUSD has supported and expanded an Assessment Information System (AiS) designed to provide
staff with up-to-date achievement data in a user-friendly web-based interface. AiS is an assessment process of
collecting, disaggregating, analyzing and reporting student performance data. Teachers at Hoover HS received
regular training on accessing, analyzing and applying the data available in AiS. The District allocated site-level
funding of 0.2 FTE for lead teachers in each core subject along with a full-time Teacher on Special Assignment
(TSA) to help teachers interpret and utilize the results of state and district assessments to guide instruction.
Lead teachers, site principals and data TSAs formed an Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) that met regularly
throughout the school year. Budget cuts eliminated the release periods for lead teachers and the school
formed a HALO (Hoover Academic Leadership Organization) that included member of the ILT and department
chairs. In 2011-2012 Accountable Community Leads replaced Lead teachers. AC Leads are provided with site
and district level support and training in analyzing student data within the professional learning community in
order to make sound improvements to instruction. Department chairs also meet on a monthly basis with the
administrative team to review relevant data points that indicate areas of need for students.

Training has been provided to staff in the use of the AiS system to analyze student achievement data from the
CSTs and district benchmark assessments. Departments have used this data to develop action plans and goals,
plans for re-teaching standards based on test results and providing intervention to identified groups of
students. Fresno Unified administer benchmark assessments three times per year in ten core academic
courses.

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Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Structured department collaboration time has been set aside in the master calendar for teachers to analyze
data and make instructional decisions based on the results. Currently teachers meet two to three times per
month to
     develop common lessons and assessments based on district pacing guides and critical standards,
     analyze the results of district benchmark assessments,
     plan for re-teaching those standards yet to be mastered.
     develop and revise common final examinations, and
     improve upon teaching plans based on test results.

Hoover continues to use data to identify students in need of additional academic support. In the ninth grade,
at-risk students are identified and placed into a two-period Algebra 1 support class. By the end of the year,
they have completed 10 units of Algebra 1 and 10 units of elective credit. Initially, Hoover HS provided two
periods of English Language Arts for ninth graders. For the last two years, students have been placed into a
program specific reading intervention called Corrective Reading. Data has indicated that a consistency of
program between high schools and support classes at the middle school level have resulted in a need for fewer
sections of reading intervention for this school year. Additionally, CST scores are utilized as well as PSAT results
to encourage students to engage in more rigorous courses such as Advanced Placement classes.

Hoover HS has consistently provided support for students to pass the CAHSEE. With monies provided by the
state of California, 10th grade students had a year-long CAHSEE support class in either mathematics or ELA until
2007-2008. Starting in 2008-2009, teachers received training in the Princeton Review ACES curriculum and
10th grade students were provided with an after-school CAHSEE bootcamp to prepare them for the exam.
Additional programs were implemented for English Learners and Special Education students on Saturdays.
Most recently, as budget cuts eliminated the 10th grade CAHSEE classes, students identified as needing
intervention based on CST data were pulled out of their PE courses for six weeks prior to the CAHSEE and
worked through an online curriculum that was customized to their on-going progress on key standards.

Students have participated in various on-site credit recovery options including 7th and 0-period sections of 9th
and 10th grade classes for students who failed the first semester. It has not been determined whether the
district can sustain funding for this program for the 2011-2012 school year. The district has expanded summer
school opportunities and provides an online credit-recovery course for students who fail classes required for
graduation through the APEX learning program.

                                Critical Area for Follow-up #2:
To help students take responsibility for their achievement, all Hoover stakeholders need to work
   together to engage students in the learning process and help them analyze their academic
     progress and use the available resources to improve their learning and performance.

Since the last self study, Hoover has implemented a number of programs aimed at engaging students in the
learning process. Implementation of Foundations in the classroom has established the expectation that all
teachers will have a posted objective in every classroom for every day. Students will understand the objective
for the day in every classroom to support their active engagement and participation in learning. In addition,
the Freshman Academy and Hoover ACE Magnet program have tried to provide an environment where
students can better connect to school and become engaged in meaningful curriculum. SMART classrooms
have been installed in 47 classrooms. These classrooms have made it easier for teachers to engage students
using a variety of web-based resources and presentations to enhance real world connections to the
curriculum. The Men’s Alliance is in its second year and continues to provide support to at-risk males on
campus.


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Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

To help students better analyze their progress, a number of measures have been instituted. Communication
with parents has been more focused on student achievement. The typical open house was moved to the first
reporting period to allow teachers to have conversations with parents about their child’s grades. Additional
counseling staff have allowed each counselor to implement a comprehensive counseling calendar for the 2011-
2012 school year to allow each student to be conferenced with individually in grades 10-12. All at risk
freshmen will also have individual counseling sessions with the freshman counselor. The Teleparent system,
which provides automated phone messages, is available for teachers and staff to communicate with parents
via automated phone messages. This system allows teachers to record messages and administration to provide
critical information in several languages to parents via the telephone. ATLAS Parent Portal was instituted by
the FUSD in 2010-2011 to allow parents to view their child’s grades and progress online. The system and
parent trainings have continued to be refined in the 2011-2012 school year. CST, CAHSEE, AP and SAT scores
are all mailed home to parents. Additional school wide information regarding student achievement is provided
in the quarterly school newsletter, The Towne Crier.

Prior to CST and CAHSEE testing, teachers conduct test chats with their students.Teachers support students in
assessing their current scores and how to improve in each area as well as how to set realistic goals for
improvement. Students are eligible for rewards based on maintain proficient or advanced or gaining a
performance level on the CSTs from year to year. For the last two years, teachers have identified 5 students
(FOCUS 5) and provide ongoing support and encouragement to them throughout the school year to help them
improve by one performance level.

                                Critical Area for Follow-Up #3:
 To help foster an environment that nurtures learning, Hoover stakeholders need to continue to
     develop school and district resources to make our campus a safe, caring, and cohesive
                                          community.

Fresno Unified District Goal 2 stating that all students will engage in arts, activities and athletics provides
staffing for a Campus Culture Director and Athletic Director at Hoover High School. Their primary duty is to
implement aspects of the Single Plan for Student Achievement related to campus culture and athletics. Since
2006, the Hoover staff has worked diligently to engage more students and the community in activities and
athletics. There are currently 62 active clubs on campus. Some of the new clubs and programs added since
2006 include Mathematics, Engineering, Science, Achievement (MESA), Chinese Culture Club, ACE
(Architecture, Construction and Engineering), Robotics Club, Arabic Club, Beyond Sight, Hiking Club, Chess
Club, and Gay Straight Alliance. Link Crew supports freshman students to feel welcome and a part of the
campus culture. Link Crew leaders are a vital part of freshman orientation activities. Link Crew activities
continue throughout the year and include tailgates before a home football games, movie nights, and study
sessions with Link Leaders.
Leadership students and Student Body officers are key components of the Campus Culture Plan. These
students annually identify areas of improvement and work towards achieving goals with the entire study body
through a representative form of government, led by the Student Senate that consists of elected class officers
and Associated Student Body officers and a House or Representatives. This body meets monthly to discuss
current student issues, events, and opportunities for student engagement. Representatives are expected to
have two-way communication with their class and the House.
The activities director has worked tirelessly along with her leadership students since 2008 to provide many
campus culture activities to increase student engagement and involvement with the Hoover school
community. These activities reach out into the community through Kid’s Day newspaper sales, working with
feeder middle schools and providing a rich environment for all students. Campus culture maintains the Hoover
Home page, which is a resource for students, parents and staff members to find out what is going on at the
school. Student safety has continued to be an emphasis for Hoover High School stakeholders as well as the
district at large. Since the 2006 WASC visitation, progress has been made on several fronts. Additional
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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

security measures have been implemented including peepholes on all of the security doors, video cameras
monitor several locations on campus, and there is an increased security presence on campus and at athletic
events. Another key component in trying to promote school safety has been addressed through on campus
programs such as Breaking Down the Walls which seeks to improve communication and relationships between
diverse students groups present on campus. The district’s Safe and Civil Schools initiative based on the work of
Dr. Randy Sprick has been in place since 2009-2010. School staff has incorporated Start on Time to reduce
tardies, CHAMPS, and a revised school-wide discipline plan to support pro-active classroom management. The
addition of a Student Responsibility Center (SRC) staffed by a certificated teacher, a Vice Principal and a
classified staff member this year has provided a place for students to go who are disruptive to the learning
process. Clear steps are in place for students who have on-going issues related to inappropriate classroom
behavior before they are sent to the SRC. The SRC provides a place for students to go to receive behavioral
intervention that is clear, consistent, and progressive in accordance with the school-wide discipline policy. A
Safe and Civil Committee meets regularly and provides training to all staff at the annual institute days on these
programs. In addition, teachers have been provided stipends to attend the Discipline in the Secondary
Classroom and Capturing Kids Hearts workshops, and all teaching staff has received the Discipline in the
Secondary Classroom text. The additional administrators on campus (both vice principals and counselors) have
also contributed to improving school safety as they are able to supervise students during lunch and at athletic
events.

             Critical Area for Follow-Up #4 (Suggested by the Visiting Committee)
  More alternatives to college prep track classes need to be an integral part of the instructional
                        program, such as technical and vocational classes.

 Since 2006, Hoover added a magnet program focused on Architecture, Construction and Engineering,
increased the number of students attending the Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART), added
ROP classes in construction and architectural drafting through the magnet program, and ROP classes are
offered at Duncan Polytechnic High School where Hoover students can attend half-days. There are currently
198 Hoover students enrolled in the Magnet Program.

Through the 2010-2011 school year, all Hoover 9th grade students took a semester long Introduction to
Technology course and had the opportunity as 10th graders to move into the Technology Magnet. The 2011-
2012 school year has brought about significant changes regarding student elective options due to the state
financial crisis. Ninth grade Introduction to Technology and Sociology for Living courses have been eliminated.
The school offers 5 sections of Foods & Nutrition. The Hoover A.C.E (Architechture, Construction, Engineering)
Magnet program offers two different ROP classes and 3 other electives (each enrolling approximately 30-35
students). Enrollment in the Building Trades ROP class has increased by 300% over last year.

Besides our magnet program, students looking for an alternative to college prep courses have the option to
attend the Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART), a school jointly run by Fresno and Clovis
Unified focusing on hands on learning in several career pathways. Students take classes such as video game
design and forensic science as part of the program. Students attend CART for half of the school day, morning
or afternoon, and then spend the rest of the day on the Hoover campus. Currently Hoover has 60 students
attending CART (11th and 12th grade) and a few students who are enrolled in ROP courses at Duncan
Polytechnic High School where they attend for a half-day. Hoover HS continues to focus on expanding
opportunities for students while providing academic support to meet a-g requirements.




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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


             Critical Area for Follow-Up #5 (Suggested by the Visiting Committee)
 At least one full time counselor needs to be reinstated to meet the academic and development
demands and interests of students and to provide an increased focus on scholarships and grants
                                   for college bound students.

Since 2006, Hoover has added three full time counselors with one counselor specifically working with ninth
grade students. This brings the total number of counselors to six. A Teacher on Special Assignment funded
under the Smaller Learning Community Grant also works with ninth grade students on academic counseling
issues. As part of AB 1802 counselors work with students that are not showing adequate progress towards
graduation. Counselors track their contacts with students through log entries in the ATLAS system.

Hoover has provided opportunities to help more students gain access to scholarships and financial aid. Seniors
are called into the computer labs in January to remind students of the importance of the FAFSA and to begin
the application process. Counselors are available in the computer lab to help with the process. Financial aid
workshops are held after school, in the evening, and on Saturdays for parents and students. Scholarship
information is posted in the career center and is also made available to all senior students as they meet with
their counselor for their senior conference. During their senior conference, seniors are given a senior folder
that includes names, criteria and deadlines for various scholarship opportunities. Binders are also stored in the
office with hardcopy scholarship information.
Over the last few years, there has been a tremendous push to "up draft" our students so that they can be
challenged, engaged, and meet the "A-G" requirements for 4 year colleges. CollegeBoard has partnered with
Fresno Unified School District to provide professional development training to Counselors and teachers within
the last few years. Furthermore, our District has created a Comprehensive Guidance Plan for 7-12 grade
students. Our Comprehensive Guidance Plan covers the 3 National Counseling Standards; Academic, Career
and Personal/Social Counseling.

The counseling department continues to build upon its successes with a cohesive plan that will benefit ALL
students at Hoover HS in 2011-2012. This plan is detailed below.

        1. Counselors will meet with all of their Seniors. Seniors who are "at-risk" due to credit deficiency or
        have yet to pass CAHSEE will have a parent/student conference with their counselor. All Seniors will
        receive a Senior folder with important information pertaining to "A-G" requirements, graduation
        requirements, CSU/UC/Community Colleges information, how to set up an appropriate email account,
        important dates for Seniors throughout the year, scholarship packet, SAT/ACT test dates, as well as
        informational websites that Seniors need to be aware of.

        2. Counselors will meet with all of our "at-risk" Juniors in October and Sophomores in November. We
        will also provide group counseling to all of our Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen by the end of 1st
        semester.

        3. Counseling Academic Computer Lab are available to all of our students every Wednesdays and
        Thursdays at lunch time in room 75 where students can receive help with SAT/ACT registration,
        completing their college application, and etc.

        4. All students at Hoover High will complete the web based CareerCruising by end of 1st semester.
        Each grade level will complete the standards/goals set for their specific grade level.

        5. CSU, UC and FCC application workshops are scheduled for all Seniors during the school day.

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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

        6. In December, the Counseling Team will be working with our American Government and Economics
        teachers to deliver information regarding FAFSA for Seniors.

        7. English Learners are better able to meet a-g requirement with SDAIE courses in all content areas
        and the creation of a faster track for EL students to enroll in English P classes. Previously, students
        moved through 5 levels of ELD classes and now they only take three.

              Critical Area for Follow-Up #6 (Suggested by the Visiting Committee)
      Staff needs to complete the development of standards based benchmark tests and final
                                          examinations.

In the 2006-2007 school year, Fresno Unified started administering Assessments of Critical Standards, ACS,
benchmark assessments in nine core subject areas. As of 2011-2012, there are benchmark assessments in
twelve core subject areas (Algebra, Geometry, English 9, 10 and 11, US History, Modern World History, Biology
and Chemistry). These assessments were developed at the district level by teacher leaders from the core
departments and varied in the number of questions that were given. Testing windows were set based on
district pacing guides to ensure that critical standards are learned prior to the administration of the California
Standards Tests. Results from these assessments are available within 24 hours of scoring on the district AiS
system and teachers can view data on the performance of individual students on assessed standards. AiS
provides several ways for teachers to disaggregate the data as well as administrative opportunities to monitor
student progress on district benchmarks. Tests have been reviewed and revised by district committees as
pacing guides and curriculum have been adjusted. .

As of 2011-2012, all core departments have created common semester final examinations. Teachers have
used sub-release days and scheduled teacher collaboration time to develop and revise final exams.
Departments meet regularly to review the results, refine and modify the assessments as needed and adjust
curriculum for the next year based on test results. Departments are working on the creation of additional
common assessments embedded within the semester. Physical Education has common unit assessments
aligned to their standards and competencies. US History and Modern World History have common standards-
based unit assessments created using the Online Assessment Reporting System (OARS) program. The English
language arts department has begun this process as well, and the ninth grade mathematics teachers often
utilize common chapter/unit tests. The OARs program, along with software provided with district adopted
texts, provides a rich source standards-aligned assessment items for teachers to use when creating common
assessments. The OARS program has the added functionality of allowing teachers to analyze individual student
progress on the tested standards. The use of OARS varies from department to department.

             Critical Area for Follow-Up #7 (Suggested by the Visiting Committee)
  Teachers need to make a clearer connection between the standards, ESLRs, and daily student
                                             work.

In 2006 Hoover teachers began writing daily Learning Goals on their boards in order to make a clear
connection to what students would be learning in class. Since that time, administrators and teachers have
worked through several research-based models (The Skillful Teacher, Learning by Doing, SIOP) to improve their
ability to create and teach to standards-based, significant learning objectives. Teachers received professional
development based on The Skillful Teacher while professional learning for administrators focused on The
Skillful Leader. Hoover staff reviewed and implemented ideas based on Dufour’s professional learning
communities and the work of Robert Marzano and Jay McTighe. The district is in the process of training all
teachers in the SIOP model and the establishment of daily content and language objectives as an essential
element of this instructional approach designed to benefit English Learners. The 2011-2012 Classroom

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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Foundations includes a required daily learning objective. At Hoover HS, the ESLRs have been incorporated into
our daily learning objectives.

Prior administration made the decision to focus on standard-based instruction and minimized a school-wide
focus on ESLRs. As the WASC Self-Study process began last year, the co-chairs participated in WASC training
and were members of WASC Visiting Committees. As a result of these experiences, significant time was spent
in focus groups and home groups revising and updating our ESLRs from 2006. This fall, staff is working
diligently to make up for lost time and infuse the ELSRS in our daily lessons. Staff has received lessons on the
revised ESLRs during 3rd period ZAP and staff has brainstormed ways to connect ESLRs to daily instruction as
part of the work of focus groups this fall and last spring. Classroom observation data from Fall 2011 indicate
that all classes had a stated learning objective and that it was aligned to at least one ESLR.

               Critical Area for Follow-up #8 (Suggested by the Visiting Committee)
   Staff and students need to take a more active role in understanding, interpreting, and using
  results of standards based assessments to plan instruction and support programs to maximize
                                       student achievement.

Hoover HS staff take an active role in understanding, interpreting and using the results of standards-based
assessments. Standards-based assessments such as the district benchmark assessments, department common
final exams, and department common assessments and lessons along with the collaboration time that has
been built into the schedule have provided the means and the opportunity for teaching staff to become more
engaged in this process. Two additional tools that facilitate data analysis by staff include the district’s AiS
system and the OARS program. AiS allows staff to quickly disaggregate benchmark, CAHSEE and CST data
down to the classroom level by standard. When each teacher accesses the website, they view a CST data-
dashboard for their students. During collaboration time, staff reviews progress on SMART goals by analyzing
the results of the benchmark assessments. Teachers have the opportunity to share their individual results and
discuss what they did to teach a particular topic. Plans are made for re-teaching standards and adjusting
lesson plans to improve student achievement. The OARS system provides a database of standards-aligned
multiple choice questions. Teachers create assessments or use existing ones. Results can be scanned and
uploaded for instant analysis by teachers and students in class. Teacher use of OARS varies by department at
this time.

Teachers have also used data to identify their Focus Five students who are in need of additional support to
improve on CSTs. Each teacher designates those five students they feel that can most impact on both an
academic and personal level. Preliminary analysis indicates that this focus has had a positive impact on
student achievement. Academic All-Stars began this year as a way to reward students who made CST gains on
2010-2011. In the past, students who made gains have been rewarded with off-campus lunch privileges and
been entered into raffle drawings.

Administration has used the results of standards-based assessments along with other measures to identify
students for a variety of support programs including CAHSEE interventions, mathematics and English language
arts intervention classes, pre-registration course placement (updrafting into honors or AP courses), and after-
school programs to help students prepare for testing.




                                                                                                               54
 HOOVER HIGH
   SCHOOL




     Chapter 4
Self-Study Findings
Hoover High School                              WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012




                          Category A:
         Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance,
             Leadership and Staff, and Resources
                                     Focus Group Leaders:
                     Mary Estelle Anderson, Teacher on Special Assignment
                               Oliver Valenzuela, WASC Co-Chair

Focus Group Members:

  Name                                           Name
  Lori Grace, Principal                          Debbie Flowers, SPED
  Tim Carey, Athletics                           Theresa Fernandez, SPED
  Greg Boden, Counselor                          Vanessa Richardson, SPED
  Denise Routhier, English                       Sonny Nieto, Instructional Aide
  Patrick Casey, English                         Cathy Lopez, Instructional Aide
  Peter Sharkey, Math                            Yvonne Muller, Instructional Aide
  Raquel Quinto, Math                            Holly Brabeau, Instructional Aide
  Stella Perez, Music                            Julia Casho, Instructional Aide
  Jim O'Brien, PE                                Lee Haroutunian, Instructional Aide
  David Poodry, Science                          Sharon Yemoto, Parent
  Tori Nolen, Social Science                     Nathan Munoz, Student
  Al Frausto, SPED                               Ia Thao, Student
  Christina Nelson, SPED                         Christina Valle, Student




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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


A1: To what extent a) does the school have a clearly stated vision or purpose based on its student needs,
current educational research and the belief that all students can achieve high levels and b) is the school's
purpose supported by the governing board and the central administration and further defined by expected
schoolwide learning results and the academic standards?

Findings/Narrative                                                                         Evidence
Hoover’s vision statement reads as follows: “An enduring community of learners              2005 WASC self-
where every student succeeds at high levels, and where every teacher, administrator,           study document
parent, and staff member gives and receives on-going support.” In 2008-2009 the
Hoover Administrative Leadership Organization (HALO) was formed. This group began           Mission and
studying the work on Professional Learning Communities by Rick and Becky DuFour.             Vision Statement
As a part of that process the group revised the Hoover Mission and Vision. HALO met
and developed a draft and then it went out to departments for feedback. With some
minor revisions, it was approved in a later HALO meeting. As a part of reviewing the
school mission and vision, in 2011-2012, every faculty and staff member completed a
5 year vision document that was compiled and compared to the current school
mission and vision.

The school’s mission statement is as follows: “Provide a positive environment that
inspires students to grow as individuals, as learners, and as citizens.” This statement,
developed in the spring and summer and finalized in the fall of 2005, is the result of
input and discussion by the entire staff. Staff believes this articulates the purpose of
the school to meet our current needs, keeping in mind the idea that the vision
statement should be student-friendly. Hoover offers a variety of programs to fulfill the    ESLRs Poster
vision statement to further student achievement at all levels.

The ESLRs were created, which are the actions implemented in conjunction with the
mission statement that would foster student achievement. The ESLRs were originally
developed in 2005-2006 from an earlier version used in the previous self-study and
revised in the spring of 2010. The ESLRs are as follows:

        HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL’S EXPECTED SCHOOL-WIDE LEARNING RESULTS

College and Career Ready Graduates who

       Meet the State / National Standards.
       Read, comprehend, and write about information from various sources.
       Strive and achieve at our highest potential.
       Work collaboratively while establishing and accomplishing objectives.

Critical Thinkers who
       Find solutions to problems by using a variety of sources and strategies.
       Use application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation to communicate our
        learning.
       Select and apply appropriate strategies, tools, and technologies for a specific
        learning task.


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Hoover High School                                           WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Effective Communicators who
       Write and speak appropriately to the topic and audience.
                                                                                          Focus Group
       Speak confidently within a group and to an audience.
                                                                                           meeting notes,
       Listen effectively and respectfully.
                                                                                           agenda and
                                                                                           documentation
Responsible Citizens who

       Demonstrate caring, tolerance, respect, and empathy for our diverse school
        and community.
       Behave appropriately and ethically in the work, social, and academic
        environment.
       Demonstrate a basic knowledge of our civic duties.                                Copy of FUSD
       Resolve conflicts through positive, non-violent actions.                           Core Beliefs and
       Respect the property of others.                                                    Commitments
       Practice and maintain appropriate hygiene, proper nutrition, and physical          documents
        fitness.

Self-Directed Learners who

       Create and pursue educational, vocational, and personal goals.
       Engage actively in learning experiences.
       Value and reflect upon learning experiences.                                      Copy of Board
       Exhibit personal independence.                                                     Policy 0100
       Actively participate in co-curricular activities such as clubs, music, etc.        related to the
       Behave in ways that aid in our own personal growth.                                Theory of Action
                                                                                           and Aligned
Technological Learners who                                                                 Instructional
                                                                                           System
       Use technology at appropriate times and for identified purposes.
       Use social technology in safe and respectful ways.                                Copy of Board
       Understand the ethical responsibility when using technology for personal,          Policy 0300
        professional, and academic use.                                                    related to the
                                                                                           Professional
Hoover HS has engaged in several reviews of the mission, vision and ESLRs since the        Learning
last self-study. In 2006 the Hoover HS staff reviewed the ESLRs to offer revisions and
to discuss student competencies of the ESLRs. In 2010 the Hoover HS staff                 Copy of Board
brainstormed on how to bring the mission and vision to life. In 2011 in preparation        Policy 0201
for the Focus On Learning process, the administrative team led the staff through a         related to the
review of the mission, vision and ESLRs to bring focus to the self-study process. Each     Data Dashboard
focus group began the self-study process by spending the first month reviewing the
mission, vision and ESLRs and deciding within each focus group whether or not to
change these documents. Each focus group concluded to keep the mission, vision and
ESLRs in place with minor revisions. Additionally, our focus groups began to
brainstorm concrete evidence that would demonstrate how students have progressed
toward attaining the ESLRs.

The Fresno Unified School District Board of Education has established Core Beliefs and
Commitments and four overarching goals that are designed to directly support all
                                                                                                            58
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

FUSD schools including Hoover High School. These goals and policies set high
expectations, and prepare students, for college and the world of work.




Board Policies have been established in the following four areas to support the
growth and improvement of all schools including Hoover High School they are:
   1) Aligned Instructional System
   2) Theory of Action
   3) Professional Learning
   4) Data Dashboard

These Board policies are designed to support school sites in implementing and
monitoring high quality programs that produce results in the classroom, and the tools
mentioned in the last paragraph are used to make sure that what is being done in the
classroom is true to the school’s vision.

A1 Strengths
     The Hoover HS staff participates in the review and revision of the mission, vision and ESLRs
     FUSD has established policies that support Hoover HS in implementing the instructional changes
       necessary to improve teaching and learning
     Fresno Unified has established goals focused on student achievement and engagement that support
       Hoover HS in its improvement efforts

A1 Areas for Growth
    Make sure that there are clear, articulated expectations defining how students attain competency in
       the ESLRs
    Clearly defined criteria that outline student achievement of the ESLRs
    Annual review of the mission, vision and ESLRs and development of ESLR competency for students to

                                                                                                           59
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        achieve in conjunction with the review of the SPSA (Single Plan for Student Achievement)


A2: To what extent does the governing board have policies and bylaws that are aligned with the school’s
purpose and support the achievement of the expected school-wide learning results and academic standards
based on data-driven instructional decision for the school?
To what extent does the governing board delegate implementation of these policies to the profession staff?
To what extent does the governing board regularly monitor results and approve the single school-wide
action plan and its relationship to the Local Education Association (LEA) plan?

Findings/Narrative                                                                        Evidence
The Fresno Unified School Board works with the superintendent to assess the needs of
the district and continually evaluate the effectiveness of initiatives that have been      FUSD website
implemented. Additionally, the Board holds workshops where they review current data
indicators to ensure that FUSD goals are in line with students’ educational needs.
There are four key board policies that have been implemented to support decision-
making at the school site and increased student achievement.

Aligned Instructional System




The FUSD Board policy that focuses on creating an Aligned Instructional System is a
comprehensive theory of action. This theory is at the heart of our belief that FUSD        CSTP
must be redesigned to support its core business of teaching and learning in the most        documentation
efficient and effective way possible. The core of the FUSD Aligned Instructional System
focuses on the classroom. Foundational to this system is the alignment of student
content standards and the California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP),
purposeful assessments, intense and specific planning, and effective targeted
instruction.                                                                               Alignment
The key elements of the FUSD aligned instructional system are:                              checklist for
                                                                                            lessons
                                                                                                            60
Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

    o   Standards based- this includes but is not limited to the California state content
        standards for students, CSTP, and the Fresno Unified standards for leaders.
    o   Purposeful Assessments – any challenging district curriculum must be
        supported by classroom based assessments of and for learning.
               o Intense and Specific Planning – based on assessment for learning,
                    great attention must be paid to every student’s unique learning            Copy of the
                    needs.                                                                      California
               o Effective Targeted Instruction – based on assessment and planning,             Standards for
                    powerful instructional approaches should be used, maximizing                the Teaching
                    teacher expertise and creativity.                                           Profession

The Aligned Instructional System commitment outlines that all students will be
supported in reaching their individual educational goals. Each and every student will
learn the same standards, but when necessary, reach them using differentiated time,
resources, and approaches. Leadership and accountability at all levels are essential.
Leadership is not attached to specific roles or official titles. Actions that demonstrate
leadership are expected from everyone. We support risk-taking and learning from
setbacks in our support of success. Accountability is defined as being responsible to
peers and colleagues in the pursuit of learning. All learners take responsibility for their
learning. This includes students, teachers, staff, administrators, parents, families,
community, Superintendent and Board. There are content and performance
standards for all learners.

Theory of Action
This Theory of Action focuses on the need for a significant increase in support for all,
through:
     Building capacity for all learners.
            o Professional development
            o System capacity
            o Infrastructure
     Engaging to collaborate
     Directing resources where required
     Piloting new ideas
     Empowering schools will follow demonstrated performance

The Board recognized the need for dramatic changes and improvements throughout
the entire system and that it is necessary to increase the expectations of all learners.
This work is about significantly improving opportunities for all learners and is outlined      Copy of
in the FUSD Board Policy called the “Theory of Action.”                                         secondary
The “Theory of Action” specifies that change will be deliberate and intentional.                professional
Establishing and operating an effective, Aligned Instructional System is not simply             learning
making the current system work better. The roles and responsibilities of every FUSD             offerings for
employee and community member and all processes related to our core business of                 the 2011-2012
teaching and learning will need to be reviewed. Accordingly, effective change                   school year
management leadership by all, supported by a comprehensive internal and external
communication system, will be required.                                                        Copies of the
It is the intention and commitment of the Board that the Theory of Action provides a            Site and
stable, long-term framework for improving student achievement in the Fresno Unified             District Data
School District.                                                                                Dashboard

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Professional Learning
The purpose of this policy is to support the Fresno Unified Board Policies. As a result of
the establishment of the Professional Learning policy, professional learning is now
more than just professional development. Professional learning is centered on
empowering employees to engage in continuous improvement and extend learning
throughout the entire district. In a well-functioning school district, professional
learning is part of a seamless process of tightly linked instruction and improvement for  Snapshot of AiS
adults and children.                                                                       main page
In order for professional learning to work as a cumulative learning process, it has to be
connected to the practice of improvement. Improvement is a discipline that requires
focus, knowledge, persistence and consistency over time.

Data Dashboard
The purpose of the FUSD data dashboard is to establish the strategic indicators that
                                                                                          Hoover HS
the Superintendent will regularly use to communicate progress and improvement to
                                                                                           WASC action
the Governing Board and public.
                                                                                           plan
These indicators provide a snapshot of the operational health of the District and
                                                                                          Single Plan for
progress towards the Boards strategic goals. The data dashboard enables our
                                                                                           Student
stakeholders to monitor District performance.
                                                                                           Achievement
The purpose of the data dashboard policy is to improve the oversight and                  FUSD website
communication of District performance. This is supported by the Board adopted              with FUSD
policies on Core Beliefs and Commitments, Theory of Action and Management                  Goals and
Oversight.                                                                                 Board Meeting
                                                                                           posting
Data Dashboard: monitoring results and performance improvement
The governing board regularly reviews demographic and performance data to ensure
that all students are being afforded an education that is moving them towards higher
levels of academic achievement. The FUSD School Board holds regular open door
meetings where they provide opportunities for public comments and concerns to be
addressed. In addition, school board members frequently visit the Hoover HS campus
to ensure that FUSD goals are in line with site needs. Decisions about curriculum and
instruction are made by administration and others involved with the learning team on
campus, based on achievement data provided by the district office and available to
teachers and staff. Needless to say, FUSD leadership has worked diligently with the
office of Research, Evaluation and Assessment to provide teachers with a web-based
student data information system called Assessment Information System (AiS).
The school board uses quarterly benchmark assessment results as well as state
assessments to monitor student achievement results. At board meetings, the associate
superintendent of secondary education reports to the board on academic progress
being made by the district. Our School Board monitors results and annually approves
the Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA) and its relationship to the District
Improvement Action Plan (DIAP). Each year the School Site Council reviews
achievement data and provides input for the school and the School Board reviews.
The Board of Education is actually involved in monitoring the single school-wide plan.
The Single Plan is written in a manner that outlines actions that align to each of the
four FUSD goals. The SPSA is also written to ensure alignment with the WASC action
plan. Following the development of the SPSA at the school site by school
administration, the Instructional Leadership Team and the School Site Council, it is
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reviewed by a panel of administrators at the central office level. These administrators
provide specific feedback to ensure tight alignment of the plan to the Board Core
Beliefs and Commitments. Following this revie, the revised SPSA is submitted to the
Board of Education where it is reviewed and approved.


A2 Strengths
     FUSD leadership utilizes data-driven decision-making through the use of the data dashboard
     School board approves school site action plans (SPSA)
     District leadership personnel report academic progress to the Board
     FUSD Board delegates implementation of initiatives to district leaders and site leadership

A2 Areas for Growth
    Provide increased opportunities for staff to assess the school’s progress according to Data Dashboard
       indicators
    Provide specific training to the staff on the district action plan and provide venues to gather greater
       staff input to the Single Plan for Student Achievement to ensure that all staff understand what
       actions are expected be implemented
    The Single Plan for Student Achievement should be written in alignment with the Hoover HS WASC
       action plan to create an umbrella plan for school improvement


A3: To what extent, based on student achievement data, does the school leadership and staff, make
decisions and initiate activities that focus on all students achieving the Expected School-wide Learning
Results and academic standards?
To what extent does the school leadership and staff annually monitor and refine the single school-wide
action plan based on analysis of data to ensure alignment with student needs?

Findings/Narrative                                                                    Evidence
Data drives instruction at Hoover High School. The Hoover HS administrative and        Institute Days
teaching teams are focused on the analysis and synthesis of student achievement           Agendas
data to monitor programs and progress.
Prior to the beginning of each school year, site administrators analyze
standardized assessment information to identify areas of strength and areas of         Institute Days
academic need. The results of standardized assessment data analysis are used in         Powerpoint
the following three ways:

       To drive instructional decision-making at the leadership level                 Classrooms have
       To drive the creation and implementation of action plans to address             posted mission and
        assessed areas of need                                                          vision posters
       Work with Accountable Community lead teachers and Department Chairs
        to craft professional development to address assessed areas of strength
        and weakness.

All content area teachers at Hoover HS are expected to teach in support of the
California Content Standards, ESLRs, and utilize research-based practices and          Hoover HS Bell
instructional strategies. One of the commitments that Hoover HS has made to             schedule noting
increase student ownership of the learning process is for teachers to post and          collaboration
explicitly state daily learning objectives.                                             schedule
                                                                                                             63
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


Hoover High School has intentionally designed the bell schedule to incorporate
teacher collaboration days. During these collaboration times, staff members meet      School Site Council
to discuss increasing student academic performance and providing access and            agenda outlining
opportunities to engage students in a rigorous academic experience. The School         meeting when
Site Council (SSC) annually reviews achievement data to create a viable plan that      student
focuses on improving learning and increasing the opportunities for all students to     achievement data is
achieve Hoover HS’ ESLRs.                                                              reviewed

The Single Plan for Student Achievement exists as the umbrella plan to guide all      School Site Council
school improvement initiatives in alignment with student achievement data. The         meeting minutes
SSC, made up of teachers, students, staff, and parents meets at least quarterly.
Central to the discussions and agenda of this body are data, meeting the needs of     Department Chair
all students and narrowing the achievement gap. The SSC is dedicated to                meeting agendas,
increasing student performance through programs that develop students socially,        Accountable
emotionally, behaviorally and academically.                                            Community Lead
                                                                                       Teacher Meeting
In addition to the SSC providing feedback and gathering information about the          Agendas, notes and
school’s progress, department chairs and Accountable Community Lead teachers           handouts
meet every month with the Principal to discuss benchmark results, academic
issues, upcoming tests, curriculum, and best practices. Department chairs             AVID Certification
communicate the results of this meeting with department members during                 Document
department business meetings.
                                                                                      School Site Council
Hoover’s student achievement data is presented to the School Site Council (SSC),       meeting minutes
highlighting critical academic needs. This information helps the SSC determine         focused on
how to allocate resources to best meet the need of our students. . At Hoover, we       allocating resources
have included such interventions as adding courses for students, tutorials during      to support students
and after school, Men’s Alliance, pull out programs for CAHSEE, and AVID               with CAHSEE, CST
program. As a result, funds were allocated and our AVID program was certified for      and increasing
the first time in 2009-10.                                                             English Learner
                                                                                       student
School leadership and staff utilize the FUSD Assessment information System (AiS)       performance
to monitor student achievement on state and local assessments. Data reports are
generated for each subject level by the FUSD Office of Research, Evaluation and       AiS page hits report
Assessment. Additionally, site leaders can review subject area, grade level and
classroom level performance data regularly to monitor student progress toward
proficiency. AiS data is a vital component of the master schedule development
process. Counselors, teachers and administrators review past and present
performance data to determine the most rigorous and challenging course of study
for each student. Student achievement data is compiled from AiS and shared with
the English Learner Advisory Committee, School Site Council, Board of Education
and Secondary Education Division to ensure that all stakeholders are made aware
of the school’s progress.

A3 Strengths
     The Single Plan for Student Achievement serves as an umbrella plan which determines allocation of
       resources to support the implementation of the Hoover HS WASC action plan
     The School Site Council reviews student achievement and performance data to reallocate resources
       in support of identified areas of need
                                                                                                              64
Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

       Site administrators and faculty analyze student performance data prior to the beginning of the
        school year to determine the site focus for instructional improvement, SMART goals, and
        professional learning opportunities
       The School Site Council represents staff, parents, students, and community members
       Student achievement reports which assist teachers in reviewing and analyzing student progress are
        generated by the Office of Research, Evaluation and Assessment

A3 Areas for Growth
    While the School Site Council reviews student achievement data, it is important for them to
       participate in the actual analysis and synthesis of student achievement data
    More in-services on the data-driven process, more inclusive of the teacher
    More in-services concerning the interpretation of available data

A4: To what extent does a qualified staff facilitate achievement of the academic standards and the ESLRs
through a system of preparation, induction, and ongoing professional development?


Findings/Narrative                                                                 Evidence
Hoover has a highly qualified staff, according to the “No Child Left Behind Act”    Human Resources list
of 2001. To foster the growth of all staff on campus, professional                     of teacher credentials
development opportunities are available the week prior to the start of school,         and subject areas
during mandatory Institute day, and during teacher collaboration days held          CBEDS Teacher NCLB
throughout the year. In addition, there are many opportunities for staff               Compliance Report
members to grow professionally by attending summer and winter workshops             CDE Dataquest report
and seminars.                                                                          on teacher education
                                                                                       level
Part of Hoover’s commitment to teacher development includes the extensive           Professional learning
training provided to all first year teachers through the Beginning Teacher             schedule
Support and Assessment (BTSA) program. This program offers new, as well as          Sample BTSA teacher
continuing teachers, on-campus observations and support, workshops, and                workshop schedule
partnership teaching projects where teachers share lessons and expertise.           BTSA and PAR Program
                                                                                       overview
They also exchange ideas while coming together in separate disciplines to           ATLAS information
offer a more enriched learning environment for students. The BTSA program              sheet and FAQ
includes an induction component to ensure that new teachers are compliant              information
with legislation outlined in SB2042 and are proficient in the California State      ATLAS screenshot
Teacher Induction Standards. FUSD also provides new and veteran teachers            ATLAS list of reports
support through the Peer Assistance and Review board (PAR). Both the BTSA              available
and PAR programs focus on increasing the effectiveness of teachers and both         Capturing Kids Hearts
demonstrate the ways in which FUSD support and focus on adopting and                Discipline in the
practicing instructional methods across the district to meet the educational           Secondary Classroom
needs of all students.                                                              Priority Plus, Diploma
                                                                                       English, Diploma Math
The ATLAS student information system, introduced to FUSD in the Fall of 2010        SIOP Training
and developed specifically for Fresno Unified in partnership with Microsoft,        Departmental In-
provides FUSD employees with a comprehensive student information system                services
and data warehouse that can be accessed through one program instead of              AC Collaborative
utilizing multiple programs. ATLAS provides the Hoover HS staff with the               Lesson Plan
ability to monitor student progress and past performance to increase student           Development
awareness of academic progress.                                                     AVID Subject Area
                                                                                                                65
Hoover High School                                           WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                                                                                        Training

A4 Strengths
     Hoover HS teachers participate in the BTSA and/or PAR programs for support
     Microsoft partnership has resulted in the development of a new student information system, called
       ATLAS, which is designed specifically to meet the needs of FUSD
     New teachers benefit from a system of support through the induction program which helps them
       develop effective teaching practices
     Hoover HS has established the workshops to support teachers in developing effective teaching
       practices
     NCLB highly qualified staff

A4 Areas for Growth
    Implement a systematic, long range professional development plan for classified and certificated
       staff
    Implement a staff needs assessment for professional development

A5: To what extent are leadership and staff involved in ongoing research or data-based correlated
professional development that focuses on identified student learning needs?


Findings/Narrative                                                                     Evidence
During the 2007-2008 school year, FUSD began “Secondary Support                             Co-Admin
Administrators Training”, which provides monthly trainings for assistant                      Meeting Agenda
principals, vice principals, and program managers. During the 2008-2009 school
year these began being called “co-administrator meetings”. These meetings are
aligned with the FUSD leadership standards and the California Professional                 FUSD Leadership
Standards for Educational Leaders. The training focuses on the implementation               standards
of research-based leadership strategies, the refinement of knowledge to
increase the effectiveness of schools, oversee the appropriate allocation of
                                                                                           Start on Time
resources, and to drive student achievement initiatives.
                                                                                            flyer
In 2009-10, Hoover High School implemented the initial phases of its Safe and
                                                                                           Roster of
Civil Schools training. A team of certificated, classified, and Administrative staff
                                                                                            Attendees for
attended the cohort training given by Dr. Randy Sprick. Safe and Civil Schools
                                                                                            Discipline in the
initial training focused on the common areas of the school. “Start on Time” was
                                                                                            Secondary
the focus of the implementation. This initiative was to reduce tardiness for all
                                                                                            Classroom
periods of the school day. Additionally, teachers were given the opportunitiy to
attend Discipline in the Secondary Classroom. This was a class for teachers to
learn about effective classroom management at the secondary level. This
seminar was part of the Safe and Civil Schools program.
                                                                                           Capturing Kids
In summer 2011, approximately 20 members of the Hoover Staff attended the
                                                                                            Hearts Training
Capturing Kids Hearts Conference. This program is a professional training
                                                                                            Agenda
program to assist the teachers in classroom management and developing
student teacher relationships. This is the first year that Hoover High School has
implemented this program.

In an effort to bring about an aligned instructional system, all FUSD employees

                                                                                                                66
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involved in the instructional process have implemented the Three Phase Lesson
Design as outlined in the book, “Better Learning Through Structured Teaching”
by Fisher and Frey. “Lesson Design” has helped teachers refine their planning
skills. This ensures instruction is aligned with the needs of the students and the
targeted areas of instruction of critical standards. This is a significant part of the
entire planning-teaching process, the alignment of curriculum with the needs of
our students.

A recent addition to teacher development opportunities has been training for
                                                                                          A-G progress
teachers who have been selected to teach Corrective Reading. This training is
                                                                                           monitoring
demonstrating measurable results. The direct instruction approach appears to
                                                                                           report from Beta
be a good fit for the corrective reading student attending Hoover HS and the
                                                                                           tool
staff members that teach this course have all been given intensive instruction
and support.

Hoover HS students benefit from a diverse array of course selections that match
the ability of each student—all designed to foster the development of effective
communicators and complex thinkers. There are a number of Advanced
Placement courses being taught, including: Calculus, Statistics, English
Literature, English Language, U.S. History, American Government, European
History, and Human Geography. In addition to advanced classes, Hoover HS
provides remediation opportunities for students that are scheduled within the
school day including CAHSEE intervention courses, Corrective Reading Courses,
and Algebra intervention. Students are also able to recover credits through the
APEX on-line learning program scheduled within the school day. Summer School
is also schedule for students who have received grades below a C in their core
content classes. In Summer 2010, CyberHigh online courses were made
available for students for credit recovery. These courses were held in the
evening after summer school classes.

A5 Strengths
     Professional learning opportunities available for teaching and administration staff
     Research-based professional learning including the implementation of training in the Three Phase
       Lesson Design protocol
     Counselors engage in training utilizing the Beta Tool which provides support for transcript analysis,
       A-G progress, and monitor students with potential for success in accelerated courses
     Supportive administrative team with regards to staff development
     Master schedule that is developed using data driven placement
     Master schedule that adheres to the vision statement for Hoover HS creating equity in opportunity
       and access for all students
A5 Areas for Growth
     Consistent examination of course offerings by staff to ensure fidelity of courses in relation to vision
       statement
     Continue improving student progress toward A-G completion through targeted counseling and
       school wide support plan

A6: To what extent are the human, material, physical, and financial resources sufficient and utilized
effectively and appropriately in accordance with the legal intent of the program(s) to support students in
accomplishing the academic standards and the ESLRs?

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Findings/Narrative                                                                  Evidence
FUSD has introduced a rigorous screening process to select and assign possible           Hoover HS
candidates to open teaching positions. New teacher candidates are carefully                Budget
screened by the Human Resources department through a rigorous interview                    allocation page
process to ensure that each is highly qualified by verifying prior employment              (2010-2011)
and credential information. Part of this screening involves the taking of a              Certificated staff
teacher insight survey, which was developed by Gallup, to help determine the               roster
suitability of a candidate for the teaching environment they are about to enter.         Classified staff
Once this process is complete, the applicant is placed on a list that is given to          roster
each principal, who assigns a panel of department chairs to interview                    Human
prospective teachers. This process ensures that Hoover HS receives candidates              Resources
who are NCLB highly qualified.                                                             Website
                                                                                           Application
In addition to a rigorous hiring process implemented by FUSD, Hoover                       Procedures
effectively supports the nurturing of highly qualified teachers. Professional
development at Hoover HS has focused on three areas in the past several years:          CBEDS teacher
research-based instructional strategies, data driven instruction, and campus             education report
culture and environment. The entire Hoover HS staff shares a collective sense of
responsibility for student outcomes. The principal also meets during the year           Professional
with new teachers to provide support and feedback.                                       development
                                                                                         agenda
One of the key documents which delineates the financial resources available to
Hoover is the Single Plan for Student Achievement. This document provides a             Hoover HS Single
line item description of what funds are available and how they are allocated.            Plan for Student
This document makes it very clear that Hoover funds available positively impact          Achievement
the students and programs on campus. During the development of the SPSA,
                                                                                        Hoover HS
the certificated members of the SSC met with the faculty to identify needs. This
                                                                                         School Site
feedback is directly related to the final budget approved by the SSC.
                                                                                         Council roster


A6 Strengths
     The SPSA is utilized to align resources to meet the schools hiring needs
     Systematic approach to hiring and retaining highly qualified staff members
     The Hoover HS School Site Council takes an active role in monitoring the school’s allocation of
       categorical funds
     Support of new teachers by implementing a “new staff” professional learning program and periodic
       meetings with the principal

A6 Areas for Growth
    A regular feedback loop to staff regarding the use of categorical funds, and current levels of funding
       available for use in securing additional instructional resources
    Implement a professional learning plan that provides structure for supporting all staff




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Hoover High School                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012




                               Category B:
                     Standards-Based Student Learning
                               Curriculum
                              Focus Group Leaders:
                          Wendy DenBesten, WASC Co-Chair
                                Curtis Sisk, Teacher

Focus Group Members:

  Name                                   Name
  Chris Gage, ATS                        Aleyda Ruvalcaba, World Languages
  Lynn Habib, Consumer Family Studies    John Mayes, Instructional Aide
  Mony Ward, Counselor                   Bryan Medina, Instructional Aide
  Celeste Curcio, English                Barbara Oaxaca, Instructional Aide
  Mark Sanchez, English                  Caroline Barsamian, Instructional Aide
  Janice Hallaian. Library               Earlene Starnes, Instructional Aide
  Stacey Faught Math                     Maria Lealaimatafao, Instructional Aide
  Brian Bellis, Science                  Laura Ross, Parent
  Brant Brazill, Social Science          Jamile Acfalle, Student
  Megan Park, Social Science             David Munoz, Student
  Debbie Hoe, SPED                       Regina Zamora, Student
  Ken Pruse, SPED
  Michael Hill, SPED
  John Baker, Tech Ed/ROP




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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012


B1. To what extent do all students participate in a rigorous, relevant, and coherent standards-based
curriculum that supports the achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide
learning results? [Through standards-based learning (i.e., what is taught and how it is taught), the
expected schoolwide learning results are accomplished.].

Findings/Narrative                                                                      Evidence/Data
Hoover HS provides a standards-based, rigorous and meaningful curriculum to         CA Standards and
all students. All core courses taught at Hoover HS are aligned with the                Frameworks
California Content Frameworks and nearly all courses are designated as                Master Schedule
college prep. In addition to experiencing a curriculum whose foundations are
the California Standards and Framework, students at Hoover HS learn and               Department Binders
apply the skills and strategies of the Expected School-wide Learning Results          Course Pacing Guides
(ESLRs): College and Career Ready Graduate, Critical Thinker, Effective               District-Adopted
Communicator, Responsible Citizen, Self-Directed Learner and Technological             Textbooks
Learner in their core classes and electives. The California Content Standards
and the ESLRs form the basis of the curriculum students experience during           Hoover HS ESLRs
their four years of high school.


Through a district-wide study focusing on creating academic equity and access
for all students, administrative staff at Hoover HS worked with district leaders    a-g Beta Tool
to examine master schedules, bell schedules, teaching assignments and
number or preps, a-g completion rates and Advanced Placement (AP)
participation rates. This study resulted in district-wide programmatic changes
designed to updraft students into more rigorous coursework to create more
college and career ready graduates.


At Hoover HS, these changes have resulted in more students enrolling in and
                                                                                    Master Schedule
completing rigorous high school coursework to provide them access to a
broader range of post-secondary options. Specifically, Hoover HS has added
three new AP courses (Human Geography, European History, Environmental
Science) and increased the numbers of students enrolling in AP courses. In
science, all ninth graders now begin with biology and move into either
physics, chemistry or zoology as 10th graders to meet UC a-g science
requirements. Increased numbers of students enroll in foreign language
classes to address college entrance requirements as well, with Hoover adding        AP Enrollment Data
five sections of Mandarin Chinese when the ACE Magnet began in 2006-2007.
Students in the magnet program or those attending CART are enrolled in              CART Enrollment
Career Technical Education (CTE) courses that also qualify as college-prep.
English Learners (EL) enroll in 3 levels of English Language Development (ELD)      Magnet Enrollment
instruction instead of 5 to provide more timely access to college-prep English
courses. Special Education students are deployed into mainstream classes to
provide a least-restrictive environment for their learning per their IEP.
                                                                                    Department Binders
All core courses as well as Foreign Language, Physical Education, Fine Arts,           for Standards and
Architecture, Construction, Engineering (ACE) Magnet, and Consumer Family              Pacing Guides
Science classes have a rigorous set of standards. These standards guide the
selection and development of curriculum within each course and establish a
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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

framework for instruction and assessment. In accordance with the district’s       Classroom
Classroom Foundations, every teacher at Hoover HS posts daily objectives and        Foundations
standards that are in alignment with the ESLRs. Teacher collaboration time          Document
focuses on aligning instruction and assessment to pacing and curriculum
guides, the development of common lessons and assessments, and ensuring
that all students regardless of the course or teacher have access to a            District Testing
consistent, rigorous and relevant curriculum. The pacing and curriculum             Calendar
guides align to district benchmark testing calendars in core subjects and         Walk-Through
administrators monitor instruction aligned to curriculum through their regular      Observation Form
walk-through observations.

All ELA courses are aligned to CA standards and the district curriculum map.      Department Binders
The department has further aligned instruction by creating a Hoover HS
pacing guide based for each course on the standards and district curriculum
maps. Teachers administer the district benchmarks in English I, II and III and
common assessments (usually final exams) that were created by the
department. The department is in the process of creating more common
assessment per quarter. The district adopted text is McDougall-Littell and
various other literary works are incorporated to further provide standards-
based instruction. Novels are selected per grade level from the district-
approved reading lists.

All mathematics courses at Hoover HS are aligned to CA standards and district
curriculum documents. Mathematics teachers meet regularly in accountable
communities to discuss pacing, lesson design and assessment results to plan
for reteaching. Part of the work of the communities in the past was the
creation of common final exams. Each year, the department reviews and
updates these exams as needed. As staff and teaching assignments have
changed, department members are using the time in accountable
communities to assist new teachers with lesson design and planning. These
efforts are supported by the department chairperson, lead teachers in
Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2 and the on-site instructional coach who is
a credentialed mathematics teacher as well as SIOP trainer. The district
benchmarks in Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2 have also helped the
department to provide instruction aligned to key standards and to plan for
reteaching as needed based on these results. SMART goals developed at the
beginning of 2011-2012 that relate to particular standards are reviewed and
analyzed periodically with teachers planning curriculum to address those
goals.

The social science department utilizes curriculum and textbooks aligned to
the CA standards and has also dramatically expanded AP opportunities for
students at all grade levels. All AP courses syllabi have been approved
through the College Board’s AP Audit process guaranteeing a rigorous
curriculum aligned to the course standards. Since the 2006 WASC Self-Study,
the social science department has added AP European History for tenth grade
as an alternative to World History and AP Human Geography as a ninth grade
elective for students. The numbers of students enrolled in AP US History and
AP Government have also increased. Staff members engage students in

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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

higher-level thinking through frequent use of Data-Based Questions and
project-based learning. Government students have opportunities to gain real
world experience through guest speakers and volunteering at polling places
during election years. Through the work of the accountable communities,
department members are creating standards-based common final
examinations and unit/chapter assessments and sharing curriculum on a
regular basis.

All Science courses at Hoover are aligned to CA standards and district pacing
maps to guide subject matter taught in the classes. Each discipline (Biology,
Chemistry and Physics) develops themes to revolve around the subject matter
in the pacing maps to help form connections between the different topics.
 Biology for example often connects its lessons to the overall theme of Natural
History and within that theme examines the levels of organization from
molecules to ecosystems. Accountable Communities meet regularly as a
department and by discipline to construct common lessons and assessments
and review data from both formative and summative assessments which is
used to drive instruction. Laboratory activities are designed in AC’s to give
common hands on experience, provide additional exposure and allow
students to teach each other and develop problem solving skills that support
their ability to succeed in areas of Investigation and Experimentation on the
benchmark exams and CST’s. Science teachers often collaborate outside the
school day and share time and labor required to gather materials to put
together presentations, activities and laboratory activities. In addition to
lessons and assessments, goals are set both for the entire department and the
individual AC’s (Smart Goals – 2011) revolving around student success as seen
on Benchmark exams and CST’s. This year, one focus is to examine ways in
which we as a group can address what happens when students don’t succeed
and develop a plan or plans to support them so they will.

The World Languages and Culture department meet during scheduled
collaboration times and meetings are aligned to the critical Classroom
Foundations questions which provides for meaningful discussion about what
students know and are able to do as a result of daily instruction. The
department also meets outside of scheduled collaboration time to work
specifically on the Spanish I curriculum. The Spanish II teachers work closely
on a regular basis to align curriculum. All courses use the district-adopted
textbooks which to the California Foreign Language Standards and
Framework. Overarching goals for students are fluency in speaking, listening,
reading and writing either Spanish or Chinese as well as developing an
appreciation for the target culture.

The Special Day Class (SDC) students use two vocational curricula: Vocation
Special Occupations Program (VSOP) and Steps to Employment Pathways
(STEPS). In ELA, SDC students are using the Corrective Reading Program as
well to help bring students up grade level standards. In mathematics,
students not yet performing at grade-level enroll in a course called Intro to
Algebra and Geometry which is using the VMATH program. They have also
used Passport to Algebra and Geometry curriculum.

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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

The autistic program uses a program called Model Me Conversations to
facilitate and teach students communication skills and the Circles Program to
help them with social issues. IEP Goals and Objectives for these students are
guided by the SCERTS (Social, Communicative, Emotional, Regulation,
Transitional Support). These students are often mainstreamed into regular
education classes for standards-based, grade-level instruction per their IEP.

The Functional Skills and Orthopedically Impaired students who are not on a
diploma track are provided the SEACO program that develops their skills and
abilities to be able to functionally live on their own after high school. This
curricula focuses on the areas of home living, recreation and leisure,
community, health and family and vocational skills. Orthopedically Impaired
students who are either SDC or regular education follow core content
guidelines based on their IEP placement.

As part of the WASC/CDE Self-Study process, staff at Hoover HS gathered
evidence to demonstrate the implementation of a standards-based
curriculum and the ESLRs. Teachers, students and parents were surveyed,
teachers conducted a total of 80 classroom observations, and each teacher
was asked to submit a lesson snapshot and accompanying samples of student
work.


Survey data indicate that a majority of teachers feel graded assignments in
                                                                                  WASC Teacher Survey
their classes are aligned to ESLRs, standards and daily goals and learning
objectives. To a somewhat lesser degree, teachers think that they make the
connection between classroom instruction and ESLRs, standards and daily
goals and learning objectives clear to students.


             2012 Teacher Survey Results—Curriculum Alignment
                     Percent Responding Usually or Always
                                 Daily Goals   Standards    ESLRs
                                     and
                                 Objectives
 In my classroom, I think that      90%          86%         62%
 graded assignments are
 aligned to…
 In my classroom, I think that      89%          72%         50%
 I clearly connect instruction
 to…


An analysis of the classroom observation data shows that all classrooms
                                                                                  WASC Classroom
                                                                                    Observation Summary
provided instructional aligned to ESLRs and appropriate grade-level standards.
Observers noted that students were engaged in the lesson, that technology
was frequently used by teachers to enhance the content of their lessons and
lessons provided for frequent checking for understanding. All of these
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Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

instructional decisions by teachers support student engagement in and
achievement of the standards and over-arching ESLRs.


Lesson snapshot data indicate a variety of lessons designed to engage              WASC Lesson
students in a rich, viable curriculum. A summary of the lesson snapshot data        Snapshots
is provided below for core subjects.


A review of English Language Arts lessons showed that all lessons were based
on grade level appropriate standards and that students were engaged in
higher-order thinking in most lessons. Students analyzed poems, claims by
another author, and the use of rhetorical devices. In some lessons,
instruction focused on grammar. Another lesson had students providing peer
feedback an autobiographical essay. Student reflections on the lesson
snapshot showed that they were able to identify the relevant ESLRs—
especially Effective Communicators and Critical Thinkers. The students’
reflections on their work indicated that many students felt the work was
relevant for their future goals and would provide preparation for them for
college level work. Students in the Corrective Reading class were able to
clearly identify that their class work was designed to help them improve their
reading skills.


All the mathematics snapshot lessons were based on the CA standards.
Students were able to restate the content objectives and their descriptions of
the lessons were in line with the stated objectives. The ESLRs identified by
teachers and students on the self-evaluation forms aligned consistently. The
mathematics snapshot data included a precalculus lesson where students
studied the connection between the unit circle and the graphs of sine and
cosine that used spaghetti to create a large poster-sized model of a sine curve
from the unit circle. Students were engaged in collaborative efforts to
discover the connection between the unit circle and the related sine function.
In another mathematics class, students worked in pairs to solve word
problems and create a poster of their work that emphasized the critical
thinkers and effective communicators ESLRs.


All of the social science lesson snapshots were based on the CA Standards
and/or AP Course of Study. These daily learning goals and objectives
reflected higher-order thinking in nearly all lessons. Students were asked to
analyze, evaluate and interpret various documents and evidence related to
topics in history and American government. The curriculum was engaging
with students creating graphic organizers, writing essays or taking lecture
notes, and creating/conducting a gallery walk. An examination of the student
reflections showed that a majority of the students were able to identify the
appropriate ESLRs and the daily learning goals/objectives they identified
aligned with those stated by the teacher. Many students reflected that the
lesson was relevant to them and their future.


Examination of the science lesson snapshot data revealed that all the lessons
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Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

were standards-based with clearly expressed content objectives. Students
were generally able to describe what they had done in the lesson and lab but
only a little more than 70% made a clear connection to the stated content
objective on the self-evaluation form. This indicates a slight disconnect
between the intended and actual outcomes. There was much greater
congruence between the ESLRs identified by teachers and those reported by
students in their self-evaluation form. For example, critical thinkers were
always addressed by both teachers and students because most of the lesson
snapshots involved students doing laboratory work describing, analyzing,
graphing, and evaluating data. In addition, while teachers may have seen
connections to the real-world in their lessons, students did not always make
those same connections. About of the half of the time, students made real-
world connections to the lesson’s content.


World Languages and Culture snap shot data indicate the lessons were
aligned to the Hoover HS ESLRs and CA standards and provided for active
student participation. For example in the Spanish II lesson, students created a
post card from a Spanish-speaking country of their choice. They wrote their
likes and dislikes about the selected country in Spanish. The emphasis was on
effective communicators and self-directed learners ESLRs as well as identified
CA standards related to writing and culture.


In elective courses, students engaged in a variety of activities aligned to
standards and objectives in each subject area. Students were engaged in
higher level thinking as they analyzed, created and performed various tasks
and products. The elective programs offered at Hoover HS provide students
with enriching experiences in many areas including visual and fine arts,
performing arts, consumer family students and technology (magnet) courses.
Samples of student work from the snapshots included students evaluating line
drawings they had created, analyzing color theory, learning to prepare a
recipe and creating a scale drawing of a piece of wood. Student reflections on
these snapshots showed a majority of students were able to identify relevant
ESLRs and learning objectives for the lesson.


Taken together, this data indicates that the curriculum students experience at
Hoover HS is standard-based, rigorous and meaningful and teachers are
providing a stimulating instructional environment that engages students in
this curriculum. Teachers continue to work towards creating a curriculum
that makes the ESLRs more explicit to students as part of ongoing instruction
and assessment.


Hoover HS provides an ‘open enrollment’ policy in all Honors, GATE and AP
courses. Counselors and staff work diligently during pre-registration to use
multiple data measures to identify additional students to ‘updraft’ into more        Master Schedule
rigorous coursework. These efforts have resulted in a significant increase in
the numbers of students taking one or more AP courses prior to graduation
since the last self-study. Also, the addition of AP courses in social science and

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Hoover High School                                         WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

science have provided more students access to a rigorous, standards-based
curriculum. Students have also been ‘updrafted’ in science, as all ninth
graders are now enrolled in Biology P and 10th graders into Chemistry P,
Physics P or Zoology P. All of these courses meet UC/CSU entrance
requirements with curriculum aligned to the CA Science Standards and
Framework. In mathematics, district-wide initiatives have increased the
number of students successfully completing Algebra 1 in the 8th grade
providing a pipeline to AP mathematics courses. Hoover HS offers AP Calculus
AB, Calculus BC and Statistics for students who have met the course-
prerequisites. Social Science offers multiple sections of Advanced Placement
courses at the ninth and tenth grade levels to provide increased access to
rigorous coursework.


Data indicates that more students are enrolled in UC/CSU eligible courses are
completing their college entrance requirements than in the past. As of 2010,        UC/CSU Eligible
72% of students were enrolled in courses required for UC/CSU admission and            Enrollment and
42.8% of graduates completed all courses required for UC/CSU admission.               Completion Data


Hoover HS also provides a number of support structures to help all students
be successful in a rigorous academic program. These include mathematics             Master Schedule
and ELA intervention classes for ninth graders, on-site online credit-recovery      Apex program
options using the Apex Learning System, tutoring targeting students enrolled          description
in AP courses provided by AP teachers, AVID grades 9-12, and an expanded
district-wide summer school program that encourages students with D and F
grades to make-up courses to meet college entrance requirements.


Prior to entering the ninth grade, students in need of additional support in
mathematics are identified and placed into intervention classes. Students         Math Department
take two periods of math each day and if successful, they earn 10 units of high    Binder
school elective credit for Mathematics Intervention and 10 units of Algebra
One credit which satisfy UC a-g requirements and high-school graduation           Intervention Teacher
requirements. The content of the Mathematics Intervention/Algebra 1A/1B            Binders
courses focus on providing (1) instruction on critical pre-requisite skills
identified by the CA Content Frameworks, (2) differentiation to re-teach and
master key Algebra 1 standards, and (3) spiraling and review of critical
content to promote ongoing achievement. The number of sections of 9th
grade Algebra intervention has decreased since 2008 due to district budget        ATLAS Report—
cuts and staffing reductions. Currently, 105 students are enrolled in a total of   Enrollment by Section
4 sections of Algebra One Intervention.


Literacy is an essential tool for success in all high school courses. To support
students who struggle in this area, Hoover HS has implemented the research-
                                                                                    Corrective Reading
based Corrective Reading (CR) program designed to bring students to grade-
                                                                                      Program Description
level proficiency and improve their academic reading abilities. The program
targets students with weak decoding and/or comprehension skills. Students
were identified via a placement examination. In 2010-2011, 11 sections of CR        ELA Department
were offered. In 2011-2012, fewer sections are offered as placement test              Binder

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Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

results indicate fewer students with identified deficiencies. There are             CR Teacher Binders
currently, 7 sections of CR serving a total of 76 students. Teachers of the CR      ATLAS Report—
program have been provided with extensive training and support as they                Enrollment by Section
implement the curriculum.


English Learners (ELs) are scheduled into English Language Development
courses that have been streamlined to allow students to complete ELD
coursework in 3 years or less. Placement into ELD courses and program               Master Schedule
advancement is based on CELDT scores, the ELDA (district ELD benchmark              2010 R-30
assessment), class grades and CST scores. The course levels currently offered
at Hoover HS are Intermediate and Early Advanced. Intermediate students
have two periods of ELD and early advanced have one period of ELD. The
school uses the Cengage curriculum (formerly known as Heinle and Heinle)
with the VISIONS curriculum. ELD courses follow ELD standards as mandated
by CDE and our ELD teacher attends professional development for eld and is
CTEL certified.

ELs then have access to English I, II and III college prep courses. At the same
time, ELs are provided SDAIE college prep courses in the other content areas
with certified teachers. Hoover HS has trained nearly all of its teachers of EL
students in the SIOP model of best practice instruction to provide a                List of teachers who
supportive, rigorous and engaging learning environment to students. The               have attended SIOP
district also provides funding for an instructional coach who works with              training
teachers of EL students to align curriculum to standards and deliver high-          Instructional Coach
quality lessons that promote access for EL students. In addition, 62 students         calendar
are enrolled in Spanish I or II for Native Speakers. Enrollment in these classes
allows our Spanish-speaking ELs to meet foreign language college entrance
requirements and is creating a pipeline for students to enroll in AP Spanish
Language and Literature during their junior or senior years.


Hoover HS provides special education services through the Resource
Specialist Program (RSP), Special Day Class (SDC), Visually Impaired (VI), Deaf
and Hard of Hearing (DHH), Autistic Program, Emotionally Disturbed (ED),
                                                                                    ISGI Interview
Functional Skills, and Orthopedically Impaired (OI). Hoover HS is the only
comprehensive high school in the FUSD to offer all available special education
programs. Based on their triennial assessment cycle and annual IEP, students
are placed in a least restrictive environment to ensure they have the most
opportunities to succeed to their highest potential. All RSP students are fully
included in mainstream academic programs and nearly all students in the VI,
DHH, Autistic, ED and OI programs are fully mainstreamed. SDC and
Functional Skills students are mainstreamed into Physical Education and Art
classes and those SDC students on a diploma-track are also mainstreamed
into Algebra 1. Student success in mainstream and special education courses
is supported by certificated staff and instructional assistants. Nearly all
instructional assistants are deployed into mainstream courses to support
special needs students, providing direct support per IEP guidelines to students
in those classes. In addition, two certificated staff members serve as
Individual Small Group Instruction (ISGI) teachers. Their primary job duties

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Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

include monitoring progress and supporting RSP and SDC students and
coordinating the instructional aides classroom-level support. Examination of
student grades and success in mainsteam courses has indicated a need for
additional support during the school day. Plans are in progress to institute 3
sections of a study skills class for special education students to support the
work they are doing in core classes.


Students enrolled in AP courses have the opportunity to attend after-school
and evening tutoring offered by AP teachers. The district provides extra-pay
                                                                                  AP Tutorial Schedule
contracts to teachers to support these tutorials. Other support programs that
ensure all students have access to a rigorous curriculum include AVID,            Master Schedule
Upward Bound and CSU Mentors. These programs provide extensive support            AVID and Upward
for both academic success and college-planning for students enrolled in the         Bound Enrollment and
program. Hoover HS is an AVID certified school and serves 83 students. The          Program Description
Upward Bound program currently serves 30 students.

Hoover HS provides opportunities for teachers to collaborate within the
accountable community structure to ensure all students have access to a
rigorous and consistent curriculum. The Small Learning Community (SLC)            Department Binders
Grant and the ACE Magnet program have provided opportunities for teachers         AC Agendas and
to collaborate across disciplines as well. The SLC grant has supported the          Minutes
Ninth Grade Academy for several years. Teachers of ninth graders meet to
create common lessons and discuss progress of ninth grade students. To the
extent possible, students in the ACE Magnet program are scheduled into            SLC Grant binder
common sections for their core classes and all take their magnet technical
electives together along with Chinese. In the past, teachers of magnet
sections have met to collaborate. Juniors and Seniors also have the option to     ACE Magnet brochure
enroll at the Center for Advanced Research and Technology and take classes
there for half of the day. These classes provide a more integrated curriculum     Master Schedule
than is found on a traditional high school campus.

All Hoover HS courses are aligned with FUSD Courses of Study in accordance
                                                                                  CART Brochure
with the FUSD Board of Education adopted curricula and state-approved
textbook guidelines. Testing, grading and homework policies follow those
guidelines established by the FUSD Board of Education. These policies and         FUSD Website
procedures are reviewed at the district level and when changes are initiated,     Board of Education
Hoover HS complies per district directives. As a direct result of aligning
                                                                                  Curriculum
instruction to the California Content Standards, district Courses of Study and
                                                                                    Departments
Pacing Guides, and the district benchmark tests, Assessment of Critical
Standards, teachers provide a rigorous and relevant curriculum to all             Research Evaluation
students. At the school level, the Accountable Community model of                   and Assessment
professional collaboration along with the Classroom Foundations provide a         Accountable
structure for teachers to communicate about, align and create high-quality          Community Info
lessons and assessments that guarantee all students access to the curriculum.       Sheet/Ppt
Teachers are also working in the ACs to develop common syllabi and grading
                                                                                  Classroom
expectations for each course to ensure a guaranteed and viable curriculum for
                                                                                    Foundations Info
all students regardless of the teacher.
                                                                                    Sheet/Ppt


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Hoover High School                                          WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Survey results indicate that teachers, students and parents believe that
students are engaged in a rigorous, challenging and standards-based learning
environment that is preparing students for post-high school options.
                                                                                  WASC Teacher,
                                                                                    Student, Parent
Student survey results from fall 2011 indicate that:                                Surveys
       65% of our students feel their classes are preparing them for college
        or career options after graduation,
       72% of students believe teachers connect lessons to CA standards,
       69% of our students feel their teachers have high expectations of
        them, and
       65% of our students feel their teachers provide challenging
        assignments.


Parent survey results from fall 2011 indicate that:
       78% of our parents feel their child’s classes are preparing them for
        college or career options after graduation,
       86% of parents are aware that their child’s curriculum is based on the
        CA standards
       81% of our parents feel their teachers have high expectations of their
        child, and
       73% of our parents feel their child is challenged in his/her classes.


Teacher survey results from fall 2011 indicate that:
       82% of teachers believe their lessons are preparing students for
        college and career options when they graduate,
       86% of teachers report that graded assignments are based on CA
        standards in their subject area,
       94% of teachers believe they have high expectations for their
        students, and
       94% of teachers believe their lessons provide challenging work for
        their students.



B2. Do all students have equal access to the school’s entire program and assistance with a personal
learning plan to prepare them for the pursuit of their academic, personal and school-to-career goals?

B3. To what extent are students able to meet all the requirements of graduation upon completion of the
high school program?

Findings/Narrative                                                                    Evidence/Data
Equal Access to School Program and Assistance to Prepare Students to
Pursue Their Goals


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Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

In line with the FUSD goal to prepare college and career ready graduates, all
students have access to a college preparatory curriculum that includes            Master Schedule
options for Honors, GATE and Advanced Placement courses. The school has           AP Parent Meeting
an open-enrollment policy in all Honors, GATE and AP courses that allows any       Agendas
student to opt-in to higher level courses. In addition, during annual pre-        Interviews with Head
registration, the counseling staff works with department leaders to identify       Counselor
students using multiple achievement measures to ‘updraft’ additional
students into AP and Honors level classes. Initial placements are made and
then counselors work with students and parents to ensure that students are
aware of the increased rigor and expectations such as summer homework at
which point, students can opt-out with parental permission. Through these
efforts, Hoover HS has created a culture of high-expectations for students and
dramatically increased enrollment in AP, Honors and GATE courses.


At the same time, data tools are used by counselors to identify those students    a-g Beta Tool
in need of additional support. Student achievement data is used to identify       AiS Reports
students in need of academic intervention in ninth grade mathematics and
English language arts. Students who have yet to pass one or more parts of         AVID and Upward
the CAHSEE are scheduled into intervention classes during the junior and           Bound program
senior year. Support programs such as AVID and Upward Bound provide                descriptions
further support for our students to meet college entrance and high-school
graduation requirements.


Pre-technical training is provided to those students who are enrolled at CART
or in the ACE Magnet program. Both of these programs have an open-
                                                                                  CART and Magnet
enrollment policy. Sophomores and Juniors are recruited for CART annually
                                                                                   program descriptions
via field trips and during annual meetings with their counselors. ACE Magnet
students are recruited during 8th grade pre-registration and any current
Hoover HS student can join the magnet program as well. Courses in these
                                                                                  Interviews with Head
programs provide college prep credit and/or ROP credits for students.
                                                                                   Counselor
Students also have the option to enroll in ROP courses at Duncan Polytechnic
High School.


A variety of other support programs exist to ensure all students have access
to courses designed to ensure the most post-secondary options are available
to students. These programs include                                               Campus Culture
                                                                                   Center
       After school tutorials for AP classes
                                                                                  Hoover Website
       Mathematics and ELA Interventions courses for 9th graders
       CAHSEE Prep in 10th grade ELA and Mathematics
       CAHSEE Intervention for 11th and 12th graders
       AVID
       Apex Learning Credit Recover
       Upward Bound
       MESA (Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement)

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Hoover High School                                       WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

       CSU Mentors
       Center for Advanced Research and Technology
       ACE Magnet
       ROP Courses at Duncan Polytechnic
       Smaller Learning Community Grant
       Link Crew sponsored activities
       Men’s Alliance Program
       Jr. LARCs
       Multi-cultural clubs and activities


Students have a four-year individualized plan that is developed with and
monitored by the counseling staff. Counselors meet annually with students to
review their four-year plan and make changes based on student interests and  Interview with Head
academic progress. All students participate in the Career Cruising program.      Counselor
Career Cruising is a district-adopted program where students answer survey
questions and then are guided to career information and explorations based      AiS, ATLAS and
on their personalities. The program provides information about post-             Powerschool Logs
secondary options related to student career goals and interests. Last year
freshman classes participated in Career Cruising, but this year the program is  Career Center
being expanded to all grade levels. Students, teachers, parents and
counselors can monitor student progress through the ATLAS information
system. Teachers and counselors can also monitor progress through the
districts Assessment Information System (AiS).


Annual parent meetings are held for each grade level. These meetings             Master Calendar
provide parents with valuable information about what their child can expect      Hoover Website
each year regarding coursework, college and career options. An AP parent
meeting is typically scheduled for the Spring to inform parents about student
options for taking higher level courses during high school. Parents are          Teleparent Logs
informed of these meetings via Teleparent (Automated phone messages), the
Towne Crier, the Hoover website, and the Hoover Marquee.


Counselors work with students, parents and teachers to facilitate
communication regarding progress in individual classes. All teachers’ email
                                                                                 WASC Parent Survey
addresses are available on the Hoover website and teachers can use the
Teleparent system to contact parents with automated phone messages.
WASC parent survey results indicate that while a variety of communication
options are available, parents most frequently get information about their
child’s progress via progress reports sent home with their child or by
discussing it with their child.


On a more formal level, parental involvement is encouraged through the           Master Calendar
School Site Council (SSC), English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) and the     SSC and ELAC Agendas
Hoover Educational Foundation (HEF). Notifications of meetings are                and Minutes
published in the newsletter, via Teleparent, the website and on the marquee      HEF Agendas and
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in front of the school. Back to School Night at the start of the year and Open        Minutes
House near the end of the year both provide opportunities for parents and
teachers to discuss course curriculum and monitor student progress.
Counselors facilitate parent conferences with teachers when requested. For
identified students, the school personnel meet with parents and students
regarding SSTs, IEPs and 504 Plans. The team collaborates to provide support        ISGI Interview
structures including accommodations and modifications to ensure students
with identified learning needs are placed in the least restrictive environment
to address their needs and educational goals and objectives. Special needs
students are regularly mainstreamed into a wide-variety of classes with
regular education students. This practice promotes an inclusive environment
that allows special needs students to flourish.

Hoover HS implements many programs and strategies to facilitate transitions
to post high school. Given the fact that Hoover HS strives to increase the          AVID Program
number of students going to four-year colleges, we offer students the                Description
opportunity to join AVID so they can have access to an academic support             Upward Bound
college preparatory program. AVID is designed to enhance and expand the              Program Description
student population that is eligible for admission to 4-year college systems by
giving students college entry skills, motivating them to seek a college             Men’s Alliance
education, increasing their level of career awareness, and converting them           Program Description
into participating members of the school and community cultures. The
Upward Bound program also serves a small number of students at Hoover HS
and provides for school-year tutorials, summer bridge programs, college-
planning, tutors and field-trips. The Men’s Alliance also schedules trips and
speakers to discuss post-high school options with students participating in
that program.

Counselors work extensively with Seniors to ensure eligible students complete
their college applications and Financial Aid paperwork. During the school day,
students are excused from class to go to the computer lab to do much of this        Counseling Calendar
work online. Government and Economics classes schedule speakers as well to          Counseling Master
discuss post-secondary options with students. Military recruiters also visit the     Plan
campus on a regular basis to provide information about career options in the        Senior Folder
military. Fresno City College placement exams are administered on site and
students have multiple opportunities to take other placement exams such as
the SAT on campus during the school year. A half-time career tech supports
students as they explore post-high school options and college opportunities.
The career tech facilitates the Career Cruising program, meets with students        Career Tech interview
referred by counselors, issues work permits and coordinates Upward Bound
tutoring.

Numerous Hoover HS programs use field trips to universities, in order to
create a college-going culture for students and to ease the transition for
them. Many colleges, including FCC, CSUF, UC Merced, and others, also send          Master Calendar
representatives to visit Hoover HS, to help familiarize students with their
school. In addition, Financial Aid workshops are offered for both students and
parents to receive information that may ease their transition to college.

Students have the opportunity to work in the community through Work
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Hoover High School                                           WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

Permits (general education) and Workability (special education) and
Internships (CART). In 2010-2011, the Workability program at Hoover High              Career Tech Records
School served 207 students and 51 of them were placed into jobs.

Students attending the Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART)
receive job shadowing experience during their first year and an internship
during their second year, resulting in students who are well-prepared to enter
college or a post-high school career.

The Special Education department works extensively to provide students with
life-skills and job training. Functional Skills students participate in job-skills
training through their classes and SDC students participate in the STEPS
(Success to Employment Pathways) program. The four-year program                       Special Education
culminates with a STEPS curriculum certificate upon graduation. Student                Department Binder
progress is measured through standards-based competencies that teachers
monitor throughout the school year.

The Hoover ACE Magnet provides student with real world experiences in
Architecture, Construction and Engineering. Typical activities in Magnet
courses include hands-on projects related to the course of study. Some
activities include (but are not limited to) designing and building a mock up          Magnet Teacher
house in Construction. In Architecture, students design a building for a client        Binders
and compete against other high schools in design competitions. In
Engineering, there is a focus on robotics and learning about various
engineering disiciplines. Many magnet students have also been involved with
the MESA program and the Robotics team is experiencing great success this
year as students build and compete with a working robot in competitions
across California and Nevada.

Hoover HS students have access to real-world application of their educational
interest in relation to a rigorous, standards-based curriculum through
classroom experiences, participation in extra- and co-curricular programs like
MESA or Men’s Alliance, and enrollment in the ACE Magnet or CART
programs. For example in the CART program, students collaborate with
businesses and community agencies in a cross-curricular project-based
environment that is academically rigorous, and facilitated through a business-
based instructional model. The CART curriculum infuses core academic
standards into business and industry projects creating a seamless transition
between school and the world of work and higher education, thereby
thoroughly preparing students for post-high school careers. The Physical
Education department offers Cross-Age PE for students interested in working
with children and the Science Enrichment club also conducts field trips for
students to work with elementary age students.

Survey results indicated that teachers (73%), parents (72%) and students
(42%) felt their classes included real-world applications. Parents (80%) and
students (70%) felt that Hoover HS usually or always provided a variety of
electives and curriculum choices that provided real-world opportunities, while        WASC Survey Results
teacher survey results indicate a need for more curriculum choices with 20%
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responding positively.

Students Meet Graduation Requirements Including CAHSEE

Hoover HS is committed to ensuring that all students have access to rigorous
course work that will prepare them for college or careers upon graduation.
Each student is required to complete 230 credits by the end of their senior         FUSD Board of
year. For each class successfully passed with a grade of “D” or better students      Education
are given 5 credits. Each student takes 6 classes a semester for a total of 30 a    FUSD Handbook
semester and 60 in one year. By the end of their senior year students have
the opportunity to complete the 230 credits required for graduation.

All students are enrolled in a course of study that meets FUSD graduation
requirements. Some students require further assistance and support in order
to meet all requirements of graduation.                                             ATLAS Enrollement
                                                                                     Report
Students are guided toward successful completion of all graduation
requirements through numerous academic and social programs that promote
positive skills and behaviors. Support classes such as Algebra 1 Intervention,
Corrective Reading, and CAHSEE Intervention assist students who are
struggling in core classes or to pass the CAHSEE. Special education students       Master Schedule
have the opportunity to enroll in a Study Skills class to provide further support
for academic success. The availability of the Student Responsibility Center
and a consistent discipline program implemented starting with this school
year have also improved students’ ability to complete their coursework by
providing an alternative to suspension and a consistent method of follow
through that encourages appropriate classroom behavior. Several programs
provide after school tutoring to students including AVID and the CSU Mentors.
Tutoring is also available for AP students and the mathematics department
has coordinated a lunch and after school tutoring schedule as well to assist       Tutoring Schedules
struggling students.

The counseling department takes an active role in supporting students to
meet their high school and college entrance requirements. Pre-registration
for incoming 9th graders begins when counselors visit feeder middle schools to      Counseling Master
enroll students. At that time, staff works to identify students in need of           Plan
accelerated learning options or remediation by examining multiple measures          Counseling Calendar
including CST scores, district benchmark assessments, grades, attendance and        Student Four-Year
teacher recommendations. One counselor works exclusively with ninth                  Plan Samples
graders to ensure all ninth graders are making adequate progress as they
transition to high school.

To monitor student progress towards meeting graduation requirements,
including the CAHSEE, students meet with counselors regularly. Annual
meetings are scheduled with students to review transcripts and CST scores
using the a-g Beta tool to ensure proper placement in the appropriate course
level. Every sophomore is counseled to review student progress and to revise        AiS Data
their 4-year plan that was developed during their 9th grade year. All 9th, 10th,    a-g Beta tool
11th, and 12th grade students who are designated ‘at-risk’ by being not on
track for graduation are required to have a counselor/ parent conference. At
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that point counselors recommend options for credit recovery: summer
school, Fresno Adult School, Continuation school. Juniors and seniors who
have not passed the CAHSEE are also placed into intervention classes at this
time. Counselors also encourage students who are at risk of failing their
classes to take advantage of ZAP and other on-campus tutoring opportunities.
The ninth grade counselor holds parent/student conferences quarterly for
students who have more than 3 F’s to recommend options and provide
resources for academic assistance.

In reviewing student pass rates and a-g requirements, it was determined that,
in addition to the traditional credit recovery options that include repeating
classes, attending Adult School or Summer School, students would benefit
from an Online Credit Recovery course. These options help students make up
credits and fulfill graduation as well as UC/CSU requirements.

Hoover HS offers an online-credit recovery program using Apex Learning to
increase our graduation rate, reduce the impact on our master schedule, and
decrease the need for students to enroll in Cesar Chavez adult school for
credit recovery. The training materials for Apex Learning indicate that, the
Apex Online Learning academic curriculum provides standards-based courses           Apex Program
for Hoover HS students in English I, II and III, IV, Modern World History and US     Description
History, American Government and Economics, Algebra and Earth Science.
These courses are designed to offer scaffolded content interactively to keep
students motivated and help them succeed. A powerful set of learning-
management tools support differentiated instruction and provide flexibility in
meeting students’ needs.

Four Hoover HS instructors have been trained to use Apex Learning on during
Fall 2010 by an Apex Learning trainer. Last year, these classes were offered
after school for students needing credits during the 2nd semester. This year,
the classes are offered during 1st, 5th and 6th period. Students have access to     Master schedule
the instructor via email and during class times. These courses are supported
by the district and an Apex Online Learning coordinator. For the first
semester of 2011-2012, fifty students are enrolled in the program with plans
to include roughly the same number second semester. Interviews with Apex
learning teachers indicate that approximately 75% of students will earn 5
units of recovery credit that will meet a-g requirements in either English or
Social Science.

The PE department offers a zero period PE course to juniors and seniors that
need to make up graduation credits in PE. Providing the option before the
regular school day begins allows students to enroll in a full program during
the regular school day helping to keep them on track to graduate with their         Master Schedule
class.

Credit recovery is also offered during Hoover HS Summer School. During the
summer of 2010, the size of the district’s summer school program was greatly
expanded to include students earning a D or F in a-g required courses. With
the full support and partnership of the Board of Education, all students who
earned a grade of D or F in an a-g required course were required to attend
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summer school. During the summer of 2011, 1172 students were enrolled in
summer school at Hoover HS and 6887 credits were earned. A majority of the
students who completed 2011 summer school at Hoover attend Hoover
during the regular school year. Some of our students also enroll in district       Summer School
summer school at other comprehensive high schools, primarily based on               Enrollment Query
proximity to their home.

Analysis of the master schedule shows that nearly all of the courses taught
fulfill graduation requirements in either core areas or electives, with many of
those primarily geared toward students meeting UC/CSU a-g
requirements. Some of the courses are intervention classes designed to             Master Schedule
provide support for students to meet these requirements, as well as the
CAHSEE requirement for graduation. Intervention classes meet graduation
requirements under the electives category.

Students are selected for our Intervention English and mathematics courses
based on the following criteria: CST Scores, grades, teacher recommendation,
ACS Scores, CELDT, etc. Students are then placed in appropriate courses that
target their academic needs. For example, select 9th grade students are            ELA and Math
placed into Corrective Reading classes, which are geared toward assisting           Department and
students with reading and writing skills that will prepare them to do well on       teacher binders
the CAHSEE and succeed in their core classes. Select 9th grade students are
offered a Paired Algebra One & Intervention Course as well. This class is
targets students who have scored Far Below Basic on their most recent math
CST or have consistently failed their math courses. Students have both an
Algebra I class and an Algebra Intervention class with the same teacher and
group of students. There are 4 paired Algebra-intervention sections offered at
Hoover HS, with about 30 students per class. This particular intervention
course is designed to supplement the regular Algebra curriculum by building
up those specific Pre-Algebra skills used in the Algebra class.

Hoover HS also implements additional academic support through programs
that help students pass the CAHSEE. For example, in addition to core math
and English classes, Math and English CAHSEE intervention classes are
available in the 11th and 12th grades to target students who may have not yet
passed the exam. During 2011, 10th grade students in need of additional
support were identified for placement into a 6 week intensive online CAHSEE        CAHSEE 380 Program
380 prep program. Students were identified based on prior year CST scores.          Description
Students were excused from their PE courses and worked in a computer lab
on an individualized learning plan designed to address weaknesses identified
using a pre-test. This same model will be repeated in prior to the 2012 Tenth
Grade CAHSEE administration with 200 students targeted for the intervention.
Parents are notified via letter and phone calls by teachers that have been
trained to use the program. The program will be implemented in the library
computer lab, the room 75 computer lab and the mobile laptop labs.
Students will participate in either mathematics or ELA depending on their
area of greatest identified need.

Tenth grade English language arts teachers use the Standards Plus Priority
English program in class to prepare students for the CAHSEE. This standards-
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based program is used district-wide during the first 10 minutes of each class.    ELA Teacher Binders
The ELA CAHSEE Intervention for yet-to-pass 11th and 12th grades use the
Standards Plus CAHSEE Ready curriculum.

Parents and students are kept informed of student progress towards
graduation and post-high school options in a variety of ways. The school
holds annual grade-level parent meetings and student meetings. There is also      Master Calendar
an AP Parent meeting held every spring. Special Education and 504 Plan
students meet annually per federal guidelines to provide an individualized
educational plan to support student achievement and career and educational        ISGI Interview
goals.

Students and parents are provided information about post-high school
options. The Career Cruising program was implemented last year in
designated ninth grade classes and is being expanded to all grade levels this
year. A comprehensive plan for seniors assists them to complete college           Career Cruising
entrance requirements. Seniors are provided with extensive support during          Program Description
the school day to register for ACT/SAT exams, apply to colleges and
universities, apply for financial aid and scholarships and take college
placement exams on-site. Support programs like AVID, Upward Bound, UC             Interview with Head
Scholars, MESA and Men’s Alliance support students to become college-ready         Counselor
and make close connections to local colleges and universities. The school also
has a regular schedule of college, technical school and military institutions     Senior Counseling
visiting students to keep them informed about post-secondary options.              Folder
Special education students have opportunities such as Work Ability and
Transition to College through Fresno City College to place them into job          Career Center
settings and prepare them for work upon graduation.                                Calendar
Analysis of achievement data indicates that Hoover HS is providing an             Master Calendar
academic environment that allows students to meet graduation and college-
entrance requirements upon graduation. The AYP graduation rate for Hoover         Special Education
HS has increased from 78.4% in 2008 to 84.08% in 2011. CAHSEE results              Department Binder
indicate that 89.4% of seniors had passed both parts by the time they
graduated. Nearly all of those students who were yet-to-pass were special         AYP Graduation Rate
education students who were not on a certificate track or who were granted a
waiver by the California Department of Education.                                 CAHSEE Longitudinal
                                                                                   Data
Increased numbers of students are also enrolling in college-prep courses and
completing college entrance requirements. As of 2010, 72% students were
enrolled in courses meeting UC-CSU entrance requirements and 42.8% of
graduates met UC-CSU entrance requirements. Student enrollment in AP              UC/CSU Enrollment
courses has dramatically since the last full WASC Self-Study. The number of        and Eligibility Data
AP exams taken increased from 205 in 2008 to 369 in 2010 while the
percentage of students earning a 3 or better increased from 25% in 2008 to        AP Enrollment and
26% in 2010.                                                                       Success Rate Data

Analysis of survey results indicates that parents and students feel that
adequate support is provided to students to complete their graduation
requirements and be prepared for college and/or careers.

Parents (82%) and students (60%) feel that the school is doing a good job of
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Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

keeping them aware their progress to meet high school graduation                  WASC Survey Data
requirements including the CAHSEE. Similarly, parents (78%) and students
(65%) feel the school is doing a good job of preparing them for college and/or
career options when they graduate.


B
Areas of Strength
   Students experience a rigorous, standards-based curriculum. Significant efforts have been made to
    updraft into more challenging coursework including AP classes.
   Daily instruction is consistently tied to standards-based goals and objectives that are aligned with
    district curriculum and instructional calendars.
   Special needs students are mainstreamed into elective and core classes on a regular and consistent
    basis.
   Ninth grade intervention courses for Mathematics and English Language Arts.
   Hoover HS has increased the numbers of students who meet college entrance requirements.

Areas for Growth
       The ESLRs need to be incorporated more into daily lessons.
       Explore opportunities to provide more electives and options for students to explore career
        interests and post-high school options.
       Provide more options during the school year for students who are failing their classes or who need
        additional support.
       Provide more support structures for at-risk, EL and special needs students in their classes.




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                                Category C:
                     Standards-Based Student Learning:
                                Instruction
                               Focus Group Leaders:
                               Ysabel Oliva, Teacher
                             Johnny Stafford, Teacher
                              Jeremy Wright, Teacher

Focus Group Members:

  Name                                     Name
  Angel Durazo, Administration             Tina Nieves, SPED
  Tom Wilson, Art                          Tricia Hudson, SPED
  Judy Rose, Counselor                     Celea Alfaro, World Languages
  Nicolet Diaz, English                    Stacie Baum, Instructional Aide
  Bonnie Rooney, English                   Pat Soliz, Instructional Aide
  Leanne Lacozette, English                Yvonne Eaton, Instructional Aide
  Marianne Blasingame, English             Preston Mcgil, Instructional Aide
  Julie Dunn, Math                         Carol Rodgers, Instructional Aide
  Martin Ha, Math                          Carey Hudson, Instructional Aide
  Micki Plummer, PE                        Julio Dominguez, Student
  Becky Shiner, Science                    Jeson Morgan, Student
  Scott Higgins, Science
  Jason Bessard, Social Science
  Dee Dee Woolery, SPED




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C1. To what extent are all students involved in challenging learning experiences to achieve the academic
standards and the expected schoolwide learning results?

Findings/Narrative                                                                   Evidence/Data
At Hoover High School, we believe that for students to achieve academic            California Standards
success there must be complete alignment between the written curriculum,
the taught curriculum, and the assessed curriculum. All professional learning      Courses of
at Hoover HS focuses on the interdependent relationship of curriculum and           study/Curriculum
instruction.                                                                        Guides

Instruction at Hoover HS is guided by curriculum maps built around the state       Instructional
standards for each subject area. Textbooks for the classes are a valuable           calendars/pacing
resource for both teachers and students, but instruction is guided by subject       guides
area and grade level standards. Other resources, including technology, are
used to enhance lessons and make content rigorous and accessible to our            Snapshot data
students.
                                                                                   ESLRs
Hoover High School is a traditional four year comprehensive high school
offering college preparatory, Advanced Placement, GATE, and Honors level           Master schedule
classes. All classes are “open enrollment,” meaning all students have access
to GATE, Honors, and AP level classes. In addition, students with an
Individualized Education Program (IEP) and in Special Education classes are
challenged with rigor through inclusion in mainstream classes. Hoover
currently operates on a traditional fifty-five minute, six period schedule.

                                                                                  Copies of Common
To ensure that students are working towards achievement of the academic            Assessments
standards in all classrooms, teachers in many core departments (math, English
Language Arts, science and social science), have developed common                 AC agendas
standards-aligned assessments or finals to measure student progress toward
attaining mastery on essential standards. Teachers meet within their subject      Pacing Guides and
area accountable communities to collaborate on instruction and to analyze          Instructional
student progress according to assessments. These assessments provide the           Calendars
ability for teachers to discuss the effectiveness of instructional practices and
determine content that is needed to be re-taught. Instructional
Calendars/Pacing Guides have been developed for Algebra I, Geometry and
Algebra 2, 9th, 10th, and 11th grade, English Language Arts to move these
teams toward aligning the taught curriculum to essential standards.

For effective teaching to take place, teachers must first be able to create and
maintain a classroom climate conducive to learning. This is attained by
teaching and encouraging positive student-student and student-teacher
interactions, developing relationships in the classroom, and guiding student
metacognition. More than 20 teachers and administrators completed three
days of training from The Flippen Group on Capturing Kids’ Hearts, a program       Sample Classroom
that focuses on improving classroom climate and developing self-managing            Social Contract
classrooms. Many teachers who have completed the training have
incorporated elements of Capturing Kids’ Hearts into their classroom
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procedures and instructional routines, including the development and use of
social contracts, beginning classes by discussing “good things,” and ending
classes with a “launch.” Effective use of Capturing Kids’ Hearts tools helps
students develop communication skills and improve their ability to work
collaboratively with other students.                                                Three Phase Lesson
                                                                                     Design Graphic
Based on the research of Fisher and Frey (2008), teachers create lessons that
provide students with challenging learning experiences, and support for
achieving those standards, using Three-Phase Lesson Design, which is a model
for lesson planning that incorporates a gradual release of responsibility from
the teacher to the students. All core area teachers on campus have received
professional development during the 2010-2011 school year. The beginning
of the 2010-2011 school year was utilized to monitor implementation of the
Three-Phase Lesson Design, and the Spring of 2011 has brought a renewed
emphasis on troubleshooting and providing targeted support in English
Language Arts and mathematics to ensure full implementation of the
Foundations in the classroom, which is a variation of Three-Phase Lesson
Design. Foundations uses a focus objective, aligned instruction, assessment,
and closure model to ensure that students understand what they will be              SIOP Strategies
learning during a class period, have ample opportunities to practice what they
have learned, and solidify the learning before leaving the classroom. In            Lesson Plan (SIOP)
addition to supporting students in achieving the academic standards, with the
gradual release model, students are guided towards becoming self-directed
learners by encouraging students to manage their time effectively and take
risks in the classroom. Student interaction strategies, such as think-pair-share
or think-write-pair-share, are utilized as part of the gradual release model to
build communication skills and to help students become collaborative                Foundations
learners. Interactive engagement strategies also help English Learner
students acquire proficiency in academic English as they achieve standards.

The use of ongoing formative assessment in classrooms is an important
element of the Foundations that leads to data-driven instruction.
Additionally, teachers use methods for checking for understanding in the
classroom to provide information on the necessity for immediate adjustment
to teaching, as well as data regarding the need for re-teaching concepts
during the next lesson. Methods of checking for understanding used in
classrooms include the use of techniques such as “thumbs up/thumbs down”            Walkthrough data
that allow for students to indicate their readiness to move on to a new
concept, which helps students become more effective communicators and
self-directed learners. Teachers can also check for student readiness to move
on to a different concept with the use of whiteboards, student response
devices, and/or a ticket-out-the-door. While many teachers are utilizing
ongoing formative assessment, walkthrough data demonstrates that this is an         SIOP training agenda
area that needs to be addressed through follow-up training and support.
                                                                                    List of SIOP trained
In order to provide challenging experiences to all students on our campus,           teachers
including English Learner students, 19 teachers in the core areas of English
Language Arts, social science, math, and science with SDAIE classes are in
their second year of training in the SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observation
Protocol) model. Although SIOP has been around the district for a few years,
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English Language Arts, science, math, and social science teachers have been
receiving training from 2009 to present. The SIOP model incorporates into a
lesson the use of language objectives, which explains how students will
interact with language to access the concepts and skills to be learned during
the class period. SIOP lessons include necessary elements such as vocabulary
frontloading, structured student interaction, and multiple opportunities for
language practice. Teachers are encouraged to integrate the SIOP model with
Three-Phase Lesson Design and Foundations to ensure that English Learner
students are exposed to the same structure of gradual release of
responsibility in their classrooms. Use of the SIOP model in classes populated
by English Learners provides assurance and language practice through
focused content instruction and support, which clarifies concepts and
solidifies understanding. For instance, these classes may include activities
such as Information Gaps, Guided Listening, Talmudic Pair Work, Think-Pair-
Share, and Selection Retelling to help support students in gaining proficiency
with language so they work towards becoming effective communicators.
Additionally, these strategies assist in increasing rigor and cognitive demand
for English Learners by increasing student accountability and requiring           Sample Gate / AP
students to be complex thinkers. Structured student interaction supports           differentiated
students in working toward becoming collaborative workers and community            instruction sheet
participants, as they learn to communicate well with other students.

Within the AP and GATE structure, our district office has engaged Hoover HS       A.P. Recommendation
and all other comprehensive high schools in specialized trainings with the         tool-Beta tool print-
College Board called the Advanced Placement Achievement Institute (APAI).          out
GATE and AP teachers have attended AP summer institutes with follow up
training through the Advanced Placement Achievement Institute for the last
two summers with follow up training occurring during the Fall and Spring
semesters. Through this training teachers focus on creating an AP-GATE
pipeline for student success focused on increasing rigor, aligning curriculum
among schools, and focusing on creating equity and access for non-traditional
AP and GATE students. To ensure the AP and GATE experience is challenging
for students, teachers must submit a Differentiated Instruction plan. The
plan, which must be approved by the FUSD GATE office, details activities,
lessons, and requirements that are expected to challenge students beyond a        AVID site team and
regular college preparatory class. For example, students in AP Biology are         AVID certification
required to complete 12 College Board-approved laboratories, which are             binders
more challenging than labs required in non-AP Biology classes.

The Advancement via Individual Determination (AVID) Site Team at Hoover HS        AVID Site plan
has made it a mission to incorporate its Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, and
Reading (W.I.C.R.) strategies school wide in various stages. During the 2011-     2010-2011 AVID
2012 school year, the AVID Site Team is focusing on regular use of Cornell         Certification
Notes in the AVID Classroom. Students are required to use their notes to           Document
form questions for their tutorials and regularly reflect upon their learning.
Cornell Notes are to be taken in all academic classes are graded based on
number of notes taken per week in each class, and student generated
questions and summaries. In years past, Hoover has focused on reading and
writing in the AVID classroom. AVID teachers focused on reading to learn
strategies such as underlining claims, circling dates and using marginalia.
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To provide more equitable access to students in Algebra I and English              Sample lesson for
Language Arts, students were targeted using multiple measures to determine          Math Intervention
placement into intervention classes for these subject areas.

During math intervention, instruction is focused in three areas: frontloading
skills necessary for students to master the content in their Algebra I classes,    Corrective Reading
differentiating to re-teach concepts that were not mastered during their            Sample lesson and
Algebra I classes, and spiraling Algebra I concepts and skills throughout the       student workbook
year.                                                                               example

Corrective Reading is a program used by Hoover HS for English Language Arts
intervention. The program is structured as reading intervention to help
students improve necessary decoding, fluency, and comprehension skills.
Both intervention structures for math and English Language Arts are geared to
provide specific, structured instruction to prepare students for success in
challenging learning experiences that focus on achievement in Algebra I and
English Language Arts standards.

The Corrective Reading program being used at Hoover HS consists of two
components: decoding and comprehension, provided by McGraw-Hill’s SRA
Corrective Reading program. Student are initially assessed using the publisher
provided screening in the Spring semester with a follow up at the beginning of
the Fall semester. Based on this assessment students are placed in either
decoding or comprehension classes. These classes include decoding levels B2
and C as well as comprehension levels B1, B1-Fast, and C. Upon completion
of the comprehension B1-Fast curriculum, this class continues with
comprehension B2 curriculum for the remainder of the year. Instruction in all
corrective reading classes is scripted using direct instruction. Teachers guide    Information Station
students through structured reading practice, and require choral, whole-class       print out
responses to check for understanding. Additionally, there are reading
checkouts at the decoding levels as well as workbook exercises and mastery
tests in all decoding and comprehension classes that are used to determine a       Printout of DRP
student’s progress throughout his or her experience in the Hoover HS                students accessed
Corrective Reading program. All data collected by teachers from daily
classwork or mastery tests is input into SRA’s Information Station
(http://srainformationstation.com), an online interface that allows site and
district administrators a way to analyze data at both the site and district
levels. In conjunction with this monitoring system teachers also utilize DRP
(Degrees of Reading Power) to ensure any student placed in this intervention
is minimum two years below grade level. Should any assessment show the
student no longer needs these services, students are placed in a mainstream
program.

                                                                                   ISGI job description
The Hoover HS administrative team and special education department
reviewed the pattern of low performance of special education students and
felt it necessary to transition to a full inclusion model to provide special
education students with access to the core curriculum in the Least Restrictive
Educational Environment (LRE). Beginning with the 2010-2011 school year,
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Hoover HS began to process of changing the structure of the special
education department to focus on using an inclusion model . There are plans
to implement a co-teaching model with general education teachers co-teach
these classes with a Resource Specialist (RSP) teacher to support student
achievement. As general education teachers plan instruction, they will
collaborate with RSP teachers to determine necessary modifications and
adaptations in their classrooms to support the success of all students. During
classes, RSP teachers use a combination of teacher collaboration and small-
group instruction to support and monitor students. To support the effective
implementation of the full inclusion model, Hoover HS employs two full-time
Individual and Small Group Instruction Specialists (ISGI). In addition to
support with case management, the ISGIs provide assistance in the form of
co-planning, co-teaching, and modeling within the full inclusion classroom.

With a focus on supporting our students in successful achievement of
academic standards and our ESLRs, teachers in elective classes integrate
instruction in their content with skills and concepts necessary for success in
core subject areas, as well as language development for our English Learner
students. For instance, in visual arts classes programs are standards-based
and incorporate reading and writing through analysis and interpretation.
Additionally, students in these classes work on note-taking skills, and are
exposed to content and non-content specific vocabulary development. Other
subject areas are integrated through written reflection on art and world
history and social issues.

Teachers in the visual arts department teach a California State standards-
based curriculum, incorporating three-phase lesson design that include                Sample lessons from
learning objectives and daily agendas, which are displayed and communicated            visual arts classes
to students. In the Art Department, teachers teach a standards-based
curriculum that develops student learning in district approved art classes.
Classes include several sections of Art I, an Art II section, 3-D Art, Photography
I-II, and Yearbook I-II. Teachers use common assessments in classes that use
the same curriculum and similar assessments for classes that aren’t using the
same media. Art teachers regularly show their artwork throughout campus
and in the community, such as the Big Fresno Fair.

In foreign language classes, students receive instruction in language content         Sample lessons from
that is very similar to instruction using the SIOP and SELD models previously          foreign language
mentioned. For instance, instruction in foreign language classes includes the          classes
use of language objectives, vocabulary frontloading, scaffolding language
development, and student interaction strategies.

Physical Education teachers also incorporate standards-based instruction              Sample unit and
using three-phase lesson design and the Foundations. PE teachers use                   lesson plans from
modeling, guided practice, and collaborative practice as they work with every          Physical Education
student to master PE standards. Physical fitness stations are integrated into          classes
classes daily to ensure students make progress toward attaining proficiency
on the California Physical Fitness Test. Additionally, PE teachers have
developed common standards-aligned units to provide an aligned curriculum
to all students.
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Three-phase lesson design and the Foundations is used, in both core and
elective classes, to develop effective focus lessons that incorporate modeling,
and use of a gradual release of responsibility to the students. Student
exposure to curricula that integrate standards from elective classes with
concepts and skills necessary for success in core subject areas provides
transferrable learning experiences for students, and helps students to
become critical thinkers and self-directed learners.

WASC parent survey data indicate that 81% of parents feel their child’s            WASC Parent Survey
teachers usually or always have high expectations for them, 73% of parents         WASC Student Survey
feel their children are usually or always engaged in challenging learning          WASC Teacher Survey
experiences and 86% report that their child’s curriculum is usually or always
based on the CA standards. WASC student survey data indicate that 69% of
student feel their teachers usually or always have high expectations for them,
65% of parents feel their teachers usually or always provide challenging
assignments and 72% report that their teachers usually or always connect
their lessons to the CA standards. Sixty-one (61%) of students report that
their teachers usually or always connect their lessons to the ESLRs. WASC
teacher survey data indicate that 94% of teachers always or usually have high
expectations for their students, 91% usually or always provide challenging
work for students and 82% always or usually make a clear connection
between their instruction and the CA standards. Only 50% of surveyed
teachers thought that they usually or always made the connection between
the ESLRs and instruction clear to students.

Survey data indicate that instruction is aligned to standards-based objectives
with teachers, students and parents reporting positively. Further, data
indicate teacher’s have high expectations for students and in provide
challenging learning experiences. Making the connection to ESLRs explicit to
students continues to be a growth area for Hoover HS staff.


C1
     Areas of Strength
         Hoover HS provides access and equity for GATE, Honors, and AP classes.
         Hoover HS teachers provide standards based instruction.
         Hoover HS teachers utilize technology in the classroom.
         Hoover HS teachers differentiate instruction.

     Areas for Growth
       Hoover HS needs to provide more vocational classes.
       Hoover HS needs to provide access to afterschool tutoring.
       Hoover HS needs to improve analyzing data to re-teach standards based curriculum.
       Hoover HS accountable communities need to develop more common formative assessment.
       Hoover HS teachers need to continue work on Foundations to improve lesson closure.
       Hoover HS teachers need to continue to make the connection to ESLRs explicit to students during
          daily instruction.


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C2. To what extent do all teachers use a variety of strategies and resources, including technology and
experiences beyond the textbook and the classroom, that actively engage students, emphasize higher
order thinking skills, and help them succeed at high levels?

Findings/Narrative                                                                      Evidence/Data

At Hoover, we understand the importance of providing a variety of strategies
and multiple modalities to actively engage different styles of learners. This
includes a variation in instructional strategies, as well as use of technology       Observation Data
and other resources to provide relevant, data-driven lessons for our students.
Continual professional development aims to provide tools for delivering high-
quality instruction, and to use assessment and collaboration to improve and
fine-tune instructional practices to the needs of our students.

Quality instruction begins with effective planning and lesson design. Teachers
at Hoover HS receive ongoing training and support in three-phase lesson
design, which incorporates a focus lesson, student practice, and closure into        Three Phase Lesson
each lesson. Part of the lesson design process includes the creation of               Graphic
objectives, which are displayed and communicated to students.                        Walkthrough Data

The use of three-phase lesson design at Hoover High School allows for
teachers to build in a variety of instructional strategies to facilitate the
gradual release of responsibility to the student. As Fisher and Frey (2008)
described in their framework for the gradual release of responsibility,
students learn from interacting with each other, and specific, focused learning
can take place when interactions between students are intentional.                   Foundations
Strategies that are used during classes depend on multiple factors, including
the content being taught, the phase of the lesson, and the requirements of
the students in the classroom. Instructional aids such as non-linguistic
representations, concept maps, and other graphic organizers are used
throughout lessons to help students make connections to the concepts being
learned. During the focus lesson, teachers use strategies such as modeling,
“think alouds”, and direct instruction to guide student note-taking and
learning. In the practice phase, teachers use a variety of strategies and
resources to shift the work responsibility onto the students. Teachers use
guided instruction, grouping strategies, or other activities to allow students to
interact with each other, and with the learning. During closure, teachers
revisit the learning and use formative assessments, such as a “ticket out the
door” to determine students’ mastery of the concepts.

In addition to three-phase lesson design, all core subject area teachers with
SDAIE classes are receiving ongoing training in the SIOP (Sheltered Instruction
Observation Protocol) model. These teachers are learning to use a variety of
instructional strategies to provide challenging experiences and learning
opportunities for English Learner students. The SIOP model incorporates into         SIOP binder
a lesson the use of language objectives, which explains how students will
interact with language to access the concepts and skills to be learned during
the class period. SIOP lessons include necessary elements such as vocabulary
frontloading, structured student interaction, and multiple opportunities for
language practice. Teachers are encouraged to infuse the SIOP model with
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three-phase lesson design to insure that English Learner students are exposed
to the same structure of gradual release of responsibility in their classrooms.
Use of the SIOP model in classes populated by English Learners provides
assurance and language practice through focused content instruction and
support, which clarifies concepts and solidifies understanding.

Within SDAIE classes, teachers include activities such as: Information Gaps,
where students communicate with a partner to complete information on a
graphic organizer or table format; Guided Listening, a whole class activity that
teaches students to become more acute listeners by providing key words and
requiring students to fill in information around those words; Talmudic Pair
Work, a partner exercise that requires students to read passages and explain
the meaning in their own words; and A/B Text Edit, where students have
completed sentences with conflicting key words and students need to
communicate to determine which word is correct. These activities, and many
more, help support students in gaining proficiency with language so they work
toward becoming effective communicators. Additionally, these strategies
assist in increasing rigor and cognitive demand for English Learners by
increasing student accountability and requiring students to be complex
thinkers. Structured student interaction supports students in working
towards becoming collaborative workers and community participants, as they
learn to communicate well with other students.

Teachers who are training in the SIOP models receive support from an on-site
instructional coach. Coaches assist teachers with incorporating SIOP
strategies within the three-phase lesson design model. The instructional
coach and EL coach work side-by-side with teachers to create effective,
standards-based lesson objectives that include both the expectation of
content to be learned during the lesson, but also the language form that will
be used to access and demonstrate mastery of the content. Coaches work
with teachers to co-plan lessons, based on the content and language
objectives, incorporating SIOP strategies that encourage student interaction
to develop language ability and content mastery. When necessary, coaches
demonstrate or co-teach lessons or strategies for teachers. Alternate to
demonstration and co-teaching, coaches visit classrooms to observe SIOP
elements in lessons and meet with teachers to guide reflection on lessons.

Standard One of the California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTPs)
requires teachers to engage and support all students in learning. In order to
be successful on this standard, teachers must use a variety of instructional
strategies to engage students with different learning styles throughout an
entire lesson. These instructional strategies engage students in the learning
and help them succeed at high levels. All teachers on campus use learning
objectives and agendas to communicate to students the expectations for
learning for each lesson. The teachers who have been trained in the SIOP
model incorporate language objectives in addition to the objective that is
focused on content. This communicates to students how they will interact
and build academic English as they work toward mastering the content of
each lesson.

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In math classrooms, most teachers begin with a warm-up activity to review
topics previously learned and to activate students’ prior knowledge. All
mathematics teachers communicate learning objectives to students. This
information conveys to students exactly what they need to do and learn
during the class period. A typical mathematics lesson begins with a focused
lesson to teach students concepts, usually by discussing concepts and
demonstrating to students how specific problems can be solved. Some
teachers use a form of Cornell Notes to teach organizational skills to students.
During lessons, some mathematics teachers use collaborative learning and            Math department and
other student interaction strategies to engage students in learning. One             math classroom
teacher discussed assigning group roles to students for structure and                binders
accountability. Students are expected to interact with each other as they
work towards mastery of the learning. To incorporate this interaction, some
teachers use a think-pair-share strategy. Instruction is strengthened using
manipulatives during lessons, especially in Geometry classrooms. Other
teachers have used card sorts, mix-and-match, cooperative frames, and
information gap activities to reinforce learning. Mathematics teachers use
formative assessments to determine the effectiveness of their lessons in
helping students achieve. To check for understanding with students, some
teachers use whiteboards to determine accurate use of mathematical skills
and problem solving, and to provide students with immediate feedback to
correct any errors. Some teachers discussed the use of a “ticket-out-the-
door” activity, which provides a quick assessment of the learning for the day.

Three teachers have a document camera and over 80% of the teachers in the
mathematics department use data projectors, which allow for more dynamic
and interactive lessons, using programs such as PowerPoint, to enhance
student engagement. One Algebra II teacher has students input responses
into their TI calculator to obtain instantaneous information regarding
students’ mastery of lesson content. The teacher can use the information to
determine the overall readiness of the class to move on to other content, as
well as to determine areas that require re-teaching. Approximately 80% of
math teacher use an Interwrite Pad, which allows the teacher, or students, to
write on the whiteboard from anywhere in the classroom. Most math
teachers have access to manipulatives and other resources, such as graphing
calculators, to make concepts accessible to students during a lesson. In AP
Calculus, students use TI graphing calculators to view graphs of functions,
make a table of values, use derivative and integral functions, and to develop
programs for investigating Riemann sums, trapezoidal sums and definite
integrals. In Trigonometry, the TI graphing calculators are used for viewing
and manipulating both algebraic and trigonometric functions, creating graphs
of parametric equations and polar coordinates. Additional textbooks and
lesson resources are used by mathematics teachers to engage students and
help them succeed. Some teachers use supplemental books to help students
learn and improve vocabulary and problem-solving skills.

Math teachers use state accountability resources, such as CST released test
questions to help students achieve. All teachers have access to Exam View
Pro, which includes a test generator, power-point presentations, notes and
other resources. In AP Calculus and AP Statistics, students use released AP
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Calculus exams, as well as released AP Calculus free-response questions, and
practice exams. In Trigonometry, students review CST released questions for
algebra and geometry, to maintain knowledge of algebraic manipulations,
arithmetic calculations, and geometric interpretations and figures. Geometry
teachers meet to develop some common lesson plans as well as analyzing and
reflecting on summative and formative assessments such as ACS,

History/Social Science teachers try to make the learning relevant to students,
using contemporary connections to academic contents when possible. Lesson
objectives are tangible, and are posted in each classroom daily. In some
History/Social Science classes, during the early part of class students complete
a brief activity that focuses on interesting current events, at the local, state,
or national level. Students are also required to determine the “big ideas” of
readings to help determine the meaning. . Some teachers also use Teacher             History/Social Science
Curriculum Institute (TCI), which incorporates role play and other games to           department and
help students understand key historical concepts. In History/Social Science           classroom binders
classrooms, students are also required to interpret and analyze historical
images, political cartoons, graphs and charts. Technology is utilized in all
Social Science classrooms as power point presentations are common, helping
the students to understand the information with the addition of images,
graphs, and political cartoons. In addition, the Social Science department has
created common formative assessments for U.S. History and Modern World
History. These assessments are created by the Accountable Community
members and graded on the OARS system. Using the data from OARS, the
Accountable Community members are then able to collaborate and discuss
best practice lessons in their subject area.

Science teachers use technology and other resources to enhance their lessons
and support students in their achieving at high levels. Most Science teachers
have “Smart Classrooms” and all at least use document cameras and data
projectors to incorporate interactive PowerPoint-style (or Keynote)
presentations during lessons. Many of the teachers embed student
participation activities into the PowerPoint presentation. Projectors also
allow teachers to use streaming video to incorporate current scientific
information into lesson demonstrations. Science teachers have access to
student laptops and Vernier Probs which are used in Chemistry and Biology            Science department
for students’ research projects and laboratory activities. Most science               and classroom
teachers use supplemental materials and varied scientific equipment to assist         binders
students in understanding concepts during laboratory activities. As an
example, AP Biology students work in gel electrophoresis to study DNA and
biotechnology, and they study genetic engineering while working on a
transformations lab. In another example, students demonstrate their
knowledge of Physics concepts by completing projects that require them to
design and build a trebuchet or a race car. Life Science students use a variety
of chemical to determine unknown biological molecules and microscopes for
viewing cell and tissue types. Students also learn about the relevancy of
Physics from guest speakers, including a CAL TRANS engineer. Science and
other students are encouraged to participate in MESA to gain experience in
the applied sciences.

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Teachers in the visual arts department offer a California State standards-
based curriculum, incorporating three-phase lesson design that include
learning objectives and daily agendas, which are displayed and communicated
to students. Teachers incorporate technology into their classrooms with
Powerpoint presentations in lesson introduction. Even though each art
teacher teaches a different class, Art department instructors are able to use
common lessons planned through their Accountable Communities involving              Visual arts
the Elements and Principles of Art, a standards-based directive. Lessons             department and
involve critical analysis of master artists and their artworks and encompass         classroom binders
the artist’s use of the design elements and its impacts upon their artworks.
Technology is further incorporated into classrooms in Photography I-II
through the use of digital cameras, and Photoshop CS4, an industry-standard
image editing software. Students explore numerous aspects of the multi-
faceted application and how it can impact and improve their artworks.
Students do assignments that have both artistic and well as vocational
applications, all while adhering to a standards based curriculum. Students in
yearbook use a proprietary on-line desktop publishing program developed by
Josten’s, our publisher, to create the yearbook. The Yearbook class teaches
design elements used by many professional publishers and designers.
Students again use advanced Adobe Photoshop techniques, professional
photography lighting in the studio, and also use of Adobe Illustrator for the
use of graphics in the school’s graphic intensive yearbook.

In Art I-II as well as 3-D classes, students are able to learn drawing, painting
and three-dimensional art techniques using traditional art methodology and
media. Lessons are all standards-based and involve learning the use of the
Elements and Principles of Principles of Art. Lessons are structured so as
develop the students artistic skill, and increase a student’s critical thinking
abilities through the interpretation and analysis of master artworks, as well as
their own artwork. The art department believes by incorporating analysis and
writing skills into their curriculum, they are able to fully support all the
programs offered at Hoover High School.

Teachers in the Foreign Language department support the core content areas
(English Language Arts, Science, Math, and Social Science) in multiple ways.
Implementing instructional strategies, using technology, and using data-as the
foundation for AC work are all commonplace strategies found both in the             Foreign language
Foreign Language department and core content areas . Think-pair-share,               department and
ticket out the door for assessment at the end of class, posting and review           classroom binders
objectives, using whiteboards for checking for understanding, small learning
groups, oral and written presentations are all shared strategies. Moreover,
they likewise utilize technology such as: elmos, powerpoints, overhead
projector,the internet, and whiteboards (class size and individual student
sized). The Four Foundational Questions (What do we want students to learn?
How do we know if they learned it? What if they didn't learn it? What if they
already know it? drive their AC conversations as all other departments on
campus.

Physical Education has changed over the years, with more of an emphasis             Physical Education
placed on standards-based instruction. PE teachers use three-phase lesson            department and
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design to instruct classes in a different setting than core content teachers. In       classroom binders
addition to PE, students have other options such as Band, Color guard, and
Cross-age PE.

To increase implementation of a variety of instructional strategies, Hoover
High School teachers have access to the services of an instructional coach, as
well as an EL coach. These positions are filled by teachers on special
assignment who work side-by-side with teachers to co-plan, and reflect on
lessons, as well as provide structured feedback from classroom observations
to help refine instructional strategies and teaching practices. In alignment
with FUSD goals and Hoover HS student achievement data, the main focus for
both coaches has been working with teachers who are using the SIOP model
for instruction. Instructional coaches have also focused additional support to
9th grade English Language Arts during the 2009-2010 school year and to
Algebra teachers during the 2010-2011 school year.

To ensure a focus on higher-level thinking, all teachers at Hoover HS have
displayed, on their walls, the Fresno Unified School District “Train of              Train of Thought
Thought”. This shows verbs that promote three different levels of thinking,
using Costa’s three levels, and aligning with Bloom’s Taxonomy, to provide
guidance for teachers to ensure they are incorporating higher-level questions
into their lessons. The Train of Thought is also relevant to learning objectives
for lessons, which helps to promote higher-level thinking in classrooms.

The library at Hoover High School is another valuable resource for teachers.
Hoover HS employs a part-time librarian and library tech, who teach research
lessons to classes in any subject area or level. In addition to existing hard
copy resources, over 25 computers are available for use when teachers bring          Library Technology
their classes to the library. Twenty-two student mini-laptops can also be             Calendar
checked out for use during classes. If hard copy resources are desired, but
not currently in the library, FUSD libraries share books through interlibrary
loan. Although the library is mainly used by English classes, teachers from
other subjects, including Chemistry and U.S. History have made use of library
resources for their classes. English teachers reserve core novels for their
classes through the library, and teachers from all subject areas obtain videos
from the FUSD central library for use in their lessons. The library also
provides access to a mobile library cart for teachers to encourage
independent reading, and for research purposes.

In addition to the library, many teachers at Hoover High School have
embraced the use of technology to enhance lessons and increase student
engagement in the classroom. Teachers are using technology in the
classroom for modeling and demonstration, student engagement, as well as
checking for understanding and assessment. Technology is used in some
classroom for lesson demonstration to make lessons more interactive for
students. For instance, Microsoft PowerPoint is used to create mini-lectures
that provide movement and color to emphasize important concepts and
learning. In some classrooms, document cameras allow teachers to project
information or objects of interest to make it visually accessible to all students
in the classroom. Hoover uses an inclusion model for special education
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students. Technology is used in these classrooms to ensure that students
have the access to curriculum and instruction. PowerPoint presentations
provide more structured instruction and note-taking for students, the. use of
document cameras allows teachers to magnify and model examples for
students, and mini-laptops are available for note-taking and for writing
essays.

Some individual teachers on campus have created web sites, which provide
more information to students about assignments and grades, as well as
increase communication and outreach to families. In some cases, other
resources are made available to specific groups of students based on the need
for additional focused, differentiated instruction. As an example, to help 10th
grade students prepare for success on the CAHSEE, technology is used to
make the most of preparation time. CAHSEE 380 is an online preparation
program that is administered to targeted 10th grade students, based on prior
performance on assessments. The program is available in English Language
Arts and Mathematics, and provides students with individualized
differentiated content and pacing, and allows for monitoring of progress for
accountability.

In the fall of 2011, teachers conducted a total of 80 classroom lesson             WASC Lesson
observations. The results indicate that a wide-variety of instructional             Observation Data
strategies are being utilized in the classroom. The percentage of lessons with
each observed activity is noted below.

Percentage of Lessons with Various Instructional Activities:

       78% Direct Instruction
       70% Class Discussion
       36% Group Work
       30% Small Group Discussion
       24% Hands-on Learning/Manipulatives
       28% Note-taking/Cornell Notes

Percentage of Lessons with Student Practice:

       58% Independent Practice
       30% Worksheets/Study Guides
       18% Journals/QuickWrites
       11% Lab Activities

Percentage of Lessons with Assessment & Closure:

       69% Check for Understanding Strategies/Tools
       23% Lesson Closure
       13% Project/Student-Created Product
       12% Student Performances
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       11% Essay/Written Communication
       8% Objective/Multiple-Choice Quiz/Test
       2% Open-ended/Essay Quiz/Test
       8% Self or Peer Assessment
       6% Student presentations/performances

Percentage of Lessons Incorporating Technology:

       56% Use of Technology (Teacher)
       19% Use of Technology (Students)

Observers also noted that all lessons were tied to a stated standard-based
learning goal or objective and one or more ESLRs. The stated objectives in the
observed lessons were then compared to the FUSD Train of Thought levels.
Level 1 is knowledge/recall. Level 2 is application/analysis. Level 3 is
synthesis/evaluation. Fifty-five (55%) of lesson goals and objectives were
rated as Level 2, 25% were rated and level 1 and 17% were rated as Level 3.
At least one ESLR was observed in all lessons. A summary of the ESLRs from
the lesson observations is shown below.

Percentage of Observed Lessons Incorporating Each ESLR:
     73 % Critical Thinkers
     60% Self-Directed Learners
     58% College and Career Ready Graduates
     54% Effective Communicators
     51% Responsible Citizens
     30% Technological Learners

Analysis of the observation data indicate that the most frequently observed
instructional activities were direct instruction, class discussion, and
independent student practice. Less frequently students were engaged in
collaborative group activities or those requiring written communication.
Most classes included check for understanding activities as part of instruction
and teachers used a variety of methods to assess student understanding. A
majority of lessons incorporated teacher use of technology. However student
use of technology was limited.

WASC student survey data related to classroom instruction is summarized
                                                                                   WASC Student Survey
below.

 My teacher’s lessons provide time for           Percent Usually or Always
 A Variety of Teaching Techniques                          86%
 Using Technology to Teach Lessons                         61%
 Using Written Communication                               74%
 Working Together                                          64%
 Reflection (Closure)                                      54%
 Re-teaching                                               46%
 Me to Actively Participate in Class                       74%
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 Real-World Applications

Additional student survey questions showed that a 66% of students felt
teachers always or usually connected their lessons to daily goals and
objectives, but only 54% felt that their knowledge of these goals and
objectives had increased by the end of the day’s lesson.

WASC teacher survey data related to classroom instruction is summarized             WASC Teacher Survey
below.

 My lesson incorporate                           Percent Usually or Always
 A Variety of Strategies to Differentiate                  87%
 Technology                                                54%
 Written Communication                                     72%
 Opportunities for Student Collaboration                   68%
 Reflection and Closure                                    79%
 Re-teaching Based on Assessment Results                   71%
 Higher-order Thinking (Level 2 and 3)                     75%
 Real-world Applications                                   73%

Overall there is a great deal of consistency between teacher and student
surveys related to instructional activities, lending validity to these data.
However, a discrepancy exists between teacher and student survey results
regarding the reported frequency of reflection and closure and re-teaching.

To more effectively engage students and differentiate instruction, analysis of
the observation and survey data indicate a need for teachers to continue to
seek ways to incorporate instructional strategies other than direct instruction
and independent student practice into their daily instruction. Increased use
of closure strategies and student use of technology would also help to engage
students in the learning process. Teachers also need to explore ways to
provide time for re-teaching when students don’t fully comprehend the daily
goals and objectives.

In closing, to provide access for students to a guaranteed and rigorous
instruction in all subject areas, teachers should continue to participate in on-
going professional development activities, and collaborate with colleagues to
discuss assessment and instruction. All teachers have received ongoing
training and support in three-phase lesson design, but need on-going support
for wide-spread implementation of build a repertoire of effective instructional
strategies to engage all students in learning. Additionally, core subject area
teachers in SDAIE classes have received training and support in the SIOP
model of instruction and the instructional coach will continue to provide
implementation support to teachers. Teachers should continue to use
collaboration time, built into the weekly schedule, to meet in subject area
teams to discuss curriculum, instructional practices, and assessment of their
students.



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C2
     Areas of Strength
       Hoover HS teachers utilize a variety of teaching methods.
       Hoover HS teachers utilize technology in the classroom.

     Areas for Growth
       Hoover HS teachers need to increase the use of technology within AC’s (accountable communities)
         to determine best practices.
       Hoover HS teachers need to utilize other resources, beyond the text, to make student learning
         more relevant.
       Hoover HS teachers need to keep students better informed of their progress throughout the
         grading period.
       Hoover HS teachers need to work on implementing the Classroom Foundations best practices into
         daily instruction, particularly closure and those strategies needed to differentiate learning and
         provide for re-teaching when students are not learning.




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                                Category D:
                     Standards Based Student Learning:
                       Assessment and Accountability
                               Focus Group Leaders:
                            Shannon Creviston, Teacher
                                Jan Trotter, Teacher

Focus Group Members:

  Name                                     Name
  Lauren Lemons Odell, Administration      Patrick Sauceda, SPED
  Choua Mouavangsou, Counselor             Elma Orozco, World Languages
  Andrea Hall, Counselor                   Li Chian, Instructional Aide
  Chong Thao, English                      Diane Robinson, Instructional Aide
  Daniel Springer, Math                    Fanter Her, Instructional Aide
  Lance Trueblood, Math                    Dianne Bryan, Instructional Aide
  Sam Flores, PE                           Luis Arellano-Vera, Instructional Aide
  Debbie Diaz, Science                     Tarsha Tatum, Instructional Aide
  Jonathan Gillespie, Social Science       LaTonya Jones, Instructional Aide
  Steve Calhoun, Social Science            Chelsea Carter, Student
  Brian Mott, SPED                         Garrett Cooper, Student
  Chris Blastock, SPED
  David Ferrer, SPED
  James Bronson, SPED




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D1. To what extent does the school use a professionally acceptable assessment process to collect,
disaggregate, analyze and report student performance data to the parents and other shareholders of the
community?

D2a. To what extent do teachers employ a variety of assessment strategies to evaluate student learning?


D2b. To what extent do students and teachers use these findings to modify the teaching/learning
process for the enhancement of the educational progress of every student?

Findings/Narrative                                                                 Evidence/Data
At Hoover High School, assessment and data disaggregation are part of our      FUSD Data Dashboard
continuous cycle of improvement (CCI). The Hoover HS community views
assessment as integral to monitoring the progress of students and the
effectiveness of classroom instruction. The use of data is critical to drive
curricular decisions. As a school we have taken concrete steps from 2007 to
present to implement data driven decision making, to advance our school
improvement efforts, and to monitor the effective implementation of
innovative programs and processes with an emphasis on results.

COLLECTION AND DISAGGREGATION OF DATA

Through intense and specific support from our district leadership, Hoover HS
has transformed itself into a school that not only utilizes data, but views it as Screen Shots/Samples of
essential to providing every student the personalized support necessary for        Various Tools and
success. As a data driven school, Hoover HS utilizes the following systems and     Assessments
programs to analyze and disaggregate student achievement data:
     Assessment Information System (AiS)
     Achievement Technology Learning Assessment System (ATLAS)
     Equity and Access BETA Tool
     Online Assessment and Reporting System (OARs)
     Special Education Information System (SEIS)
     CAHSEE 380 Assessment Monitoring Tool
     Career Cruising Monitoring Tool
     Information Station for Corrective Reading
     California Department of Education’s DataQuest System
     California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS)

Assessment Information System (AiS)
Hoover HS, utilizes several specific programs that provide concrete data
related to assessment, accountability, and individual student progress. The
Fresno Unified School District has developed a unique data warehouse called
the FUSD Assessment Information System (AiS). Through this system, staff
members have the ability to analyze and disaggregate student achievement
data for state and local formal assessments. Staff members are able to
download, sort, filter, and access charts of student performance to monitor
student performance levels on an ongoing basis. Administrators are able to
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reflect on student performance with teachers using static reports that identify
student performance comparison on the CSTs and the quarterly benchmarks
called the ACS.

Achievement Technology Learning Assessment System (ATLAS)
From 2002-2009, FUSD utilized PowerSchool a student information system
developed by Pearson Education. During the 2009-2010 year FUSD
established a partnership with Microsoft to create ATLAS, a web based
student information system which replaced Powerschool. Systematic training
for all levels of use in FUSD was provided. ATLAS now contains “portals” which
are accessible to various groups; within each portal a staff member has access
a number of features. The portals are divided into the following users:
           Student
           Parent
           Teacher
           Counselor
           School Office
           Principal

Some of the prominent features of ATLAS include gradebook features,
behavior log, assessment link, and attendance snapshot features.

Equity and Access BETA Tool
The Equity and Access Beta Tool is utilized by the Hoover HS counseling team
                                                       to monitor student
                                                       progress in the areas
                                                       of A-G Progress, Credit
                                                       recovery needs, post-
                                                       secondary education
                                                       application status,
                                                       online learning
                                                       potential, and to
                                                       monitor overall
                                                       enrollment in
                                                       advanced learning
                                                       courses.

Through utilizing the Beta Tool, Hoover HS counselors have been provided
with the ability to monitor student progress on a real time basis, and are able
to provide targeted counseling and support for students in response to the
reports generated through the Beta tool.

Online Assessment and Reporting System (OARS)
This web-based system provides schools within the FUSD the ability to create
customized assessments aligned to California State Standards. Users also
have the ability to create and add questions to the item bank and share
assessments they have created with other users. The program provides a
powerful tool for site level development of common assessments. The
reporting piece of the system allows teachers to quickly disaggregate

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assessment results and quickly identify those standards in need of additional
teaching or those which students have already mastered.

Other district-wide systems such as the Special Education Information System
and the CAHSEE 380 Tool are used by specific stakeholders for the purposes
of program planning and decision-making.

Assessments of Critical Standards (ACS):
The Fresno Unified School District Office of Research, Evaluation and
Assessment has worked with high schools within the district to develop
standards based quarterly Assessments of Critical Standards (ACS) and English
Language Development Assessments. These tests are aligned to state
standards, and they provide quarterly feedback to assist us in analyzing
student progress toward standards mastery. These assessments are currently
in place for English I, II, III, & IV, Algebra I & II, Geometry, Biology, Chemistry,
Modern World and United States History.

The ACS has five primary functions:
     Measure student performance on the assessed standards/skills
     Enable teachers to target students for appropriate instructional
       interventions
     Provide overall ACS results in a manner similar to CST results
     Allow teacher self-study of standards/objectives taught
     Enable monitoring of the delivery and pacing of the adopted
       curriculum

To ensure students toward standards mastery, the ACS test performance
bands have been calibrated to CST performance bands so that they serve as
strong predictors of how students will perform on corresponding CSTs. The
Fresno Unified Office of Research, Evaluation and Assessment took students’
ACS results and compared them to their CST results. Using this information,
REA established cut-points that indicate how a student may perform on the
same subject CST. For example, in the case of ELA 9 or 10, if a student is
proficient on ACS ELA 9, it is very likely that s/he will be proficient on the
English I CST. The ACS results can be used to identify red-flags before CST
testing. The ACS has been correlated to the CST and revisions have been
made for the 2011-2012 school year in the areas of ELA and Math to support
the revised FUSD instructional calendar.

These assessments are given during a testing window and scored through our
district office of Research, Evaluation and Assessment (REA). Within 24 hours
of scoring, student data is accessible through our web based Assessment
Information System (AiS).

English Language Development Assessment (ELDA) :
In addition to introducing quarterly assessments based on content standards
(ACS), the quarterly English Language Development Assessment (ELDA) was
implemented in 2007-2008 and is still being used at Hoover HS. The ELDA is
utilized to monitor the progress of English Learner students toward attaining
fluency in the English language. The ELDA system is aligned to the California
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English Language Development Standards and the adopted curriculum in ELD
(Visions). ELDA Tests are to be given to those students enrolled in ELD
Beginning through Early Advanced courses three times throughout the year.
The ELDA mirrors the purpose and timeline of the ACS.

The ELDA has five primary functions to:
     measure student performance on the assessed ELD standards
     enable teachers to target students for appropriate instructional
       interventions
     provide ELDA results in a manner similar to CELDT results and
       determine ELD level adjustment (ELDA)
     allow teacher self-study of standards/objectives taught
     allow monitoring of the delivery and pacing of the adopted curriculum

ANALYSIS OF DATA

Data informs instructional decision making at Hoover High School. The           Four Foundational
implementation of the Four Foundational Questions:                               Questions
     1. What do we want the students to learn?
     2. How do we know if they learned it?
     3. What do we do if they don’t learn it?
     4. What do we do if they already know it?
 These four leading questions act as the grounding for all work in our
 Accountable Communities and Departments, and further imbed the use of
 data to guide our work.

Accountable Communities:
Hoover HS has made progress in implementing assessments at the classroom
level and school-wide. During the 2011-2012 school year, Hoover HS has          District Pacing guides
increased our focus on working within subject area collaborative teams,
known as Accountable Communities (ACs) to construct and revise common           AC pacing calendars
formative assessments to ensure that they are aligned to critical standards
within each content area. Hoover HS has completed the following steps to        Department Binders
assess student learning:
     Implementation of classroom based assessments that serve as               Lesson Snapshots
        accurate predictors of performance on state standardized tests
     Implementation of Common final exams in all core content areas and
        several electives which serve as formative assessments for standards
        based performance indicators in each subject area.
     Grades and ACS data are often shared at 504, IEP, and SST meetings
        to make sure students are properly placed and accommodations and
        support is given if necessary.

Accountable Community Collaboration Time:
While collaboration has been present within the master schedule for more
than four years, the current structure for collaboration provides a venue for   Master Calendar
weekly dialogue surrounding curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This       AC Meeting Agendas and
provides time for staff to gain an in-depth understanding of the needs of our    minutes
students. For the 2008-2009 school year, weekly teacher collaboration time
was designed as part of the bell schedule in order to provide specific
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structured time for staff to engage in analysis, reflection, professional
dialogue and planning related to student performance on standardized and
local assessments. This designated time continued through the subsequent
school years and is currently the structure for collaboration during the 2011-
2012 school year.

This teacher collaboration time has been valuable in ensuring that
departments are provided necessary time to demonstrate progress toward
                                                                                   Instructional Calendars
effectively implementing the school-wide action plan; addressing the
implementation of weekly/daily objectives; and continuing the development
                                                                                   Common Formative
and integration of common objectives with assessments. During the 2010 to
                                                                                    Assessments
present school years the ELA and Math departments have utilized
collaborations to review student performance on assessments, conduct error
analysis of student responses, revise objectives, and review the instructional
calendar to ensure all assessments are moving students toward achieving
proficiency on the California Standards Test.

While all core departments implement common learning goal assessments,
the Hoover HS Leadership team has focused their efforts on supporting the
alignment of the instructional calendars and learning goal assessments
specific courses: English I, II, III, & IV, Algebra I & II and Geometry over the
course of the 2011-2012 school year.

Accountable Community Collaboration Release Days:
Release days have been implemented throughout the history of Hoover High
School, but only since 2008-2009 have the release days been explicitly for the     Release day calendars
development of more aligned instruction. A release day provides a full day for
a team of teachers to drill down into their student data, delve into the           Release day agendas and
content standards, and share best practices. For some departments such as           minutes
English Language Arts, the idea of curriculum maps and instructional
calendars were historically not of the norm and alignment required
adjustments by teachers and instructional material. Through the years these
release days allowed for these changes to be developed and implemented in
all grade levels and subject areas. The release days are pivotal in all core
departments for teachers to continue to implement best practices for the
ever changing needs of the student.

SMART Goals:
Prior to the beginning of the school year, the staff engages in review and
analysis of school-wide student performance data (conversation is guided by
the Four Foundational Questions listed above). Following the school-wide           SMART Goals
review, department breakout sessions provide teachers time to analyze
subject/course specific data and focus collaborations to plan lessons to close     Department meeting
the gap in mastery. All departments set subject and course specific SMART           agendas and minutes
goals based on annual performance data. These SMART goals are to be
specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely. Following the release of
CST scores, Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and Academic Performance Index
(API) data, the staff reviews the SMART goals and makes adjustments where
necessary.

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Instructional Calendars and Pacing Guides:
FUSD has developed pacing guides for core content classes. The Hoover HS          District and department
Accountable Communities have taken those pacing guides, the California             pacing guides
curriculum standards, and curricular resources to develop instructional
calendars. These calendars are the manifestation of the collaborative work        Department binders
these teachers have been participating in, and help to provide greater
consistency between different sections of the same course.

The ACs also use CST released test items, and state approved CAHSEE
preparation materials to integrate rigorous test items that will provide
teachers with data to modify instructional plans to ensure students’ progress
toward mastery. The implementation of objectives, aligned curriculum
calendars, and interim assessments in 2008 has provided departments and
grade level teams with common data to chart and discuss student progress,
this helped each department build common assessments, and propelled the
ability of subject area teams to have common conversations.

Common Formative Assessments:
During the 2011-2012 school year, the focus of the assessments has changed
in order to be aligned with the development of the instructional calendars        Course common
and pacing guides. The Accountable Communities have aligned curriculum             formative assessments
calendars and are in the process of developing common interim assessments
to gauge student progress toward mastery. These Formative Common                  OARS sample print out
Assessments (CFAs) are aligned with the California standards identified for
each grade level. The creation of common assessments assisted departments         AC meeting agenda and
in focusing in on instruction through the process of identifying and               minutes
“dissecting” essential standards, designing lessons for student content
mastery, and collaboration in course/grade-alike groups to plan for
improvement in student academic achievement. This work has been refined
in the 2010-2011 school year as teachers work to make assessments more
reflective of the format of the CST’s. The onsite instructional coach is in the
beginning stages of working with departments to increase the use of the
Online Assessment and Report System (OARS) as a tool for creating common
assessments and analyzing student achievement based on critical standards.
Departments are at varying stages of utilizing the OARS to create individual
teacher tests, common unit/chapter assessments and common final exams.

Teacher survey results also indicate that a majority of teachers report that
their department always or usually analyzes student achievement data from         WASC Teacher Survey
standards-based assessment (72%), utilizes common assessments developed
during collaboration time (66%) and common final exams developed during
collaboration time (70%).

COMMUNICATION OF DATA TO STAKEHOLDERS

Results of state- and district-level standards-based assessments can be
disaggregated and analyzed by school staff using the AiS system. Parents and
students have access to individual assessment results through the ATLAS
system, through regular progress reports sent home to parents, and annual
mailings of state assessment results. Students and parents discuss these          Town Crier samples
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assessment results along with college placement test results during meeting       SSC meeting agendas
with their counselors as students plan their 4-year path through high school.      and minutes
Hoover HS summarizes disaggregated student achievement data on a regular
basis with stakeholders through the School Site Council (SSC) and English
Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC). Finally, results of state assessments are
available to the community through the California Department of Education
(www.cde.ca.gov), through information on the district website, and reports
printed in the local news

Parent Communication:
At Hoover HS we use a variety of structures and venues for keeping parents
informed of their student’s progress and activities, these include: ATLAS
Parent Portal, Academic Progress reports, The Towne Crier Newsletter,
Summer School mailers, Syllabi, Parent Nights (AP, AVID, Back to School, Open
House), Teleparent, CAHSEE 380 Parent meeting, SSC, ELAC, IEP/504/SST.

Teleparent:
Teleparent is an automated call system used to increase the contact between
parents and teachers. Teachers can send messages and information                  Teleparent report
regarding assignments, grades, attendance, behavior and other pertinent
information directly to the home or cell phone of the parent in their home
language. Teleparent delivers the message in over 30 languages of which
English, Spanish, Hmong and Khmer are most often used at Hoover High
School.

Student Communication:
Some examples of student feedback used at Hoover HS include teacher-made          Lesson snapshot
tests, common assessments/final exams, ACS and CST tests, warm –up
questions, quick writes, visual assessment of student work during class, and      Department Binders
verbal assessment of students. These assessments are used to set
individualized academic goals for students.

In the Spring of 2010 Hoover HS began a school-wide initiative to increase
student awareness of its own performance on the CST’s through personalized        CST goal setting sample
CST goal setting. As a result of this goal setting, students began to engage in
dialogue with each other and staff about the importance of their individual       BETA tool sample
student achievement. Hoover HS will continue to implement this goal setting
process due to the positive impact that it has had on our campus. Various
data points for conversations with students included scores from CST,
CAHSEE, AP, CELDT, ELD redesignation, Grades (via progress reports), and
Graduation status (including A-G status).

Parent and student survey results indicate that parents obtain information
about their child’s progress in a variety of ways. A majority of parents          WASC Parent Survey
indicate they get regular reports of their student’s progress most frequently     WASC Student Survey
from progress reports mailed home, talking to their child or using ATLAS.
Student survey results indicate a need for more frequent communication
regarding grades and progress.

Percent of Parents Responding Usually or Always:
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       65% get regular reports of student progress
       61% using ATLAS
       10% email
       47% Teleparent
       28% talking to teachers or counselor
       70% progress reports sent home with their child
       78% talking to their child

Percent of Students Responding Usually or Always
       31% My teachers keeps me informed of my grades on a regular basis
       61% I use ATLAS to check my grades
       56% My teachers go over results of tests and quizzes regularly

VARIETY OF ASSESSMENTS

Hoover HS teachers use multiple indicators to monitor student academic
progress on the academic standards and expected schoolwide learning results
(ESLRs). Collecting data through course grades, ACS scores, CST scores and
other formal assessment listed above has been effective in giving
stakeholders one view of how students are meeting standards and
expectations. Teachers are also using common formative assessments (CFAs)
to collect data that drive their curriculum. In all subject areas, teams use ACS
data to drive their collaborative discussions in terms of strength and areas of
challenge as a department. One purpose of student feedback is to check for
student understanding. Checking for understanding allows the teacher to
monitor student progress and modify and/or plan future lessons accordingly.
Student feedback also allows students to self-assess which assists in
motivating students to improve.

Eighty-four percent (84%) of surveyed teachers reported using a wide variety       Teacher survey results
of assessment options. Observers noted the following types of assessments
related activities during classroom observations.                                  Classroom Observations

       69% Check for Understanding Strategies/Tools
       58% Independent Practice
       30% Worksheets/Study Guides
       18% Journals/QuickWrites
       13% Project/Student-Created Product
       12% Student Performances
       11% Lab Activities
       11% Essay/Written Communication
       8% Objective/Multiple-Choice Quiz/Test
       8% Self or Peer Assessment
       6% Student presentations/performances
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       2% Open-ended/Essay Quiz/Test

Assessment For Learning:
Assessment informs instructional decision making at Hoover. Teachers use
assessments for two primary purposes: assessment for learning and                Single Plan for Student
assessment of learning. Through the introduction of data-driven decision          Achievement
making, teachers have taken hold of the philosophy that assessment results
must inform curricular decision making. This is reinforced by the Four           Leadership team
Foundational Questions which guide ACs. In addition to this, teachers utilize     meeting agenda and
assessment of learning. Through various assessments teachers utilize              minutes
summative assessments to determine to what degree students have
mastered critical academic content standards. To ensure that students are        Cycle of Continuous
provided rigorous and challenging standards based course of study, teachers       Improvement
employ a variety of assessment strategies to gauge student progress toward
standards mastery. Hoover utilizes three primary types of assessment:            Walkthrough/ Learning
diagnostic, formative, and summative. Each form of assessment is used in a        visit tool
purposeful and unique manner to ensure that all students are provided
multiple ways of demonstrating their content area knowledge.

Formal & Informal Assessments:
Teachers utilize formal and informal diagnostic assessments regularly within
the curriculum. In terms of informal diagnostic assessments, teachers utilize
questioning strategies, writing prompts, projects, checking for understanding
techniques and discussion to gauge students’ background knowledge.
Examples of formal diagnostic assessments include assessments utilized
within the CAHSEE intervention courses to identify specific areas of strength
and weakness in terms of the assessed clusters on the CAHSEE. The results of
these diagnostic assessments are utilized by teachers to tailor curriculum and
modify instructional plans.

Summative Assessments:
Summative assessments are utilized to determine to what extent students
have mastered critical academic content standards. Hoover teachers
understand that summative assessments by themselves do not maximize
student learning; however, when the teachers partner summative
assessments with ongoing formative assessments, prior use of diagnostic
assessments, and frequent review of student performance data, the
summative assessments will provide data points for the teacher to measure
student progress. Freshman, sophomore, and junior students at Hoover take
the CST each spring. Results of these state standardized assessments are
utilized in every aspect of instructional decision making from appropriate
student placement in rigorous courses to instructional planning and lesson
design. Our district, in concert with leadership from school sites, has
developed quarterly ACS (Assessment of Critical Standards) tests for the core
classes of Language Arts, Science, Social Science, and Mathematics.

Formative Assessments:
Formative assessments at Hoover are ongoing and occur almost daily in every
classroom, including checking for understanding. These formative                 Walkthrough data
assessments take place in the form of role-playing, simulations, question and
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answer, higher order questioning (according to Bloom’s Taxonomy and/or
Train of Thought vocabulary), choral response, response to literature, quizzes,
projects, presentations, and formal paper assessments.

To more accurately note the types of assessments employed in the classes at
Hoover, the following list includes examples of the assessments that take      Lesson snapshot
place in each of the content areas:
     Art: portfolios, responses to artist quotes, art projects, notes;
     Business: programming, timed tests, projects, multimedia
         assessments;
     Consumer and Family Studies: cooking projects, portfolios, notes
     English: essays, research papers, literature analysis, Priority English
         Assessments, ACS tests, Ticket-out-the-door;
     Foreign Language: written and oral exams, group reading;
     Mathematics: warm-ups, manipulatives, student presentations,
         whiteboarding, unit packets, ACS tests;
     Physical Education: written exams, fitness tests, participation, skill
         test, vocabulary, portfolios;
     Science: labs, lab notebooks, text notes, written exams, group
         presentations, projects, demonstrations, ACS tests;
     Social Science: posters, lecture, text, and film notes, notebook checks,
         written exams, projects, ACS tests.

Checks for Understanding:
Hoover HS teachers implement a variety of informal assessments embedded
within the lesson. These Checking for Understanding (CFUs) strategies vary in
                                                                                  WASC Classroom
implementation within departments depending on the lesson and content.
                                                                                   Observation Summary
Strategies that can be observed include tickets out the door which utilize:
individual student whiteboards, quick writes, think-pair-share, red-yellow-
green cards, thumbs up-thumbs down, and fist to five methods. While this list
is not exhaustive, these are the most frequently observed informal
assessments at Hoover HS. Classroom observation results noted that 69% of
lessons included some form of checking for understanding when the
observers were present in the classroom.

State Assessment Preparation:
Since 2007 the staff was in-serviced and implemented school wide use of
Aligning California Educational Standards (ACES) to improve student
achievement on the CST. ACES includes test taking strategies, practice            Standards Plus lesson
questions in the core content areas and sample release CST questions.              samples
Additionally, in the 2010-2011 school year, Hoover HS implemented for 10th
grade students the use of: Standards Plus Priority English; and for CAHSEE        Department Binders
intervention for 11/12th grade students: Standards Plus Diploma English and
Diploma Math. This Standards aligned modular program continues to provide
Hoover HS teachers with common standards aligned mini-lessons and mini-
assessments to refresh and monitor student progress on key standards
outlined in the instructional calendars for each content area. Hoover HS has
expanded the use of Standards Plus Priority English to include the 9th grade
students in the 2011-2012 year. Teachers utilize the results of these mini-

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assessments to modify instructional plans.

Students were surveyed regarding preparation for state and district                WASC Student Survey
assessments. Sixty-five percent (65%) of students surveyed indicated that
their teachers usually or always took time in class to prepare them for district
or state assessments such as ACS, CSTs or CAHSEE.

Modifying Instruction and Providing Feedback to Students:
Hoover HS examines standards-based assessment data in core departments
and uses that information to modify the teaching and learning process.
Different departments are examining a variety of assessments including
common assessment created by accountable communities, common lab in
                                                                                 Department Binders
science, district benchmark assessments (ACS). Teachers are also examining
student performance throughout the year in relation to the department
created SMART goals established at the beginning of the 2011-2012 school
year.
In addition to using a variety of assessment options in class, teachers at
Hoover HS are using these results to modify instruction and work
collaboratively with their peers to increase student learning. A majority of the
surveyed teachers indicate that they are using assessment results to modify
instruction and re-teach material when needed.
These results are summarized below.

Percent of teachers who usually or always use assessment results to                WASC Teacher Survey
     77% Modify instruction in my classes
     71% Re-teach material when needed
     84% Review assessment results in a timely fashion in my classes

At the department level, a majority of teachers responding to the survey
indicated that their department always or usually analyzes (72%) and plans
and modifies instruction (71%) based on student achievement data from CSTs,
CAHSEE, ACS, common assessments, etc.
                                                                                   WASC Student Survey
Student survey results relating to review and re-teaching are summarized
below.

 Question                                 % Usually       %              %
                                          or Always   Sometimes        Never
 I feel my teachers’ lessons provide         46%         40%            12%
 time for re-teaching when students
 have difficulty.
 I feel that after each class my             52%          42%           4%
 knowledge of the daily goals and
 objectives has increased.
 I am allowed to re-take tests and           42%          47%           9%
 quizzes to improve my grade.
 I think my teachers go over results         56%          32%           9%
 of tests and quizzes regularly.


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These results indicate a need for on-going work with regards to checking for
understanding and having teacher’s consider how to best provide feedback to
students regarding their achievement of the standards and ESLRs.

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING FOR DATA DRIVEN DECISION MAKING

Professional Learning and training at the administrative team level has been
provided through strategic meetings, evening retreats, district facilitated co-
administrator meetings and through a district wide program focused on the
work of Andy Platt and Jon Saphier found in their books The Skillful Leader 2
and The Skillful Teacher.

Skillful Leader Project:
The Skillful Leader Project began in 2008 and is still in place during the 2011-   Skillful leader and
2012 school year. Every administrator at Hoover High School has participated        teacher resources
in this training. The Skillful Leader training enabled us to formalize the
walkthrough process at Hoover, to learn about analyzing instructional and           Walkthrough data
curricular trends, and to utilize walkthrough data to support our school-wide
professional learning and workshop offerings. As our administrative
leadership team proceeded through these trainings, the walkthrough process
was revised and new data points were identified. Support has been provided
to the administrative leadership team at the school site through individual
and small group training on the following critical topics:
           Data driven decision making for master scheduling
           Using data to ensure higher graduation rates by identifying
              students in need of credit retrieval
           Querying and downloading student achievement data by
              subgroups from the FUSD Assessment Information System (AiS)
           Identifying students for CAHSEE intervention
           Creating presentations and modeling effective mini-cycles of
              review by content area
           Using data to drive faculty meetings on data analysis and
              reflection
           Connecting professional learning with identified student
              achievement needs (for example: identifying the needs of long
              term English Learner students and the implications for the
              classroom instructional environment)
           Using data to focus the work of department teams and subject
              area Accountable communities (ACs).

Three-Minute Walkthroughs:
Prior to 2008, Administrative and the Instructional Leadership Team members Walkthrough data
utilized the Downey 3-Minute Walkthrough protocol. In 2008 the
administrative leadership implemented a revised walkthrough accountability
tool that is currently in place. This new tool identifies important data on our
progress in implementing posted agendas, objectives and learning goal
results, and provides the administrative team the ability to review the levels
of questions teachers ask students, and to collect data related to the
California Standards for the Teaching Profession. Following walkthroughs, the

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administrative team provides feedback to teachers in writing or in
conversation (where needed ) about instructional decision making, planning
and assessing student learning.

Counseling Professional Learning:
Professional learning related to data driven decision making has also helped     Counselor meeting
the counseling team refine their counseling skills. Our counseling department     agenda and minutes
received training on five primary counseling program components:
         Implementation of at-risk student counseling through AB1802            BETA tool sample
         Utilizing the Equity and Access BETA tool to monitor student
            progress through transcript analysis and A-G completion              Pre-registration
         Development of supports for English Learner students                    paperwork
         Utilizing the pre-registration and master scheduling process to
            incorporate academic supports for all students
         Utilizing data to analyze the effectiveness of the counseling
            program

Teacher Professional Learning:
All teachers have access to regularly updated information regarding student
progress toward meeting district, state, and federal accountability guidelines
according to the FUSD Assessment Information System (AiS). Most staff have
accessed AiS and viewed student achievement data.
                                                                                  Department Meeting
We recognize that there is a continued need to provide professional               Agendas and Minutes in
development to support staff in implementing data driven decision making          Department Binders
including:                                                                       Lead Teacher Training
     Expanding training in data analysis to ensure effective                    Instructional Coach
        implementation of data driven decision making
     Continuing to analyze and reflect on implementation of Objectives
        and common assessments to ensure they are in tight alignment with
        the content and cognitive rigor of standards
     Increasing training for staff on accessing and utilizing AiS
     Increasing training for staff on accessing and utilizing the Online
        Assessment Reporting System (OARS) to build standards aligned
        assessments that reflect the format and rigor of the CSTs.


D3. To what extent does the school with the support of the district and community have an assessment
and monitoring system to determine student progress toward achievement of the academic standards
and the expected schoolwide learning results?


D4. To what extent does the assessment of student achievement in relation to the academic standards
and the expected schoolwide learning results drive the school's program, its regular evaluation and
improvement and usage of resources?

Findings/Narrative                                                                     Evidence/Data
Fresno Unified School District (FUSD) has made a concerted effort to enable
all schools to be aligned through web-based systems in order to properly           REA
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detail a students’ progress individually, within a school and district wide. The
primary online tool, ATLAS, allows for teacher, students, parents and                 Quarterly progress
administrators access to student’s grades, attendance, behaviors, special              reports mailed to
education needs, and assessment not only at the school in which they are               parents -Sample
attending, but every FUSD school the student has attended. This tool is
beneficial to all shareholders in addressing every student’s need. ATLAS              OAR Logins and print
allows for parents and students to check his/her student’s grades or                   for data review
attendance at any time of day and email teachers with questions or concerns.
Counselors are able to review the history of a student and determine if special
needs are to be put into place as well as whether students need to be
challenged in the AP, GATE or Honors programs. Teachers also are able to see
a student’s grades in all of the student’s scheduled classes. This is pivotal in
assisting students when utilizing our designated ZAP (tutorial built into the
bell schedule) period. A teacher has the opportunity to assess where a
student needs to go for assistance.

                                                                                      ATLAS Progress
Hoover High School parents can utilize the ATLAS web-based program to                  Reports and Daily
identify the progress of their students at any time of day. Training for parents       review
and guardians to utilize ATLAS, called Parent Portal, is held annually and on a
                                                                                      ATLAS – Progress
needs-basis.
                                                                                       Reports
                                                                                      Login percentages
The student survey revealed that 84% of students use ATLAS to monitor their
                                                                                      WASC Student survey
grade. Additionally, 74% of students feel that teachers keep them informed
of their grades on a regular basis.


Teacher & counselor phone calls can be logged in to the ATLAS behavior
modification screen to allow for the reporting to parents of a student’s
progress and needs. The phone calls become a record to all school
                                                                                      Phone calls in
administration and district personnel upon access to ATLAS. Teleparent, the
                                                                                       behavior log in ATLAS.
telephone tool provided by FUSD, is also used to communicate student
progress by Hoover staff.


In the spring of 2007, Hoover began utilizing the TeleParent automated phone
system as a means to communicate school information to parents. Teachers
use this automated phone system to deliver informational messages on
performance, behavior, attendance, missing assignments, and even upcoming
events to each student’s parent/guardian. Some of the messages that have
been utilized to share information with parents include upcoming CAHSEE test
information, CST test information, and individual teacher concerns.
TeleParent has provided Hoover HS staff members the ability to make
frequent contact with parents. TeleParent records the results of each
“broadcast” in graphs and charts providing teachers the opportunity to review
each evening’s “call statistics.” The results of the call statistics have provided
the school with the opportunities to get correct phone numbers and make
referrals for home visits of students whose parents cannot be reached.



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Hoover High School utilizes Fresno Unified School District’s Assessment
Information System (AiS) which is the web-based system to collect, analyze and
disaggregate formal standardized assessment information. The district
Research, Evaluation & Assessment (REA) department maintains the AiS system
allowing teachers and administrators to view student performance. This                 AC common
information is used to guide classroom instruction to be rigorous and                   assessments and
challenging for student’s individual learning needs. It enables teachers to             monthly agendas (ELA,
correctly identify which standards have been mastered by individual students and        SS, Science, Math) –In
which need to be addressed again or in a different modality. Formal assessment          department binders
results are utilized to gather relevant performance/achievement data to
provide the school direction in addressing critical areas of academic need on a
school-wide, department wide, and subject specific basis. The tool is used             ACS sample
regularly to evaluate quarterly benchmark results such as ACS, ELDA assessments and
the state assessments such as CAHSEE, CELDT, and CST.

Individual student assessment information is linked from ATLAS to AiS. This
provides students access to grade information, state standardized
assessments, and local assessment results. Results are reported on AiS include
CAHSEE, CST, CELDT and ACS.

The ACS benchmark assessments are administered 3 times a year by
classroom teachers in the core subject to determine the progress of students
toward mastery of state standards. The last quarter is dedicated to the CSTs           CELDT and ELDA
which also determine the mastery of State standards in regards to other                 results
schools in the state. A similar assessment given quarterly is the ELDA which is
                                                                                       CAPA individual level
for English Language Learners in English Language Development courses.
                                                                                        results
Other state standardized testing which is administered each fall to determine
the progress of English Language Learners is the CELDT test. Special Education
assessments include the Woodcock-Johnson III cognitive abilities test (WJ III),
California Alternative Performance Assessment (CAPA) as well as the
California Modified Assessments (CMAs). The CMA’s are modified
assessments for special education students where the results are used at
Hoover to determine placement in appropriate classes which will meet the
needs of each individual SPED student. This year the WIAT-II was replaced
with the WJ III to determine the academic level of performances which is
administered every 3 years.


A number of teachers evaluate and share good teaching practices of the
standards through the use of OARS which is a web-based software tool that
facilitates the collection, reporting and analysis of periodic assessments within
departments. This web-based system again enables teachers, school, and
districts to modify instruction based upon the assessment results and district
administrators can plan appropriate professional development and support.


Teachers meet on a regular basis in Accountable Communities (ACs) which
review common assessments, share professional development, discuss and
plan for standards-based curriculum involving the curriculum map developed

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by the teachers within the FUSD district. These Accountable communities also         Foundations template
have designated Lead Teachers in all core classes which serve as a window
between District and Grade level instructors to ensure the “tight “curriculum
is being addressed. The conversations in the ACs are guided by the Four
Essential Questions: What do we want the students to learn? How do we
know they learned it? What do we do if they haven’t learned it? What do we
do if they already know it? These questions support the use of data as the
basis of all curricular decisions. The results of this teacher collaboration have
resulted in an understanding of identifying critical standards, intentionally
designing lessons for student content mastery using the Three Phase Lesson
Design protocol and collaboration in course/ grade-alike groups to plan for
improvement in student academic achievement.


When reviewing CST results shareholders are able to determine if                     CAHSEE – Pass rate
intervention courses are needed to assist those who are below grade level             and AiS results,
standards in math or English. Hoover High School offers math intervention,            Reading and Math
CAHSEE Intervention Courses for those who have not passed the CAHSEE in               intervention – BB &
the 10th grade as well as Corrective Reading courses for 9th and 10th grade           FBB CST Scores
students to increase reading comprehension for those below and far below             CAHSEE 380
basic on CST exams. Students who are targeted by the CST results are also
placed in a CAHSEE 380 computer course six weeks before the exam as a
review of standard-based skills.


FUSD Board, District offices, SSC, ELAC, and Parents are able to view the CST
and AYP results from The Fresno Bee Newspaper which posts the scores by
school and district in order to compare results. Parents, District and Board
members are able to evaluate Hoover High School improvements through the             SSC/ELAC minutes
results of the Parent-Teacher Surveys taken each year with results posted on         Fresno Bee –AYP
the Hoover Website. Results of the state assessments such as CST, CAHSEE,             comparison with
and CELDT exams are sent home to parents in order to identify the progress            similar schools
of each student as compared to others in California. Moreover, community             FUSD Parent-Teacher
members can view Hoover HS results as a school through the SARC (School               survey results
Accountability Report Card) which is on the FUSD and Hoover HS website.


Modifications Based on Assessment Results
The Fresno Unified School District has offered a comprehensive support
system to work with schools in implementing data driven decision making. All
broad scale changes in terms of campus culture, instruction, curriculum and
safety are rooted in relevant data. The Fresno Unified School Board,
Superintendent, and Cabinet members annually review assessment results to
drive the District Improvement Action Plan (DIAP). The District level of
analysis follows the cycle of continuous improvement (CCI), the results of
which are planning for action. Following the cycle of continuous improvement
has allowed the School Board and district level administrators to stay innately
in tune with and supportive of school level changes.

Data drives the allocation of resources at all levels in the Fresno Unified

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School District. The allocation of categorical monies is specifically tied to data
demonstrating the capacity of the school to implement necessary changes.
The district has developed a template for the Single Plan for Student                 Hoover HS SPSA
Achievement (SPSA) based on research-based best practices and student
assessment data. The categories encompassed within the SPSA reflect district
identified areas of need based off of student assessment results from the
California High School Exit Exam, the California Standards Test, the California
English Language Development Test, and the California Healthy Kids Survey.

The School Site Council and English Learner Advisory Committee serve as links
with the community and parents. These advisory groups analyze student
assessment data to plan for the allocation of Title One, Economic Impact Aid          SSC/ELAC minutes and
and Limited English Proficient categorical monies. The focus of the School Site        agendas
Council is on closing the achievement gap to proficiency for minority
subgroups. To assist in this endeavor, the ELAC allocates monies to provide
services, interventions, instruction and professional development that will
close the achievement gap and scaffold all students to proficiency.

The purpose of the English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) is to provide
opportunities for parents to give advice and assist the school in the decision
making process concerning programs for English Learners. The ELAC focuses
on the development and implementation of the school plan for English
Learners that is submitted to the Fresno Unified School Board of Education.
The committee also develops an annual school needs assessment for English
Learners and reviews the school's annual language census (R-30) to develop
the school's plan for English Learners and help make parents aware of
concerns related to ELs. The SSC and the ELAC are fully staffed and
functioning at Hoover High School, which provides the school with valuable
information based on relevant student data (performance, language,
attendance, demographic) to implement essential programs and services to
close the achievement gap and provide rigorous educational opportunities to
all students.

As a result of the FUSD school boards commitment and Assembly Bill 1802,
additional counselors were hired to meet students’ needs. The counseling
department is dedicated to make one-on-one contact with every student,
every year of their career at Hoover High School. Counselors utilize these AB
1802 conferences to discuss graduation progress, attendance, grades,
behavior, AP potential, rigorous courses of study, career technical education         Comprehensive
options and assessment information (including CAHSEE, CST, CELDT, ACS and              Guidance Plan grade
ELDA). The AB 1802 conferences promote the ESLRs by challenging students               7-12 (2011)
to become self-directed learners who set goals and review their own
progress. Following each one-on-one conference, counselors utilize the
academic counseling link in ATLAS to input information discussed with
students. This helps the counseling department reflect on past conferences
and address critical areas of student need in follow up counseling sessions.

As Hoover High School has evaluated the results of the CST exams from the
previous year, students have been identified as needing assistance in English

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and Math when they score Far Below Basic and Below Basic. These                    CAHSEE – CST FBB &
identifications resulted in establishing CAHSEE Intervention Classes, CAHSEE        BB results
380 program, and the addition of classroom aides in courses where
mainstreamed RSP, 504 and SDC students are present.


Another change which has been enacted due to assessment results is the
addition of credit recovery courses. These courses allow students to quickly
regain units which were lost in the first semester by completing the course in     Transcripts and
a district created and approved after school program. Students make up              graduation %
credits in the second semester rather than wait for Summer school which
increases the percentage of students who are still on track to complete the A-
G requirements needed for graduation.


Areas of focus for teachers to improve instruction and classroom
management includes SIOP training, Capturing Kids Hearts Training, and
incorporating aspects of the methods expressed in Discipline in the Secondary
Classroom.


Other areas of change are established in the addition of a corrective reading      classroom and dept.
course to assist Far Below Basic and Below Basic scores in English Reading          lessons
Comprehension for incoming 9th grade students. In math the emphasis is on a
teacher generated tutorial during lunch time and after school. This tutoring is    CAHSEE – CST FBB &
available for all math classes and is manned by the math department on a            BB results
volunteer basis in order to increase the math pass rate on the CAHSEE and          Sign-in sheets for
CST scores.                                                                         tutoring


In order to establish greater teacher/student connections and enable more
opportunities to instruct a student on a daily basis, Hoover High School
eliminated the Modified Block schedule and instituted an all period traditional
day schedule. This allows for a better relationship between student and
teacher as well as a better ability to make up missing assignments when            Bell Schedule
absences happen due to illness or school related business. This change of
schedule also includes a built-in study hall type of program which we call ZAP.
It enables students to get more individualized instruction or tutoring from
their actual teacher as well as make-up tests, homework or in class
assignments within the provided school day.


The most productive of changes, which resulted from the overlay of
information, came in the need for teachers to collaborate. This collaboration      AC meetings monthly
developed into our Accountable Communities (ACs) wherein like grades and            agenda
classes are able to collaborate about instruction by identifying weakness and
strengths in the development of new lesson plans which incorporate the
Curriculum Maps provided by the district. These meetings look at statistical       Course syllabus and
data from Ais and ATLAS in order to meet the needs of each student. They are        Observations
based on the Four Foundational Questions. Not only are the AC committees
managed by the Department Chairs of each content area, but individual grade        Foundations template
levels or content areas have Lead Teachers who are responsible to facilitate
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the discussions in more specific areas and follow the designed agenda. (AC
lead examples are: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, English I, II, III, MWH, and    Common assessments
USH). The Development of the AC committee continues to initiate growth in            & lesson designs
all areas of content and standards based instruction.


The English Language Arts courses have also established a district mandated
program designed for all 9th and 10th grade ELA courses called, Priority English
which is a daily 10 minute review lesson of the required California English         Professional
Language Arts Standards. The FUSD has provided training and professional             development agendas
development each year to assist in the use of this program.


Professional Development days have been designated for Math and English
teachers in order to assess the needs of the school each year. These PD days
have been pivotal in the development of common assessments and
curriculum.


Another area of change which has taken place at Hoover High School was the
removal of the old grade book program of Powerschool and the integration of
the new web-based program ATLAS. This transformation made it possible for
all district schools to view the records of any student from elementary, to
middle school, to high school all from the same system. This information is
invaluable as an assessment tool and meeting the needs of every student in
the district.

Hoover has expanded and refined the monitoring structures put in place to
assess our progress in improving student achievement. These structures,
Cycle of Continuous Improvement, the Cycles of Review, District Data
Dashboard Indicators and School Site Council, are designed to help monitor
progress at the site and district level.

Each department utilizes the Cycle of Continuous Improvement to ensure
refinement of Learning Objectives. Department lead teachers provide time
within collaborations to lead discussions surrounding the effectiveness of
Learning Objectives in measuring student learning. Following this analysis,
each subject area AC refines smart goals and/or identifies appropriate
interventions to meet students assessed learning needs.

The Cycle of Review is a process where the instructional leadership team and
administrative leadership utilize the Cycle of Continuous Improvement
matched with specific data dashboard indicators to discuss Hoover’s progress
toward improving student achievement.

The FUSD Board of Education monitors the progress of all High schools each
semester through data presentations and a discussion of student
achievement and attendance data.

The Hoover HS School Site Council reviews the site’s progress in implementing
the WASC action plan. Additionally, the SSC requests information regarding
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the implementation of new initiatives.


Additional Findings:

Two years ago upon examination of the decline in the amount of students
who enrolled in 2-4 year Universities during their senior year, Hoover made a
concerted effort to improve the opportunities granted to Hoover graduating
seniors. This included a push for a greater percentage of Hoover students          AVID
taking the SAT /ACT college preparation test, and through the impact of
counselors, an increase in the number of seniors applying to UC and CSU
colleges and financial aid. To ensure that all students are college ready
graduates, Hoover also increased the amount of AVID courses offered to the
academic “middle of the road” students who have the desire to go to college
and the willingness to work hard. Typically, they will be the first in their
families to attend college, and many are from low-income or minority
families. Not only are students enrolled in Hoovers most rigorous classes,
such as honors and AP, but also in the AVID elective where they learn
organizational and study skills, work on critical thinking and asking probing
questions, get academic help from peers and college tutors, and participate
in enrichment and motivational activities that make college seem attainable.
Their self-images improve, and they become academically successful leaders
and role models for other students.


Through further analysis Hoover realized we were in need of intervention
with the male students who often times scored far below basic to basic in
their CST scores, had multiple suspensions, had poor attendance and had
behavior problems while in class. With this criterion, the Men’s Alliance
                                                                                   Men’s Alliance
program was formed to capture the trust and academic future of these
young men. This course focuses on respect for all, team building exercises,
tutorials, field trips to such places as the museum of tolerance and a real
effort to view things from another’s point of view. The program is in its
infancy stages, but the results and changes which have occurred in the
behavior and academics of the 25-30 young men in the program has proven
effective.


Another area of focus is the District ELAC committee. The formulation of
this committee by the district has been pivotal in meeting the needs of the
English Language Learners at Hoover High School. The Hoover ELAC
committee nominate a few of its representatives to meet with the DELAC in
                                                                                   DELAC
order to address the issues District wide which impact the Hoover
community as well. The ELAC works similarly to the SSC but specifically for
English Learners to ensure that monies and needs at each site are being
distributed and met in appropriate fashion.




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D
Areas of Strength
    The school, with the support of FUSD, is committed to data-driven instructional decision-making at
       all levels.
    The school and teachers have a wide variety of options to communicate assessment results to
       students including Teleparent, progress reports, and the FUSD ATLAS System.
    The staff has high quality tools provided by FUSD at their disposal to use in analyzing and
       disaggregating standards-based achievement data such as ATLAS and AiS.
    The school has dedicated time for teachers built into master calendar to provide teachers with the
       opportunity to collaborate regarding assessment and accountability.
    Staff is dedicated to working as a collaborative team utilizing common assessments and curriculum
       discussions in accountable communities.
    Teachers use technology for test construction, evaluation and good teaching practices.

Areas of Growth
    The staff must continue to work to develop common assessments and utilize the results of
       assessments to modify the teaching and learning process in a more targeted manner.
    Teacher and students need to communicate about grades and progress on a more frequent basis.
    The school must examine better ways to assess and evaluate student progress on the ESLRs.
    More teacher training on updated technology such as OARS and smart classrooms to continue to
       assess and evaluate the data from those assessments.
    To increase student accountability and engagement in the learning process, establish more support
       structures to improve student attendance, reduce truancy and support academic achievement and
       meeting graduation requirements.
    To improve communication and increase student accountability, provide more options to inform
       students about what it means to be a college and career ready graduate starting in the ninth grade.
    The district needs to continue to refine the ATLAS system to increase its ease and frequency of use
       with all stakeholders.




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                        Category E:
    School Culture and Support for Student Personal and
                     Academic Growth
                               Focus Group Leaders:
                              Dara Johnson, Teacher
                              Barbara Rios, Counselor

Focus Group Members:

  Name                                     Name
  Blair Campbell, Administration           Nick French, SPED
  Sheri Mallory, Art                       Phil Ureno, Tech Ed/ROP
  Leslie Loewen, Campus Culture            Elaine Yen, World Languages
  Chuck Toste, English                     Susan Gutierrez, Instructional Aide
  Paul Miskulin, English                   Lee Williams, Instructional Aide
  Luke Ross, Math                          Sareta Elliot-Deal, Instructional Aide
  Stephanie Garcia, Math                   Vivian Walls, Instructional Aide
  Sheldon Schlesinger, Music               Nina Billups, Instructional Aide
  Rick Lyons, PE                           Kara Veith, Parent`
  Joel Janzen, Science                     Soloman Ambrayan, Student
  Jill Holt, Social Science                Brijido Cisneros, Student
  Peter Beck, Social Science               Theo Wales, Student
  Michelle Carmichael, SPED




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E1. To what extent does the school leadership employ a wide range of strategies to encourage parental
and community involvement, especially with the teaching/learning process?

Findings/Narrative                                                                    Evidence/Data
Regular Parent Involvement

The Hoover High School Staff knows that building healthy relationships with
parents and the local community is essential to ensuring continued student
success. Hoover HS dedicates a significant amount of human, material and
time resources and employs a wide range of strategies to encourage parental
and community involvement in the areas of academics, activities, and
athletics.
                                                                                    School Web Site
Hoover High School employs a wide range of strategies including publications,       Towne Crier
electronic technology, and various other measures to encourage parental and         Tele-Parent
community involvement and to inform parents and community about the                  Calendars
learning process. The school newsletter and Teleparent are the primary means        Master Calendar
of communicating with parents. The electronic marquee is used to convey             Open House
daily and weekly information about upcoming events.                                  Calendar

Additional efforts to include all parents include:                                  ELAC Parent
    English Learner Advisory Committee Meetings: To ensure all parents              Meeting Sign-In
        are notified of ELAC meetings, a Teleparent automated phone                  Sheet
        message in English, Spanish, & Hmong Languages go out to all parents        Agenda
        to remind them about meetings. Agendas are posted in the front office
        a minimum of 72 hours in advance of each meeting.
    Home Visits and Referrals: Our School Readiness Facilitator is available       Referral Form
        to make home visits. All visits are logged in and kept in a binder with     Logged Entries and
        results on referrals.                                                        Binder
    Translation services: Translation services are primarily provided by our       Examples of
        School Readiness Facilitator. Services include translation in written        Hmong/Spanish/
        and oral form for all parents, counselors, teachers, SAP counselor,          English translation
        Nurse, and other Staff for all conferences and other issues as
        requested. The District English Learner Services is used for lengthy
        translations.

To gather feedback from parents regarding the support that they receive from        Annual
Hoover HS, a Parent/Family Survey (PFS) is sent home with students during the        Parent/Family
Fall semester. All FUSD schools participate in this parent perception survey,        Survey
and the Hoover HS administrative team reviews parent/family perceptions
annually to determine how to modify the parent education and involvement
program at Hoover HS to ensure it is inclusive and meets the needs of all
parents.

School Site Council:                                                                School Site Council
The School Site Council is a collaboration of elected parents, teachers and          Sign in
students who meet monthly to evaluate school-wide issues and strategies.            Agenda and
The Hoover HS School Site Council takes an active role in developing the Single      Minutes
                                                                                    Single Plan for
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Plan for Student Achievement, annually reviewing student achievement data,              Student
monitoring the implementation of categorically funded programs, and                     Achievement
allocating financial resources to support the school in meeting the needs of all
students
                                                                                     Sample
In the Fresno Unified School District, parent input is gathered in multiple ways.     Redesignation form
One of the ways that input is gathered is through the parent recommendation
component of the English Learner Re-designation Form. Prior to a student
being re-designated as Fluent English Proficient (R-FEP) the parent must read
and sign a re-designation form agreeing that their child is fluent in the English
language.
                                                                                     HEF Minutes
In alignment with FUSD goals, it is important that Hoover HS engage parents in       HEF Scholarship
supporting athletics in addition to arts and academics. The Hoover Educational        Application
Foundation (HEF) is comprised of Hoover parents and teachers. HEF raises
funds to support all Hoover programs and students. HEF meets monthly to
discuss fundraisers and school site needs.                                           Hall of Fame
                                                                                      Banquet Ticket
The Hoover Boys Basketball Boosters Club raises funds for the members of the         Tournament
Boys Basketball Program. The Booster Club raises money for tournaments,               Bracket
transportation, equipment, and volunteers who help work the Holiday                  Little Pates
Invitation Tournament, Little Pates K-8 Winter Basketball Camp and the Spring         Registration Form
/Summer tournaments offered at Hoover. It also helps to honor and recognize          Summer Camp
past Basketball players at their Hall of Fame banquet in the Fall.                    Registration Form

The Hoover Girls Basketball Program encourages parent and community                  Potluck agenda
involvement through various activities and events including their parent/player      Tournament
potluck, Hoover Holiday Classic Tournament and Toys for Tots Drive, Little            brackets
Pates Winter Camp, middle school outreach free basketball camps, Alumni              Toys for Tots Flier
Recognition Night, Middle School Basketball Team Night and “R-word Night” in         Little Pates
conjunction with Special Olympics. The coaching staff communicates to the             Registration Form
parents on a weekly basis through the basketball calendar and the “Lady Pate         Various Fliers and
Update” newsletter.                                                                   Invites
                                                                                     Calendar
                                                                                     Lady Pate Update
The Hoover Dugout Club was established in 2010. The club is comprised of              Newsletter
Hoover parents who fundraise for equipment and travel for the Hoover                 Hoover Dug Out
baseball program. Other activities include community service and outreach to          Sign In
feeder middle school program.                                                        Christmas Tree
                                                                                      Fundraiser Flier
                                                                                     Hall of Fame
The Hoover Football Boosters Parent Club goal is to help raise funds and              Banquet Flier
community support for the Hoover HS football program. Contributions assist           Football Booster
with team meals, uniforms, practice shoes, game cleats, and other necessary           Membership
equipment, as well as award and recognition items. The football booster              Football Program
program functions as a nonprofit organization. All donations received are tax
deductible.

The Hoover Girls Volleyball Program encourages parent and community
involvement with a parent potluck and team dinner. Team members walk door            Potluck Invite
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to door before each season in the Hoover community handing out schedules             T-Shirt
and inviting businesses and neighbors to the team’s games and their Breast            Announcement
Cancer Awareness Night and encourages participation by selling T-shirts,             Breast Cancer
distributing bracelets to the entire staff, student body and feeder middle            Awareness Bracelet
schools. Additionally, the team hosts a Little Spikers League from February          Invites to Little
through April for K-6 graders and a Middle school tournament, where the               Spikers and Middle
entire valley middle schools are invited to attend.                                   School Clinics

Hoover’s Special Olympics Program invites parents to attend all events and are
notified of events by notes, field trip request forms, calendar. Parents are also    Meeting Sign in
welcome to attend the Fresno County Special Olympics committee meetings              Correspondence
held the 3rd Tuesday of each month at Eaton Elementary school. They are put           Examples
on a mailing list when they attend a meeting and will receive all
correspondence regarding special Olympics.

Hoover has a long rich tradition of participation in the Special Olympics
originating in 1988. Furthermore, Hoover was the first school in FUSD and            Flyers
Northern California to establish an active “R” word campaign designed to raise       T-Shirt Order Forms
the consciousness of society by supporting the elimination and use of the            Calendar
word ‘retard’ from every day speech and promote the acceptance and
inclusion of people with Intellectual Disabilities.

Hoover’s Special Olympics Program relies completely on community financial
and volunteer support to run all of its programs. There are no federal/state
grants. All support is 100% fundraising. Hoover is the sole host of the Fresno
County Special Olympics local school basketball competition, the Regional
basketball tournament and the Regional aquatics tournament. Though the
swim meet is held at Clovis High, Hoover hosts and runs the program. Hoover
students provide the bulk of volunteer support for these ‘host’
tournaments/competitions.

Other athletic programs, including Hoover Tennis, Boys and Girls Golf, Lacrosse
and Hoover Aquatics also encourage parent involvement by hosting parent              Sports Banquet
dinners and encouraging their attendance and support to attend athletic               Letters
events and awards programs.                                                          Sports Banquet
                                                                                      Program
The music department has a non-profit community parent group to support
Hoover’s orchestra, called the Central California Youth Symphony. This parent        Meeting Minutes
group provides financial support by fundraising for students who wish to             Silent Auction Flier
attend the bi-annual European spring tour during Easter break. They host two
silent auctions annually to support this tour.

Connecting with the Community

In addition to getting parents involved in the school, Hoover HS focuses on
getting students involved in building connections within the community.


Hoover parents and community members have found many opportunities to
affect the student learning process. Several professional services have formed
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partnerships with Hoover. In the past, several businesses have provided
judges for Mock Trial, real world experiences for leadership students,
sponsored club activities, and awarded scholarships at Hoover.


Other community involvement includes guest speakers who are invited to
classrooms in various departments. Guest speakers have included staff from         Guest Speaker
community organizations, business professionals, school board members, and          Request Forms
college and career representatives. Business professional from the community       ACE Advisory Role
also provide an advisory role for Hoover’s Architecture, Construction and           List
Engineering (ACE)Magnet. School leadership is able to further engage               Various Fliers
community involvement in the learning process through Cultural Diversity
Assembly, Fine Arts Performances, Adopt a Park Program, “End the R word”
campaign, Relay for Life, Toys for Tots, Holiday Community Food Drive and the
Susan G. Komen Foundation (Hoover Digs Pink).


Another off campus resource is CSU-Fresno whose students mentor Hoover
students and provide assistance in the learning process through AVID. CSU-         Student Sign In
Fresno also provides support for Hoover HS students involved in the MESA
program. Fresno City College and UC Merced’s Upward Bound programs also
help mentor Hoover students and offer academic support for these students.

                                                                                   Syllabus
In addition, many Hoover students serve as Cross-Age Physical Education            Assignment Sheet
tutors in the community, which allows students to work in Hoover’s feeder          Field Trip Form
elementary schools, assisting the elementary teacher in teaching to the
Physical Education State Standards. These students also volunteer at
McCardle’s Monster Mash and the Eaton, McCardle and Wolters school
carnivals.
                                                                                   Club Flier
The Science Enrichment Club, an on campus club, is open to all students and        Assignment Sheet
encourages community involvement, as well. The club’s primary goal is to           Field Trip Form
teach standards based science curriculum to first through third grade
students. The club brings hands on materials, that most elementary schools
do not have access to, into their classroom. Additional service has been
provided to our Hoover HS feeder schools, McCardle and Wolters, as well as
Manchester G.A.T.E and Lincoln Elementary in Clovis Unified and Webster
Elementary in Madera Unified.

In addition to community outreach and service programs, Hoover HS provides
several opportunities throughout the school year for parents to come to the
school to meet with staff members to discuss and receive feedback regarding
their child’s academic progress. At each of these parent meetings, translators
are present to assist parents, whose primary language is Spanish or Hmong, to
ensure that they have access to information related to their child’s academic
progress. These parent nights include the following:
               Back to School Night
               Open House
               ACE Magnet Recruitment
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               AVID Parent Night
               FAFSA Parent –Student Workshops
               Summer School Information Night
               Freshmen Summer Bridge Parent Night
               Grade Level Parent Nights

AVID Parent Night:                                                                   Flier
THE Hoover HS AVID program holds two parent nights per year, one in the fall
and one in the spring. Parent meetings are a certification requirement of the
national AVID program. The AVID coordinator, AVID elective teachers, AVID
site team, and AVID students plan the purpose and agenda for the meetings.

Back to School Night:                                                                Flier
Back to School Night is held during the first semester and provides parents an       TeleParent Log
opportunity to visit their child's teachers in the classroom where syllabi are       Town Crier
distributed including class expectations. Parents are invited to attend by
TeleParent, flyers, school marquee and banners.
                                                                                     Flier
FAFSA Parent-Student Workshops                                                       TeleParent Log
THE Hoover HS Counseling team facilitates evening Free Application for               Counselor Monthly
Federal Students Aid (FAFSA) workshops for students and parents to ensure             Map
that all students have access to the resources that will encourage success in        Classroom
post-secondary education. All counselors work together to reach out to all            Presentation
seniors and their parents. Parents and students are notified by classroom             Assignments
presentations, mail, Teleparent, and counselor contact regarding these
evening meetings. A computer lab is made available to all parents and students
and financial aid representatives from Fresno City College and CSU Fresno are
present to assist parents with the application process and to answer questions.

Grade Level Parent Nights:                                                             Towne Crier
Parent Nights for every grade level are held to reach out to Hoover HS parents         Website
and inform them of grade level requirements and school activities. Parents are         TeleParent
informed of the meetings via the Towne Crier, Hoover website, TeleParent,              Flier
flyer and marquee. The first parent night is held for Seniors in November.             Grade Level Booklet
During the second semester, Junior, Sophomore and Freshman parent nights
are also held. At each meeting, parents are introduced to administration,
campus culture personnel, counselors, Hoover athletics and class officers. At
each meeting, every parent receives a booklet of information pertaining to
that particular grade level as well as, information regarding graduation
requirements and key academic and social events offered by our Campus
Culture for all of Hoover HS students.

Open House:
Open House night is held during the second semester and provides parents a           Flier
second opportunity during the school year to visit with their child’s teachers to    TeleParent
discuss progress and academic achievement. Parents are invited to attend via         Town Crier
TeleParent, flyers, school marquee and banners.

The Summer Bridge Parent Night                                                       Flier
The Summer Bridge Parent Night offers 9th grade parents information about            T-Shirt
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the summer program that supports transition from middle school to high
school. Students who have been identified by their middle school as being
underperforming and disengaged in learning are invited to attend a three
week structured Bridge program to assist them in easing the transition to high      Summer School
school.                                                                              Letter
                                                                                    Flier
The Summer School Parent Night
The Summer School Parent Night is hosted by the Hoover HS summer school
administration and provides information to students who have been identified
as needing to attend to earn credit recovery and/or to meet A-G eligibility. The
Hoover HS Counseling team also attends to provide support and assistance to         WASC Parent
parents regarding questions pertaining to placement and progress towards             Survey
graduation.

A WASC Parent Survey was administered in the Fall of 2011. The results below
of 129 parents who responded to the survey indicate their perceptions of
communication and parental involvement.

 Survey Question                                          Percent Responding
                                                          Usually or Always
 I get regular reports of my child’s progress in school           65%
 in a variety of ways.
 I feel there are ways to partner with the staff to               57%
 become more involved in the teaching/learning
 process.
 I feel that district level administration and the school         55%               FUSD Parent Family
 board support the Hoover community.                                                 Survey

The parent and family survey results also indicate that a majority of parents
feel the school does a good job of communicating with them and providing
opportunities for them to become involved in their child’s education.




E1
Strengths:
     Hoover High School has a variety of active programs that involve the community.
     The teaching staff has the ability to contact parents through multiple means of communications.


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Areas of Growth:
    More involvement with community is desirable
    Better communication needed with families of students who are struggling academically.

E2. a) To what extent is the school a safe, clean, and orderly place that nurtures learning?

E2. b) To what extent is the culture of the school characterized by trust, professionalism, high
expectations for all students, and a focus on continuous school improvement?

Findings/Narrative                                                                       Evidence/Data
Hoover High School prides itself on using various existing policies and available         Hoover HS
resources to maintain and ensure a safe, clean and orderly environment that                  Handbook
nurtures learning. The Hoover High School Student-Parent Handbook                         FUSD
communicates site and district policy, while the Fresno Unified School District              Handbook
Handbook, outlines all district policy and procedures, and are each given to
students and parents.

In a recent survey, 76.2 % of the Hoover parents surveyed felt that their child is
safe on campus. A total of 65.2% of teachers felt that Hoover is a safe, clean and        California
orderly place. In order to increase the level of safety felt by all staff, the Student     Healthy Kids
Responsibility Center (S.R.C.) has been set up to reinforce consequences of bad            Survey
behavior. However, when students were surveyed about whether they felt safe at            Staff Survey
Hoover, only 42.8% felt very safe. The S.R.C. will also assist in raising this            Parent Survey
percentage. Faculty and staff have also responded to make students feel safer by          Student Survey
encouraging more teacher and staff presence outside classrooms during lunch an            Safe and Civil
passing periods.                                                                           Schools
                                                                                           Handbook
To respond to the needs of students, Hoover HS structures all programs regarding
student safety, and behavior support in alignment with the Response to                    Sample
Intervention Tiered Intervention Model. In this model at Hoover HS we have found               documents
it necessary to establish universal behavior support and classroom management                  from Safe and
processes to afford all students the opportunity to learn in a safe and orderly                Civil Schools
environment.                                                                                   Handbook




Hoover HS has implemented two universal interventions to support student safety

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and learning. These interventions were developed through the implementation of
structures learned through Dr. Randy Sprick’s Safe and Civil Schools Training and
Flip Flippen’s Capturing Kid’s Hearts Training.

Safe and Civil Schools Universal Intervention

In the Summer preceding the 2010-2011 school year, approximately 10 staff
members from Hoover HS were able to participate in Dr. Randy Sprick’s Safe and          Safe and Civil
Civil Schools Training. In 2011-2012 an additional group of staff were trained. Safe     Handbook
and Civil Schools is considered to be an evidenced based Positive Behavior Support      Safe and Civil
System (PBS) that provides proactive and positive strategies for improving school        Schools
culture and climate. Through implementing the structures outlined through Safe           student video
and Civil Schools, intended outcomes of the implementation are:
              Reduce expulsions, suspensions, office referrals, truancy,
                 tardiness, and classroom disruptions
              Improve the degree to which students feel connected to their
                 school
              Increase consistency and use of common language among staff
              Reduce bullying

The focus of Safe and Civil Schools is on what is called the S.T.O.I.C. Model
             • Structure/organize all school settings for success
             • Teach students how to behave responsibly in those settings
             • Observe student behavior (supervise!)
             • Interact positively with students
             • Correct calmly, consistently and immediately in the setting in
                 which the infraction occurred
Safe and Civil Schools is part of a district Targeted Improvement Action and is
linked to the FUSD Data Dashboard indicator focused on decreasing suspensions
and expulsions. Hoover HS is part of Cohort 3 of the training and participated in       FUSD Data
the training with 12 other high school and middle schools in FUSD. The                   Dashboard
introduction of the Safe and Civil Schools program at Hoover was necessary so            Report
that we can maintain a safe and orderly learning environment for our campus.

Together, the team created a variety of strategies that were implemented in 2010.
These strategies were brainstormed at a variety of seminars attended with other
FUSD school teams. The seminars provided examples of other programs that
schools across the country were implementing. As a follow-up to the seminars,
the team met on a biweekly basis to (1) ensure all loop holes were addressed, (2)
reflect on the process, and (3) revise ideas for improvements with advice and           Behavioral
important concerns from our students, parents, and staff. Strategies                     Expectation
implemented include: Tardy Sweeps by teachers and administration; Behavior               Chart
Expectations and Consequences Chart posted in classrooms and communicated to            Tardy Slip
students by their teachers; Tardy Slips, written by students and signed by              VP Referral Slip
administrators during tardy sweeps or given by attendance office to assist              10/10 Rule
teachers in taking attendance; red VP referral Slips when a student is needed to         Flier
see a VP for discipline reasons; and the 10/10 rule where students are not
permitted to leave the classroom for the first or last ten minutes of class.

Capturing Kids Hearts-Universal Intervention
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At the core of the Capturing Kids Hearts Training is “if you reach a child’s heart,      Capturing Kids
you reach his mind.” The primary focus of Capturing Kids’ Hearts is to develop            Hearts
healthy relationships between members of the school’s educational community               Handbook
and to teach effective skills that help participants:                                    Men’s Alliance
     Develop self -managing classrooms and decrease discipline issues through            Class Data
        innovative techniques such as a social contract                                  Sample
     Decrease delinquent behaviors such as disruptive outbursts, violent acts,           Classroom
        and drug use                                                                      Social
     Utilize the EXCEL Teaching Model™ and reinforce the role of emotional               Contracts
        intelligence in teaching
     Build classroom rapport and teamwork to create a safe, trusting learning
        environment
     Develop students’ empathy for diverse cultures/backgrounds
     Increase classroom attendance by building students’ motivation and
        helping them take responsibility for their actions and performance

To accomplish these outcomes, the primary skills/strategies that we learn in
Capturing Kids’ Hearts are:
1. The EXCEL Leadership/Relationship/Teaching Model™
2. The Social Contract
3. Four Questions for Misbehavior
4. Four Questions for Disrespect
5. SOLER Listening Skills
http://www.flippengroup.com/pdf/funding/Overview_of_CapturingKidsHearts.pdf

Capturing Kids’ Hearts is a training experience available for faculty, teachers, and
staff. It takes place off campus and lasts up to three days. This process focuses on
building trusting relationships with the students. The goal is for teachers to be
able to provide their students with leadership and productivity skills. This program
allows administrators, faculty, and teachers to make their classroom a more safe
and effective environment for learning. Two staff members attended Capturing
Kids’Hearts training in 2010 -2011. The success of their program led to more staff
members participating in the 2011-2012 training. Utilizing Capturing Kids Hearts
has provided the Hoover HS Administrative team with the ability to restructure
the approach to discipline beginning in the 2011-2012 school year through the
Student Responsibility Center(S.R.C.).

S.R.C. is located in Room 76 at the rear of the Hoover campus. The S.R.C is where
the majority of discipline is handled. The S.R.C. is staffed by a rotating Vice          SRC Mission
Principal who is assigned to the center once every three weeks. It is also staffed by     Powerpoint
a Teacher on Special Assignment whose primary assignment is to support the Vice-         Progressive
Principal in overseeing discipline. Additionally, a classified staff member is housed     Discipline
in the S.R.C. as well as a Campus Assistant to monitor and dispatch from the video        Policy
surveillance center.                                                                     S.R.C. V.P.
                                                                                          Supervision
With the establishment of the S.R.C., a universal, progressive discipline policy was      Schedule
established and reviewed with all staff and students at the beginning of the school
year. Parents were also sent copies of the policy. Clear steps and progression were      Dress Code
                                                                                         Progressive
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outlined to ensure students, teachers, and administrators were aware of                    Discipline
consequences for rule violations the first, second, third, and subsequent times.           Policy

When a student is referred to SRC they are required to complete a Personal
Responsibility Reflection. On the reflection, students must respond to the four          Capturing Kids
questions regarding misbehavior outlined in the Capturing Kids Hearts Training.            Heart
These questions have been modified slightly for Hoover HS, but state                       Handbook

1. What were you doing when you got in trouble?
2. What were you supposed to be doing?
3. Were you doing what you were supposed to be doing?
4. What is going to happen to you if this happens again?

Once the Vice Principal reviews the discipline issue, they speak to the student and
determine an appropriate consequence. As the Vice Principal is speaking with the
student regarding their actions they again review the four questions for
misbehavior. The rationale behind asking these questions is to eliminate
opportunities for students to make excuses for negative behavior and to help
them take responsibility for their actions through reflecting on their behavior.

Students who are referred to S.R.C. still receive consequences, but our approach
to discipline has shifted from being reactionary and punitive to focusing on
changing negative student behaviors by helping students take responsibility for
misbehaviors.

Consequences may range from staying in S.R.C for the current period to being             Sample of
recommended for expulsion. Parents, counselors and referring teacher are                  Emailed S.R.C.
contacted and notified of the consequence. Parents are notified by phone and              List
teachers and counselors are emailed a daily list of S.R.C. attendance with referral      Sample of
reason and outcomes. All actions are logged in ATLAS for monitoring.                      ATLAS Log

Creating a safe, clean and orderly environment doesn’t stop at universal
interventions; at Hoover HS we have established a comprehensive safety and
cleanliness team.

Campus Safety

To support the effective implementation of a comprehensive safety and crisis
management team, Hoover HS Vice Principal serves as the site Safety Coordinator
to oversee safety and security for the Hoover HS campus. The responsibilities of         Safe School
the Safety Coordinator include:                                                           Plan
     Develop and implement the Safe School Plan which outlines all emergency            Evacuation
        protocols, safety drills, crisis management and response protocol and             Map
        threat assessment processes                                                      Fire Drill Map
     Modify and make recommendations to improve safety procedures on our                Campus
        campus. Ensure that safety procedures are being implemented                       Supervision
     Coordinates Supervision Team assignments for all areas of the School                Assignment
        campus to ensure that every area is monitored during start of school,
        passing time, lunch time and afterschool
     Oversees the scheduling and security zones for all 5 School Safety                 Agenda
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        Assistants
       Meets with the School Safety Assistants, School Resource Officer and
        Probation Officer to discuss security needs, safety and emergency                  Crisis Response
        procedures, safety concerns and recommendations from the team                        Flip Chart
       Oversee the implementation of the Crime Stoppers program at Hoover HS.
        The Hoover HS Safety and Security Team consists of 5 School Safety
        Assistants, a full time on campus, Fresno Police Department Officer-School
        Resource Officer, and a full time, on campus, Fresno County Probation
        Department Officer. These Tactical (TAC) officers help to ensure safety and
        order during morning, lunch time and afterschool supervision. They serve
        as an immediate resource for any questions regarding student behavior,
        legal issues and any acts of violence on campus. Along with school
        administrators, Student Safety Assistants and teachers, the TAC officers
        also help monitor and supervise students at school events.

Another measure to ensure a safe school is the District’s contract with the
Kontraband Interdiction Services (KIDS) to bring specially trained dogs onto
Hoover’s campus to detect contraband substances. The dogs are used for random
inspection of students’ possessions.

To provide additional support in ensuring the Hoover HS campus is safe, we have            Screen shot of
16 security cameras installed on campus that are accessible by all administrators            security
through our computer monitoring system. These cameras are monitored by our                   camera angles
campus assistants, administrators and by the FUSD Centralized security
monitoring system.

A Student Assistance Program (SAP) counselor is available to assist students with          SAP Referral
alcohol, drug or emotional issues. Students, staff and parents can make referrals.           Form
Additionally a full time school psychologist is also housed on the Hoover campus.

To further ensure the safety of our students, District and site discipline policies are
enforced regarding our closed campus policy. Students are kept safe by not                 Visitor’s Pass
allowing them off campus during the school day and controlling visitors coming on          Visitor Log
to campus. Regulations for all visitors are posted at the main gate of the school,
and at the main entrance to the office. Visitors are required to sign in at the front
desk and obtain a visitor’s pass.

Campus Cleanliness

In alignment with FUSD Cleanliness and Maintenance Standards focused on
Operational Excellence, Hoover HS employs a site daytime and evening plant                 Hoover HS
coordinator plus 10 custodial staff that monitor the school for cleanliness. Hoover         SPSA with
is a large campus that serves over 1,800 students and a little over 100 staff               Cleanliness
members. The custodial team is needed to ensure that the campus is a safe, clean            Standards
and orderly environment.                                                                    identified

To support our site custodial and maintenance staff, FUSD boasts a large
maintenance team that provides comprehensive support for site needs. The FUSD
maintenance department provides assistance with plumbing, electrical, carpentry,           Sample Job
masonry, HVAC and all other plant related maintenance needs. To receive                      Order
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supports from one of these departments, one of the Hoover HS office support
staff inputs Job Orders (J-Orders) through a centralized system which is then
filtered to the appropriate department, who then dispatches workers to deal with
the maintenance concern.

In addition to supporting the school through the J-Order process, FUSD provides a
Mobile Maintenance truck two weeks per year to provide routine maintenance for
the school site. Mobile maintenance normally comes to Hoover HS during the              Mobile
Spring semester and provides upkeep and more detailed maintenance jobs at the              Maintenance
school. Receiving the support of the custodial and maintenance crew ensures that           Request Form
there is a safe and healthy physical environment.

To further ensure an atmosphere of trust, respect and professionalism, Hoover
maintains its professionalism for all its stake holders. There is an open line of
communication with parents through the newsletter and the School Site Council.          Various
The principal meets with students and teachers as needed to involve them in the            Agendas
site decision making process and to focus on continual improvement. Department
chair meetings, faculty meetings and administrative meetings allow for discussion
and the promotion of respect amongst faculty.


E2
Areas of Strength:
    The creation of the Student Responsibility Center (S.R.C.) and the “Progressive Discipline Policy.”
    An improved use of ATLAS log entries on students, by teachers and administrators.
    The implementation of the Safe and Civil schools and Capturing Kids Hearts by staff and faculty.
    The addition of security cameras around campus and the computer monitoring system.
    The availability of our Student Assistance Program (SAP) to students needing support with alcohol
       and drug use and emotional issues.

Areas for Growth:
    The need for more articulation of safety plan procedures.
    A more consistent implementation of Safe and Civil schools procedures by staff.
    Getting more faculty trained in Capturing Kids Hearts.
    The need for an additional SAP counselor.

E3. To what extent so all students receive appropriate support along with an individualized learning plan
to help ensure academic success?

E4. To what extent do students have access to a system of personal support services, activities and
opportunities at the school and within the community?

Findings/Narrative                                                                   Evidence/Data
                                                                                     AiS Report
Through a system of academic, career and social-emotional supports, Hoover           CELDT
HS students are supported through personalized learning plans. For those               Information
that have demonstrated social-emotional needs, they are supported through            Redesignation
a personalized behavior support or wellness plan.                                      Certificate
                                                                                     Copy of Hoover HS
                                                                                                            140
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The Hoover HS counseling department works individually and collaboratively             student transcript
with administrators, teachers and/or other school personnel (i.e. school            BETA Tool
psychologist, nurse, SAP Counselor) to identify students who are at risk and
establish appropriate interventions that may include referrals to Caesar            Individualized
Chavez Adult School, on site credit recovery programs, migrant program,                counseling
tutoring and behavioral supports. In 2008, Hoover High School was able to              meetings are held
hire two additional counselors to the counseling department and create more            with students and
manageable caseloads as well as provide these newly targeted services to the           parents. AB 1802
students. These counselors were hired to help counsel students in grades 10-
12 who are specifically targeted and provide specific services who fall under
the AB 1802 counseling guidelines. The Hoover HS counseling team consists of
one 9th grade counselor, four 10-12th grade counselors, and one head
counselor. It is important to highlight that the counseling services that AB
1802 mandates are for student in grades 10-12.

The Hoover HS counseling department has established standard counseling
practices for each grade level to ensure that all students are provided
supports to develop a 4-year plan and explore career interests. Every
counselor for grades 10-12 receives transcripts for their caseload prior to the
beginning of each school year and is tasked with analyzing each student’s
transcript to ensure that students are on track for graduation and A-G
completion.

During the 2009-2010 school year, FUSD partnered with UC Merced to
Develop an Equity and Access Beta Tool. This electronic web based tool              Sample of BETA
provides our counselors real-time access to tools that monitor student                 tool
progress toward A-G completion. During the 2010-2011 school year, the               4 year plan
search tools available through the BETA tool were expanded to provide our              samples
counseling team additional tools to monitor student academic progress in
alignment with their four year plan.

The Equity and Access BETA tool includes the following features:
     A-G Course Monitoring Tool                                                    FUSD A-G Course
     Early Start Program Exemption Initiative Monitoring Tool                         Monitoring Tool
     ELM/EPT Monitoring Tool                                                          (Web based)
     Extended Year Program Student Placement Beta Tool
     FAFSA Registration Monitoring Tool
     IHE App/Admit/Enrollment Monitoring Tool
     Online Course Student Identification Tool
     Potential ELC Identification Tool
     UC/CSU Eligibility Index Monitoring Tool
     Secondary Data Dashboard
     Summer 2011 Program Student Placement Beta Tool

The BETA tool has equipped the Hoover HS counseling team with data that
provides them the opportunity to intervene when students are not on-track
for A-G completion, and provides each counselor the opportunity to analyze
the progress of specific subgroups in their caseload including students who
participate in the AVID, Migrant, and special education programs. Through
this tool, Hoover HS is able to provide equity in scheduling and access to all
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students to increase the completion of A-G requirements.

In addition to targeted counseling provided through the use of the BETA tool,
the Hoover HS counseling team engages in focused counseling to support
students at every grade level in graduating on-time and with the grades,
credits and courses necessary to complete A-G requirements. The following is
a breakdown of what counseling at Hoover HS consists of at each grade level.

9th Grade Counseling (including but not limited to):
      Developing a four year plan with all freshmen in an individual group         Four Year Plan
        setting                                                                     Credit Recovery
      Counselors conduct a career cruising assessment                                 Course Schedule
      At-risk counseling on a daily basis- Counselors monitor caseloads for        Counselors
        students with excessive absences/tardies, for D’s and F’s, and for             Trained in Career
        negative behaviors in class                                                    Cruising
      Pre-registration for all 9th graders transitioning to 10th grade through
        English classes                                                             Pre-registration
      Appropriate referrals as needed to SAP counselor                                Form
      Advise students to attend tutorials that are offered through Link Crew       SAP Referral
        support                                                                     Link Crew
                                                                                       Tutoring sign in
  th
10 Grade Counseling (including but not limited to):                                    sheets
    Reviewing progress on four year plans
    AB 1802 At-risk student counseling                                             Four Year Plan
    D & F targeted counseling and enrollment in Summer School or                   Data Driven
      Ceasar Chavez Adult School                                                       Student
    At-risk counseling on a daily basis- Counselors monitor caseloads for             Placement
      students with excessive absences/tardies, for D’s and F’s, and for               documentation
      negative behaviors in class
    Assist students to complete grade specific standard in Career cruising
    Additional counseling consists of post-PSAT counseling and targeted
      counseling for students at-risk of not passing the CAHSEE
    Pre-registration for all 10th graders transitioning to 11th grade through
      English classes
                                                                                    Counseling
11th Grade Counseling (including but not limited to):                                  Calendar
     Review four year plan, analyze A-G completion, and provide academic           Pre-Registration
        intervention enrollment for students to meet A-G                               Form
        completion
     AB 1802 At-risk student counseling                                            Four-Year Plan
     PSAT counseling to review and analyze scores and progress
     SAT and ACT counseling to provide fee waivers for students and assist
                                                                                    Fee Waiver Form
        them in signing up for the SAT and ACT tests
     D & F targeted counseling and enrollment in Summer School, Night
                                                                                    Ceasar Chavez
        School at Caesar Chavez Adult School or APEX Lab
                                                                                       Registration Form
     At-risk counseling on a daily basis- Counselors monitor caseloads for
        students with excessive absences/tardies for D’s and F’s, and for
        negative behaviors in class
     Pre-registration for all 11th graders transitioning to 12th grade through
                                                                                                           142
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       English classes

12th Grade Counseling (including but not limited to):                             Pre-Registration
     Review four year plan, analyze A-G completion, and provide academic            Form
        intervention enrollment for students to meet A-G completion
     AB 1802 At-risk student counseling                                          Four Year Form
     SAT and ACT counseling to provide fee waivers for students to meet
        and assist them in signing up for ACT and SAT registration
     Review SAT and ACT results, provide guidance in analyzing scores,           Fee Waiver Form
        and review post-secondary educational options
     Free Application For Student Aid (FAFSA)Financial Aid workshops
        including assisting students and parents one-on-one and in small
        groups settings to complete the FAFSA
     D & F targeted counseling and enrollment in the Summer School,              Workshop Agenda
        Night School at Caesar Chavez Adult School or APEX Lab
     At-risk counseling on a daily basis- Counselors monitor caseloads for
        students with excessive absences/tardies, for D’s and F’s, and for
        negative behaviors in class                                               ATLAS Screen
     Providing information and Monitoring Placement testing including the
        ELM/EPT for the CSU system, and on site placement tests for our
        local community colleges                                                  ELM/EPT
     Coordinate student meetings with representatives from colleges and             Monitoring Tool
        universities

In a collaborative effort with Fresno State University and FUSD, Hoover High
School increased the student candidates for the enrollment to Fresno State in     FUSD/CSUF Fall
the fall of 2012 by 9%. As a result of this partnership with Fresno State,           2012 Tracker
Hoover has an assigned outreach counselor to work closely advocating
college-going activities, collaborating with counselors, and meeting on-          BETA Tool Tracker
campus with students and parents. Fresno State College Ambassadors serve
as role models and mentors visiting Hoover HS to meet with students               EPT/ELM Letters
regarding the enrollment process. In support of college and career readiness
FUSD counselors and Fresno State outreach staff identify Hoover HS college
eligible students and help them complete the application process. Fresno
State also provides Hoover HS counselors with professional development to
keep them informed of CSU information to assist student in preparing to
graduate. In addition to the on-campus support Fresno State offers at Hoover
HS after school courses (developed by Fresno State and the Fresno County
Department of Education) to help students pass the English Placement Test
and Entry Level Math Exam needed to meet the application process at CSU
Fresno and minimize the number of students needing to remediate through
the new Early Start Program.

Equal Access to Curriculum and Support

 In order to support struggling students, Hoover HS offers Reading
Intervention for 9th graders, and CAHSEE math and CAHSEE English                  Master Schedule
intervention classes for 11-12th graders . These CAHSEE intervention classes
are taken concurrently with the standards-based English class at the grade        CAHSEE 380

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level for 11th and 12th grade students who have not passed the CAHSEE (High             Enrollment List
School Exit Exam). In addition, six weeks prior to the CAHSEE test at-risk
sophomore students are enrolled in CAHSEE 380, an intervention class to help
them prepare for the CAHSEE. This intervention is a pullout program from
Physical Education classes. Juniors and seniors can take credit recovery
classes during the school year and all students are required to take summer
school for any “D” or “F” earned the previous year. Teachers are often
available to assist students before school, at lunch, and after school. A wide       AP Tutorial Sign-
variety of AP, GATE, and Honors courses are offered for our advanced                    Ins
learners. There is an open door enrollment policy for our advanced classes.
Additionally, summer and after school preparation programs have been
offered to increase the success of students challenging themselves with
Advanced Placement courses. Counselors check CST scores, PSAT scores, and
grades to ensure that all students who are AP ready can enroll in advanced
classes. AP teachers have attended workshops designed to make AP skills and
content more accessible to students. Two Hoover teachers serve on the
District AP Advisory committee, whose goals are to create an AP program, but
more importantly, to create a college readiness culture at Hoover HS.


GATE and Advanced Placement class students are actively recruited by the
AP/G teachers, and recommended by current teachers for placement.                    GATE/AP master
Students who show high achievement and motivation in college prep classes               schedule of
are encouraged to enroll in GATE/Honor or AP classes. Further, students who             courses
have earned proficient or advanced CST scores are scheduled in these higher
level courses. To support AP/GATE students, after school tutorials are taught
by AP/GATE teachers. AP Human Geography is now offered to 9th grade
students as a “gateway” course to AP, and through district trainings, are
moving toward developing an AP pipeline with feeder middle schools.

In an attempt to intervene at the 9th grade level, students who score Far
Below Basic, and others identified as being at risk are placed in regular 9th
grade English class and a Reading intervention class. When possible, the             Hoover HS D and F
English and Math teachers who share students have the same prep period to               analysis
facilitate their communication about their students. This is part of the “9th
grade academy” approach. Currently, one counselor is assigned to the 9th
grade. We offer credit recovery classes in core subject 4 days a week, totaling
60 hours of work, so students can retrieve deficient credits and graduate.
Hoover HS provides additional support for English learners through English
Language Development classes and SDAIE courses (Structured Specifically
Designed Academic Instruction in English).

Support for Students with Disabilities: At Hoover HS we welcome and
support participation of special needs students in all aspects of our school
program and include them in the Least Restrictive Educational Environment.
All students with disabilities are supported in their learning environments by
use of multiple services. All special education classes are supported with
Instructional Assistants and Para Educators, who help implement lesson plans
activities and IEP goals. Students with severe disabilities are also able to have
a one on one Instructional Aide to help with daily physical and educational
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needs. Disabled students who require specific support services, like
Emotionally Disturbed, Adaptive Physical Education, Speech, Technology and
Vision, are given specific instruction time with these teachers and therapists
to insure that all educational needs are being met.

Special Education staff have access to additional staff development from the
FUSD Special Education Office. Hoover’s population of students with special
needs include students who are Emotionally Disturbed, students who receive
assistance through the Resource Specialist Program, students qualifying for
Special Day Classes, and Designated Instructional Services.

Special Education students’ (RSP/SDC) academic needs are monitored                 Sample IEP with
regularly and placed in mainstream core classes based on ability and needs            accommodations
identified through the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) process. Each              and modifications
special education teacher is assigned a caseload of special needs students and        list
monitored and supervised by two Individual and Small Group Instructors
(ISGI).

Expansion of the AVID program: There are currently 129 students enrolled in        AVID Class
the AVID program. Upon continued enrollment in the program, AVID students             Schedule
must challenge themselves with GATE and/or AP courses to increase the rigor           Enrollment
of their coursework and move them toward preparation for university
admission. A counselor and the AVID coordinator met prior to the school year       AVID master
to individually enroll students in classes to meet A-G requirements. Every            schedule
teacher is available for individualized tutorial. Students involved with the
AVID program are given instruction on study skills and personal responsibility.    AVID certificates
Teachers help to review data with each student and conference with them on            and awards
academic and graduation progress.
                                                                                   AVID photos from
A System of Student Support Services, Activities and Opportunities                    field trips




At Hoover HS we understand that to support students it is essential to build
                                                                                                          145
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an environment that values diversity, engages students, promotes a healthy
lifestyle, promotes citizenship and works to provide a personalized learning
experience for each student. FUSD supports all schools in implementing a
comprehensive Campus Culture program. The FUSD Campus Culture Egg
(pictured above) demonstrates a focused approach to supporting students
tied to surveys and data indicators that provide measurable data to
determine the school’s progress in improving student engagement and                   9th grade calendar
feelings of belonging. At Hoover HS, most of the programs featured above                of activities
exist at Hoover HS. The House of Representatives has replaced the Human
Relations Council. The Sociology for Living Curriculum, as well as, the entire        Hoover HS Weekly
Healthy Lifestyles area of the Campus Culture Egg, was eliminated by FUSD               calendar (sample)
when the Sociology for Living class was eliminated from graduation
requirements. However, the FUSD Student Code of Honor was added to the                Hoover HS ASB
Character Education.                                                                    Officer list

The Campus Culture Program at Hoover is focused on engaging all students in           Class Rosters
arts, activities, and athletics (Fresno Unified School District Goal #2). The
Campus Culture Center is supervised by our Campus Culture Director, who
supports the students in a variety of ways. The Campus Culture Director
teaches one Leadership class of students from all grades, including special
needs students. The Student Senate, comprised of Associated Student Body
Officers, Class Assembly, and Freshman Assembly members, meets in a
second Leadership class and provides additional services to manage all ASB
Financials.

The Leadership Class is the catalyst for student engagement, personal support
services, and community involvement. Through the Leadership Committees
of Activities, Athletics, Cultural Diversity, Community Service, Public Relations,
Students/Staff Recognition, Rally, and music, students are provided
opportunities to participate in lunchtime activities, rallies, assemblies, clubs,     Campus Culture
and community service projects. Annually students participate in over 20                Calendar
service projects and contribute countless hours to their peers and community.
Students are recognized for academic achievement, athletic achievement,               Rally Fliers
musical talents, and the arts throughout the year by the committees. Each
rally includes representatives from individual classes, sports teams, clubs, and      Fundraising
staff performances. More than 300 senior signs are custom produced for our              Calendar
athletes, musicians, cheerleaders, and drama students per year. Intramural
sports have also been incorporated into the lunchtime activities schedule to          Food Fair Sign-Ups
encourage those students not on a sanctioned team to get involved.
Interaction and support are the cornerstones of the Leadership program.

The Student Senate provides the leadership for all Clubs and Athletic teams
on campus. They meet weekly for a public Senate meeting and complete the
business of ASB accounts. All fundraising and other activities run through the        ASB Meeting
Senate. The Senate maintains the Campus Culture Calendar, Club Activities               Agenda
and Fundraising Calendar, and Special Events. They provide two club days for
sign-ups and four food fairs for the minimum club commitment. Those                   House of
students wishing to provide added input without the commitment of holding               Representatives
office may participate in the House of Representatives. This group, which is            Agenda
run by the ASB Vice President, is made up of representatives from 3rd period
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classes and meets monthly to discuss Current Events, Campus Culture,
Academics, and areas of need on campus. The House is also broken up into
committees: Student Safety Team, Structures/Logistics/Policies/Facilities,
Campus Connectedness, and Community Outreach. These committees
maintain communication with the at-large student population through their
3rd period class, but more importantly become ambassadors for their school.

Each year Hoover appoints two students to the Fresno Unified Student
Advisory Board. Along with the ASB President these students attend meetings
twice per month (on average) with other student representatives from each
of the other high schools in Fresno Unified

In addition to an established Campus Culture program, Hoover HS works with
all students to provide them access to academic supports. Examples of these         Student Advisory
supports include the following:                                                        Board Meeting
                                                                                       Agenda
       Adult School Night Classes
       APEX online learning
       Migrant PASS Program
       Summer School Credit Recovery Program
       Advanced Placement Tutorials and Saturday Support Program
       CAHSEE 380 Support program
       Hoover HS Special Education Program
       ACE Magnet
       Library Media Services
       English Learner Supports through Systematic ELD
        CAHSEE Intervention program for 11th-12th grade students
       Passport to Life
       Transition to College Classes

Hoover Credit Recovery: Hoover High School provides an array of
opportunities for credit retrieval to those students who are deficient in
credits, considered “at risk” of not graduating and need to make-up
deficiencies to meet the A-G requirements for admissions to a 4-year
university. Students in need of credit recovery are identified by the
counseling department and administration team by way of two methods. As
counselors review the student transcript during the summer and after the
first semester grades are posted in January, they identify students who are in
need of credit recovery and students who need to make up a deficiency to
meet the A-G college admission requirements. The Head Counselor assists in
running a query to help identify all students who receive a letter grade of “D”
or “F”. The use of the BETA tool also assists in identifying those students in
with an A-G deficiency. The credit recovery options to students are as
follows:

Adult School Night Classes: Adult school night classes are offered at Ceasar
Chavez Adult school for students who are at least sixteen years of age. Priority
enrollment however, is for seniors and juniors. These courses are offered
both in the classroom by teacher lead instruction or computer lab credits. The
                                                                                    Adult School
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courses only meet graduation requirements and are not considered college             Application
prep. Students are able to participate in three sessions throughout the school      Fresno Adult
year and earn up to 30 credits for the year. Students meet the 60 hour               School Schedule
requirement by meeting twice a week for 3 hours                                      of Courses

APEX On-Line Courses: This is the second year of implementation of the APEX
on-line course offerings to students. Currently, the on-line program only
offers course work in ELA and Social Science to 11th and 12th graders. These
courses are considered college prep and offer students the opportunity to
meet graduation requirements and make-up deficiencies to meet A-G college           Beta tool report of
admission requirements. The class is offered during 5th and 6th periods.               students with
                                                                                       online learning
Migrant PASS Program: The PASS program offers credit recovery towards                  potential
graduation and make-up of A-G deficiencies only to students who are
considered active in the migrant program. The program offers both college           Schedule of APEX
prep and non-college prep coursework for students. Students meet with a                courses
migrant teacher and staff to complete course work and can complete up to 15
credits a semester.                                                                 Roster of students
                                                                                       enrolled in APEX
Summer School: Hoover High School along with the rest of the high schools
within the district implemented a default enrollment into our Summer School         Roster of PASS
program for those students who failed or received a letter grade of “D” during         Program
the first or second Semester. Priority for enrollment at our site was given to         participants
students who attended Hoover High and course enrollment priority was given
to core classes with English and Mathematics being the first and second             Summer School
choice for students. The majority of coursework offered during the summer is           Letters
college prep and meets both graduation and A-G requirements. Students have
the opportunity to complete a maximum of 10 credits in the summer by                Summer
attending two, three week sessions.         During the summer of 2010, a PM            Placement BETA
session to summer school was added to include Lab classes where students               Tool
could earn an additional fifteen credits in college prep or on line lab credits.

CAHSEE 380: Fresno Unified has benefited from the receipt of state CAHSEE
funds to assist in the effective implementation of support structures for
students in preparation for the CAHSEE. In alignment with the Board’s Theory
of Action, Hoover HS offered CAHSEE Revolution Program. This strategic
computer based program targets students whose standardized assessment
scores indicated that they were at-risk of not passing the CAHSEE. Identified
sophomore students are provided intensive preparation in their assessed,
area of need for Math or ELA for the 6 weeks prior to the CAHSEE. Students
are pulled out of their physical education class to attend the CAHSEE
Revolution class. Each student receives at least 200 minutes of CAHSEE
Revolution support on a weekly basis for 6 weeks providing students more            CAHSEE 380 data
than 1,200 minutes of additional intervention prior to the census                      report
administration of the CAHSEE.
                                                                                    CAHSEE 380
Hoover HS Special Education Program: Hoover is home to nine Special                    student roster
Education programs designed to meet the diverse needs of students with
disabilities throughout the Fresno Unified School District. Hoover has the          Sample student
                                                                                       schedule with
                                                                                                           148
Hoover High School                                        WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

largest percentage of high school students with disabilities and programs than        CAHSEE 380
any other high school in the FUSD. Hoover is a campus that promotes
inclusive programs and activities for all students. Every student that receives
Special Education services has the opportunity to be as fully included as the
student and the IEP team deem necessary, through the IEP process. The
programs include two deaf education programs, a visually impaired program
including a braille library, an orthopedically impaired program, classes           Sample RSP, SDC
designed for students with emotional disturbances, a severely disabled                and Functional
program, four special day classes, and a Resource Program. The special                Skills student
education program employs 19 faculty, including two Individual and Small              schedule
Group Instructors (ISGI). Additionally, 35 paraprofessionals and instructional
aides, Certified Sign Language Interpreters, School Psychologist, School           Master list and
Psychology Intern, a classified support staff member for assistance with              schedule of all
enrollments and reviewing IEPs, and a part time Speech and Language                   special education
Pathologist support the needs of Special Education students on the Hoover             aides
campus. Special education case managers maintain communication with all
teachers, and assist with appropriate modifications, including testing in the      Special Education
                                                                                      Department
less-distracting environment of the RSP room. Special education case
                                                                                      Meeting
managers maintain communication with all teachers, and assist with
appropriate modifications, including testing in the less-distracting
environment of the RSP room. Together this special education team works to
provide an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and the support services
needed for all our special needs students.

Social Emotional Supports

Hoover HS understands that it is essential to support student in terms of their
emotional well-being. To provide additional social emotional supports,
Hoover HS has implemented a tiered system of social emotional supports to
provide students the greatest opportunity for success at Hoover HS.

Hoover HS Wellness Team: To support students with increased social
emotional needs, Hoover HS has a team of full time professionals that support
all students in maintaining emotional wellness. These individuals work             Wellness Team
collaboratively with general education and special education staff members            note taking guide
as well as administrators in facilitating wellness meetings, IEPs, completing         and Wellness Plan
threat assessments, and in provide counseling and crisis counseling. The              template
Wellness Team consists of the School Psychologist, School Nurse, Student
Assistance Program Counselor and administration team.

Hoover HS has one Student Assistance Program (SAP) counselor through a             SAP Referral
contract with Comprehensive Youth Services of Fresno County. FUSD provides         SAP Data
funding for one full time counselor. Our SAP counselor provides individual          regarding number
counseling for students struggling with addictions, disorders, and/or               of students
dysfunctional home environments. Additional resources are available to              serviced
students and their parents experiencing loss, grief, depression, anxiety, and      Various Brochures
stress.                                                                            Referral Form
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A full-time school nurse and health assistant work to ensure that all students      Various Brochures
receive health support services including referrals for services to district or
county health assistance. Teachers are notified of all students who have
specific health needs through the distribution of a confidential health list.

Library Services to Students: The H.H.S librarian and Library tech are
responsible for providing Library Supportive services to students, faculty and
our local community. The Hoover High School Library’s mission is to support
student academic achievement, by providing resources for personal growth
and enrichment, as well as ensuring that students are effective users of ideas
and information. The Hoover HS Library is staffed by a full-time, fully             List of Library
credentialed teacher-librarian and a full-time library technician. In order to         services offered
provide maximum access to students, the library is open Monday-Friday from
7:30-4:00. These hours include before school, during lunch, and after school
access. Students have access to textbooks for completing class assignments.
An ongoing and updated collection of popular fiction as well as non-fiction
books is also available. Students have access to computers to assist them in
conducting research, for word processing, as well as for personal growth and
enrichment. Several online database subscriptions are also provided for
students, such as Noodle Tools and Grolier Online Encyclopedias. The Library
also hosts a variety of programs and services for parents and the community
as well as for students. For students, these includes providing the necessary
technology to complete online college applications, online financial aid forms,
as well as hosting speakers from various colleges and universities such as the
UC system, the CSU system, and Community Colleges among others. The
program’s main mission is to support student academic achievement and
provide resources to students for both personal growth and enrichment.

Student Involvement in Curricular/Co-Curricular Activities

Athletics: The athletic department makes quarterly report card checks to            The FUSD Athletic
determine students’ athletic eligibility. Individual coaches of athletic teams         Handbook
conduct additional periodic grade checks of all their student athletes. Athletes
most at risk will have more frequent grade and assignment checks. Students
are expected to maintain a "C" average in order to compete in athletic
contests. Student athletes are encouraged and in some cases made
mandatory to attend after school study and tutoring sessions by their
coaches. Coaches will make teachers aware of who their athletes are and,
when needed, ask teachers to keep the coach informed when athletes are not
meeting the expectations of their class. When a student becomes ineligible
they and their parents are notified by the athletic department.
                                                                                    Athletic Clearance
At the beginning of each sports season, Physical Education teachers utilized           List
portions of their class periods to announce the current season’s sports
programs teams and coaches, as well as tryout dates and times. This provides        Team rosters
an opportunity for students to hear about activities in a non-threatening           Fliers
environment.

Students are encouraged to participate in extracurricular activities and are
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provided information via daily bulletins, lunch time activities, Teleparent, and
flyers posted throughout the campus. Parents are also informed about these
opportunities through class meetings, the Towne Crier, Hoover website and
marquee.
                                                                                    Link Crew roster
Link Crew: This Freshman transition program based on a simple concept: Link
incoming freshman with successful upper classmen. It begins at pre-                 Link Crew photos
registration on the 8th grade campuses when our Ninth Grade Campus Culture
Director visits and provides information about Link Crew to the 8th graders in      Link Crew lesson
the spring. Hoover High School Link Crew leaders are recruited from the                plans for follow up
junior and senior class. Once selected, Link Crew leaders are trained in the
summer in team building activities and cooperative skill development that           Link Crew
they will use during Freshmen Orientation.                                             orientation
                                                                                       pictures
The Link Crew orientation is a convention of opening and closing assemblies
and a small group session of 10 students led by a Link Crew Leader. The Link
Crew leader facilitates a new student orientation and provides social and
academic support throughout the school year. Link Leaders are trained to
teach life skills lessons in freshman classrooms at various times during the
year.

Link Crew Objectives:

       To empower juniors and seniors as role models for freshmen.
       To increase academic success through support of peers.
       To develop Leadership skills in students on our campus.
       To allow successful older students to pass on positive traditions to
        younger students.
       To expose students to a variety of individuals at our school in positive
        situations.
       To teach students that by working together they can be successful
        and enjoy one another.                                                      Breaking Down
                                                                                     The Walls Flier
       To help create a supportive and positive atmosphere on our campus
                                                                                    Referral Form
                                                                                    Student Roster
 Breaking Down the Walls: Each year, elected student representatives orient
incoming freshmen and other new students. “Breaking Down the Walls” is a
program that provides students a venue to connect and create social bonds
that cut across ethnic and socio-economic groups.


E3
Areas of Strength:
    The participation of special needs students in all aspects of our schools programs.
    Renewed counselor attention to creating four-year plans for all students.
    Implementation of an AVID program.
    The utilization of the BETA tool to monitor progress towards A-G completion.
    Increased enrollment in Advanced Placement courses.
    Introduction of reading intervention, CAHSEE math and English intervention classes.


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Areas for Growth:
    Provide support for mainstream teachers to deliver curriculum to our special needs students.
    Create a stronger academic culture on campus for all students.
    Provide additional support to RSP students in mainstream courses.

E4
Areas of Strength:
    Hoover students have access to a variety of academic support services to help them graduate and
       meet college A-G requirements.
    Students have access to a wide variety of activities through campus culture, athletics and academic
       sponsored events.
    An increased awareness and appreciation of the diversity of the Hoover HS campus through
       campus culture events.
    The creation of our campus culture center.
    Hoover offers ALL of the 23 CIF sanctioned sports available in our section as well as pep and cheer
       and band.
    Integration of the special education students in every avenue of our school.
    Campus culture, faculty and staff, and athletics have a variety of events to celebrate student
       successes on campus.

Areas for Growth:
     The need to create a system to identify at risk students as early as ninth grade. To prevent them
        from having to utilize credit retrieval options.
     The means of communication are in place, but the utilization of these structures by teachers,
        coaches, players and parents are not optimized.




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         PRIORITIZED AREAS OF GROWTH NEEDS FROM CATEGORIES A TO E

      Continue to align curriculum, instruction and materials to content and performance standards by using
       state and local assessments to modify instruction and improve student achievement.
           o Continue working in accountable communities to align instruction and create common
               assessments and re-teach critical standards.
           o The staff must continue to work to develop common assessments and utilize the results of
               assessments to modify the teaching and learning process in a more targeted manner.
           o More teacher training on updated technology such as OARS and smart classrooms to continue
               to assess and evaluate the data from those assessments.
           o Move instruction beyond the textbook to make learning more relevant and increase student
               engagement
           o The need to support the mainstream teachers to deliver curriculum to our special needs
               students.

      Explicitly align staff development to standards, assessed student performance and professional needs.
           o Annual review of the mission, vision and ESLRs and development of ESLR competency for
                students to achieve in conjunction with the review of the SPSA (Single Plan for Student
                Achievement)
           o Provide specific training to the staff on the district action plan and provide venues to gather
                greater staff input to the Single Plan for Student Achievement to ensure that all staff
                understand what actions are expected be implemented
           o The school must examine better ways to assess and evaluate student progress on the ESLRs.
           o Implement a professional learning plan that provides structure for supporting all
           o More in-services on the data-driven process, more inclusive of the teacher
           o More in-services concerning the interpretation of available data
           o Getting more faculty trained in Capturing Kids Hearts.

      Develop and seek ways to support underperforming students to meet the standards and reduce the
       percentage of teachers in areas experiencing low student achievement through the regular program
       and categorical funds.
           o Continue improving student progress toward A-G completion through targeted counseling and
               school wide support plan
           o There is a need to create a stronger academic culture on campus for all students.
           o Teacher and students need to communicate about grades and progress on a more frequent
               basis.
           o Need to create a system to identify at-risk students as early as ninth grade, to prevent them
               from having to utilize credit retrieval options.
           o A regular feedback loop to staff regarding the use of categorical funds, and current levels of
               funding available for use in securing additional instructional resources
           o Provide more opportunities during the school year for students who are failing their classes or
               who need additional support particularly at-risk, African American, English Learners and
               Special Education students.
           o To increase student accountability and engagement in the learning process, establish more
               support structures to improve student attendance, reduce truancy and support academic
               achievement and meeting graduation requirements.
           o The means of communication are in place, but the utilization of these structures by teachers,
               coaches, players and parents are not optimized (Town Crier, Hoover homepage, Athletic
               website, Facebook), particularly those students who are struggling academically.
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HOOVER HIGH
  SCHOOL




  Chapter 5
 School-wide
 Action Plan
   2012-2018
Hoover High School                                                                                       WASC CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

                                               HOOVER HS WASC ACTION PLAN 2012-2018
                                                     A. Data-Driven Instruction
School-Wide Area for Improvement #1
Continue to align curriculum, instruction and materials to content and performance standards by using state and local assessments to modify
instruction and improve student achievement.

Growth Target(s): (Annual)
    Increase the percentage of students scoring proficient or advanced on CSTs.
    Decrease the percentage of students scoring far below basic or below basic.
          o Decrease the percentage African American students scoring far below basic or below basic on CSTs
          o Decrease the percentage of English Learners scoring far below basic or below basic on CSTs
          o Decrease the percentage of special education students scoring far below basic or below basic on CSTs
    Increase the percentage of English Learners and Special Education students meeting AYP targets in ELA
    Increase the percentage of African American and Special Education students meeting AYP targets in Mathematics

Rationale: While progress has been made, overall Hoover HS students are not meeting performance targets for AYP or API, indicating a need to
improve achievement on both the CSTs and the CAHSEE. While overall student performance is less than desired, there is also a need to address the
achievement gap that exists between certain significant subgroups and the general population, particularly English Learners, Students with Disabilities,
and African Americans. Tight alignment of all instructional programs to the California State Content Standards and continued development of common
assessments to measure student progress is needed to address these gaps. To monitor the effectiveness of the school’s instructional program it is
essential that site leadership partner with teachers to engage in frequent conversations regarding goal setting, aligned instructional system,
accountable communities, and systematic intervention.

Critical Academic Need(s) Addressed by this Growth Area:                                ESLRs Related to this Growth Area:
1. Increase CST scores in all subjects, especially math which has the lowest             College and Career Ready Graduates
     percentage of students scoring proficient or advanced.                              Critical Thinkers
2. Improve first time CAHSEE passing rates for 10th grade students to increase the       Effective Communicators
     numbers of students scoring proficient in both ELA and mathematics and              Technological Learners
     decrease the numbers of students needing remediation.                               Self-Directed Learners
3. Narrow the achievement gap for underperforming subgroups, most notably
     African Americans, Students with Disabilities and English Learners.

Monitor Progress:                                                                       Report Progress:
CST all tested subjects, including underperforming subgroups                            Data: State assessment Results—annually in August; Program
CAHSEE both subjects, including underperforming subgroups                               Enrollment/Master Schedule—August and January; District
AYP percentage proficient overall and underperforming subgroups                         ACS—October, January, March; Site-Level SMART Goals—
Hoover High School                                                                                    WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

ACS (All tested subjects)                                                            October, January, March, August (uPLated annually);
Common Finals/Common Assessments by department and course                            Department Common Assessments/Lessons—Quarterly
Enrollment in intervention classes and program supports disaggregated by subgroup    Action Plan Progress—report to coincide with SPSA annual
(during and outside the school day)                                                  reporting/approval; Admin/Dept Chair/WASC Leadership to
CELDT and Re-designation Rates (R-30)                                                reports on and modifies (when needed) at least annually
Action Items (what will the school do to Timeline, Responsible Parties and           Assess (how will the school     Monitor and Report (how will
support the achievement of the             Resources/Funds (when will this action    measure whether or not this     the school monitor and report
identified growth area targets)            take place, who is responsible for        action contributed to the       on this identified action item
                                           implementing, what resources will         growth area targets)            with data collection and
                                           support the achievement of this action                                    evidence)
                                           item.
                                                             Target and Goal Setting
Annually review achievement data and       When: Annually in August Buy-Back         Compare CST results with        SMART goals submitted by
develop course specific SMART goals,       Who: ACs with Lead Teachers               SMART goal expected             each Accountable Community
based on identified areas of need using    Resources: SMART Goal Template, AiS       outcomes                        Lead.
CST results and other relevant data in     Access (assessment scores)
untested courses
Identify additional courses that meet UC   When: Spring; On-going                    Number of students A-G          Enrollment and number of A-G
Eligibility requirements (A-G courses)     Who: Counselors, Leadership Team,         Eligible                        courses on campus; Report
and support college readiness.             Dept. Chairs                                                              annually to faculty
                                           Resources: FTE Allocations, new course
                                           curriculum
                                                          Aligned Instructional System
Identify Critical Standards and create     When: During AC meetings and/or AC        Instructional Calendars and     Submit calendar and critical
Instructional Calendars that are aligned   release days                              critical standards reflect      standards to Admin. Team;
to course standards and ACS tests.         Who: Accountable Community with Lead      instructional time aligned to   Accountable Community
                                           Teachers                                  tested ACS standards;           agenda and minutes; Review
                                           Resources: Meeting Time, Pacing Guides,   Walkthrough data for            ACS results quarterly
                                           ACS results, Content Standards            alignment; ACS Results
Create Lesson Plans and Common             When: During AC meetings and/or AC        Common lessons and              Submit common lessons and
Formative Assessments by course.           release days                              assessments reflect             assessment to Admin. Team;
                                           Who: Accountable Community with Lead      instructional time aligned to   Accountable Community
                                           Teachers                                  tested ACS standards;           agenda and minutes; Review
                                           Resources: Meeting Time, Pacing Guides,   Walkthrough data for            ACS results quarterly; Review
                                           ACS results, Content Standards, Lead      alignment; ACS Results          Common Formative
                                           Teacher Stipend                                                           Assessment results regularly;
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Provide a site-based instructional coach   When: On-going                            Identified teacher                 Ongoing; Weekly Meetings
to support teachers to deliver high-       Who: Principal, Instructional Coach       improvement on CSTP’s and          with Principal; Teacher
quality instruction to all students,       Resources: FTE Allocation                 implementation of                  Evaluations
specifically for under-performing sub-                                               Foundations via walkthrough
groups (Special Education, English                                                   data
Learners, African American)
                                                     Accountable Community Development
Provide time for Accountable               When: Bimonthly                           Master calendar; AC                Contracted meeting time
Community meetings.                        Who: Principal and Admin Team             Agenda/Minutes                     calculation; AC
                                           Resources: Master Calendar/Meeting                                           Agenda/Minutes
                                           Time
Analyze benchmark and other common         When: On-going                            ACS and Common Formative           On-going; AC Agenda/Minutes
assessment result to inform instruction    Who: AC with Lead teacher                 Assessment Results; Re-
and plan for re-teaching.                  Resources: Meeting schedule, ACS          teaching/enrichment lesson
                                           results, Common Formative Assessment      plans
                                           Results
Examine, be course, the alignment          When: August Buy-Back, Annually and       School wide D/F grade data;        Course Syllabus; report at
between grading policies, CST/ACS          On-going                                  course completion rates            grading periods
score, and assignment completion as an     Who: AC with Lead teachers, and Depart.
Accountable Community                      Chairs
                                           Resources: Leadership team, syllabus,
                                           Summative Assessment data (ACS, CST,
                                           AP), grading data
                                                              Systematic Intervention
Implement Priority Standards Plus          When: On-going                            Increase of first-time pass rate   Walkthrough data, Pacing
lessons in English I and II classes        Who: ELA I & II teachers and AC leads     in ELA section of CAHSEE           Guide/Curriculum Map
                                           Resources: Priority English curriculum,
                                           Leadership team, curriculum calendars

Research and Implement an in-class         When: By 2013                             Increase of first-time pass rate   Walkthrough data; Pacing
CAHSEE Math prep program in 9th and        Who: Algebra I teachers with AC Lead      in Math section of CAHSEE          Guide/Curriculum Map
10th grade Algebra I classes               Teacher Resources: Office of Secondary,
                                           Leadership team, prep program
                                           curriculum
Implement CAHSEE 380 Program with          When: 6 weeks prior to the CAHSEE         Increase of first-time pass rate   Annual report from Office of
identified students in ELA or              Who: Designated CAHSEE 360 teachers       in both ELA and Math sections      Secondary presented to SSC
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Mathematics                                 with VP supervision                         of CAHSEE
                                            Resources: Program materials, laptop
                                            labs, FTE allocation, contracts for
                                            substitute teachers
Research and Implement an in-class CST      When: Review annually; implement 8          Increase in CST scores and     CST scores, course SMART
prep program for all students               weeks prior to CST                          student movement into higher   goals, Walkthrough data
                                            Who: Department Chairs, Lead Teachers       performance band
                                            Resources: Admin. Team , Curriculum
                                            materials, CST results
Research and Implement a CST prep           When: Research Spring 2012, Review          Increase in CST scores and     CST scores, course SMART
program for under-performing student        program annually; implement 8 weeks         student movement into higher   goals, Walkthrough data;
subgroups outside of the regular school     prior to CST                                performance band; decrease     after-school program
day                                         Who: Department Chairs, Lead Teachers       of achievement gap for         attendance data; reports to
                                            Resources: Admin. Team, Counseling          targeted sub-groups            SSC
                                            staff, funding, Curriculum materials, CST
                                            results
Provide 9th grade students in need of       When: Identification: Spring 2012;          Decrease in D/F grades in      Student enrollment in
support, targeted intervention              Annually                                    Algebra I and English I;       intervention courses; grade
companion courses for Algebra I and         Who: English I and Algebra I teachers       Increased scores on CST in     data; ACS & CST results
English I critical standards. (Utilize      with Lead Teachers, Dept. Chairs, Head      both Math and English
Corrective Reading for 9th grade classes)   Counselor
                                            Resources: FTE allocation for
                                            intervention, curriculum materials,
                                            collaboration time for intervention
                                            teachers.




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                                                HOOVER HS WASC ACTION PLAN 2012-2018
                                                  B. Professional Growth and Planning
  School-Wide Area for Improvement #2:
  Explicitly align staff development to standards, assessed student performance and professional needs.
  Growth Target(s): (Annual)
        Meet AMAOs designated by the CDE
        Meet annual API growth targets set by the CDE
                o Meet annual API growth targets set by the CDE for significant subgroups
        Increase the percentage of students enrolling in A-G courses
        Increase the percentage of students meeting UC/CSU entrance requirements upon graduation
        Increase the percentage of students passing at least one AP exam, while maintaining or increasing current enrollments in AP courses
        Increase the number of teachers rated “meets” or “exceeds” standards on evaluations, specifically on CSTP Standard #1
        Increase the number of teachers rated “meets” or “exceeds” standards on evaluations, specifically on CSTP Standard #6
  Rationale:
  Staff at Hoover HS must consider how to best support the need of students for both remediation and acceleration. The use of best instructional
  practices, effective use of technology, strategies for differentiation of instruction, and increased rigor for all students will provide a more engaging
  environment and ensure success of all students. Through targeted staff development in identified priority areas, monitoring of implementation and
  fidelity to professional learning, and ongoing and expanded collaborative work within the Accountable Communities, will align the course
  curriculum, provide higher quality instruction, and support the expansion of existing programs (e.g. AVID, AP, Capturing Kids Hearts, SIOP, Magnet
  Program, and Safe and Civil Schools initiatives).
  Critical Academic Need(s) Addressed by this Growth Area:                              ESLRs Related to this Growth Area:
  1. Increase CST scores in all subjects, especially math which has the lowest          College and Career Ready Graduates
       percentage of students scoring proficient or advanced.                           Critical Thinkers
  2. Improve first time CAHSEE passing rates for 10th grade students to increase Responsible Citizens
       the numbers of students scoring proficient in both ELA and mathematics           Technological Learners
       and decrease the numbers of students needing remediation.                        Self-Directed Learners
  3. Close the achievement gap for underperforming subgroups, most notably
       African Americans, Students with Disabilities and English Learners.
  Monitor Progress:                                                                     Report Progress:
  CST all tested subjects, including underperforming subgroups                          Data: State assessments—annually in August; Program
  CAHSEE both subjects, including underperforming subgroups                             Enrollments—August and January; AP Passing Data—annually in
  AYP percentage proficient overall and underperforming subgroups                       August
  CELDT and Redesignation rates for English Learners                                    Staff Development Data—August, January and June
  Enrollment in UC/CSU Eligible Classes                                                 CSTP Data—August and January
  Enrollment and Passing Rates of AP Courses                                            Action Plan Progress—report to coincide with SPSA annual

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  Staff Needs Assessment Survey Results Compared to Staff Development             reporting/approval; Admin/Dept Chair/WASC Leadership to
  Calendar                                                                        reports on and modifies (when needed) at least annually
  Summary Data Regarding Staff Participation in Various Staff Development
  Activities
  Summary Data Regarding CSTP Standards #1 and #6
  Action Items (what will the school   Timeline, Responsible Parties and          Assess (how will the school     Monitor and Report (how will the
  do to support the achievement of     Resources/Funds (when will this action     measure whether or not this     school monitor and report on this
  the identified growth area targets) take place, who is responsible for          action contributed to the       identified action item with data
                                       implementing, what resources will          growth area targets)            collection and evidence)
                                       support the achievement of this action
                                       item.
                                                                 Target Goal Setting
  Create and administer an annual       When: Spring 2012, Annual                 Compare results annually to     Needs assessment results report
  School-Wide Staff Development         administration at end of each school      track trends of needs and       to faculty and SSC
  Needs Assessment                      year                                      implementation
                                        Who: Leadership Team
                                        Resources: survey
  Provide staff with an Annual          When: Summer 2012, ongoing annually       Attainment of SMART goals       Professional Learning plan; PL
  Professional Learning plan            Who: Leadership team, Dept. Chairs,       as facilitated through          calendar; Walkthrough data; PL
  targeting priority areas, as          instructional coach                       Professional Learning; end of   meeting agenda and attendance
  identified from the WASC Self-        Resources: Professional Learning          year PL survey
  Study Results and School-wide Staff   curriculum, master calendar, contracted
  Development Needs Assessment          meeting minutes
                                                            Aligned Instructional System
  Provide professional development      When: August Buy-Back and Ongoing         Walkthrough data; teacher       Reports from leadership team to
  to implement Foundations in the       Full Implementation 2013-2014             evaluations                     faculty and staff; lesson plans
  classroom                             Who: Lead teachers, Leadership team,
                                        instructional coach, District
                                        administration
                                        Resources: Staff development plan,
                                        Foundations implementation/lesson
                                        plan template, district developed tools
                                        for rolling out Foundations
                                                      Accountable Community Development
  Lead teacher training to increase     When: Ongoing Full Implementation         Lead teacher, AC, and VP        Lead teacher feedback; AC
  implementation of the Foundations     2013-2014                                 ratings of effectiveness of     meeting agendas and minutes;
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  for Accountable Communities.          Who: Lead teachers, AC teams, VPs        Accountable Communities       published AC lesson plans
                                        Resources: District stipends for lead
                                        teachers, Leadership team, district
                                        developed tools for rolling out
                                        Foundations
                                                               Systematic Intervention
  Continue to expand participation in   When: Ongoing                            Annual program specific       Team reports to faculty and SSC;
  and implementation of                 Who: CKH Leadership Team, Safe and       implementation evaluations;   Walkthrough data; Team meeting
  programmatic Professional             Civil site team, AVID Site Team, Men’s   Attainment of SMART goals     agendas and minutes
  Learning of programs such as          Alliance Representative                  as facilitated through
  Capturing Kids Hearts, AVID, Men’s    Resources: meeting time, curriculum      Professional Learning
  Alliance, etc.                        resources




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                                             HOOVER HS WASC ACTION PLAN 2012-2018
                                          C. Student Academic and School Culture Supports
School-Wide Area for Improvement #3:
Develop and seek ways to support underperforming students to meet the standards and increase student academic achievement through regular
program and categorical funds.
Growth Target(s): (Annual)
 Increase the percent of first-time passing rates on the ELA section of the CAHSEE
 Increase the percent of first-time passing rates on the math section of the CAHSEE
         o Increase the number of African American students who pass the math section of the CAHSEE Mathematics as a 10th grader
         o Increase the number of Special Education students on a diploma track who pass the math section of the CAHSEE as a 10th grader
 Increase the percent of students on a Diploma track who pass the CAHSEE by end of their senior year
 Decrease the number of students with 1 or more F’s at the end of each semester, as compared to the previous year.
Rationale:
Hoover HS has experienced an increase in the overall number of socio-economically disadvantaged students. These students have greater academic
and social needs that must be addressed in a systematic fashion in order to provide them with a learning environment that will support their
development toward becoming career and college-ready graduates. Programs targeting under-performing subgroups (including socio-economically
disadvantaged, English Learners, Special Education, African Americans) that provide academic supports and engage students are especially critical.
Hoover HS needs to increase the variety, implementation effectiveness, and reach of programs that connect students to the greater school community,
and engage them in academic, social-emotional, and co-curricular/extra-curricular areas.
Critical Academic Need(s) Addressed by this Growth Area:                     ESLRs Related to this Growth Area:
2. Improve first time CAHSEE passing rates for 10th grade students to         College and Career Ready Graduates
     increase the numbers of students scoring proficient (as defined for      Effective Communicators
     AYP purposes) in both ELA and mathematics and decrease the               Self-Directed Learners
     numbers of students needing remediation.                                 Responsible Citizens
3. Narrow the achievement gap for underperforming subgroups, most
     notably African Americans, Students with Disabilities and English
     Learners.
Monitor Progress:                                                            Report Progress:
CAHSEE both subjects, including underperforming subgroups                    Data: State assessments—annually in August; Program Enrollment/Master
AYP percentage proficient overall and underperforming subgroups              Schedule/Master Calendar—August and January; D and F Rates—August
D & F Rates                                                                  and January, counselors review quarterly, Common Finals—January and
Common Finals                                                                June,
Enrollment in intervention classes, credit recovery classes, and other       Action Plan Progress—report to coincide with SPSA annual
program supports disaggregated by subgroup (during and outside the           reporting/approval; Admin/Dept Chair/WASC Leadership to reports on
school day)                                                                  and modifies (when needed) at least annually
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Enrollment in Extra- and Co-Curricular Programs
Master Calendar Review of Parent/Student/Community Engagement
Activities
Action Items (what will the        Timeline, Responsible Parties and        Assess (how will the school           Monitor and Report (how will the
school do to support the           Resources/Funds (when will this action   measure whether or not this           school monitor and report on this
achievement of the identified      take place, who is responsible for       action contributed to the growth      identified action item with data
growth area targets)               implementing, what resources will        area targets)                         collection and evidence)
                                   support the achievement of this action
                                   item.
                                                               Target Goal Setting
Implement parent outreach         When: Fall 2012 and on-going              Increased positive communications Teleparent reports; Annual parent
programs and improve positive     Who: AC with Lead Teachers, Dept.         home; Increased number of         survey report; outreach event
parent/student/teacher            Chairs                                    parents participating in outreach attendance
communication.                    Resources: Leadership team, Clerical      events
                                  Staff, Communication tools
                                  (Teleparent, email, etc.)
Teachers will identify 5 target   When: August buy-back, ongoing            Increased attendance; decreased       Report progress on grades, district
students to support in order to   Who: Leadership team, teachers            behavioral referrals; increased       assessments (ACS),
increase achievement.             Resources: AiS access, ATLAS reports,     GPA; Increased extra-curricular       CAHSEE/CSTs; Discipline records;
                                  SRC reports                               participation                         Attendance records
                                                          Aligned Instructional System
Provide a coherent program to     When: Fall 2012 and on-going              9th grade D/F grade data; Growth      Ongoing reports to faculty and SSC
support the transition of in-     Who: leadership team, counseling          targets met for 9th grade students;   on 9th grade progress; 9th grade
coming ninth graders.             staff, depart. Chairs, 9th grade AC       Disaggregated ACS/CST data            enrollment; attendance; extra-
                                  Resources: Campus Culture director,                                             curricular participation; ACS/CST
                                  feeder middle schools; AiS reports                                              score data
Develop and adhere to criteria    When: Spring 2012 and on-going            Criteria in-place by Spring 2012      CST/CAHSEE results reported for
for placement into existing       Who: Admin and Department Chairs          prior to pre-reg; intervention        targeted students; internal
intervention programs such as     Resources:                                enrollment; Annual review of          intervention program assessments;
Corrective Reading and Algebra                                              growth targets for students placed    enrollment records; reports to
1 Intervention, ELD classes,                                                in these programs                     faculty and SSC
CAHSEE Intervention, CAHSEE
380 and other support
programs.
                                                           Accountable Communities
Develop strategies to support     When: Spring 2012 and on-going            Growth targets for special            Report progress on grades, district
                                                                                                                                                   163
Hoover High School                                                                                              WASC/CDE Self-Study Report 2011-2012

the academic success of special      Who: Leadership team, Special Ed              education and 504 Plan students         assessments (ACS),
education and 504 Plan students      Department Chair, FUSD Special                                                        CAHSEE/CSTs; Report to faculty,
who are mainstreamed into            Education Dept.                                                                       special education department and
regular classes                      Resources: ISGI                                                                       SSC
Expand the use of AVID               When: On-going                                AVID program targets; AVID              Walkthrough data; teacher
strategies school wide               Who: AVID coordinator, AVID teachers,         certification criteria; AVID elective   evaluations; Summary of annual
                                     AC with lead teachers                         enrollment                              report submitted by AVID
                                     Resources: Leadership team, District                                                  coordinator shared with staff and
                                     AVID coordinator and support                                                          SSC
                                                                  Systematic Interventions
Create a pyramid of tiered           When: Spring/Summer 2012                      Annual review of growth targets;        Present to staff and SSC; Suspension
intervention services to provide     Who: Leadership team and                      tiered-intervention document;           and Expulsion Data; Attendance
social/emotional and academic        Department Chairs                                                                     Data; SAP counselor referrals; SST
support for struggling students,     Resources: Response to Intervention                                                   referrals
that includes interventions after    resources
the school day, during the
school day, and in-class support
Implement Men’s Alliance             When: On-going                                Academic, behavioral and growth         Men’s Alliance academic, discipline,
program and research the             Who: Leadership team, Men’s Alliance          targets for Men’s Alliance program      and test scores progress reports
efficacy of expanding it to create   teachers                                      students
a similar program for young          Resources: District Men’s Alliance
women.                               program support, Fresno High School
                                     contacts for Women’s Alliance, Course
                                     curriculum
Seek out funding and resources       When: Spring 2012 and on-going                Annual review of SPSA and               Annual report to faculty and SSC;
to provide afterschool support       Who: Leadership Team                          Categorical programs                    After school program attendance
programs, intervention               Resources: Depart. Chairs, Counseling
programs and extended day            staff, funding, intervention curriculum,
opportunities for students           facilities for afterschool program
Provide a consistent progressive     When: On-going                                Suspension and Expulsion Data;          Annual report to faculty and SSC by
school-wide discipline policy        Who: Leadership team, Safe and Civil          Attendance Data; Tardy Data;            Safe and Civil Committee
that includes a SRC and specific     Committee,                                    Disaggregated SRC attendance
strategies chronic problems          Resources: SRC teacher, Campus Safety         data
                                     Officers, SRC support staff, facilities for
                                     SRC

                                                                                                                                                               164
HOOVER HIGH
  SCHOOL




  Appendix

				
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