Download - Hunter College - CUNY

Document Sample
Download - Hunter College - CUNY Powered By Docstoc
					 10/1/2003 Welcome to NRCFCPP Weekly Update
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/
 10/1/2003 Factors Influencing the Placement of Children Solely to Obtain Mental Health Services
                                     http://www.gao.gov/
                                      Children's Mental Health, Vol. 2, No. 1
 10/1/2003 Update: Latest Findings inhttp://www.ihhcpar.rutgers.edu/downloads/summer2003.pdf
                                    http://www.bazelon.org/teamingup
 10/1/2003 Teaming Up – Using the IDEA and Medicaid to Secure Comprehensive Mental Health Services for Children and Youth
                                      http://cecp.air.org/familybriefs/
 10/1/2003 Briefs for Families on Evidence-Based Practices
 10/1/2003 Practicing Restraint       http://www.cwla.org/articles/cv0309restraint.htm
 10/8/2003 Currículum (de la NRCFCPP) para la Planificación Concurrente
                                    http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/concurrent-permanency-plann
 10/8/2003 Improving the Performance and Outcomes of Child Welfare through State Program Improvement Plans (PIP
                                 http://www.cssp.org/whatsnew.html
 10/8/2003 Fight for Your Rights: A Guidebook for California Foster Youth, Former Foster Youth, and Those Who Care
                                   http://www.youthlaw.org/
 10/8/2003 Mentoring Programs for Children of Prisoners
                                 http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2003pres/20031003a.html
 10/8/2003 Every Door Closed: Barriers Facing Parents with Criminal Records
                                 http://www.clasp.org/
 10/8/2003 Change Your Bookmarks!
10/15/2003 Preparing for the National Adoptuskids Recruitment Campaign
                                  http://event.netbriefings.com/event/adoptex/Live/recruitment/
10/15/2003 Nation Doubles Adoptions from Foster Care
                                 http://cfrcwww.social.uiuc.edu/news1.htm
10/15/2003 Youth Development Programs and Educationally Disadvantaged Older Youths: A Synthesis
                                http://www.childtrends.org/HomePg.asp#educdisad
10/15/2003 Unlimited Potential Grants
                                  http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/citizenship/giving/apply/guidelines.asp
10/15/2003 Change Your Bookmark! http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov
10/22/2003 Children's Bureau National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect
                                  http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/conferences/cbconference/index.cfm
10/22/2003 Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Violence: Early Childhood Home Visitation
                                  http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5214a1.htm
10/22/2003 Children and Domestic Violence
                                 http://endabuse.org/programs/children/
10/22/2003 Where Children Live When Parents Are Incarcerated
                                http://www.jcpr.org/policybriefs/vol5_num4.html
                                   of Life…Be a Mentor
10/22/2003 Coach a Kid in the Gamehttp://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/mentoring/index.html
10/22/2003 Pongo Publishing Teen Writing Project
                                  http://www.pongopublishing.org/overview.html
10/29/2003 Call for Workshop Proposals
                                 http://www.cffutures.org/
                                    Child Welfare System
10/29/2003 Children of Color in the http://ndas.cwla.org/
10/29/2003 Children in Kinship Carehttp://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900661
10/29/2003 Child-Only TANF Payments for Kinship Care Families
                                http://www.casey.org/cnc/policy_issues/TANF.htm
10/29/2003 Advocating for Kids with Learning Disabilities
                                  http://www.ncld.org/advocacy/tutorial.cfm
10/29/2003 Funds for Social Change Programs
                                  http://www.affund.org/
 11/5/2003 Webcast on Placement Stability
                                http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/live/hunternrcfcpp2/
 11/5/2003 Visiting Between Children in Care and Their Families: A Look at Current Policy
                                  http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/family-child-visiting.html
 11/5/2003 Programs for Teens: What Works?
                                http://www.childtrends.org/what_works/clarkwww/clarkwww_intro.asp
 11/5/2003 Juvenile Court Placement of Adjudicated Youth, 1990-1999
                                  http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/pubs/fact.html#fs200305
 11/5/2003 Handbook for Supporting Community Youth Researchers
                                http://gardnercenter.stanford.edu/resources/handbook/
11/12/2003 NRCFCPP Webcast on Placement Stability
                               http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/live/hunternrcfcpp2/
11/12/2003 Foster Kids Count: Nurturing Well-Being for Youth in Out of Home Care
                                  http://trc.eku.edu/kfcctele/conference.asp?confid=26%20
                                 Appeals: Strategies to Reduce Delay
11/12/2003 Expediting Dependency http://www.ncsconline.org/WCDS/Topics/topic1.asp?search_value=Expediting%20Depen
11/12/2003 Trends in the Well-Being of America's Children and Youth, 2002 edition.
                                  http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/02trends/index.htm
11/12/2003   Assessing The Field Of Post-Adoption Services: Family Needs, Program Models And Evaluation Issues
                                  http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/post-adoption01/index.htm
                                   A Place of Innovation for Family Group Conferencing
11/12/2003 Hampshire County, U.K.:http://www.iirp.org/Pages/hampshirefgc.html
11/19/2003 Fall 2003 Issue of Permanency Planning Today
                                  http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/newsletters.html
                                    the Child Welfare System
11/19/2003 Bullying and Children in http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/child-safety.html
11/19/2003 Explore Our New Additions!
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/index.html
11/19/2003 Call For Workshop Proposals: First National Conference On Substance Abuse And Child Welfare
                                 http://www.cffutures.com/
11/19/2003 State Innovations in Child Welfare Financing
                                  http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/CW-financing03/index.htm
11/19/2003 Fast Facts Based on the 2002 National Survey of America's Families
                                  http://www.urban.org/content/Research/NewFederalism/Newsroom/FastFacts/ChildWelfa
11/26/2003 Innovations in Technical Assistance
                                  http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/training.html
                                  in Developing Information Systems and Reporting Reliable Child Welfare Data
11/26/2003 States Face Challenges http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-267T
11/26/2003 Foster Kids Count: Census Planning and Implementation Kit
                                  http://www.trc.eku.edu/kfcctele/orderform.asp
11/26/2003 Connected By 25: Improving The Life Chances of the Country's Most Vulnerable Youth
                                http://www.hewlett.org/Archives/Publications/connectedBy25.htm
                                  Community Problem-Solving
11/26/2003 The Art and Science of http://www.community-problem-solving.net/cms/
11/26/2003 Wal-mart Holiday Grants
                                 http://www.walmartfoundation.org/wmstore/goodworks/scripts/index.jsp
 12/3/2003 Mental Health in Child Welfare: A Focus on Children and Families
 12/3/2003 Kinship Foster Care: Custody, Hardships, and Services
                                  http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=310893
 12/3/2003 Practice Guide for Using Long-Term Foster Care
                                  http://edocs2.dhs.state.mn.us/lfserver/Legacy/MS-2297-ENG
 12/3/2003 Stuart Foundation, National Convening on Youth Permanence, April 10-11, 2003
                                 http://www.jimcaseyyouth.org/resource.htm
 12/3/2003 Newsletters from North Carolina's Family & Children's Resource Program
                                http://sswnt7.sowo.unc.edu/fcrp/newsletters.htm
 12/3/2003 Articles from Your Social Worker
                                 http://www.yoursocialworker.com/index.htm
                                  Permanency
12/10/2003 New Resources on Youthhttp://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/youth-permanency.html
12/10/2003 The Roundtable          http://www.nrcadoption.org/resources/roundtable.htm
                                 Choices: Guidelines for Needs-Based Service Planning in Child Welfare
12/10/2003 Tough Problems, Tough http://www.americanhumane.org/site/PageServer?pagename=pc_home
12/10/2003 Student Self-Harm: Silent School Crisis
                                 http://www.edweek.org/ew/ewstory.cfm?slug=14cutters.h23
12/10/2003 Children's Mental Health Resource Kit
                                  http://www.childrensdefense.org/ss_maincwmh.php
12/10/2003 Relatives as Parents Program (RAPP) Seed Grant Initiative for 2004
                                   http://www.brookdalefoundation.org/
12/17/2003 Foster Families: Challenges and New Ideas
                                   http://www.aboutourkids.org/
12/17/2003 E-Grants                  http://www.grants.gov/
12/17/2003   National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center
                                     http://aia.berkeley.edu/
12/17/2003   Adoption Assistance Case Law on Subsidy Payment Level
                                     http://www.oscn.net/applications/oscn/deliverdocument.asp?citeid=438133
12/17/2003   2004 Pathways To Adulthood National Independent Living/Transitional Living Conference
                                     www.nrcys.ou.edu/NRCYD/events.htm
12/17/2003   What Makes a Solution? Lessons and Findings from Solutions for America
                                     http://www.pew-partnership.org/whatsnew.html
12/23/2003   Educational Alternatives for Vulnerable Youth: Student Needs, Program Types, and Research Directions
                                     http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=410898
12/23/2003                           on Child Abuse and Neglect Information
             National Clearinghouse http://basis1.calib.com/BASIS/chdocs/docs/canweb/SF
12/23/2003                           from Brevity
             Information on Bullying http://training.ncjfcj.org/bullying.htm
12/23/2003                           Families and Public
             The Center of Fathers, http://www.cffpp.org/Policy
12/30/2003   Improving Parents’ Representation in Dependency Cases
                                     http://www.pppncjfcj.org/html/TAbrief_washstatepilotprog.html
12/30/2003   Kinship Care Resource Kit
                                     http://www.childrensdefense.org/kinshipcareresourcekit.php
12/30/2003   Grandparents Living with Grandchildren and Grandparents Responsible for Grandchildren
                                     http://www.gu.org/projg&oresour.htm
12/30/2003   National Data Analysis System (NDAS)
                                     http://ndas.cwla.org/
12/30/2003   Project First Step – Doula Care
                                     http://l2li.org/innovation/innov_of_week/index.asp
12/30/2003   January 2004 is National Mentoring Month
                                     http://www.mentoring.org/mentoring_month/index.adp?Menu=nav_left_home.adp&Entry=
  1/7/2004   Final Report of the White House Task Force for Disadvantaged Youth
                                     http://www.ncfy.com/whreport.htm
  1/7/2004                           Social Work Month
             Get Ready for National http://www.socialworkers.org/pressroom/swm2004/default.asp
  1/7/2004   The Risk of Risks       http://www.ex.ac.uk/cebss/newsletters.html
  1/7/2004   Articles from Children’s Voice
                                     http://www.cwla.org/articles/#0401
 1/14/2004   What Can You Do By Next Tuesday?
                                     http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp3/
 1/14/2004   Tax Information for Adoptive Parents
                                     http://www.irs.gov/publications/p968/index.html
 1/14/2004   Children in Foster Homes: How Are They Faring?
                                     http://www.childtrends.org/r_resbrief.asp
 1/14/2004   Information Memorandum on Child and Family Service Reviews
                                     http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/laws/im/im0305.htm
1/14/2004 Fact Sheets on Guardianship
                                http://aia.berkeley.edu/information_resources/standby_guardianship.html
1/14/2004                           http://www.lifetimetv.com/movies/origi
                                    nals/index.html
            Gracie’s Choice         http://www.rd.com/
1/21/2004 What is a Breakthrough Series Collaborative?
                                  http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp3/
                                   Page for Judges Who Hear Child Welfare Cases
1/21/2004 The Judges’ Page – A Webhttp://nationalcasa.org/JudgesPage/index.htm
                                   http://www.aapss.org/
1/21/2004 Positive Development: Realizing the Potential of Youth
                                    http://ssw.che.umn.edu/cascw/practice_notes.htm
1/21/2004 Sibling Visits in Out-of-Home Care
                                    http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/hccc/helping_children.htm
1/21/2004 Helping Children Cope with Crisis: A Workbook for African American Families
                                   http://www.childtrends.org/Lifecourse/programs_ages.htm
1/21/2004 Guide to Effective Programs for Children and Youth
                                   http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp3/
1/28/2004 Materials Available for Webcast
                                    http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/journalOffer.asp
1/28/2004 Online Journals – Free Trial Offer
                                   http://www.cwla.org/programs/groupcare/rgcq.htm
1/28/2004 Residential Group Care Quarterly
                                    http://www.vera.org/publications/publications.asp
1/28/2004 Patterns of Criminal Conviction and Incarceration Among Mothers of Children in New York City
                                  http://www.nonprofits.org/npofaq/19/64.html
1/28/2004 Grant Writing Tools Web Sites
                                  Strengths: Developmental Assets Among Youth of Color
1/28/2004 Unique Strengths, Sharedhttp://www.search-institute.org/research/Insights/
                                   http://www.fostercaremonth.org
 2/4/2004 National Foster Care Month – May 2004
 2/4/2004 Educating Children in Foster Care
                                    http://www.ncsl.org/programs/cyf/CPIeducate.htm
                                    http://www.futureofchildren.org/pubs-info2825/pubs-info.htm?doc_id=203959
 2/4/2004 Future of Children: Children, Families and Foster Care
                                   http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/FederalTaxBenefits2003.htm
 2/4/2004 Federal Tax Benefits for Foster and Adoptive Parents and Kinship Caregivers: 2003 Tax Year
                                   http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics;112/6/1437
 2/4/2004 Families and Adoption: The Pediatrician's Role in Supporting Communication
                                   http://www.leg.state.nv.us/scd/119NevAdvOpNo68.html
 2/4/2004 Nevada's High Court Rules In Favor Of Visitation by Biological Siblings
2/11/2004 Promising Practices: How Foster Parents Can Support the Successful Transition of Youth from Foster Care to Self-suf
                                   http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/newpub.html
                                   http://www.orphan.org/programs/casey.html
2/11/2004 Scholarships for Foster Youth
                                   http://www.americanhumane.org/site/PageServer?pagename=pc_facts_info
2/11/2004 Fathers and Their Families: The Untapped Resource for Children Involved in the Child Welfare System
2/11/2004 Youngsters' Mental Health And Psychosocial Problems: What Are the Data?
                                  http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu/pdfdocs/prevalence/youthMH.pdf
                                   http://www.ahomewithin.org/
2/11/2004 The Children's Psychotherapy Project for Foster Children
2/11/2004 Understanding Child Maltreatment and Juvenile Delinquency: From Research to Effective Programs, Practice and Syste
                                   http://www.cwla.org/programs/juvenilejustice/ucmjd.htm
2/11/2004 Hold the Date!
2/18/2004 Children’s Resilience in the Face of Trauma
                                   http://www.aboutourkids.org/letter/
2/18/2004 Paradigm Online          http://www.onlineparadigm.com/
2/18/2004   PREVENT: Prevention and Evaluation of Early Neglect and Trauma
                                   http://www.ncsconline.org/D_KIS/Trends/Trends03MainPage.html
2/18/2004   Providing Comprehensive, Integrated Social Services to Vulnerable Children and Families: Are There Legal B
                                   http://www.clasp.org/
2/18/2004   New York State Kids' Well-Being Indicator Clearinghouse (KWIC)
                                   http://www.nyskwic.org/
2/18/2004   Free Web Pages for Youth Advisory Boards
                                   www.fyi3.com/fyi3/Involved/yb/index.cfm
2/25/2004   Archived Webcasts      http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/webcasts/index.html
2/25/2004   The Human Costs of Foster Care: Voices from the Inside
                                   http://pewfostercare.org/
2/25/2004   Parent Training and Information Centers
                                   http://www.dssc.org/frc/TAGuide/pti.htm
2/25/2004   Journal of the Center for Families, Children & the Courts
                                   http://www.courtinfo.ca.gov/programs/cfcc/
2/25/2004   Testimony on Child Welfare
                                   http://waysandmeans.house.gov/hearings.asp?formmode=detail&hearing=122&comm
2/25/2004   Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth
                                   http://www.chapinhall.org/home_new.asp
                                  http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp4/
 3/3/2004 Webcast – Foster Our Future: National Foster Care Month 2004
 3/3/2004 Providing Comprehensive, Integrated Social Services to Vulnerable Children and Families: Are There Legal B
                                http://www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1076428367.74/view_html
 3/3/2004 New interactive Website "Stop Bullying Now"
                                http://stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov/index.asp
 3/3/2004 Chapin Hall Alert     http://www.chapinhall.org/home_new.asp
 3/3/2004 Grants from the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption
                                http://www.davethomasfoundationforadoption.org/html/grants/index.asp
 3/3/2004 Youth Development Worker Competencies
                              http://www.nydic.org/nydic/documents/FinalCompetencies1.doc
                                  http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp4/
3/10/2004 Webcast – Foster Our Future: National Foster Care Month 2004
                                    http://www.zerotothree.org/policy/childwelfare.html
3/10/2004 Babies, Toddlers, Foster Care and the Courts
                                  Placement: Best Practices
3/10/2004 Siblings and Out-of-Homehttp://www.alliance1.org/fis/
3/10/2004 National Policy Briefing   http://www.cffpp.org/briefings/
                                   on Child Abuse and Neglect
3/10/2004 Native American Programshttp://w3.ouhsc.edu/ccan/page4.html
                                  http://www.nclrights.org/publications/lgbtqfostercare.htm
3/10/2004 LGBTQ Youth in the Foster Care System
                                   http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp4/
3/17/2004 Foster Our Future: National Foster Care Month 2004
                                 http://www.childrenshomesociety.org/2_ffkreportsData.htm
3/17/2004 Washington Permanency Framework
                                    Attorney Guardians ad Litem
3/17/2004 Standards of Practice for http://www.abanet.org/child/childrep.html
                                   http://www.fosteringresults.org/results/reports.htm
3/17/2004 Nation's Child Welfare System Doubles Number of Adoptions from Foster Care
                                    Organization Annual Conference
3/17/2004 International Foster Care http://www.fostering.us/
                                    http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/memorialflag.htm
3/17/2004 Children’s Memorial Flag Day – April 23
                                   Children in the Child Welfare System: Pioneering Possibilities Amidst Daunting Challenges
3/24/2004 Achieving Permanence for http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/youth-permanency.html
                                    Progress
3/24/2004 Using Data to Monitor PIPhttp://www.nrcitcw.org/tips_tools_trends/ttt_pip_progress.html
                                     http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/
3/24/2004 Strategic Planning for Child Welfare Agencies
3/24/2004 Best Practice/Next Practice
                                   http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/laws/placement.cfm
3/24/2004 Placement of Children With Relatives
                                   http://www.movingideas.org/ideas/full_cite/4723.html
3/24/2004 Connected by 25: A Plan for Investing in Successful Futures for Foster Youth
                                 http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Archives/hunternrcfcpp4/
3/31/2004 Foster Our Future: Webcast Archive
                                 http://www.jlc.org/home/publications
3/31/2004 Dependent Youth Aging Out of Foster Care: A Guidebook for Judges
                                   http://conferences.jbs.biz/women_and_childwelfare/together/index.htm
3/31/2004 Putting the Pieces Together: 1st National Conference on Substance Abuse, Child Welfare and the Dependency Court
                                   http://www.fosteringresults.org/results/reports.htm
3/31/2004 The Foster Care Straitjacket: Innovation, Federal Financing & Accountability in State Foster Care Reform
                                   http://www.youthcomm.org/Publications/FCYU.htm
3/31/2004 “Crack Babies" All Grown Up
 4/7/2004 Child Maltreatment 2002 http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/publications/cm02/index.htm
 4/7/2004 Childrens Bureau Express http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/
                                   http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/index.html
 4/7/2004 Children and the Households They Live In: 2000
                                   http://www.socialworkers.org/research/naswResearch/0404chldwlfr/default.asp
 4/7/2004 Professional Social Workers in Child Welfare Work
 4/7/2004 Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Bill of Rights
                                   http://www.cwla.org/programs/incarcerated/cop_billofrights.htm
4/14/2004 Child Abuse & Neglect Media Handbook
                                   http://www.childtrends.org/
4/14/2004 The Link: Connecting Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare
                                 http://www.cwla.org/programs/juvenilejustice/jjdnewsletter.htm
4/14/2004 Forgotten Children: A Special Report on the Texas Child Welfare System
                                 http://www.window.state.tx.us/forgottenchildren/
4/14/2004 Advocacy 101              http://www.texanscareforchildren.org/advocacy.htm
4/14/2004   National Child Traumatic Stress Network Website
                                    http://www.nctsnet.org
4/14/2004                            Casey Foundation's
            Advocasey: the Annie E.http://www.aecf.org/ Policy Magazine
4/21/2004   Decision-Making for the Permanent Placement of Children
                                    http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/general/legal/statutes/sag/planning.cfm
4/21/2004   Adoption Assistance for Children with Special Needs
                                    http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/laws/sneeds.cfm
4/21/2004   How Do Court Continuances Influence the Time Children Spend in Foster Care?
                                    http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/
4/21/2004   Baseline Report for One-Year-in-Foster-Care Sample
                                    http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/core/ongoing_research/afc/wellbeing_reports.html
4/21/2004                            Improved Guidance
            Better Use of Data and http://www.gao.gov/ Could Enhance HHS’s Oversight of State Performance
4/21/2004   Let's All Get In the Victory Lane: Making Children a National Priority
                                    http://www.cwla.org/conferences/2004midwest.htm
                                    http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/siblings.html
4/28/2004 Sibling Practice Curriculum
                                    http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/family-preservation-and-suppor
4/28/2004 Promising Practices in Reunification
                                    http://gucchd.georgetown.edu/document.html#CW07
4/28/2004 A Family's Guide to the Child Welfare System
4/28/2004 An Analysis of Mental Health Issues in States Child and Family Service Reviews and Program Improvement Plan
                                   http://gucchd.georgetown.edu
                                  http://www.ed.gov/about/inits/list/fbci/grants.html#safe
4/28/2004 Safe and Drug Free Schools Mentoring Programs Grants
                                  http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/
4/28/2004 2004 Destination Future National Youth Leadership Conference
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/newsletters.html
 5/5/2004 Permanency Planning Today: Spring 2004
 5/5/2004 Procedures for the Implementation of the Adoption Promotion Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-145)
                                http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/laws/pi/pi0403.htm
                                 http://www.adoptuskids.org
 5/5/2004 Mini-Grants for Adoptive Parent Support Groups
 5/5/2004 Mini-Grants for Adoptive Parent Support Groups
                                 http://www.nfpn.org/reunification/assessment_tool.php
 5/5/2004 Intensive Family Services: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale
 5/5/2004 National Resource Center for Community-Based Grants for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect
                                http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/grantreview/funding/open.html
5/12/2004 Mobilizing Trauma Resources for Children
                                http://www.cwla.org/programs/bhd/mhother.htm
                                 http://aia.berkeley.edu/training/annual_conference.html
5/12/2004 Raising Kin: The Psychosocial Well-Being of Substance Abuse-Affected Children In Relative Care
5/12/2004 Fostering Perspectives http://www.fosteringperspectives.org
5/12/2004 Breakthrough Series Collaborative on Supporting Kinship Care
                                http://www.casey.org/Resources/Tools/SupportingKinshipCare.htm
5/12/2004 Summer Positions for Law Students
                                http://www.law.capital.edu/adoption/JobSite/open_jobs.htm
5/12/2004 Foster Care Month          http://www.fostercaremonth.org
5/19/2004   Fostering the Future: Safety, Permanence and Well-Being for Children in Foster Care
                                     http://pewfostercare.org/
5/19/2004   Child and Family Services Reviews: States and HHS Face Challenges in Assessing and Improving State Perfo
                                     http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-781T
5/19/2004   Answering the Call: Partnering with Communities of Faith
                                     http://www.cwla.org/conferences/2004adoptuskids.htm
5/19/2004                             Policy Data
            The Green Book 2004 – http://waysandmeans.house.gov/Documents.asp?section=813
5/19/2004   Families in Court for Child Protection and Domestic Violence
                                     http://ncjj.servehttp.com/NCJJWebsite/publications/serial/cfcbulletin.htm
5/19/2004                            Better Child Welfare Outcomes
            Weaving Resources for http://www.conferencepros.com/conferences/CWPEP/index.htm
5/26/2004   State Child Welfare Legislation: 2002-2003
                                     http://www.ncsl.org/programs/cyf/cw.htm
5/26/2004   Working Together: Health Services for Children in Foster Care
                                     http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/sppd/health_services/manual.asp
5/26/2004   Free Foster Care Technical Assistance Bulletins
5/26/2004   Grant Opportunity: Family Support Services For Grandparents and Other Relatives Providing Caregiving for
                                     http://www.raconline.org/funding/funding_details.php?funding_id=515
5/26/2004   Understanding What Children Say About Living With Domestic Violence, Parental Substance Misuse or Pare
                                     http://www.jrf.org.uk/knowledge/findings/socialpolicy/514.asp
 6/2/2004                             10, 2004: Supporting Permanent Placements: Post-Permanency Services
            Teleconference on Junehttp://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/telereg.html
 6/2/2004   Child Welfare Outcomes 2001
                                     http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/publications/cwo.htm
 6/2/2004   Services for Kinship Carehttp://www.connectforkids.org/benton_topics1544/benton_topics_show.htm?doc_id=2261
 6/2/2004   Time Running Out: Teens in Foster Care – a study of youth in the New York City Foster Care system.
                                     http://childrensrights.org/Policy/resources_CRresources_time_running_out.htm
 6/2/2004                             Substance Abuse Treatment
            When Your Child Needshttp://family.samhsa.gov/get/family_time/treatment.aspx
 6/2/2004   2004 Adoption Excellence Awards
                                     http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/initiatives/aeawards.htm
 6/9/2004   Practice Briefs on Special Needs Adoption
                                     http://www.nrcadoption.org/resources/emerge.htm
 6/9/2004   CFSR Key Findings Reportshttp://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/cwrp/key/index.htm
 6/9/2004   Financing Child Welfare: What Policies Best Protect Children?
                                     http://www.clasp.org/
 6/9/2004   Kids Count Data Book http://www.aecf.org/kidscount/databook/
 6/9/2004   Volunteer Management Practices and Retention of Volunteers
                                     http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411005
6/16/2004                            and Communities: Post Adoption Services
            Strengthening Families http://www.caseyfamilyservices.org/pr_casey_center.html
6/16/2004   Illinois Sibling Rights Resolution
                                     http://www.state.il.us/DCFS/library/com_communications_pr_jun42004.shtml#content
6/16/2004   2004 NACAC Conference Registration
                                     http://www.nacac.org/conference.html
6/16/2004   “Out Here on My Own” Radio Documentary
                                     http://www.chicagopublicradio.org/programs/specials/chicagomatters/cm04_nextgen/cm0
6/16/2004   "Disconnected Youth: Educational Pathways to Reconnection"
                                     http://www.claspstore.org/AudioConference/2004/2004AudioConferenceBrochure.htm
6/16/2004   Government Resources in Spanish
                                     http://www.firstgov.gov/Espanol/index.shtml
6/23/2004   An Analysis of States’ Child and Family Services Reviews and Program Improvement Plans from a Youth Dev
                                     http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/NRCYD/publications.htm
6/23/2004   Evaluation of CASA Representation
                                     http://www.casanet.org/program-management/evaluation/caliber-evaluation.htm
6/23/2004   Representing Children, Families, and Agencies
                                     http://www.naccchildlaw.org/training/conference.html
6/23/2004 Lesbian and Gay Adolescents: Identity Development
                                http://www.tpronline.org/read.cfm?section=articles&id=111
6/30/2004 Family Centered Assessment Guidebook
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/assessment.html
6/30/2004 Post Permanency Teleconference PowerPoint Presentation
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/post-permanency-services.htm
6/30/2004 Information Packet: Birthright – An Adoptee’s Right to Know
                                 http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/adoption.html
6/30/2004 Information Packet: Babies Born to Incarcerated Mothers
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/birth-family-issues.html
6/30/2004 Mainstreaming Family Group Conferencing: Building and Sustaining Partnerships
                                http://www.iirp.org/library/vt/vt_pennell.html
6/30/2004 U.S. House Hearing on Failure to Protect Child Safety
                                 http://waysandmeans.house.gov/hearings.asp?formmode=detail&hearing=156
 7/7/2004 Overrepresentation of Minority Children: How the Child Welfare System Is Responding
                                http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/otherpubs/children/index.cfm
 7/7/2004 Independent Living Training Curricula
                                 http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/NRCYD/ilgrantees.htm
                                 Mandates
 7/7/2004 Fact Sheets on Federal http://www.nrcitcw.org/rscs/rscs_facts.html
 7/7/2004 Using Data in Child Welfare: Learning Resources
                                 http://sswnt7.sowo.unc.edu/fcrp/tm/tm_vol5_no4/tm_vol5no4.htm
 7/7/2004 Model Courts: Improving Outcomes for Abused and Neglected Children
                                http://www.pppncjfcj.org/html/tech_asst_brfs.html
 7/7/2004 Foster Children with Special Needs: The Children’s Aid Society Experience
                                 http://www.mssm.edu/msjournal/current.shtml
7/14/2004 View From the Bench: Obstacles to Safety & Permanency for Children in Foster Care
                                http://www.fosteringresults.org/results/reports.htm
7/14/2004 Strengthening and Preserving Adoptive Families: A Study of TANF funded Post-Adoption Services in New Y
                                http://www.nysccc.org/Post%20Adoption%20Services/postadoptmain.htm
                                Need
7/14/2004 What Adoptive Parents http://e-magazine.adoption.com/articles/508/what-adoptive-parents-need.php
7/14/2004 Indian Child Welfare Acts Checklists
                                http://www.pppncjfcj.org/html/tech_asst_brfs.html
7/14/2004 Therapeutic Foster Care for the Reduction of Violence
                                http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5310a1.htm
7/14/2004 Second Chances            http://humanmedia.org/program_secondchances.php3
7/21/2004   Answering the Call: A National Campaign to Encourage Adoption of Children from Foster Care
                                    http://www.adoptuskids.org/servlet/page?_pageid=412&_dad=portal30&_schema=PORT
7/21/2004   Youth Perspectives on Permanency
                                    http://www.cpyp.org/
7/21/2004   Grandparents Raising Grandchildren
                                    http://www.firstgov.gov/Topics/Grandparents.shtml
7/21/2004                            Supporting High-Risk Youth with Paid Mentors and Counselors
            Guides for the Journey:http://www.ppv.org/ppv/youth/youth_publications.asp?section_id=9#pub173
7/21/2004   Benefits and Costs of Prevention and Early Intervention Programs for Youth
                                    http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/rptfiles/04-07-3901.pdf
7/21/2004   Crossing Bridges and Fostering Change: Foster Parents Speak
                                    http://www.film-video.com/foster/
7/28/2004   Partnering with Familieshttp://www.rtc.pdx.edu/pgFPS04TOC.php
7/28/2004   Father Involvement – Building Strong Programs for Strong Families
                                    http://www.headstartinfo.org/publications/bullet.cfm
7/28/2004   Grandma and Grandpa Taking Care of the Kids: Patterns of Involvement
                                    http://www.childtrends.org/Files/GrandparentsRB.pdf
7/28/2004   Forum Focus: Countering Structural Racism
                                    http://www.forumforyouthinvestment.org/forumfocus.htm#jul04
7/28/2004   Emerging Practices in the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect
                                    http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/topics/prevention/emerging/report/index.cfm
7/28/2004   2004 ACF Tribal Consultation Luncheon, Expo/Reception
                                    http://www.masterkeyconsulting.com/event.html
 8/4/2004   Foster Children and Education: How You Can Create a Positive Educational Experience for the Foster Child
                                    http://tinyurl.com/48gd7
 8/4/2004   National Adoption Information Clearinghouse Website
                                    http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/
 8/4/2004   America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being
                                    http://www.childstats.gov/americaschildren/
 8/4/2004   Youth Law News          http://www.youthlaw.org/YLN.htm
 8/4/2004   Building Partnerships for Youth
                                    http://msg.calsnet.arizona.edu/fcs/Index.cfm
8/11/2004   Children Missing from Care: An Issue Brief
                                    http://www.cwla.org/programs/fostercare/childmiss.htm
8/11/2004                           the Public on Behalf of Children
            Turning Point: Engaging http://www.adcouncil.org/research/commitment_children/
8/11/2004   Tools for Youth with Special Health Care Needs
                                    http://www.medicalhomeinfo.org/tools/youthindex.html
8/11/2004                           Who Are Waiting for Community
            Incarceration of Youth http://www.house.gov/reform/min/ Mental Health Services in the United States
8/11/2004   Separated Refugee Children in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities
                                    http://www.brycs.org/brycs_resources.htm
8/18/2004   Youth Who Chronically AWOL from Foster Care: Why They Run, Where They Go, and What Can Be Done
                                    http://www.vera.org/publications/publications_5.asp?publication_id=244
8/18/2004   Hard Data on Hard Times: An Empirical Analysis of Maternal Incarceration, Foster Care, and Visitation
                                    http://www.vera.org/publications/publications_5.asp?publication_id=245
8/18/2004                            Allegations of Severe Child Abuse: Results from the Instant Response Team Progra
            Improving Responses tohttp://www.vera.org/publications/publications_5.asp?publication_id=243
8/18/2004 Ethics and Adoptive Family Recruitment
                                http://www.nacac.org/newsletters/ethics.html
8/18/2004 Building Strong Familieshttp://www.buildingstrongfamilies.info/
8/18/2004 Teaching Children with ADHD - Instructional Strategies and Practices
                                 http://www.ed.gov/about/reports/annual/osep/index.html#adhd-res
8/25/2004 Youth Permanency Framework and Measures
                               http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/permanence-for-young-people
8/25/2004 Unconditional Commitment: The Only Love that Matters to Teens
                               http://www.hawaiifosterparent.org/itemview.asp?itemid=1000153&itemtype=category
8/25/2004 The Transition Years: Serving Current and Former Foster Youth Ages 18 to 21
                                 http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/NRCYD/publications.htm
8/25/2004 Informal Kinship Care in Minnesota: A Pilot Study
                                 http://www.mkca.org/ikreport.pdf
8/25/2004 Issue Brief on the Multi-Ethnic Placement Act
                                 http://ndas.cwla.org/
8/25/2004 Re-engaging Disconnected Youth Action Kit
                                http://www.nlc.org/nlc_org/site/programs/institute_for_youth_education_and_families/disc
                                    Child Welfare: What’s your #?
  9/1/2004 Best Practices in Public http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/
  9/1/2004 Field-Initiated Research on Successful Adolescent Adoptions
                                  http://www.sc.edu/ccfs/research.html
  9/1/2004 Permanency Planning Mediation Pilot Program
                                 http://courts.michigan.gov/scao/resources/publications/reports/
  9/1/2004 Another Look at the Effects of Child Abuse
                                 http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/jr000251.htm
  9/1/2004 A Return to Orphanages?
                                http://childrensrights.org/Policy/resources_CRresources_return_orphanages.htm
  9/1/2004 Lawyer-Guardian ad Litem Protocol
                                 http://courts.michigan.gov/mji/resources/lgal/LGALprotocol.htm
 9/8/2004 Evidence Based Practice Tool
                                http://www.rom.ku.edu/EBP_Main.asp
 9/8/2004 Research to Practice Annotated Bibliographies
                                http://www.cwla.org/programs/r2p/biblio.htm
 9/8/2004 Successful Adolescent Adoptions
                                http://www.sc.edu/ccfs/research.html
 9/8/2004 Growing Pains Independent Living Conference
                                http://www.danielkids.org
                                 November 20, 2004
9/15/2004 National Adoption Day: http://www.nationaladoptionday.org/2004/index.asp
9/15/2004 National Adoption Month: November 2004
                                http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/general/adoptmonth/index.cfm
9/15/2004 Youth in Foster Care Who Commit Delinquent Acts
                                www.cwla.org/programs/juvenilejustice/jjdnewsletter.htm
9/15/2004 Early Child Development in Social Context: A Chartbook
                                http://www.cmwf.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=237483
9/22/2004 Accessing Educational Supports for Youth In Out-of-Home Care
                                 http://www.cwla.org/programs/housing/mckinneyvento.htm
9/22/2004 New Reports on Transitions to Adulthood for Foster Youth With Disabilities
                                http://www.selfdeterminationohsu.org/education/foster/research.html
9/22/2004 Background Information – Youth at Risk
                               http://www.nyec.org/ytfgbackgrounder_final.pdf
9/22/2004 Represent                http://www.youthcomm.org
9/22/2004 The Causes and Correlates Studies: Findings and Policy Implications
                                http://www.ncjrs.org/html/ojjdp/203555/
9/22/2004 Public Policy Advocacy: A Grassroots Guide
                                  http://www.hcbs.org/moreInfo.php/type_tool/125/ofs/40/doc/654/Public_Policy_Advocacy
9/29/2004 Resiliency-based Research and Adolescent Health Behaviors
                                 http://www.tpronline.org/read.cfm?section=articles&id=175
9/29/2004 AFCARS 2002 Data Files Available
                               http://www.ndacan.cornell.edu/
9/29/2004 2005 Juvenile Justice National Symposium: Joining Forces for Better Outcomes
                                http://www.cwla.org/conferences/2005jjsymposiumrfp.htm
9/29/2004 What Is "Healthy Marriage"? Defining the Concept
                               http://www.childtrends.org/
9/29/2004 Minnesota Child Welfare Waiver
                                http://www.acf.hhs.gov/news/press/2004/mn_waiver.htm
9/29/2004 Permanency by the Numbers: Improving Dependency Caseflow Management Through Data-Driven Strategies
                               http://www.law.capital.edu/adoption/04symposium.htm
10/6/2004 National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Planning
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/
10/6/2004 Permanency Planning Today – Fall 2004
                                http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/newsletters.html
10/6/2004 Seven National Child Welfare Resource Centers
                                http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/funding/fy2004ga.htm
10/6/2004 Summary of the Results of the 2001 - 2004 Child and Family Services Reviews
                                http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/cwrp/results.htm
10/6/2004 The Roundtable           http://www.nrcadoption.org/resources/roundtable.htm
10/6/2004 Youth Development Update
                               http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/NRCYD/ydpubs.htm
10/13/2003 Effective Approaches to Supporting Youth Aging Out of Foster Care
                                 www.voicesforamericaschildren.org/agingout
10/13/2003 The FYI Binder          http://www.fosterclub.com/fyi3/binder/binderFeatures.cfm
10/13/2003 Spending on Social Welfare Programs in Rich and Poor States
                                 http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/social-welfare-spending04/summary.htm
10/13/2003 Online Tutorials & Training
                                   http://ncsacw.samhsa.gov/tutorials/index.asp
10/13/2003 Call for Presentations http://www.nfpainc.org/training/conference.cfm?page=4
10/13/2003 Casey Family Scholarships for Male Students of Color in Post-Secondary Education
                                 http://www.orphan.org/casey_family_scholarships.html
10/20/2004 Adoption General Information Packet 3: Searching for Birth Relatives
                                 http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/adoption_gip_three.cfm
                                   Permanence for Children in Safe and Stable Foster Care with Relatives and Other C
10/20/2004 Family Ties: Supporting http://www.fosteringresults.org/results/reports.htm
10/20/2004 Criminal Neglect: Substance Abuse, Juvenile Justice and The Children Left Behind
                                  http://www.casacolumbia.org/pdshopprov/shop/item.asp?itemid=73
10/20/2004 State and Local Government on the Web
                                 http://www.statelocalgov.net/index.cfm
10/20/2004 The YouthArts Toolkit http://www.artsusa.org/youtharts/download.asp
10/20/2004 Donated Web Design Services Available to Nonprofits
                                http://www.michiganit.com/helpingmeit/
10/27/2004 Influencing Public Policy in Your State: A Guide for Youth in Care
                                    http://www.ylat.org/publications/index.htm
10/27/2004 The Meaning of "Family-Driven"
                                 http://www.tapartnership.org/news/Sept04/familymatter.htm
10/27/2004 The Characteristics, Experiences, and Outcomes of Youth with Emotional Disturbances
                                  http://www.ncset.org/publications/viewdesc.asp?id=1687
10/27/2004 Adolescent Maltreatment: An Overview of the Research
                                http://www.tpronline.org/read.cfm?section=articles&id=176
10/27/2004 Guidelines for Culturally Competent Organizations
                                   http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/groups/publications/documents/pub/dhs_Publications.h
                                  Evidence: Do Positive Strategies "Work"?
10/27/2004 Strengths, Assets, and http://www.rtc.pdx.edu/pgFeaturedDiscussions.php
 11/3/2004 Foster Care Maintenance Payment Rates
                                 http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/foster-care-recruitment/fc-maintenance-pay
 11/3/2004 Adoption Awareness Toolkit
                                http://www.davethomasfoundation.org/html/resource/index.asp
 11/3/2004 Native Americans and Child Welfare
                                 http://www.friendsnrc.org/resources/fact_sheets.asp
 11/3/2004 Are They Really Neglected?
                                 http://www.fncfcs.com/pubs/vol1num1/toc.html
 11/3/2004 Indicators of Child, Family, and Community Connections
                                   http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/connections-charts04/index.htm
 11/3/2004 All Students Reaching the Top: Strategies for Closing Academic Achievement Gaps
                                  http://www.ncrel.org/gap/studies/thetop.htm
11/10/2004 Webcast on Family Group Conferencing
                                http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/live/hunternrcfcpp5/
11/10/2004 National Adoption Monthttp://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2004/11/20041104-14.html
                                 h
11/10/2004 National Convening on Youth Permanence Report
                                  http://www.cpyp.org/
11/10/2004 Connectedness
11/10/2004 Indicators of Positive Youth Development - What Gets Measured, Gets Done
                                   http://www.forumforyouthinvestment.org/
                                  Through Early Care and Education
11/10/2004 Strengthening Families http://www.cssp.org/doris_duke/index.html
11/17/2004 NRCFCPPP Website           http://www.nrcfcppp.org
11/17/2004   Research Briefs from NSCAW
                                      http://www.ndacan.cornell.edu/NDACAN/Datasets/Abstracts/DatasetAbstract_103_NSCA
11/17/2004   What do Children Look for in Social Workers?
                                      http://www.fosteringperspectives.org/fp_vol9no1/vol9no1.htm
11/17/2004   Residential Care in Illinois - Trends and Alternatives
                                      http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract_new.asp?ar=1367&L2=66&L3=124
11/17/2004   A Guidebook for Child Welfare and Part C Agencies
                                      http://www.jfkpartners.org/publications.asp
11/17/2004   Discover Card Tribute Award Scholarship Program
                                      http://www.orphan.org/discover_scholarships.html
11/24/2004   Family Group Conferencing: Bringing the Family into Family-Centered Practice
                                      http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp5/
11/24/2004   How Many Children Were Adopted in 2000 and 2001?
                                      http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/s_adopted/index.cfm
11/24/2004                             the United States: A State-by-State
             Foster Care Adoption inhttp://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411108 Analysis of Barriers & Promising Approaches
11/24/2004   What’s Working for Children: A Policy Study of Adoption Stability and Termination
                                      http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/publications/2004_disruption_report.html
11/24/2004                             Children in Care – Practice Guides
             A Better Education for http://www.socialexclusion.gov.uk/publications.asp?did=189
11/24/2004   Violence Against Women: Identifying Risk Factors
                                      http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/pubs-sum/197019.htm
 12/1/2004   Reports Reveal Promising Strategies to Strengthen Tribal Families
                                      http://www.acf.hhs.gov/news/press/2004/pssf.htm
 12/1/2004   Family Strengthening Policy Center
                                      http://www.nassembly.org/fspc
 12/1/2004   Forging Connections: Challenges and Opportunities for Older Caregivers Raising Children
                                      http://www.coac.org
 12/1/2004   Early Childhood Measures Profiles
                                      http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/ECMeasures04/
 12/1/2004   Dialing for Help: State Telephone Hotlines as Vital Resources for Parents of Young Children
                                      http://www.cmwf.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=248918
 12/1/2004 Webcast Materials Available
                                http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcpp5/
                                  of Foster Children
 12/8/2004 The Educational Status http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract_new.asp?ar=1377&L2=61&L3=130
 12/8/2004 Arizona Dual Jurisdiction Study
                                  http://www.supreme.state.az.us/
 12/8/2004 Texas Committee on Child Welfare and Foster Care – Interim Report
                                http://www.house.state.tx.us/committees/reports/78interim/
 12/8/2004 Residential Treatment for Parents and Their Children: The Village Experience
                                  http://www.nida.nih.gov/Perspectives/vol2no2.html
 12/8/2004 Preventing Teenage Pregnancy in Looked After Children
                                 http://www.elsc.org.uk/briefings/briefing09/index.htm
 12/8/2004 Families for Teens: A Toolkit for Focusing, Educating and Motivating Staff
                                  http://www.thetoolkit.org/
12/15/2004 Information Packet: Gay and Lesbian Second Parent Adoptions
                                 http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/lgbtq-issues-and-child-welfare
12/15/2004 Substance-Exposed Newborns: New Federal Law Raises Some Old Issues
                               http://www.ncsl.org/programs/cyf/newbornintro.htm
12/15/2004 Family Health Portrait http://www.hhs.gov/familyhistory/
12/15/2004 The CICC Discovery Tool
                                http://www.ciccdiscoverytool.org/Welcome.aspx
12/15/2004 2005 National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health Conference Calls
                                 http://gucchd.georgetown.edu/programs/ta_center/tacalls.html
12/15/2004 How Do States Make Collaboration Work at the Local Level?
                                http://www.communityinclusion.org/publications/pub.php?page=newpubs#rp37
12/22/2004 Summary of the Results of the 2001 - 2004 Child and Family Services Reviews
                                 http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/cwrp/results.htm
12/22/2004 Mental Health Use by Youth in Foster Care
                                 http://datatrends.fmhi.usf.edu/datatrends_archive.html
12/22/2004 Serving Youth Aging Out of Foster Care
                                 http://www.financeproject.org/TFPPubs.asp
12/22/2004 HHS Actions Could Improve Coordination of Services and Monitoring of States’ Independent Living Program
                                http://www.gao.gov/docsearch/repandtest.html
12/22/2004 Guide to Federal Funding Sources for the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative and Other Youth Initiat
                                  http://www.financeproject.org/TFPPubs.asp
12/22/2004 Rethinking the Evaluation of Family Strengthening Strategies: Beyond Traditional Program Evaluation Mode
                                  http://gseweb.harvard.edu/~hfrp/eval/issue26/spotlight4.html
12/29/2004 Improving Outcomes for Older Youth: What Judges and Attorneys Need to Know
                                http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/nrcyd/publications.htm
12/29/2004 Educating Youth In Care: The First Year of Education and Training Vouchers
                                 http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/nrcyd/publications.htm
12/29/2004 An Analysis of States’ Child and Family Services Reviews and Program Improvement Plans From a Youth Dev
                                   http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/nrcyd/publications.htm
12/29/2004 The Cost of Protecting Vulnerable Children IV: How Child Welfare Funding Fared during the Recession
                                  http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411115
12/29/2004 Outcome Based Child Welfare Practice Website
                                http://xinia.social.uiuc.edu/outcomessite/index.htm
12/29/2004 Children and Domestic Violence
                                 http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/general/legal/statutes/domviol.cfm
Beginning October 1, 2003, the National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning at the Hunter College School of S
In a report from the General Accounting Office (GAO-03-865T), it is estimated that in fiscal year 2001, parents placed over 12,700
According to findings of a 1997 survey, conducted by the U.S. Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), many teenagers with seve
This report, published by the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, informs practitioners, attorneys, and advocates how to obtain se
The Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice has published a series of information briefs on research-based intervention prac
This article from the Child Welfare League of America's "Children's Voice" discusses the use of restraint and seclusion in residentia
The NRCFCPP Concurrent Planning Curriculum is now available in Spanish as well as English. The overall training objectives of this five
This paper presents background information on the federal legislative and regulatory context for the Child and Family Service R
This guidebook from the National Center for Youth Law was authored by a former foster youth who is also an attorney
HHS has announced nearly $9 million in grants to 52 organizations to train adult volunteers as mentors to children whos
Each year, approximately 400,000 mothers and fathers finish serving prison or jail sentences and return home eager to
The National Adoption Information Clearinghouse can now be found at http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/ Children's Bureau Expres
                                                                       P
Wednesday, October 29th, 2003 - 1:00 to 2:00 PM (Eastern Time) 
roduced by: The Collaboration to AdoptUSKids, A S
Fostering Results, a public education campaign focused on improving child welfare outcomes and supported by a grant fr
Educationally disadvantaged older youths have frequently been overlooked by policy makers and practitioners who design
Microsoft Corp. has announced the launch of Unlimited Potential (UP), an initiative focused on providing technology skills
The National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information has redesigned its website to be easier to navigate
The Children's Bureau sponsors biennial conferences at which professionals and volunteers discuss a broad range of poli
On the basis of strong evidence of effectiveness, the independent, nonfederal Task Force on Community Preventive Ser
This site from the Family Violence Prevention Fund contains a toolbox on children and domestic violence, including the pu
In 1999, an estimated 721,500 state and federal prisoners were parents to nearly 1.5 million children under age 18. In 19
The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has pulled all its resources on mentoring together into one si
This volunteer, non-profit effort works with Seattle teens who are in jail, on the streets, or in other ways leading diffic
"Putting the Pieces Together: 1st National Conference on Substance Abuse, Child Welfare, and the Dependency Court" w
The Child Welfare League of America National Data Analysis System has put together a series of web pages on this top
This fact sheet from the Urban Institute provides data from 2002 National Survey Of America's Families, a nationally-
Nationwide, about 2.3 million children live with relatives other than their biological parents. Of these, the majority (1.8
The National Center for Learning Disabilities and the Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation have launched the Guide to
The Andrus Family Fund supports social change through programs that focus on successful transitions for children from
The NRCFCPP is hosting our second live national web-based broadcast. Join us on Monday, November 17 from 1:00 – 2:15
New on our site: Dr. Peg Hess of the Institute for Families in Society at the University of South Carolina authored this
Programs for Teens, the latest addition to Child Trends' What Works series, provides information on specific types of p
The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention reports that nearly one quarter of cases adjudicated in 1999
Across the country, youth development efforts are going a step further and helping youth hone their skills and talents a
The NRCFCPP is hosting our second live national web-based broadcast. Join us on Monday, November 17 from 1:00 – 2:15
This live teleconference and webcast on Tuesday, November 18 from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. EST will provide a forum for explo
The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 (ASFA) mandated that States reduce the length of time courts take to fin
This annual report on trends in the well-being of America's children and youth provides the policy community with compr
This project explored the service needs of families following the adoption of a child from the public child welfare syste
Hampshire County, U.K., has been an important location for the development and use of family group conferencing (FGC),
Our latest issue of Permanency Planning Today highlights state strategies to address placement stability in an article wr
This new article looks at some reasons those who work with children involved in the child welfare system should be awar
Also new on our site, a wealth of materials originally published on the website of Casey Family Programs National Center
The National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare, a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Health and Hum
This report describes how states are implementing fiscal reforms to contain costs or improve the performance of their
Two new Fast Facts are available on the Assessing the New Federalism portion of the Urban Institute web site. The Fas
The National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning is responsible for providing on-site training and techn
This Government Accounting Office report addresses state experiences in developing statewide automated child welfar
On November 18 the Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children presented a teleconference and webcast on their Censu
This paper from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation identifies the four groups of youth who are at the highest ris
This ongoing research and outreach project, supported by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Harvard's Hauser Center for
Through December 24th, every Wal-Mart store, Supercenter and Neighborhood Market location nationwide will be eligi
From the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice, this issue of Best Practice/Next Pract
From the Urban Institute, this is No. 14 in the series Snapshots of America's Families III. While kinship foster care of
This guide from the Minnesota Department of Human Services is a nice model for agencies interested in connecting prac
The proceedings of the second national meeting on youth permanence funded by the Stuart Foundation. Work groups presente
In collaboration with the N.C. Division of Social Services, this program produces three newsletters: "Foster Perspective
Gary Direnfeld is a social worker who provides articles on parenting and custody issues on his website, and invites you to
The NRCFCPP has added several new information resources in the area of youth permanency to our website: "Permanenc
The latest issue of this newsletter from the National Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption includes a discussion
The Annie E. Casey Foundation, Casey Family Programs, Casey Family Services, American Humane’s Children’s Services, t
Experts estimate that upwards of 4% of adolescents in the United States purposely hurt themselves in some way. An ov
An estimated one in ten children and adolescents suffers from mental illness severe enough to cause impairment--and ha
Fromthe Brookdale Foundation Group. This program awards seed grants to both state agencies and local programs. The d
This issue of the NYU Child Study Center Letter discusses challenges such as finding, retaining and providing specialized
This new Web site has information about more than 800 available grant programs involving all 26 federal grant-making a
This website has been redesigned. Check it out, including new additions such as a recent PowerPoint presentation about s
The plaintiff, the adoptive mother of a special needs child, challenged the legality of an Oklahoma state statute under w
Sponsored by the Children's Bureau and Family and Youth Services Bureau and coordinated by the National Resource Ce
What does a homelessness prevention program in Los Angeles share with a rural infant mortality program and a job train
Non-college-bound youth and those who have not done well in traditional public schools have largely been left behind by
The Clearinghouse has added research tools (including access to databases such as Lexis-Nexis, Psych Info, and ERIC) t
Check here for lots of links to information about bullying. Brevity is a weekly electronic newsletter from the National Council of J
This nationally-focused public policy organization conducts policy research, technical assistance, training, litigation and p
This Technical Assistance Brief from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges describes a Washington
The Children's Defense Fund has produced a Resource Kit which enables community or faith-based organizations to supp
Questions regarding the numbers and economic circumstances of grandparents raising grandchildren are important for a
Log on to the Child Welfare League of America’s NDAS system to find these new resources: 1. A publications section co
The Leader to Leader Institute is highlighting this prevention program in Erie, Pennsylvania as its Nonprofit Innovation
You can learn more about mentoring opportunities in your community--and about "Thank Your Mentor Day" to be held Ja
Submitted to the President on October 1, the report seeks to provide "a framework for Federal youth policy that encom
March is National Social Work Month. Use the toolkit from the National Association of Social Workers to plan ahead to
The Centre for Evidence-Based Social Services (CEBSS) is a unique partnership between the Department of Health, Soc
Online selections from the January/February issue of the magazine of the Child Welfare League of America include “Ma
Please join us on January 29, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. EST for a webcast on Using the Breakthrough Series to Provide Technic
IRS Publication 968: Tax Benefits for Adoption explains two tax benefits available to offset the expenses of adopting a
In this research brief, Child Trends found that generally children in foster homes are in poorer health than other child
This Information Memorandum from the Children’s Bureau provides clarity on rating the items under each of the seven
The National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center has several fact sheets about guardianship, including subsi


If you have cable television, check out Gracie’s Choice, a movie about a teenager who struggles to keep her siblings toge
The National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning will be airing a webcast on January 29 about an exciting new
A new web site launched jointly by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and the National CASA Association bring
The latest volume of the Annals of the Academy of Political and Social Sciences is devoted to positive youth development. You can fin
The January 2003 issue of Practice Notes from the Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare looks at visiting between siblings
This new resource from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Black Child Development Ins
Child Trends charts programs in eight different outcomes areas that show significant results for a range of desired outcomes and y
Visit this link to download materials for the National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning webcast on the Break
The National Association of Social Workers is offering free access to NASW Press journals Social Work, Social Work Research, Hea
This Child Welfare League of America publication is available online at the above link. In the Winter 2004 issue, read several articles
Maternal incarceration may affect the number of children entering foster care and the length of time they spend in care. In collabor
This paper from Donald A. Griesmann, Esq and the Internet Nonprofit Center lists a wide variety of grant application forms, sample p
New Search Institute research shows that African American, American Indian, Asian American, Latino/Latina, White, and Multiracia
Start preparing your support for Foster Care Month! This year’s toolkit is available now for you to download. This year we are sending
This report from the National Conference of State Legislatures provides some background about the academic performance of childr
The latest issue of this publication from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation is devoted to foster care issues.
This booklet from Casey Family Programs explains basic rules and offers tips on ways that families can legally claim the maximum tax
This new American Academy of Pediatrics report provides an overview of children's developmental understanding of adoption and adv
The Nevada Supreme Court ruled that the state must provide a teenager in foster care with information about the adoptive placemen
This report continues the research begun in 2001 to identify best practices for agencies serving adolescents through independent liv
Casey Family Programs has once again teamed with the Orphan Foundation of America (OFA) to offer the Casey Family Scholars Prog
Historically, non-custodial fathers have been disengaged from the child welfare system. The advent of ASFA and recent Federal init
This report from UCLA's Center for Mental Health in Schools details and evaluates the existing data from research on the prevalen
This innovative program offers children in foster care a stable relationship with a caring adult by providing long-term individual psych
This report by the Child Welfare League of America examines the connections between child abuse and juvenile delinquency as well a
A NRCFCPP webcast on Foster Care Month 2004 is scheduled for March 17, from 1:00 to 2:30. Log on to hear plans for this year's ex
The January/February issue of Child Study Center Letter looks at characteristics of resilient children and how to nurtu
Paradigm is an online magazine from Three Springs Adolescent Treatment Programs. The current issue contains articles
This paper describes a national demonstration project in Miami, Florida aimed at examining developmental functioning an
This paper from the Center for Law and Social Policy offers a model of cross-system integration focusing on comprehen
This website, developed by the New York State Council on Children and Families with funding from the NYS Office for T
Are you involved with a youth board? FYI3.com will provide a free web page, complete with a message board! Check out the bo
The National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning has been exploring innovate ways to provide tech
This report by the Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care reveals what foster children and birth, foster and adoptiv
Funded by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Parent Training and Information Centers in each state
The Judicial Council of California publishes this online and downloadable journal once a year. Among the articles in the m
The Subcommittee on Human Resources of the House Ways and Means Committee held its third child welfare oversight
This survey of 732 17-year old foster youth in three states shows that they will face formidable challenges making the
The National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning will present its fourth webcast on March 17, 20
This paper is part of the Cross-Systems Innovation Project, a collaborative effort to gain a clearer understanding of th
This new campaign -- "Take A Stand. Lend A Hand. Stop Bullying Now!" -- is designed to stop bullying, including verbal or
Sign up for a free electronic newsletter from Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago to get inform
The foundation's primary interest is in funding projects that help promote permanent placements for children who are w
The National Collaboration for Youth, a coalition of more than forty national agencies, which together reach over 40 mil
The National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning will present its fourth webcast on March 17, 2004 at 1:00 p.m
Three important resources from Zero to Three: “Court Teams for Maltreated Infants and Toddlers" is a fact sheet describing a new
This article, from the October-December 2003 issue of Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, summariz
The Center on Fathers, Families, and Public Policy (CFFPP) produces monthly policy briefings, distributed by email or fax, that summa
The Center on Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Oklahoma has several projects that are specific to the needs of Native A
The web site of the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR) includes a special section on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and qu
Handouts for the March 17 webcast on Foster Care Month are available to download on this website. If you missed the webcast, look
This five-year plan for ensuring permanent families for children in foster care was developed by a statewide coalition of more than 3
Visit this site to download the American Bar Association Standards of Practice for Lawyers Representing a Child in Abuse and Neglec
According to a recent analysis of national data, 33 states and the District of Columbia doubled the number of adoptions from foster
Find information about this conference, which will take place August 7-13 in Madison, Wisconsin.
National Children's Memorial Flag Day is celebrated each year on the last Friday in April to direct attention to the tragedy of violent
This paper by NRCFCPP consultant Lorrie L. Lutz provides an overview of permanency in the child welfare system and examines innova
This new edition to the National Resource Center for Information Technology in Child Welfare “Tips, Tools, and Trends” series provid
This report from the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement presents strategic planning technique
Read the latest issue of this newsletter from the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice. This is the s
In order for States to receive Federal payments for foster care and adoption assistance, Federal law requires that they "consider gi
Most teens rely on their families and community as they transition into adulthood – but many kids in foster care age out of the system
If you missed the March 17 webcast on Foster Care Month, you can download the materials and view the archived video at this site
The Juvenile Law Center says judges should treat decisions affecting older youth -- especially those who, at 18, are aging out of the
The goal of this conference is to bring together practitioners, researchers, policymakers and front-line workers from a wide range o
This report from Fostering Results shows that state efforts to reform troubled foster care systems are hampered by federal financ
Crack cocaine-exposed babies born in the 1980s swelled the foster care population and raised alarms. Now they're young adults -- de
This annual publication presents data on child maltreatment collected by the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCAND
The April 2004 edition of CB Express is loaded with important information about National Child Abuse Prevention Month (April) and o
The U.S. Census Bureau reports that 302,000 children aged 18 and younger lived in "group quarters" (correctional facilities, hospitals
The National Association of Social Workers and the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research have entered a partner
The San Francisco Partnership for Incarcerated Parents has created a Bill of Rights for children of incarcerated parents. The docum
Child Trends has just published this booklet to help journalists improve their coverage of child abuse and neglect storie
The latest issue of The Link, CWLA's juvenile justice newsletter, is now online. This issue contains articles on effective
On April 6, Texas Comptroller Carole Keeton Strayhorn released a report on the Texas foster care system. The report
Texans Care for Children has published their Advocacy Toolkit – the basics of how to advocate for children with legislat
This new website, funded by SAMHSA, includes articles and fact sheets on child traumatic stress, resilience and recove
The Spring 2004 issue explores the workforce crisis plaguing children and family services. AECF President Doug Nelson
This publication, current through September 2003, provides information about the schedule of permanency hearings for
Children with special needs may qualify for adoption assistance (also called "adoption subsidy"), which is paid to adoptive
This study examines how court continuances in dependency cases affect the time children spend in state foster care in
The Children's Bureau of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Ser
This new report from the Government Accounting Office examines the experiences of the Administration for Children
The Child Welfare League of America Mid-West Region Training Conference, the National Juvenile Justice Summit, and
The NRCFCPP has published this curriculum on issues related to siblings in out-of-home care. The overall training objectives curriculu
This paper from the NRCFCPP looks at five practices that are important components of reunification programs that appear to be ach
This guide was developed as a collaborative effort among the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, the A
This report is an analysis of the mental health issues in 38 state Final Reports and 28 state program improvement plans. It was prep
The Safe and Drug Free Schools - Mentoring Program builds on the infrastructure and support available in school settings, including p
This conference will take place at the National 4H Youth Conference Center in Chevy Chase, Maryland, August 20-22. The Call for Pr
The latest edition of the newsletter of the National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning is now av
This Program Instruction (PI) provides the States with information about adoption incentive payments authorized by th
The Collaboration to AdoptUSKids is offering adoptive parent support groups the opportunity to apply for small grants t
The Child Welfare League of America is committed to clearly identifying the special needs of immigrant families, childre
The National Family Preservation Network offers cutting-edge information and resources for practitioners who work wi
Public or private non-profit agencies and organizations, including faith-based organizations, for-profit organizations, and
This paper discusses the need for providing a more coordinated response for traumatized children, and in particular tho
The National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center invites you to attend this two–day national conference, wh
A new edition of the child welfare newsletter "Fostering Perspectives" is now available. Every issue of this publication of
Casey Family Programs is sponsoring a Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) on Supporting Kinship Care. Twenty publ
For the last several years, the National Center for Adoption Law & Policy has worked to place law students from across
This week the National Foster Parent Association is holding its 34th National Education Conference in Orlando, Florida. J
The Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care has released recommendations to overhaul the nation's foster care syste
This GAO Report focuses on: (1) the experiences of the Administration for Children and Families and the states in prepa
The AdoptUSKids National Adoption and Foster Care Recruitment Summit meeting will be held July 15-16 in Washington
The House Ways and Means Committee has released the 2004 Green Book, which provides updated data on major progra
The National Center for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ) web site offers the contents of this bulletin about activities jointly ad
The University of Oklahoma, School of Social Work's Child Welfare Professional Enhancement Program (Title IV-E) is h
This report, produced through the Children's Bureau's Technical Assistance to State Legislators on the Child and Famil
The New York State Office of Children and Family Services developed this manual with the assistance and advice of vol
The National Foster Care Coalition is publishing a series of free technical assistance bulletins on a variety of foster care issues
The funds will be used to establish or enhance a system of support services that should include, but are not limited to, s
This literature review finds that children facing a range of domestic circumstances which they might find difficult want
Since the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997, and with Title IV-B incentives for adoption promotion, child w
The U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services' Children's Bureau has just released this fourth annual report on the perf
It's a time-honored way to meet the needs of children who are orphaned or whose parents cannot care for them -- gran
This report from Childrens Rights focuses on the experiences of and outcomes for youth in congregate care in the New
Finding out that a child is using drugs can devastate many parents or caregivers. This article provides information to hel
The Adoption Excellence Awards are designed to recognize excellence in achieving the goals of safety, permanency, and
The National Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption has posted practice briefs on the following subjects: Special
The Children's Bureau has developed summary reports of the key findings of the Child and Family Services Reviews. The
In this audio conference transcript from the Center For Law And Social Policy, Cassie Statuto Bevan, Senior Policy Advi
The 15th annual KIDS COUNT Data Book is now available. While national trends in child well-being are moving in a positiv
This Urban Institute brief turns to a survey of charities to look at the organizations' use of nine recommended practice
The Casey Center for Effective Child Welfare Practice has published two Strengthening Families and Communities white
A bill drafted by youth in foster care in Illinois has been adopted as a joint resolution in that state, creating a Sibling Post-Adopti
Register for “30 Years of Celebrating Families,” the 2004 North American Council on Adoptable Children conference to
This 30-minute radio documentary on youth aging out of foster care is based in part on Chapin Hall's Midwest Evaluation of the Adult
The Center on Law and Social Policy is hosting an audio-conference on Friday, July 9, from 12:30 – 1:30 (EDT). Too many
Many U.S. government online resources are provided in Spanish as well as English. Visit the above link to find out what is avail
This paper, written by the National Resource Center for Youth Development, presents an analysis of issues, relating spe
Caliber Associates completed this recent evaluation of the Court Appointed Special Advocates program (CASA),The link
The National Children’s Law Conference of the National Association of Council for Children (NACC) is designed for profe
This article from the Prevention Researcher discusses the difficulties faced by lesbian and gay adolescents, who must o
This tool was developed to help caseworkers guide their initial assessment conversations with families and children in wa
If you didn’t listen in on the June 10 teleconference on post permanency services from the National Resource Center on
This paper provides information about the policies and principles concerning adoptees who search for their birth parent
This paper discusses the issues involved when women in prison give birth.
This article by Joan Pennell of North Carolina State University suggests that the practice of family group conferencing
In reaction to a recent case of fatal child abuse in Baltimore, Maryland, the House Subcommittee on Human Resource he
This report from the Children's Bureau suggests that children of color, especially African American children, are overre
With the increased focus and expanded funding of Independent Living services brought about by the passage of the Fos
The National Resource Center for Information Technology in Child Welfare has posted Fact Sheets on meeting the requ
The latest issue of Training Matters from the North Carolina Department of Social Services Family Support and Child W
This Technical assistance brief from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges presents an overview of t
Children in foster care have many health needs. This article in the Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine presents the model
Fostering Results conducted a national survey of dependency court judges to better understand the information they ha
The study reports on the 1,053 families (both TANF and non-TANF eligible) who received services from 13 NYS agencie
Read the perspective of a single parent in a domestic special needs adoption. From a speech given at the Conference of t
These checklists were created to assist juvenile and family court judges in assuring that the necessary inquires are bein
Therapeutic foster care can dramatically reduce juvenile violent crime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and
This 30-minute documentary on shared family care is scheduled to air on Sunday, July 18, 2004 at 6:30 pm on KQED-FM, 88.5
The United States Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the Adop
This report from California Youth Connection and the California Youth Permanency Project summarizes what current and
According to the Census 2000, there are over 2.4 million grandparents that are responsible for raising one or more of t
This paper from Public/Private Ventures explores the potential of an emerging approach to increasing the level and quali
The Washington State Institute for Public Policy has just published a new cost/benefit analysis of the state’s programs
This training and recruitment video explores foster parenting today through the experiences and insights of foster fam
FocalPoint is a product of the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health at Portland
Volume #77 of the Head Start Bulletin focuses on father involvement in Head Start programs, but it contains articles o
A new research brief published by Child Trends shows that close to half of grandparents with young children living near
In this issue of Forum Focus, the Forum for Youth Investment explores how youth activism can be used as a powerful to
Published as a component of the Child Abuse Prevention Initiative administered by the Office on Child Abuse and Neglec
The Administration for Children and Families will share information and tools to help Tribal and Native Communities utili
When it comes to succeeding in school, foster children face unique challenges and obstacles that have them lagging behi
The National Adoption Information Clearinghouse has redesigned its website. Notable improvements include reorganizat
Since 1997, the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics has published “America’s Children: Key Nation
Youth Law News is the newsletter of the National Center for Youth Law, and beginning in 2002, is published quarterly. Y
This website provides information about youth development programs aimed at helping 9-13 year-old youths make health
This issue brief from the Child Welfare League of America is intended to inform and guide federal, state, and local polic
This report presents compelling new findings from a recent public-opinion study conducted by the Advertising Council as
The National Center of Medical Home Initiatives for Children with Special Needs at the American Academy of Pediatric
At the request of Representative Henry A. Waxman and Senator Susan Collins, the U.S. House of Representatives' Spec
This paper from Bridging Refugee Youth & Children’s Services is intended to provide an introduction to the use of the te
Adolescents who leave foster care without permission may encounter dangerous situations and place burdens on many go
The rising incarceration rates among women have raised concerns in many quarters, including child welfare. This report s
Allegations of severe child abuse and neglect may require quick, coordinated responses by child welfare and law enforce
This article from the Spring issue of Adoptalk, from the North American Council on Adoptable Children, discusses some
Strengthening marriages and relationships in low-income families has emerged as a national policy strategy to enhance ch
Produced by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs, this guide, designed for teachers, other school staff, and f
In June 2004 the National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning and the Casey Center for Effectiv
Read this article by Pat O’Brien, Executive Director of You Gotta Believe!, on the website of the Hawaii Foster Parent A
The National Resource Center for Youth Development (NRCYD) conducted a survey of states and agencies to learn how s
This is the final report to the Minnesota Kinship Care Association (MKCA) on the experience of kinship caregivers in the
The National Data and Analysis System (NDAS) at the Child Welfare League of America is generating a series of Issue
This Action Kit from the National League of Cities contains a wealth of new policy and program ideas for municipal leaders and
A PowerPoint presentation by Dr. Viola Miller, Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services, at the
The Center for Child and Family Studies in the College of Social Work at the University of South Carolina with collabora
This evaluation of Michigan’s Permanency Planning Mediation Program concludes that mediation is a valuable option in the
This study in the National Institute of Justice Journal found a relationship between removing a child from parental care
This report from Children’s Rights provides results from the first methodical study detailing where “new orphanages” ar
This Lawyer-Guardian ad Litem Protocol from Michigan is intended to assist lawyer-guardians ad litem appointed for chil
This web-based tool provides you with easy access to a review of the child welfare research evidence on factors associa
The Child Welfare League of America’s Research to Practice compiles, on an ongoing basis, annotated bibliographies on v
Last week we highlighted the executive summary of this research report from the Center for Child and Family Studies,
Growing Pains, the 17th annual national independent living conference sponsored by DanielKids and the National Independ
National Adoption Day is a collective national effort to raise awareness about the 126,000 children in foster care waitin
The 2004 National Adoption Month has been launched in plenty of time to plan events for November - thanks to a collab
The Summer/Fall 2004 issue of The Link, the juvenile justice newsletter of the Child Welfare League of America, conta
The Commonwealth Fund has just released a chartbook produced by Child Trends, in partnership with the American Aca
Child welfare agencies may be able to help minimize delays in school enrollment and provide other supports to children and yo
Oregon Health and Science University’s Center for Self Determination covers the special needs of foster youth with dis
This “media backgrounder” provides information about youth at risk, including those transitioning out of foster care. Lot
Represent is the new name of a teen-written magazine formerly knows as Stories from Foster Care Youth United. Read
This article in the September 2004 issue of Juvenile Justice looks at studies on the causes of juvenile delinquency. In p
A grassroots public policy advocacy guide and training materials developed by the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (
Over the past fifty years, research on adolescents' behavior has focused primarily on risk factors. The study of resilien
The Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) is a federal data collection effort that provide
CWLA’s 2005 symposium will focus on integration and coordination of Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare as an importan
This research brief from Child Trends examines the concept of healthy marriage and the elements that, taken together
A new child welfare waiver demonstration project for the state of Minnesota will test the impact of creating a single be
Presented by Fostering Results, Public Children Services Association of Ohio and the National Center for Adoption Law
The Hunter College School of Social Work, with our new partners the Child Welfare League of America and the Nationa
The current issue of our newsletter is devoted to permanence for young people. It contains the Framework and Measure
The Children’s Bureau has entered into cooperative agreements with seven organizations to operate National Child Welf
The Department of Health and Human Services has released a report on the Child and Family Service Reviews that inclu
The latest issue of the newsletter of the National Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption contains articles on pos
The newsletter of the National Resource Center on Youth Development contains articles on successful adolescent adopt
Voices for America’s Children has released the first in a new series of six issue briefs on foster care, made possible by
Foster Club introduces the fyi3 Binder: the tool designed for youth transitioning from foster care. It provides a roadma
This Rockefeller Institute study, supported by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) of the U.S. D
The National Center for Substance Abuse and Child Welfare has completed the first of a series of online self-tutorials
The National Foster Parent Association Annual National Education Conference will be held May 9-14, 2005 in Garden Grove, C
The Orphan Foundation of America (OFA) has announced the new Casey Family Programs Senior Year Scholarship for yo
This packet from the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse contains a collection of resources for birth parents,
This study from Fostering Results illustrates the benefits of having the option of federally subsidized guardianship avai
Four of every five children and teen arrestees in state juvenile justice systems are under the influence of alcohol or dru
Bookmark this one or add it to your Favorites list. This website can provide you access to the websites of thousands of
Downloadable detailed information about how to plan, run, provide training, and evaluate arts programs for at-risk youth
Michigan IT Solutions, a provider of web development, online marketing, software development and Internet consultancy
This guidebook helps young people who are in custody (through foster care or juvenile justice) gain the skills and confide
The newsletter of the Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health includes a report on work un
This brief from the National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET) examines characteristics of youth
In 2001, child protective service agencies reported that 25% of the substantiated cases of abuse occurred among youth
The Minnesota Department of Human Services has published guidelines for health and human services organizations to e
This month's Featured Discussion from the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children’s Mental Healt
This updated chart provides the latest information we could find on the basic foster care maintenance payment rates in
November is National Adoption Month. Get wonderful resources, such as this Adoption Awareness Toolkit, from the Dav
This learning tool, written by the National Indian Child Welfare Association, is one of seven new fact sheets presented b
This article in First Peoples Child & Family Review looks at caseworker perceptions of neglect in American Indian commu
Family indicators typically include measures such as family structure, employment and poverty status, and benefit receip
This report provides a set of practical recommendations for what policymakers, educators, parents, and the community
Please join us on Wednesday, December 8, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. EST for a webcast on Family Group Conferencing: Bringing
Read the Presidential Proclamation declaring November as National Adoption Month.
The 2004 National Convening on Youth Permanence met in San Francisco on April 21-23, 2004. The convening’s goals wer
One of the primary principles upon which our Framework for Permanency for Young People is based is that permanence includ
The November 2004 Forum Focus newsletter from the Forum for Youth Investment examines the need to take stock of
The Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) has developed a new strategy to build on evidence-based protective fa
Effective October 1, the Hunter College School of Social Work entered a new agreement with the Children’s Bureau, an
Two research briefs from Caliber Associates provide information gathered from the National Survey of Child and Adole
This is one of several interesting articles in the latest issue of Fostering Perspectives, a newsletter devoted to promotin
A new study of residential care in Illinois shows that state policies designed to serve abused and neglected children in le
This guidebook will provide communities with a format for learning about Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Educ
The Orphan Foundation of America has announced a special scholarship opportunity for which foster youth should apply.
Don’t forget to register for our webcast, which will take place on Wednesday, December 8, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. Our prese
This report presents the results of the first national study in more than a decade to attempt to estimate the total num
Released in connection with National Adoption Day, this new Urban Institute analysis is the first to identify common bar
This report from the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute offers generally good news for the growing number of childr
These eight fact sheets are mainly specific to the United Kingdom, but contain some universal wisdom about educational
This National Institute of Justice Research Brief summarizes two studies that used different methodologies and sample
The Administration for Children and Families has released four reports on the Promoting Safe and Stable Families. The
The National Human Services Assembly, an association of national non-profits, has launched a new Web site, the Family S
This report from the Council on Adoptable Children in New York makes many policy recommendations to lawmakers - fro
Researchers in Child Trends' Early Childhood Development research unit produced this compendium, which includes prof
This issue brief from the Commonwealth Fund says states could make greater use of experts in early childhood services
If you haven’t already done so, register for our December 8 webcast, Family Group Conferencing: Bringing the Family int
This issue brief, based on two Chapin Hall studies – one of youth aging out of the children welfare system in Illinois, Wis
For this study of cases in Arizona in which children were involved with the court system both as a result of maltreatmen
This Select Committee was charged with reporting to the Texas Legislature on three issues: barriers to adoption of chi
The Village South, Inc., in Miami, Florida, offers comprehensive substance abuse treatment and prevention services to a
This British briefing summarizes research findings relating to the impact or consequences of pregnancy among teens in o
This toolkit was developed to guide discussions on key permanence concepts and issues. It is available for purchase, eith
This information packet examines state laws regarding the rights of partners of adoptive or biological parents to adopt
The Keeping Children and Families Safe Act of 2003 added a number of new eligibility requirements for child welfare fu
Many individuals – and especially those separated from their birth families through involvement with the child welfare s
The Center for the Improvement of Child Caring (CICC), a parent education and training organization, is offering a free
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development will be holding a series of conference calls, beginning w
The Institute for Community Inclusion published a brief entitled "State agency systems collaboration at the local level:
The Children’s Bureau has provided both a narrative and a PowerPoint presentation containing the compiled results of all
The Research and Training Center on Children's Mental Health at the University of South Florida has produced a summa
What works to help youth aging out of foster care successfully transition to independent adulthood? In addition to impr
This GAO report, GAO-05-25, reviews the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program and makes recommendations to th
This catalog and guide includes sixty-five (65) federal programs that can be used to support youth, including foster care
Although case studies have found that family-centered services have a positive effect on child development, quantitativ
The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Youth Development in conjunction with American Bar Association Cente
In 2001, the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Provisions added a sixth purpose to the existing Foster Care Independ
This paper was written by the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Youth Development and presents an analysis
Federal, state, and local government funding supports all services provided by the state child welfare agencies. However
Through the support of the Children’s Bureau and the Department of Health and Human Services, the Children and Fami
In recent years, increased attention has been focused on children who may be impacted by violence in the home, either a
 t the Hunter College School of Social Work - A Service of the Children's Bureau, is delighted to bring you the NRCFCPP Weekly Update. Continuing
2001, parents placed over 12,700 children in child welfare or juvenile justice systems so they could receive mental health services. Many are adoles
MHS), many teenagers with severe and complex emotional disturbances are found in residential care programs rather than psychiatric hospitals. Of
 s, and advocates how to obtain services and supports needed by children with emotional and behavioral disorders. Suggestions for the strategic use
research-based intervention practices and programs for children with behavioral problems. A variety of topics such as behavioral planning meetings
 traint and seclusion in residential group homes.
 ll training objectives of this five module curriculum are: to enhance understanding of concurrent planning concepts and practices as a framework fo
 the Child and Family Service Reviews (CFSRs) and the Program Improvement Plan (PIP), and identifies the principles and guidelines for pr
 outh who is also an attorney with the NCYL. Its goal is to inform foster youth, former foster youth, and advocates about the service
s as mentors to children whose parents are incarcerated. The grantee organizations will receive referrals from parents, caretakers, s
ces and return home eager to rebuild their families and their lives. As these parents struggle to make a fresh start, they encounter m
gov/ Children's Bureau Express is now at http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/
                                                               P
boration to AdoptUSKids, A Service of the Children’s Bureau
articipate in a live, web-based broadcast to hear about the National Ad
s and supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, has released a new study detailing how 33 states and the District of Col
s and practitioners who design programs and services for young people. This synthesis examines the role that programs specifically d
 on providing technology skills for disadvantaged individuals through community-based technology and learning centers (CTLCs). Key a
bsite to be easier to navigate and more user-friendly.
 discuss a broad range of policy, research, program, and practice issues concerning the prevention, intervention, and treatment of ch
 on Community Preventive Services recommends early childhood home visitation for prevention of child abuse and neglect in families a
estic violence, including the publication "Guidelines for Conducting Family Team Conferences When There Is a History of Domestic Vi
on children under age 18. In 1997, the year of the survey used in this study, about 2% of children of incarcerated parents entered th
 entoring together into one site.
or in other ways leading difficult lives. It helps these young people express themselves through poetry and other forms of writing. Se
 and the Dependency Court" will be held July 14-15, 2004, in Baltimore, MD. This conference is hosted by the National Center on Sub
 ries of web pages on this topic that includes statistics, research, state initiatives, and more. To access, visit the link above and login
merica's Families, a nationally-representative survey of households with persons under the age of 65. The NSAF is part of the Assess
 . Of these, the majority (1.8 million) were not placed as the result of child welfare involvement. Many of these households experienc
n have launched the Guide to Advocacy for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities. It includes a complete "how-to" reference o
  transitions for children from foster care to independence and community reconciliation projects that explore how communities can a
November 17 from 1:00 – 2:15 p.m. EST for “Achieving Permanence for Children: Pioneering Possibilities for Placement Stability.” Lor
 South Carolina authored this study of state visiting policies for the us. This report provides detailed information regarding the stud
 rmation on specific types of programs designed to improve child and adolescent development. The new tables summarize research on
  of cases adjudicated in 1999 resulted in placement in a residential treatment center, juvenile corrections facility, foster home, or g
 hone their skills and talents as active participants in their schools and communities. This handbook from Stanford University offers
November 17 from 1:00 – 2:15 p.m. EST for “Achieving Permanence for Children: Pioneering Possibilities for Placement Stability.” Lor
 will provide a forum for exploring states' attempts to improve the quality of foster care and achieve the standards of the Child and
gth of time courts take to finalize permanent placements for children removed from the custody of their birth families. Although AS
e policy community with comprehensive data on their well-being.
 the public child welfare system and assessed the "state of the art" in the current array of post adoption services. It developed a fed
mily group conferencing (FGC), also known as family group decision making (FGDM). FGC is a restorative process that empowers familie
 ment stability in an article written by NRCFCPP consultant Lorrie L. Lutz. Other articles include "Foster Families Working with Birth
 elfare system should be aware of this issue, provides strategies for handling bullying, and offers links and resources to learn more.
mily Programs National Center for Resource Family Support (CNC). Our thanks to Casey for offering these publications to us and othe
 epartment of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abu
ove the performance of their child welfare systems, identifies implementation issues, and describes how well fiscal reforms are work
 n Institute web site. The Fast Facts summarize key characteristics of kinship care and information about who cares for children wh
viding on-site training and technical assistance to public, private, and Tribal child welfare agencies around issues related to the provision of q
ewide automated child welfare information systems (SACWIS) and the Department of Health and Human Service's (HHS) role in ass
ce and webcast on their Census of children in out-of-home care. They are now offering a CD with many of the necessary documents a
 uth who are at the highest risk of long-term unemployment, incarceration, and social disconnection – high school dropouts, youth invo
Harvard's Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, and the Rockefeller Foundation, has recently launched its website to provide c
 cation nationwide will be eligible to give up to $5,000 to local charitable organizations. The Holiday Grant may be awarded to qualifyi
  of Best Practice/Next Practice discusses disorders diagnosed in childhood, foster families as partners in treatment, guidelines for
   While kinship foster care offers children family support, the relatives they live with are frequently poor and face hardships themse
  interested in connecting practice to State and Federal legislation in placement decision-making.
undation. Work groups presented recommendations in the areas of: Changing Attitudes, Best Practices, Recruitment, Implementation, and R
 sletters: "Foster Perspectives" provides information to foster and adoptive parents as well as to children in care. The current issue
his website, and invites you to "print, copy, photocopy, email, post to a website, place in a magazine or newsletter or otherwise distrib
 y to our website: "Permanency Goal: Another Planned Living Arrangement" is a PowerPoint presentation prepared by Jennifer Renne
Adoption includes a discussion of the challenge of interstate placement for adoption and an article on the retention of resource famil
umane’s Children’s Services, the Institute for Human Services Management and the American Bar Associations Center on Children an
 hemselves in some way. An overwhelming majority -- roughly 90% -- have suffered some physical, sexual, or emotional abuse. Cutting
h to cause impairment--and half of these young people do not get the services they need. This Children's Defense Fund kit has inform
 cies and local programs. The deadline for local programs is January 15, 2004; the deadline for the submission of State proposals is F
 ining and providing specialized training for foster families, the factors contributing to effective foster caregiving, and the characte
 all 26 federal grant-making agencies. The site provides information in a standardized format across the agencies and includes a "Fed
 werPoint presentation about shared family care that includes outcome and cost information and the Fall 2003 issue of The Source, t
  lahoma state statute under which the maximum Title IV-E adoption subsidy payment level available to adoptive parents was less than
d by the National Resource Center for Youth Development at the University of Oklahoma, Pathways to Adulthood is a three-day conf
 tality program and a job training program for women in construction? This report highlights research findings from nineteen Solutio
e largely been left behind by the high-stakes assessment movement and its high academic standards. This report examines the need f
  exis, Psych Info, and ERIC) to help meet your information needs. Many documents on adoption, child abuse and neglect, child abuse a
 r from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Subscribe by visiting the home page at http://training.ncjfcj.org/Brevity.htm;
 ance, training, litigation and public education in order to focus attention on the barriers faced by never-married, low-income fathers
dges describes a Washington State pilot program evaluation. Although the scope of the evaluation was limited, it found a noticeable d
 h-based organizations to support grandparents and other relatives raising children. The resource kit is available in full pdf file, or by
  dchildren are important for a number of emerging policy questions at the Federal and State levels. Typical questions include: What i
 s: 1. A publications section containing Issue Briefs and Highlight Bulletins. This month's Issue Brief focuses on International Adoptio
a as its Nonprofit Innovation of the Week. The program supports expectant mothers who have a mental illness, mental retardation, a
ur Mentor Day" to be held January 15, 2004--from MENTOR and the Harvard Mentoring Project.
ederal youth policy that encompasses a comprehensive Federal response, under existing authorities and programs, to the problems fa
 cial Workers to plan ahead to celebrate this year’s theme - The Power of Social Work: Pass it On.
he Department of Health, Social Services Departments across England and the University of Exeter. The latest issue of its newslett
 eague of America include “Managing Child Welfare in Tough Times,” which gives suggestions for reducing expenses and increasing rev
ugh Series to Provide Technical Assistance to States. Register at this link to learn how the National Resource Center for Foster Care
 et the expenses of adopting a child – the adoption credit and the exclusion from income of benefits under an employer's adoption ass
oorer health than other children, they have more developmental and behavioral problems, and many are poorly engaged in school. But,
 ems under each of the seven outcomes evaluated during the Child and Family Service Reviews.
t guardianship, including subsidized, joint, and standby guardianship, on its website at the above link.


gles to keep her siblings together through kinship care, foster care, and finally adoption. Even if you can’t see the movie, read the ar
anuary 29 about an exciting new way to provide technical assistance to help states make small, rapid changes in order to improve their systems in re
 National CASA Association brings resources, research, best court practices and cutting edge programs that will assist judges in improving outcome
 e youth development. You can find a “quick read synopsis” of its contents online at the above link.
ooks at visiting between siblings who are in separate placements. It includes information about assessing the intimacy of sibling relationships as wel
onal Black Child Development Institute provides information and resources to help African-American parents support their children in times of stre
range of desired outcomes and youth ages, and those that don't. The chart has links to the summaries of the evaluation research.
cy Planning webcast on the Breakthrough Series Collaborative, to be aired on January 29 at 1:00 EST. There’s still time to sign up if you haven’t alr
Work, Social Work Research, Health & Social Work, and Children & Schools now through February 29, 2004.
 2004 issue, read several articles about the use of restraints, seclusion and timeout, as well as Understanding Emotion in Abused Children.
me they spend in care. In collaboration with the New York City Administration for Children's Services, Vera Institute researchers examined the pat
grant application forms, sample proposals, sample budgets and other resources from foundations and government sources. Some of the material is a
 no/Latina, White, and Multiracial youth all benefit similarly from experiencing more of the 40 developmental assets in their lives, regardless of the
ownload. This year we are sending out a newly designed poster that reflects our support of the National Foster Parent Association ribbon campaign.
e academic performance of children in foster care and describes what researchers have identified as major systemic obstacles to these children's
 r care issues.
an legally claim the maximum tax benefits available to them.
nderstanding of adoption and advice for parents and pediatricians concerning communicating with children about adoption. "From the time a child is
 tion about the adoptive placements of her biological siblings. Specifically, the Court last month ordered the state to provide the addresses of the
 lescents through independent living programs. (See Promising Practices: Supporting the Transition of Youth Served by the Foster Care System. htt
r the Casey Family Scholars Program for 2004-2005, which provides scholarships of up to $10,000 for young people who spent at least 12 months in
 of ASFA and recent Federal initiatives focused on fatherhood, however, have resulted in new efforts on the part of the child welfare system to en
 a from research on the prevalence and incidence of these problems and defines the research in this area that remains to be done. Includes some in
oviding long-term individual psychotherapy. Through this program, experienced therapists commit to donating one psychotherapy hour (pro bono) ea
 nd juvenile delinquency as well as the impact of foster care on youth development. It presents research and data as well as effective strategies fo
 n to hear plans for this year's exciting new Ribbon Campaign! Details and information about signing up will be sent out as soon as they are available.
 ent children and how to nurture resilience. While the primary focus is on major traumatic events such as terrorist attacks, those wh
urrent issue contains articles on real world experiences of a child leaving a treatment program, bullying, and an article on making mist
  developmental functioning and treatment needs of babies and young children who have been maltreated or exposed to violence.
 ration focusing on comprehensive services for children and families
ng from the NYS Office for Technology, offers human services providers, child advocates, researchers and others a way to quickly a
essage board! Check out the boards already listed at this site, and contact mark@fosterclub.com for more information. FYI3 is a joint effort o
  innovate ways to provide technical assistance through technology. Our webcasts have enabled us to reach up to 150 locations at one
  and birth, foster and adoptive parents participating in focus groups had to say about the daily costs exacted from them by the child
 rmation Centers in each state provide training and information to parents of infants, toddlers, school-aged children, and young adult
r. Among the articles in the most recent issue is “Promoting Permanency: Family Group Conferencing at the Manhattan Family Treatm
 third child welfare oversight hearing on January 28, 2004. The hearing focused on what federal, state, and local officials "can do an
 idable challenges making the transition to adulthood. Supporting themselves on their own will not be easy for most of these youth. T
 rth webcast on March 17, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. Register to view a discussion of Foster Care Month 2004 presented by Karl Brown, Natio
a clearer understanding of the opportunities and barriers that exist under current federal law with respect to cross-program integr
op bullying, including verbal or physical harassment that occurs repeatedly over time, that is intended to cause harm, and that involve
rsity of Chicago to get information about their publications, conferences and symposia.
ements for children who are waiting to be adopted in the U.S. and Canada. Emphasis will be given to programs and projects that move
 h together reach over 40 million youth annually, has established a common set of core competencies for paid and volunteer staff who
 st on March 17, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. Register to view a discussion of Foster Care Month 2004 presented by Karl Brown, National Foster Care Month C
 is a fact sheet describing a new effort supported by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. “Ensuring the Healthy Development
orary Human Services, summarizes existing research on sibling relationships in families where children have been abused and neglected, discusses
uted by email or fax, that summarize recent developments in policy, research and legislation as they relate to child support, welfare reform, domes
specific to the needs of Native Americans. They include: Project Making Medicine - a national training program for mental health professionals from
gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth. The site includes a white paper on LGBTQ youth in the foster care system.
 If you missed the webcast, look for it to be archived on our site soon (http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/webcasts/index.html).
atewide coalition of more than 300 individuals from 90 public and private agencies, tribes and organizations. The recommended improvements focus
nting a Child in Abuse and Neglect Cases.
umber of adoptions from foster care during the five years since the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act in 1997. The report examines f


tention to the tragedy of violent child deaths as part of a national initiative to reduce child mortality. If your agency is interested in getting involv
fare system and examines innovative strategies being implemented in eight jurisdictions throughout the country.
 Tools, and Trends” series provides information on how the state of Texas has approached their quality assurance process in four distinct ways, an
 nts strategic planning techniques and highlights PIP examples to allow agencies to establish and move toward improved outcomes for children and f
y-Centered Practice. This is the second of a two-part series on mental health issues for families in the child welfare system. Several articles focus
w requires that they "consider giving preference to an adult relative over a non-related caregiver when determining placement for a child, provided
foster care age out of the system without the supports they need. The Foster Care Work Group (part of the Youth Transition Funders Group) offe
the archived video at this site
 who, at 18, are aging out of the foster care system – as seriously as those affecting young children in public care. This guidebook outlines question
ine workers from a wide range of agencies serving families involved in the child welfare system as a result of parental substance abuse in order to
s are hampered by federal financing rules. The report highlights a common hurdle faced by nearly every state--the inability to spend federal dollar
 . Now they're young adults -- debunking myths, disproving nay-sayers, and telling their own stories in the newest issue of Represent Magazine from
d Neglect Data System (NCANDS) from state child protective services (CPS) agencies. Included in the report are national- and state-level finding
 e Prevention Month (April) and other issues. Be sure to check the section Spotlight on the National Resource Centers!
 (correctional facilities, hospitals, dormitories, and group homes) in the year 2000, while 291,507 children lived with non-relative foster parents. Tw
Research have entered a partnership in providing a webpage devoted to social work research and researchers. The theme for April is the child welf
incarcerated parents. The document includes specific strategies that the child welfare system can take to improve outcomes for children who ente
child abuse and neglect stories. While the media frequently focus on tragic cases of individual children who have been abused or negle
 ontains articles on effective girls’ programming, linking child placement and juvenile delinquency, and detention reform in the juvenile
ster care system. The report details a myriad of problems in the state foster care system and offers more than a dozen recommenda
cate for children with legislators, state agencies, the media, and by building support and taking action in your community, plus the bas
  stress, resilience and recovery, a guide to family preparedness to develop an emergency plan, and more.
 AECF President Doug Nelson highlights the need for renewed focus on frontline workers serving needy kids and families, with close-
le of permanency hearings for children in foster care, who may be present at hearings, determinations made at hearings, and perman
dy"), which is paid to adoptive families to help them defray expenses related to their child's need for ongoing therapies or treatment
spend in state foster care in Washington state, and also examines the effects of continuances on the length of dependency and term
 ent of Health and Human Services, has undertaken the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) to learn about
  Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and the states in preparing for and conducting the statewide Child and Family Servic
Juvenile Justice Summit, and the Indiana Juvenile Judges Symposium will all be combined into one comprehensive conference to be h
erall training objectives curriculum are: to enhance understanding of issues concerning siblings in out-of-home care; to expand knowledge and skills
 programs that appear to be achieving good results. These practices are: placement decision-making; parent-child visiting; intensive services; resou
d and Human Development, the American Institutes for Research, the Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health, the Child Welfare Leagu
 improvement plans. It was prepared by the National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health at Georgetown University Center fo
 ble in school settings, including private schools, and focuses on youth who are most at risk of educational failure, dropping out of school, or involvem
nd, August 20-22. The Call for Presenters, which you can find on the home page of the National Resource Center for Youth Services above, includes
Permanency Planning is now available on our website. Articles include: Foster our Future: National Foster Care Month; Foster Parents
ve payments authorized by the Adoption Promotion Act of 2003, establishing adoption baseline data, calculating awards, reporting re
 ity to apply for small grants to support their efforts. Groups may receive up to $4, 000. Please note, there is a 25% cost matching r
  of immigrant families, children and youth and addressing the multiple practice, program and policy intersections that affect this pop
for practitioners who work with families, tools and training to meet federal standards for family preservation and reunification servi
  for-profit organizations, and institutions of higher education may apply for this grant to provide financial support for training and t
children, and in particular those affected by maltreatment. This is a draft of an article that will be published by Johnson & Johnson
o–day national conference, which will focus on the unique psychosocial issues affecting children residing in kinship care due to parenta
ery issue of this publication offers North Carolina's foster and adoptive parents, foster children, and social workers a place to share
 ing Kinship Care. Twenty public child welfare agencies/tribes (state agencies in state-administered systems, county agencies in count
ace law students from across the country in paid and volunteer positions with employers able to provide a summer experience with ch
nference in Orlando, Florida. Join the NFPA in honoring foster parents and social workers who care for those children whose parents
the nation's foster care system. The Commission undertook a comprehensive assessment of two key aspects of the foster care syste
amilies and the states in preparing for and conducting the CFSR statewide assessments and on-site reviews; (2) experiences of ACF a
held July 15-16 in Washington, D.C. The Summit will provide an opportunity for Communities of Faith, States, and Tribes to enhance p
 updated data on major programs within the Committees jurisdiction, as well as related programs and issues. Of special interest to W
etin about activities jointly administered by the Supreme Court of Ohio and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services to impr
ment Program (Title IV-E) is hosting this national conference July 12-14 in Santa Fe, NM. The conference offers a variety of worksho
slators on the Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSRs) Project, describes significant State legislation related to child welfare issu
e assistance and advice of voluntary agencies and county departments of social services, and is based on extensive research into laws
n a variety of foster care issues. To receive a copy, send your name, e-mail address, organizational affiliation and mailing address to Robin N
  lude, but are not limited to, social services, counseling, legal and financial services, and assistance with custodial issues. Projects sup
they might find difficult want to talk about these issues but rarely do so, particularly with professionals.
  for adoption promotion, child welfare agencies have been under tremendous pressure to move foster children into permanent placements. W
  rth annual report on the performance of States in meeting the needs of children and families who come into contact with the child w
  cannot care for them -- grandparents and other relatives opening their own homes. Yet kinship care has never received the kind of o
n congregate care in the New York City foster care system. The study examined issues in six areas: placements for youth who enter
 le provides information to help them focus on finding the best available services to help a child stop using drugs and alcohol and begi
  s of safety, permanency, and well-being of children in out-of-home care. The 2004 National Nomination Guidelines are now available.
 he following subjects: Special Needs Adoption; Adoption Assistance; Older Child Adoption; Post Adoption Services Overview; New Je
  Family Services Reviews. These Key Findings Reports are posted on the Child Welfare Reviews section of the Children's Bureau Web
tuto Bevan, Senior Policy Advisor for House Majority Leader Tom DeLay; Nick Gwyn, Minority Staff Director of the House Human Re
 ll-being are moving in a positive direction, there are enormous differences among the states in many critical indicators. Nearly one in
of nine recommended practices and to analyze the relationship between volunteer management capacity and retention.
amilies and Communities white papers that highlight key aspects of post-adoption service needs: “Promising Practices in Adoption-Com
 , creating a Sibling Post-Adoption Continuing Contact Governor's Joint Task Force to study and make recommendations concerning visitatio
  table Children conference to be held July 28 – 31, 2004 in Minneapolis. Early registrant discounts are available only for registrations
 Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth. The documentary is part of the Chicago Matters annual public affairs series
 12:30 – 1:30 (EDT). Too many young people aged 16-24 are disconnected (or are at risk of being disconnected) from the worlds of sc
ove link to find out what is available. Also in Spanish: federal consumer publications on a variety of subjects such as food and nutrition, mone
nalysis of issues, relating specifically to adolescents, identified in the final Child and Family Service Review (CFSR) reports and the P
ates program (CASA),The link above will take you to a one page synopsis of the study and to the full report
  (NACC) is designed for professionals from the fields of law, medicine, mental health, social work, and education. The program focus
d gay adolescents, who must often learn to manage a stigmatized identity without active support and modeling from parents and famil
 th families and children in ways that focus on family strengths and successes and seek to employ principles of family centered pract
 National Resource Center on Organizational Improvement, you can still download the PowerPoint presentation summarizing a white pa
search for their birth parents and discusses the psychology behind adoptees’ search for their birth families as well as the history of

  of family group conferencing in child welfare has moved away from the initial goal of joint problem solving and toward “systemic goal
  mittee on Human Resource held a hearing on June 17. The case involved a young mother, herself a runaway from foster care, who kill
 American children, are overrepresented in the child welfare system for a variety of reasons, including poverty and racial bias. It is o
 out by the passage of the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999 (FCIA), the Children's Bureau saw a need to broaden the knowledg
  t Sheets on meeting the requirements of the Adoption Safe Families Act and other Federal mandates. This web page shares common
 es Family Support and Child Welfare Services Statewide Training Partnership provides resources for child welfare agencies interest
 ges presents an overview of the Model Courts project, which was created to provide judges, attorneys, and numerous other professi
Medicine presents the model of the Children’s Aid Society (CAS) of New York City in addressing these needs.
 stand the information they have at their disposal and the context in which they make decisions related to child safety, permanency a
services from 13 NYS agencies and includes results from a parent satisfaction survey. There is a great deal of valuable information
h given at the Conference of the Dave Thomas Center for Adoption Law by Rita Laws.
he necessary inquires are being made to determine as early as possible in every case whether the Indian Child Welfare Act applies. T
enters for Disease Control and Prevention. Troubled youth placed with trained foster families, separated from their delinquent peers
  at 6:30 pm on KQED-FM, 88.5 FM (San Francisco) and 89.3 FM (its affiliate in Sacramento). The program will also be audible that day on S
  and Families (ACF), the Adoption Exchange Association (AEA), and the Collaboration to AdoptUSKids, created a new public service a
  summarizes what current and former foster youth in California had to say on the subject of permanency and lifelong connections. Cl
 e for raising one or more of their grandchildren. Grandparent-headed households can be found in every socioeconomic and ethnic gro
   increasing the level and quality of adult involvement with high-risk youth: extended contact with a paid mentor-counselor. A small nu
alysis of the state’s programs for youth. The report finds that some prevention and early intervention programs for youth give taxpa
  es and insights of foster families in New York State. Foster parents speak candidly about the challenges and rewards in developing a
n's Mental Health at Portland State University. The articles in the current issue of focus on the Center's current work, which refle
 ams, but it contains articles of interest to anyone who cares about family-centered practice in any work with children and families, li
with young children living nearby report providing some type of child care assistance to their adult children. And though grandmother
m can be used as a powerful tool for increasing both personal development and collective engagement around the issues of race and ra
 ice on Child Abuse and Neglect, this study identifies evidence-based effective practices in the field of child abuse prevention. Exem
 l and Native Communities utilize the many community-based programs and federal grants they offer at the Rayburn House Office Bu
 s that have them lagging behind their peers. This kit, designed primarily for use by caseworkers and educators, lays out those challen
  ovements include reorganization of the site around adoption professionals and members of the adoption triad, improved search featu
  merica’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being,” a report that includes detailed information on a set of key indicators of c
2002, is published quarterly. Youth Law News features articles on critical children's issues written both by NCYL attorneys and by o
3 year-old youths make healthy choices. Sponsored by the National 4-H Council in partnership with the University of Arizona and the
   federal, state, and local policymakers, as well as members of the law enforcement and child welfare communities, in the development
  by the Advertising Council as part of its Commitment to Children. In addition to specific research findings, it offers communication
merican Academy of Pediatrics has also launched a new tools section of their website dedicated to youth. These pages will help educa
ouse of Representatives' Special Investigations Division surveyed every juvenile detention facility in the United States to assess wha
 roduction to the use of the term “separated children” and to help the reader consider the needs of this population. It provides exam
 and place burdens on many government agencies, including child welfare and police. Using data from New York City's Administration f
ng child welfare. This report shows, for the first time, how many children in foster care have mothers in jail or prison. While Vera re
 child welfare and law enforcement in order to reduce trauma to children and to arrest and prosecute perpetrators. This report exam
 able Children, discusses some practice and ethical principles agencies must keep in mind when implementing photolistings and other ch
  policy strategy to enhance child well-being. Building Strong Families (BSF) is an initiative to develop and evaluate programs designed
 ers, other school staff, and families, focuses three main components for successfully educating children with ADHD: academic instru
  he Casey Center for Effective Child Welfare Practice at Casey Family Services co-sponsored a meeting of experts in the field of yo
of the Hawaii Foster Parent Association. Look for it under “Permanency” and check out the other sections for valuable and interestin
 es and agencies to learn how services are currently being delivered to older youth. This monograph describes some available services
ce of kinship caregivers in the state of Minnesota aged 60 and over, who were providing primary caregiving to young relatives or non-r
  generating a series of Issue Briefs to highlight a wide range of child welfare topics. This month's Issue Brief focuses on the Multie
deas for municipal leaders and draws upon the latest research and best practices from across the nation -- with a specific focus on older you
 of Children’s Services, at the Biennial Child Welfare Conference: Focus on Evidence-Based Practice, sponsored by the DHHS, ACYF C
  South Carolina with collaboration from the South Carolina Department of Social Services conducted this research study, which focu
tion is a valuable option in the range of legal responses to child maltreatment. Participants, mediators and judges spoke to the value o
 ing a child from parental care and later delinquent and criminal behavior. It also showed that children who were removed from the cu
 ng where “new orphanages” are being established in the U.S., the nature of those facilities, and the factors associated with their de
 ns ad litem appointed for children in child protective proceedings to comply with Michigan law and other requirements. Appendixes c
 h evidence on factors associated with the six major Child and Family Service Review outcome measures, and several possible action s
 annotated bibliographies on various child welfare topics and related fields. The bibliographies are as inclusive and detailed as possibl
for Child and Family Studies, College of Social Work, University of South Carolina. The full report is now available online.
ids and the National Independent Living Association, will be held in San Antonio, Texas on September 29-October 2, 2004. Informat
 children in foster care waiting to find permanent, loving families. Now in its fifth year, National Adoption Day has made the dreams o
November - thanks to a collaborative effort on the part of the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse and The Collaboration to
 are League of America, contains this article discussing study findings and recommendations about young people in foster care involve
ership with the American Academy of Pediatrics' Center for Child Health. The 115-page chartbook reviews 33 indicators of intellectu
her supports to children and youth in foster care through the McKinney-Vento Homelessness Assistance Act. McKinney-Vento ensures that c
needs of foster youth with disabilities in two new reports: “Are We Ignoring Foster Youth With Disabilities?: An Awareness Documen
tioning out of foster care. Lots of links to follow for sources of more information!
 ter Care Youth United. Read a sample of recent stories online
s of juvenile delinquency. In particular, the effect of maltreatment in childhood only, adolescence only, and persistent maltreatment
 e Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN), New Jersey's Family Voices chapter and Family-to Family Health Information and Resource Cen
  factors. The study of resiliency and what buffers adolescents from engaging in harmful health behaviors has received much less att
  ollection effort that provides child-specific information on all children covered by the protections of Title IV-B and Title IV-E of th
 Child Welfare as an important aspect of working to better serve the nation’s children. The symposium will provide a unique cross-sys
elements that, taken together, help define it. Drawing from available research studies and data, theoretical writings, and short paper
 impact of creating a single benefit program for youth in foster care. It aims to decrease the use of long-term foster care for youth
  nal Center for Adoption Law & Policy, October 18 & 19, 2004, Greater Columbus Convention Center, Columbus, Ohio. Data-driven case
e of America and the National Indian Child Welfare Association, has received a five-year grant for the operation of the NRCFCPPP. T
s the Framework and Measures developed at the meeting of experts held in June 2004 and co-sponsored by the Casey Center for Ef
   operate National Child Welfare Resource Centers for the coming five years. In addition to the NRCFCPPP at Hunter College, center
 ily Service Reviews that includes information for all 50 States, D.C., and Puerto Rico. This latest report on the CFSRs includes inform
 ption contains articles on post-adoption services and programs in several states.
   successful adolescent adoptions, an adolescent permanency model, and merging permanency and independent living.
 oster care, made possible by support from the Freddie Mac Foundation. This paper looks at research that is currently underway to
ter care. It provides a roadmap for youth to become more involved in their foster care plan, as a resource as they become more infor
valuation (ASPE) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the changing relationships between state fiscal ca
series of online self-tutorials designed to teach baseline knowledge on the subjects of substance abuse and child welfare to support a
 9-14, 2005 in Garden Grove, California. There is still time to submit a presentation proposal if you have not already done so. The deadline is
enior Year Scholarship for young men of color in college and vocational training programs. OFA asks for your assistance in reaching o
  resources for birth parents, adopted persons, and others interested in learning more about the process of searching for birth relat
y subsidized guardianship available for children, families and the foster care system as a whole.
the influence of alcohol or drugs while committing their crimes, test positive for drugs, are arrested for committing an alcohol or dru
 he websites of thousands of state agencies and city and county governments. Only pages that are controlled and managed by state an
ts programs for at-risk youth. The toolkit is based on the results of a project begun in 1995 to define critical elements and best pra
ment and Internet consultancy services, donates web design services to nonprofit organizations. Nonprofits can register to receive do
 ce) gain the skills and confidence they need to testify at hearings or meet with public officials.
h includes a report on work undertaken by an expert panel of stakeholders to define what "family-driven" means in the context of sys
 ines characteristics of youth with emotional disturbances and their households that distinguish them from other youth with disabilit
 f abuse occurred among youths 12 to 17 years old. Of these cases, 78% were between 12 and 15 years old.
 an services organizations to enhance their abilities to serve individuals from diverse cultures. "Guidelines for culturally competent or
 t and Children’s Mental Health focuses on positive strategies and whether they are effective for enhancing outcomes. Positive strat
maintenance payment rates in each of the states.
areness Toolkit, from the Dave Thomas Foundation.
n new fact sheets presented by the Friends National Resource Center for Community-based Child Abuse Prevention.
 ct in American Indian communities, and concludes, “In summary, American policies, practice, and habits regarding Indian children hav
 rty status, and benefit receipt. However, these indicators do not fully portray how families function as a unit and as part of society.
  parents, and the community can do to move all students -- particularly minority and low-income students -- to high levels of academi
Group Conferencing: Bringing the Family into Family-Centered Practice. Our presenters are: Karin Gunderson MSW - Northwest Ins

 04. The convening’s goals were: 1) to continue to build the knowledge base regarding permanency for older children and youth; 2) to p
 ased is that permanence includes connectedness: “a stable, healthy and lasting living situation within the context of a family relationship with
 nes the need to take stock of how children are doing nationally and locally on a variety of validated indicators that measure such fact
  evidence-based protective factors for children and families to prevent the occurrence child abuse and neglect. This strategy focuse
with the Children’s Bureau, and we are now the NRC for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Planning. While we still provide tec
  nal Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW). The first, Who are the Children in Foster Care?, describes the characteri
ewsletter devoted to promoting the professional development of North Carolina's child welfare workers and foster parents and to pr
ed and neglected children in less restrictive settings have sharply cut the number of Illinois children and youth served in institutions,
 ividuals with Disabilities Education Act early intervention services, child welfare services, and how the two systems, along with other
  ch foster youth should apply. The Discover Card Tribute Award Scholarship Program will award up to nine $2,500 scholarships in eve
   2004 at 1:00 p.m. Our presenters are: Karin Gunderson MSW - Northwest Institute for Children and Families, Child Welfare Train
mpt to estimate the total number of children adopted in each of the States for 2000 and 2001, as well as the composition and trends
   first to identify common barriers to finding adoptive families for children in foster care, as well as promising practices to overcome
  the growing number of children being adopted from foster care nationwide – and for the families in which these boys and girls are f
  sal wisdom about educational issues for children in foster care and highlight some promising practices being tried “across the pond.”
rent methodologies and samples to determine the extent to which physical and sexual abuse as a child or adolescent contribute to lat
  afe and Stable Families. The reports reveal ways that greater state flexibility in federal funding could strengthen the abilities of tr
d a new Web site, the Family Strengthening Policy Center. It is a clearinghouse of information and tools focused on practices, progra
mendations to lawmakers - from educating older caregivers about resources and eligibility for financial and social service assistance, t
mpendium, which includes profiles of early childhood assessments that are commonly used to measure areas of development, including
  ts in early childhood services—as well as knowledgeable parents—in fielding calls and training staff. Help lines could also be made mo
 encing: Bringing the Family into Family-Centered Practice. Then download preparatory materials, which include information about the
welfare system in Illinois, Wisconsin, and Iowa, and the other of Chicago Public School students in substitute care – describes the ed
  th as a result of maltreatment and through juvenile delinquency, the National Center for Juvenile Justice was asked to examine barr
 s: barriers to adoption of children in foster care, means of promoting substitute care with relatives, and licensure and performance
 t and prevention services to adults, adolescents, and children. Their Families in Transition program, launched in the early 1990s as on
 of pregnancy among teens in out-of-home care, documents describing proposed structural models for the delivery of policy and impro
  s available for purchase, either as a print volume or as units for downloading. Each of the 40+ topics was first published as an issue o
or biological parents to adopt without terminating the existing partner’s rights. Today, about half of the states allow second-parent a
  irements for child welfare funding under the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA).3 Among these is a requirement th
 ment with the child welfare system – are unaware of their relatives' medical histories. The U.S. Surgeon General's Family History In
  ganization, is offering a free electronic newsletter and a tool for assessing child development from birth through age 4. The tool als
  conference calls, beginning with one on Thursday, January 20, at 1:00 p.m., ET on Transforming Mental Health Care in America. All i
  llaboration at the local level: Gluing the puzzle together--The staff perspective." This brief describes states' difficulties in making
  ng the compiled results of all 52 State Child and Family Services Reviews (including Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia) conduc
 Florida has produced a summary of an article reporting on rates of outpatient mental health service use by youth in foster care who,
  dulthood? In addition to improving supports and programs, communities can combine the available programs and funding streams to p
  makes recommendations to the Secretary of HHS to improve the availability of information on the array of federal programs that c
rt youth, including foster care youth, in their transition to independent living. Although the majority of the identified programs are n
  hild development, quantitative evaluations have not demonstrated a significant correlation between family support programs and chil
merican Bar Association Center on Children and the Law have released this comprehensive guide to federal legislation for youth in out
 xisting Foster Care Independence Act (FCIA) that called for the availability of Education and Training Vouchers. These Vouchers we
ment and presents an analysis of issues, relating specifically to adolescents, identified in the final CFSR reports and the PIPs. The rep
 ild welfare agencies. However, the amount of funding from federal, state, or local sources varies greatly by state and can be affecte
ervices, the Children and Family Research Center, School of Social Work, at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign has develope
   violence in the home, either as direct victims or as witnesses to domestic violence. This review of State statutes defines domestic v
e NRCFCPP Weekly Update. Continuing the great tradition begun by Casey Family Programs National Center for Resource Family Support, the NRCF
ental health services. Many are adolescents with multiple problems and behaviors that threaten the safety of themselves or others. Agencies say t
s rather than psychiatric hospitals. Often, these are "system kids" who are shuttled in and out of temporary placements in various child-serving ag
ders. Suggestions for the strategic use of the two statutes are included.
s such as behavioral planning meetings, promoting resilience in children, and alternative schools are discussed.


 cepts and practices as a framework for child welfare practice; to expand knowledge and skills of engaging vulnerable families; to increase differen
s the principles and guidelines for program improvement. Perhaps the most compelling section of the paper is a close look at five states that
th, and advocates about the services and issues that are important to youth preparing for the transition from foster care to self-suf
ferrals from parents, caretakers, schools, courts, social services agencies or religious organizations. They will train and match mento
ake a fresh start, they encounter many legal barriers that will make it very difficult for them to successfully care for their children

cast to hear about the National AdoptUSKids Recruitment Campaign for foster and adoptive families! In this broadcast, you will lear
w 33 states and the District of Columbia doubled the number of adoptions from foster care during the five years since the passage o
 e role that programs specifically designed for this population can play in promoting positive youth development and subsequent self-s
and learning centers (CTLCs). Key attributes of CTLCs include public access (accessible on a walk-in, low-fee, or no-fee basis); an info


 intervention, and treatment of child abuse and neglect. Materials from the 13 th and 14th National Conferences are posted at this sit
 hild abuse and neglect in families at risk for maltreatment
There Is a History of Domestic Violence." The Guidelines are meant to assist workers in ensuring that the safety of all family memb
of incarcerated parents entered the foster care system, while about 12% lived with grandparents or other relatives. If those percen

etry and other forms of writing. Several of the pieces published on the site speak about experiences in the foster care system.
ted by the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW) and co-sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental
ccess, visit the link above and login to the system as a guest.
 5. The NSAF is part of the Assessing the New Federalism project (ANF).
any of these households experience economic hardship and have difficulty accessing the variety of services they often need to care
es a complete "how-to" reference on all aspects of public policy advocacy and offers information for both first-time and experienced
that explore how communities can acknowledge past wrongs and begin a healing process. The Fund believes that one vital factor in cre
 lities for Placement Stability.” Lorrie L. Lutz, a consultant with NRCFCPP, will discuss CFSR results and findings from a survey of the
led information regarding the study findings, excerpts from the responding states policies that provide illustrations of clear and spe
  new tables summarize research on what works, what doesn't work, and some promising practices for designing, administering, or fund
rections facility, foster home, or group home.
   from Stanford University offers strategies and lesson plans to help students tackle "real world" problems that matter to them and
 lities for Placement Stability.” Lorrie L. Lutz, a consultant with NRCFCPP, will discuss CFSR results and findings from a survey of the
 ve the standards of the Child and Family Services Review. The Kentucky Foster Care Census describes the interaction of child well-
 f their birth families. Although ASFA focuses on the initial trial, appeals are also an important part of the permanency process. Per


doption services. It developed a federal research agenda on these issues, particularly as they arise from the Adoption and Safe Fami
 tive process that empowers families to make decisions, normally made for them by public officials, concerning the care and support o
Foster Families Working with Birth Families to Help Move Children to Timely Permanency" by Jane Elmore; "Lighting the Fire of Urge
 inks and resources to learn more.
 g these publications to us and other organizations as they undergo a restructuring that is phasing out the CNC as a separate entity.
ration's Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and the Administration on Children, Youth and Families' Children's Bureau is holding
es how well fiscal reforms are working.
 n about who cares for children when their parents cannot.
 d issues related to the provision of quality foster care services and timely permanency planning for children in out-of-home care. We are wor
 Human Service's (HHS) role in assisting in their development; factors that affect the reliability of data that states collect and repo
many of the necessary documents and guidelines any state would need to conduct such a census. Visit the link above for information ab
  – high school dropouts, youth involved with the justice system, youth aging out of foster care, and unmarried teen mothers. It discu
 y launched its website to provide community builders with problem-solving tools and strategies. Practitioners can access strategy and
 y Grant may be awarded to qualifying 501c3 charities, 501c4 civic groups, 501c19 veteran's organizations, public schools and governm
 tners in treatment, guidelines for foster families, services and supports, creating effective systems of care, supporting parents with
 tly poor and face hardships themselves, and children in kinship foster care often do not receive important protections and services.

  Recruitment, Implementation, and Research.. In addition, progress reports were given on initiatives discussed in the first convening (http://w
children in care. The current issue contains letters children in foster care would like to send to their birth parents. "Children's Serv
  or newsletter or otherwise distribute these articles in any fashion... and for free." Many of his articles have relevance for foster an
  ation prepared by Jennifer Renne of the Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues to explain the ASFA permanency option "anot
  on the retention of resource families once they are recruited.
Associations Center on Children and the Law announce the publication of a unique casework resource. The book is designed to help ch
sexual, or emotional abuse. Cutting is the most common way that young people choose to hurt themselves, followed by burning, bruisin
 dren's Defense Fund kit has information on accessing mental health screens and assessments through Medicaid and the Children's H
  submission of State proposals is February 12, 2004.
  oster caregiving, and the characteristics of successful placement. The points of view of the biological parents, the foster parents, a
 ss the agencies and includes a "Federal Grant Opportunities" feature to help applicants find potential funding opportunities. It also c
  e Fall 2003 issue of The Source, the Resource Center's bi-annual newsletter.
e to adoptive parents was less than that available to foster parents and the state Department's denial of assistance to her at the fo
  s to Adulthood is a three-day conference open to state independent living coordinators, transitional living grantees, youth service pr
 rch findings from nineteen Solutions for America sites and identifies common features of effective community-based programs. It a
ds. This report examines the need for alternative education for such vulnerable youth and describes the numbers and characteristics
hild abuse and neglect, child abuse and neglect prevention, and child welfare are available for no charge in full-text electronic format
 t http://training.ncjfcj.org/Brevity.htm; scroll down to the bottom for instructions.
 never-married, low-income fathers and their families. Recent publications include “Fatherhood Programs and Public Policy” and a “Chil
 was limited, it found a noticeable difference in case processing timeframes, time spent in out-of-home care, and case outcomes in pil
kit is available in full pdf file, or by smaller topic files.
s. Typical questions include: What is the extent of the issue? Are grandparents raising grandchildren more likely to be in poverty? W
 f focuses on International Adoption. In 2002, there were over 20,000 adoptions in the United States of children from other countr
  ental illness, mental retardation, a physical disability, drug and alcohol addiction, or are at high risk of having a child with a disability

s and programs, to the problems facing America's youth, with a focus on enhanced agency accountability and effectiveness." The Task

er. The latest issue of its newsletter focuses on risk in social services, and includes an editorial dealing with the effects of risk asse
 ducing expenses and increasing revenue; “Many Efforts, One Vision,” which connects several of CWLA’s initiatives to practice improv
al Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning plans to help states make small, rapid changes in order to improve their
ts under an employer's adoption assistance program. Beginning in 2003, both the credit and the exclusion increase to $10,160. Adopti
y are poorly engaged in school. But, on the positive side, nearly all foster children have health insurance, many have strong relationshi
 ou can’t see the movie, read the article from Reader’s Digest on which the story is based.
 in order to improve their systems in response to the Child and Family Service Reviews. Sign up at the link above. For some background information,
 will assist judges in improving outcomes for children who have been abused or neglected.


intimacy of sibling relationships as well as best practices in this area.
 support their children in times of stress or crisis. The book's activities, which help parents communicate with their children to strengthen the fam
 evaluation research.
s still time to sign up if you haven’t already registered! Learn how the NRCFCPP plans to use this methodology to provide technical assistance to the


  Emotion in Abused Children.
 nstitute researchers examined the patterns of arrest and incarceration of mothers of children in foster care by matching child welfare and crimin
ment sources. Some of the material is available in Spanish and other languages. There are also links to online grantwriting and fundraising tutorials a
 assets in their lives, regardless of their socioeconomic status. At the same time, the importance of particular categories of assets varies by race/
er Parent Association ribbon campaign. The beautiful new logo, which you can see at the link above, is the centerpiece of the poster. To find out mo
 ystemic obstacles to these children's academic success. It also examines what the Child and Family Services Reviews are saying about state perfo



out adoption. "From the time a child is adopted, it is appropriate for families to use language on a routine basis that relates to adoption," explains th
state to provide the addresses of the two adoptive families so that the teenager can serve the adoptive parents with petitions for sibling visitation
Served by the Foster Care System. http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/pubstext/prompract.html ).
 people who spent at least 12 months in foster care and were not subsequently adopted. The deadline for submission of Part I of the scholarship ap
 part of the child welfare system to encourage the involvement of fathers and other paternal relatives. American Humane focused on fathers and t
 t remains to be done. Includes some interesting data about children in foster care and kinship care including the information that preschoolers rec
 one psychotherapy hour (pro bono) each week and to maintaining a therapeutic relationship with one foster child, for as long as that child needs tr
 data as well as effective strategies for child abuse and neglect prevention; intervention for early onset of delinquency; juvenile justice system resp
 sent out as soon as they are available.
such as terrorist attacks, those who work with children in the child welfare system will find useful information to help with the traum
 lying, and an article on making mistakes. Archives are available, and subscriptions are free.
eated or exposed to violence.

 chers and others a way to quickly and conveniently access and sort data tailored to accommodate their needs. It is a wonderful exam
 re information. FYI3 is a joint effort of Foster Club and the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative.
 o reach up to 150 locations at one time to provide information on topics such as Concurrent Planning, Achieving Permanence for Child
sts exacted from them by the child welfare system.
hool-aged children, and young adults with disabilities and to the professionals who work with them and their families. This web site of
 g at the Manhattan Family Treatment Court.” At the same site, find “Can You Hear Me?” a collection of poems written by children an
state, and local officials "can do and should be doing to ensure the safety, permanency, and well-being of children." To read the testim
be easy for most of these youth. The study, by Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago will continue to track the
004 presented by Karl Brown, National Foster Care Month Chair at Casey Family Programs, who will be joined by Karen Jorgenson of
 h respect to cross-program integration both within human services programs and across the welfare and work force systems. The pa
ded to cause harm, and that involves an imbalance of power between the child who bullies and the child who is bullied. The website is

o programs and projects that move children out of foster care and into adoptive homes, especially children who are older, medically a
 es for paid and volunteer staff who work with youth. The list of ten competencies applies to front-line youth development staff. Each
rl Brown, National Foster Care Month Chair at Casey Family Programs, who will be joined by Karen Jorgenson of the National Foster Parent Associa
 es. “Ensuring the Healthy Development of Infants in Foster Care: A Guide for Judges, Advocates and Child Welfare Professionals” is a working too
 been abused and neglected, discusses the conditions that sometimes lead to separation, and offers practical solutions to support maintaining sibling
  child support, welfare reform, domestic violence, and poverty. View the February 2004 briefing, as well as those in their archives, at this link.
 m for mental health professionals from tribal and Indian Health Services agencies in the prevention and treatment of child abuse; Native American
 er care system.
/nrcfcpp/webcasts/index.html).
 The recommended improvements focus on six strategic areas to effect significant change within the system: Expediting Permanence, Kinship Famil


 es Act in 1997. The report examines five years of adoption performance for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, exploring the impact of alig


 r agency is interested in getting involved and raising awareness, consider purchasing a flag for your own use or providing one for a prominent govern


 rance process in four distinct ways, and are incorporating these tools into the social work practice of the State of Texas.
  improved outcomes for children and families.
 welfare system. Several articles focus on frontline caseworkers and supervisor
 mining placement for a child, provided that the relative caregiver meets all relevant State child protection standards." Current through June 30, 2
 Youth Transition Funders Group) offers a roadmap for public and private investments in services and supports that can improve the odds for foste


 care. This guidebook outlines questions judges should answer when ruling on permanency or discharge plans for youth in foster care.
  parental substance abuse in order to 1) encourage cross discipline interaction to suggest new models of collaboration for service delivery; and 2) d
 e--the inability to spend federal dollars earmarked for foster care on services that could actually help give children safer, more stable, permanent
west issue of Represent Magazine from Youth Communication.
 rt are national- and state-level findings on perpetrators of maltreatment, CPS work force workload, and preventive and post-investigation services


 ed with non-relative foster parents. Two-thirds of foster children (67%) were under 12 years of age and foster children were almost twice as likel
 . The theme for April is the child welfare workforce, and focuses on a number of studies that identify challenges to recruitment and retention. It p
mprove outcomes for children who enter foster care or kinship care or are adopted when their parents are incarcerated.
dren who have been abused or neglected, these stories often fail to put these cases into a larger context. The Child Trends Child Ab
nd detention reform in the juvenile justice system
ers more than a dozen recommendations on how to fix the system to better serve children.
tion in your community, plus the basics on nonprofit lobbying rules.

needy kids and families, with close-up look at this challenge in Greenville, South Carolina. Other articles document Michigan’s “just-in-
 ions made at hearings, and permanency options for each State, Territory, and the District of Columbia
 for ongoing therapies or treatment. Current through June 2003, this publication provides information on eligibility, limitations, cert
the length of dependency and termination cases. The study found on average that continuances increase the duration of dependency
Well-Being (NSCAW) to learn about the experiences of children and families who come in contact with the child welfare system. This
e statewide Child and Family Service Reviews (CFSR) assessments and on-site reviews; ACF and state experiences in developing, fund
 comprehensive conference to be held June 7-11. This conference will provide a variety of learning and networking options for those w
 e care; to expand knowledge and skills in making appropriate placement decisions for sibling groups; to enhance knowledge and skills in the recruitm
 child visiting; intensive services; resource parent/birth parent collaboration; and aftercare services.
Mental Health, the Child Welfare League of America, and the National Indian Child Welfare Association. It is organized into 10 sections and include
 lth at Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development and the Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Healt
 ure, dropping out of school, or involvement in criminal or delinquent activities, or who lack strong positive role models. This grant supports projects
 ter for Youth Services above, includes information on the costs of the conference, as well as information on what they seek in proposals for works
Foster Care Month; Foster Parents and Permanency; Foster Parents Ambassadors in Utah; Foster Club Builds a National Network for
 a, calculating awards, reporting requirements and other aspects of implementing the adoption incentive payment program.
 te, there is a 25% cost matching requirement. Applications due July 1, 2004. For more information, or to have an application sent to
  intersections that affect this population. In September, 2005, CWLA will devote a special issue of its journal, Child Welfare, to im
 reservation and reunification services, and protocols for establishing and maintaining effective family preservation and reunification
financial support for training and technical assistance to promote the purposes of the Community-Based Grants for the Prevention of
e published by Johnson & Johnson Pediatric Institute in a book this fall.
 iding in kinship care due to parental substance abuse. The benefits and challenges of kinship care, and useful strategies and interven
and social workers a place to share information and ideas related to foster care and adoption. The current edition includes articles o
d systems, county agencies in county-administered systems, tribal agencies or tribal consortiums) will be selected to participate in th
ovide a summer experience with child welfare and adoption law and policy issues. Visit their website for links to various informationa
e for those children whose parents can’t. Visit the website to find out how you can participate.
 y aspects of the foster care system: the federal financing structure and the court system. They determined that reform in these t
e reviews; (2) experiences of ACF and the states in developing, funding, and implementing items in their PIPs; and (3) additional effor
th, States, and Tribes to enhance partnerships that recruit and support foster and adoptive families.
 nd issues. Of special interest to Weekly Update subscribers may be Section 11, Child Protection, Foster Care and Adoption Assistan
 of Job and Family Services to improve both the interaction between child welfare and judicial systems, and the effectiveness of inte
 erence offers a variety of workshops on Child Welfare practice and university/state/federal partnership issues.
 lation related to child welfare issues that was enacted during calendar years 2002-2003, including citations and summaries of specif
 ed on extensive research into laws, regulations and best practices. The primary audiences are foster care caseworkers, supervisors,
 ation and mailing address to Robin Nixon at robinnixon@msn.com
 with custodial issues. Projects supported under this funding opportunity are expected to serve as models for service provision to chi

hildren into permanent placements. With the increase in permanent arrangements for children, the question arises: how can we strengthen a
  come into contact with the child welfare system. Two Federal data reporting systems are used to gather data on seven outcomes: re
 re has never received the kind of official attention given to non-relative foster care. In this article from Connect for Kids, Jennifer
s: placements for youth who enter foster care; services for youth in congregate care; safety in congregate care; permanency for you
op using drugs and alcohol and begin building a drug-free future.
nation Guidelines are now available. Nominations are due August 2, 2004
doption Services Overview; New Jersey's Post Adoption Services and Provider Certificate Program; Retaining Recruited Resource Fa
ction of the Children's Bureau Web site.
ff Director of the House Human Resources Subcommittee; and Rutledge Hutson of the Children's Defense Fund discuss the current
ny critical indicators. Nearly one in six young adults, ages 18 to 24, are not working, have no degree beyond high school, and are not e
 acity and retention.
 romising Practices in Adoption-Competent Mental Health Services” and “Creative Strategies for Financing Post-Adoption Services.”
ecommendations concerning visitation rights of foster children with their siblings after parental rights have been terminated. The link above de
  are available only for registrations postmarked by June 30. The National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning
 o Matters annual public affairs series. This year, the six-week series focused on youth - the assets they have and the challenges they face. The se
sconnected) from the worlds of school and work—estimates range from nearly 3 million to more than 7 million. What can be done to “
ects such as food and nutrition, money, employment, federal benefits, children, housing, health, and more. Visit http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/ci
ce Review (CFSR) reports and the Program Improvement Plans (PIPs). The report analyzed reports for the presence of youth related

 and education. The program focus is the practice of children’s law through interdisciplinary training.
nd modeling from parents and family. The conclusion, that “access to adult and peer support, accurate information and resources can
principles of family centered practice in planning for the services and supports from the entire system of care that can help parents
 resentation summarizing a white paper report on post adoption services from Casey Family Services, along with select resources and
th families as well as the history of adoption record laws.

m solving and toward “systemic goals of maintaining control, meeting regulations, containing costs, and avoiding litigation.” She recomm
 runaway from foster care, who killed her twin infant daughters. Testimony from witnesses, as well as an opportunity to submit writte
 ding poverty and racial bias. It is one of the first studies to explore the attitudes and perceptions of the child welfare community re
aw a need to broaden the knowledge base of workers providing services to adolescents in care. To meet this need, they funded 12 pro
ates. This web page shares common concerns and questions that have been received and answered by Federal staff on the AFCARS R
 for child welfare agencies interested in actively using outcome information in their decision making.
 neys, and numerous other professionals who work in the courts and child welfare agencies with practical, concrete, and effective too

ated to child safety, permanency and well-being. In partnership with the National Center for State Courts and the National Council o
great deal of valuable information in the report that can be helpful to any locality. One important finding was that the most frequen

  ndian Child Welfare Act applies. These checklists will help judges ensure that the necessary parties are present in all cases where I
arated from their delinquent peers, and closely supervised at school and at home committed 70 percent fewer violent crimes than pe
 am will also be audible that day on Sirius Satellite Radio channel operated by National Public Radio. Check http://www.npr.org/about/sirius.h
  ids, created a new public service advertising campaign (PSA) with the Ad Council to encourage the adoption of children from foster c
 anency and lifelong connections. Click on “CPYP New Documents.” Must reading!
every socioeconomic and ethnic group in the U.S. FirstGov.gov has developed a new page that provides resources for grandparents wh
a paid mentor-counselor. A small number of programs where this approach is being tested and refined show considerable early promis
tion programs for youth give taxpayers a good return on the dollar. The report recommendations to the state include: invest in resea
 llenges and rewards in developing and nurturing shared parenting relationships with birth families and professionals to benefit the ch
Center's current work, which reflects the evolution of expectations for partnering with youth and families. Partnering successfully r
   work with children and families, like “Father-Friendly Environmental Assessmen,” as well as information both birth families and reso
  children. And though grandmothers are more likely to provide this care, roughly one-third of grandfathers do so as well. The brief p
nt around the issues of race and racism
 ld of child abuse prevention. Exemplary prevention programs were nominated for the project and reviewed by an advisory group of e
er at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC on September 20. During the Expo and Reception, both Tribal and Federa
nd educators, lays out those challenges and offers some simple, inexpensive lessons and tools that can enhance the educational exper
option triad, improved search features, State-by-State information and resources, and online ordering of hundreds of publications d
tion on a set of key indicators of child well-being. To make better use of its resources, the Forum has decided to alternate publishing
 n both by NCYL attorneys and by other related organizations. It also includes project updates, litigation developments, and other inf
   the University of Arizona and the University of California, Davis.
 re communities, in the development of effective policies and practices with children who are missing from the care of a child welfare
   findings, it offers communication strategies that can effectively motivate the public to act on behalf of children. These strategies
   youth. These pages will help educate youth on what a medical home is and how having one can help with a smooth transition in all aspe
in the United States to assess what happens to youth when community mental health services are not readily available. The results of
  f this population. It provides examples of relevant current practice with separated children in the international refugee services are
m New York City's Administration for Children's Services, Vera Institute of Justice researchers interviewed adolescents with chron
hers in jail or prison. While Vera researchers found that only a small percentage of the mothers of children in care are incarcerated
ute perpetrators. This report examines the operations and outcomes of a collaboration between the NYC ACF and the New York Polic
ementing photolistings and other child-specific recruitment strategies.
op and evaluate programs designed to help interested unwed parents achieve their aspirations for healthy marriage and a stable fami
hildren with ADHD: academic instructions, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations.
eeting of experts in the field of youth permanency to develop a framework and measurements that can be used by public child welfar
 ections for valuable and interesting information as well
h describes some available services, and some current barriers to serving this population. The monograph is structured around the fo
 regiving to young relatives or non-related children of close friends through informal arrangements that were initially made among fa
  Issue Brief focuses on the Multiethnic Placement Act (MEPA). MEPA was enacted in 1994 to prevent children of color from remaini
n -- with a specific focus on older young people who are disconnected from the workforce, school, and community. The Action Kit lists good a
 e, sponsored by the DHHS, ACYF Children's Bureau, on Wednesday June 30th, 2004.
ted this research study, which focused on families who “successfully” adopted children as adolescents. It was designed to expand kno
ors and judges spoke to the value of a highly-interactive process, in a less formal and less adversarial environment, with time dedicat
 ren who were removed from the custody of a parent or primary caregiver and placed in foster care with nonrelatives were significan
 e factors associated with their development. In spite of research about the highly negative impact of institutional care on children,
 other requirements. Appendixes contain helpful reference resources, a list of time requirements in child protective proceedings, a m
sures, and several possible action steps to consider when designing program improvements as indicated or implicated by the research
 as inclusive and detailed as possible. Most entries include a description of the project or program, location, number served, and purp
  is now available online.
ber 29-October 2, 2004. Information and registration information can be found at the link above.
 doption Day has made the dreams of thousands of children come true by working to finalize their adoptions into permanent families a
aringhouse and The Collaboration to AdoptUSKids, both services of the Children's Bureau.
 young people in foster care involved in delinquency.
  reviews 33 indicators of intellectual, social, and emotional development, and health for children up to age six and of family and neigh
  Act. McKinney-Vento ensures that children are entitled to continued enrollment in their home school or immediate enrollment in a new scho
 sabilities?: An Awareness Document for Parents, Professionals and Youth” and “Transition Planning for Foster Youth with Disabilities



only, and persistent maltreatment are examined, with important implications for appropriate interventions and treatment at various s
 alth Information and Resource Center, is now featured on the website of the HCBS Clearinghouse for the Community Living Exchang
 haviors has received much less attention. This risk-focused approach has included examining what is lacking in a youth's life that may
s of Title IV-B and Title IV-E of the Social Security Act. The Archive distributes two data files for each federal fiscal year since 19
sium will provide a unique cross-system opportunity for information sharing, networking and collective learning. CLWA welcomes propo
 eoretical writings, and short papers commissioned from scholars in the field, the study identifies 10 critical ingredients of a healthy
of long-term foster care for youth and to increase prospects for youth to move from foster care to permanent homes. Under the wa
r, Columbus, Ohio. Data-driven caseflow management is one of the most powerful tools available to dependency courts aiming for mor
r the operation of the NRCFCPPP. The change in our name (from NRC for Foster Care and Permanency Planning) reflects an expanded
nsored by the Casey Center for Effective Child Welfare Practice at Casey Family Services.
 RCFCPPP at Hunter College, centers will be based at: University of Southern Maine (NRC for Organizational Improvement); ACTION
 eport on the CFSRs includes information on State-level analyses and case-level analyses. State-level data show how many States wer

ndependent living.
 rch that is currently underway to determine which supports are effective at preparing youth aging out of the foster care system fo
 esource as they become more informed about opportunities, a valuable tool in their quest to become more independent, successful ad
lationships between state fiscal capacity and spending on social programs.
buse and child welfare to support and facilitate cross-systems work. The free tutorial takes approximately 4 hours to complete. It
not already done so. The deadline is October 20. Email events@NFPAinc.org for more information.
ks for your assistance in reaching out to young men of color, through your personal connections and networks, who are currently in th
rocess of searching for birth relatives.

 ed for committing an alcohol or drug offense, admit having substance abuse and addiction problems, or share some combination of th
controlled and managed by state and local government are included.
fine critical elements and best practices of arts programs designed for the at-risk youth population at three pilot sites
onprofits can register to receive donated web design services that include custom website design, unlimited email accounts, an integr

driven" means in the context of systems of care.
em from other youth with disabilities and from youth in the general population.

delines for culturally competent organizations" and "Clinical guidelines for culturally competent mental health services for American
enhancing outcomes. Positive strategies are practices that are intended to build individual and/or family strengths, assets, or compe



Abuse Prevention.
abits regarding Indian children have led to variations in attitudes toward and treatment of Native children and families by mainstrea
on as a unit and as part of society. To lay the groundwork for addressing this issue, the Assistant Secretary for Planning & Education
udents -- to high levels of academic achievement. It argues that to close achievement gaps, we first must close the experience gap. T
 Gunderson MSW - Northwest Institute for Children and Families, Child Welfare Training Faculty/Manager; Deanna Grace, MA - Fam

 or older children and youth; 2) to provide a roadmap for implementing youth permanence with a focus on public child welfare agency
e context of a family relationship with at least one committed adult; reliable, continuous and healthy connections with siblings, birth parents, e
d indicators that measure such factors as the absence of family poverty, child neglect, and child abuse, and limiting youth behaviors s
e and neglect. This strategy focuses on building protection for children within their homes and communities and seeks to overcome or
Planning. While we still provide technical assistance and support to States and Tribes on foster care issues, the change in name signa
er Care?, describes the characteristics, experiences of abuse/neglect, living situations, and status of 727 children who have been in
 rkers and foster parents and to providing a forum where the people involved in the child welfare system can exchange ideas about fo
 en and youth served in institutions, but that those entering residential care for the first time are more troubled and traumatized th
  the two systems, along with other community partners can collaborate to improve the identification of Part C eligible children within
p to nine $2,500 scholarships in every state and the top 3 winners in each state will compete for one of nine $25,000 national scholar
n and Families, Child Welfare Training Faculty/Manager; Deanna Grace, MA - Family Decision-making Coordinator - DSHS Region IV -
 well as the composition and trends of all U.S. adoptions. A brief history of adoption data collection, a description of the strengths a
 as promising practices to overcome them. More than 90% of states report difficulty identifying adoptive families for children in fos
 in which these boys and girls are finding permanent homes. The Institute's study finds that the vast majority of adoptions from fos
 ices being tried “across the pond.”
hild or adolescent contribute to later abuse.
 could strengthen the abilities of tribal families to care for their children. The reports also highlight promising practices tribes have
 tools focused on practices, programs and policies to strengthen families. In addition to policy briefings and updates, the site offers
 cial and social service assistance, to informing and training child welfare professionals of the needs facing kinship care and elderly o
 re areas of development, including language and literacy, cognition, mathematical understanding, social and emotional competency, an
 f. Help lines could also be made more easily accessible through the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau's national 800 number
 hich include information about the Connected for Care project and the Washington State Long Term Outcome Study, and backgroun
 substitute care – describes the educational status of these children and examines some of the challenges confronting child welfare a
 Justice was asked to examine barriers to effective court handling of dual jurisdiction cases. The final report provides a number of r
es, and licensure and performance of substitute care facilities. This report outlines the background to each charge; provides a summ
 , launched in the early 1990s as one of the Nation’s first 11 federally funded programs for women with children, has provided service
for the delivery of policy and improved practice, studies carried out by health and social care practitioners, documents relating their
 cs was first published as an issue of the online newsletter on adolescent permanence and includes a case study about actual teens in t
of the states allow second-parent adoptions, either by statute or through case law.
 3 Among these is a requirement that states have policies and procedures requiring health care providers to notify CPS of “infants bo
urgeon General's Family History Initiative encourages family discussion of health history. The initiative includes an easy-to-use, down
m birth through age 4. The tool also offers feedback to parents and professionals to help identify the presence of special needs tha
ental Health Care in America. All information about the national conference call series can be found on their website, including annou
 ibes states' difficulties in making interagency collaboration work and gives an overview of tools that can help
 d the District of Columbia) conducted between 2001 and 2004.
ce use by youth in foster care who, as a consequence of their behavioral problems, had to change foster homes. See Summary 106.
programs and funding streams to provide more comprehensive and seamless services for these youth. This issue brief offers an over
 e array of federal programs that could be used to assist youth transitioning out of foster care at the state and local levels and to im
ty of the identified programs are not specifically targeted to foster care or other disadvantaged youth, many of the funding stream
 n family support programs and child outcomes. This article suggests that typical results-based evaluation methods are not applicable
  federal legislation for youth in out-of-home care for use by judges, attorneys, and youth advocates around the country. The guide c
 ning Vouchers. These Vouchers were funded in Fiscal Year 2004 for the first time and offered students money to continue their ed
 FSR reports and the PIPs. The report analyzed reports for the presence of youth related issues and explores their ramification in t
 reatly by state and can be affected by both national and state-specific events. These findings from the Urban Institute document t
 ois Urbana Champaign has developed a website that provides comprehensive information on outcome based practice in child welfare.
 State statutes defines domestic violence and provides an overview of legal responses to domestic violence committed in the presenc
 or Resource Family Support, the NRCFCPP will bring you our version of weekly news highlighting timely and important issues in children, youth, and
f themselves or others. Agencies say that reducing costs, improving access, and expanding the range of mental health services for teens could help
 placements in various child-serving agencies. This publication is the result of a collaboration among Rutgers University, the U.S. Department of hea




lnerable families; to increase differential assessment skills and the ability to think critically about case potential and progress; to enhance profess
aper is a close look at five states that have completed program improvement plans. For executive summaries and final reports for the 32 stat
nsition from foster care to self-sufficiency. It is recommended that the information be given to youth early - perhaps when they are
ns. They will train and match mentors with children from age four to 15. They will also screen all potential mentors for child and dome
successfully care for their children, find work, get safe housing, go to school, access public benefits, or even, for immigrants, stay in

ies! In this broadcast, you will learn how the Campaign came to be, the products and plans being put in place to help States respond t
 the five years since the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act in 1997. Of these states, six tripled and two quadrupled the
development and subsequent self-sufficiency in adulthood. Many former foster youth are among the educationally disadvantaged pop
n, low-fee, or no-fee basis); an informal, welcoming environment; strong leadership; friendly, knowledgeable staff or volunteers; a soc


 Conferences are posted at this site. Provided are program highlights, presentations and handouts, awards, photos, videos and transc

that the safety of all family members is addressed in a supportive and empowering manner throughout the process of the FTCs
or other relatives. If those percentages remained constant, that would place 30,000 children in foster care and another 180,000 in

ces in the foster care system.
y the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) and



f services they often need to care for children who have been abused or neglected, or otherwise traumatized by the loss of their fam
or both first-time and experienced advocates.
believes that one vital factor in creating successful social change is recognizing and addressing the emotional and psychological affec
s and findings from a survey of the states designed to learn about barriers to placement stability and promising practices to promote
 ovide illustrations of clear and specific policy statement or that illustrate differing ways of addressing a content area, and recomme
 or designing, administering, or funding services for children and adolescents. The tables include specific information on academic ach

problems that matter to them and learn valuable research and academic skills.
s and findings from a survey of the states designed to learn about barriers to placement stability and promising practices to promote
ribes the interaction of child well-being, foster system capabilities, and agency practices. National experts will use Census results t
rt of the permanency process. Permanency cannot be achieved if a child’s case is awaiting resolution of an appeal. Some appellate co


  from the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA).
, concerning the care and support of their children and other family members. This article explores the wide variety of FGC program
 Elmore; "Lighting the Fire of Urgency: Families Lost & Found in America's Child Welfare System," a description of work being done b

out the CNC as a separate entity.
milies' Children's Bureau is holding its first National Conference on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare on July 14 and 15, 2004, in B
 ren in out-of-home care. We are working to provide technical assistance in new and innovative ways. Our first webcast, on Concurrent Plann
of data that states collect and report on children served by their child welfare agencies and HHS’s role in ensuring the reliability of
 it the link above for information about ordering the CD for $25.00. If you were unable to participate on 11/18, you can view the pres
d unmarried teen mothers. It discusses a number of policy directions for helping these youth make successful transitions into adulth
 actitioners can access strategy and program tools in the form of case-studies, best practices, and web links related to community de
zations, public schools and government agencies. In total, Wal-Mart expects to provide $20 million in funding to charitable organizat
ms of care, supporting parents with mental illness, and racial disparities in use of services.
mportant protections and services.

cussed in the first convening (http://www.stuartfoundation.org/convening.html).
eir birth parents. "Children's Services Practice Notes" is addressed to the state's child welfare workers. The current issue focuses
 ticles have relevance for foster and adoptive parents and kinship caregivers.
the ASFA permanency option "another planned permanent living arrangement" (APPLA). "Facilitating Permanency for Older Adolescen

ce. The book is designed to help child welfare professionals develop child-and family-specific case plans by providing a structured too
selves, followed by burning, bruising, excessive nail biting, breaking bones, and pulling out hair. This Education Week feature includes
ugh Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) programs.

gical parents, the foster parents, and the child are considered. Also included are suggestions on how foster parents can help children
tial funding opportunities. It also contains an "Apply for Grants" feature that greatly simplifies the application process by allowing a

enial of assistance to her at the foster care level under that statute. She contended that under federal law she was entitled to nego
 al living grantees, youth service providers, and anyone interested in improving services to youth in out-of-home-care. This conferenc
ve community-based programs. It also describes the participatory evaluation model that partnered faculty and program staff in the r
es the numbers and characteristics of young people who disconnect from mainstream developmental pathways. It suggests the beginn
arge in full-text electronic formats through an online search of the Clearinghouse library.

 grams and Public Policy” and a “Child Support Handbook.”
 ome care, and case outcomes in pilot cases.

 en more likely to be in poverty? What is the ethnic distribution of caregivers? And, since the Older Americans Act now provides som
ates of children from other countries. At the same time, there were over 50,000 adoptions from the public child welfare system. Th
 k of having a child with a disability and/or are at risk for having the child removed from the birth home due to the parent's disabilit

 bility and effectiveness." The Task Force recommends that the first designated “special target populations” should be youth who are

 aling with the effects of risk assessment on child welfare staff, and a conference workshop description on Children, Resilience and R
WLA’s initiatives to practice improvements that can help states in their Child and Family Service Reviews proves; and “When You're N
  changes in order to improve their systems in response to the Child and Family Service Reviews. The webcast will be conducted by NR
 clusion increase to $10,160. Adoptive parents will be allowed these amounts for the adoption of a child with special needs regardless
rance, many have strong relationships with at least one adult, and more than half attend religious services regularly. The brief descri
ove. For some background information, check out our Overview, which can be accessed at http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/training.htm




th their children to strengthen the family and help children feel safe, are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The book contains


y to provide technical assistance to the states as they continue the Child and Family Service Review process.



e by matching child welfare and criminal justice records, focusing on children who entered foster care in 1991 and 1996. This report presents the r
rantwriting and fundraising tutorials and courses that are free.
ar categories of assets varies by race/ethnicity, suggesting the need for focused, ongoing dialogue within communities of color about their unique s
terpiece of the poster. To find out more about the ribbon campaign, visit www.nfpainc.org . To order free posters and lapel pins with the new logo, e
s Reviews are saying about state performance in this area and describes some promising state initiatives to address foster children's educational n



is that relates to adoption," explains the article, which notes that such "foundations are important in the later development of positive attitudes ab
nts with petitions for sibling visitation. The Court found that the state agency defied a previous family court order to develop a sibling visitation p


mission of Part I of the scholarship application is April 1, 2004.
 ican Humane focused on fathers and their families in the September 2003 issue of Child Protection Leader.
 the information that preschoolers receiving mental health services were almost twice as likely as older children to be living with kin caregivers or f
child, for as long as that child needs treatment, no matter where the child is placed. In return for providing this service, the therapists receive wee
elinquency; juvenile justice system responses; and child welfare and juvenile justice system integration and reform efforts.


 information to help with the traumas experienced by these children




their needs. It is a wonderful example of using the Internet to provide access to data related to children’s health, education, and we

ng, Achieving Permanence for Children, and the Breakthrough Series Collaborative Methodology. Visit the link above to view archived

and their families. This web site offers a list of programs within each state, and links to a page that tells more about that state's pr
 on of poems written by children and youth involved with the California court system.
  ing of children." To read the testimony visit the link above.
 f Chicago will continue to track these young people until they turn 21
 l be joined by Karen Jorgenson of the National Foster Parent Association, Linda Campbell from the Alabama Department of Human R
 re and work force systems. The paper examines potential barriers arising from federal law and serves as a template for analysis nee
child who is bullied. The website is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Health Resources and Serv

 children who are older, medically and/or emotionally challenged, from an ethnic minority, and/or part of sibling groups that seek to b
-line youth development staff. Each competency has several examples to guide organizations
 of the National Foster Parent Association, Linda Campbell from the Alabama Department of Human Resources, and Johnna Breland, President of th
Welfare Professionals” is a working tool for those involved in the court process to understand the questions to ask and the resources that can addre
 solutions to support maintaining sibling relationships during placement.
 hose in their archives, at this link.
atment of child abuse; Native American Topic-Specific Monograph Series, booklets to assist individuals in understanding issues affecting Native co



  Expediting Permanence, Kinship Families, Alternate (Non-kin) Permanent Families, Effective Practice with the Youngest Children, Permanence for


f Columbia, exploring the impact of aligning the right outcomes with federal financial incentives and importance of collaboration in getting the work


or providing one for a prominent government office in your community.




tandards." Current through June 30, 2003, this publication from the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse summarizes State statutes rega
ts that can improve the odds for foster youth as they become self-sufficient adults.


 or youth in foster care.
aboration for service delivery; and 2) disseminate the latest state-of-the-art research and practice experience about the intersect between subst
 hildren safer, more stable, permanent homes.


ventive and post-investigation services. The report is intended for use by policymakers, child welfare practitioners, researchers, and others concer


ter children were almost twice as likely (9%) to live in "an unmarried partner household" than sons/daughters of householders (5%). Over three-qu
 nges to recruitment and retention. It provides research and resource information that supports the importance of professional education for child


 ontext. The Child Trends Child Abuse & Neglect Media Handbook helps journalists provide that larger context. The handbook include




ticles document Michigan’s “just-in-time” hiring process and Cincinnati's pay-for-performance contract with area human services wor

ation on eligibility, limitations, certification for, and termination or modification of subsidies for each State, Territory, and the Distr
 rease the duration of dependency and termination cases. Select Publications by Policy Area: Child Welfare from the menu on the left
 ith the child welfare system. This report focuses on a subset of over 700 children who have been in foster care for one year. The in
ate experiences in developing, funding, and implementing items in Program Improvement Plans (PIPs); and additional efforts ACF has t
  and networking options for those working for or with the child welfare or juvenile justice systems. Topics will focus on integration a
ce knowledge and skills in the recruitment and retention of resource families willing and able to parent sibling groups; to enhance ability to present


 organized into 10 sections and includes a general description of the child welfare system and information about child protective services, the serv
ship for Child and Family Mental Health at American Institutes of Research.
e models. This grant supports projects that address the academic and social needs of children with greatest need through school-based mentoring
 what they seek in proposals for workshop presentations. The deadline for submitting a proposal to present at the 2004 conference is May 14th, 20
Club Builds a National Network for Youth in Foster Care; Promising Practices in Reunification; Bullying and Children in the Child Welf
ntive payment program.
n, or to have an application sent to you, contact Sylvia R. Franzmeier, Parent Group Manager: 281-413-7377 or 281-353-7459. Emails
of its journal, Child Welfare, to immigrants and refugees in the child welfare system. Interested parties are invited to submit an abs
mily preservation and reunification services. One of the tools available on its website is an assessment scale to measure family functi
Based Grants for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect program. Applications due June 14, 2004. The grantee must match at le

 and useful strategies and interventions for working with these children and their families, will be presented. The conference will be
 current edition includes articles on siblings and separation and loss when placements end.
will be selected to participate in this exciting initiative to share knowledge, challenges, and successes over the course of a year. Agen
te for links to various informational pages relevant to students, employers or both.


determined that reform in these two areas would have far-reaching effects for children in foster care and is a critical first step to
their PIPs; and (3) additional efforts that ACF has taken beyond the CFSR to help ensure that all states meet federal goals of safety

Foster Care and Adoption Assistance.
tems, and the effectiveness of intervention in cases involving families where judicial action is required.
 nership issues.
g citations and summaries of specific child-welfare-related laws in each State. This is the first of five reports to be produced by the
ter care caseworkers, supervisors, and persons responsible for the coordination of health services. It is not specifically designed for

 models for service provision to children and adolescents affected by HIV/AIDS. A model project funded under this initiative must:(

 tion arises: how can we strengthen and support these families to assure stable and successful placements? Many states have developed inn
   gather data on seven outcomes: reduce recurrence of child maltreatment; reduce maltreatment in foster care; increase permanency
  e from Connect for Kids, Jennifer Ehrle and Rob Geen of the Urban Institute say these caregivers need more support.
ongregate care; permanency for youth in congregate care; youth involvement in planning and decision-making; and transitioning from f



m; Retaining Recruited Resource Families; and Sibling Placement.

Defense Fund discuss the current child welfare crisis confronting states, explain how federal financing affects child welfare service
e beyond high school, and are not enrolled in school. This year's essay, "Moving Youth From Risk to Opportunity," explores how these

 inancing Post-Adoption Services.” Together, with their initial white paper, “An Approach to Post-Adoption Services,” these papers pr
e been terminated. The link above describes the resolution, which you can read in its entirety at http://www.legis.state.il.us/legislation/93/SJR
ster Care and Permanency Planning is proud to be one of the sponsors of this always interesting, stimulating, and enjoyable event
 e and the challenges they face. The series is a partnership of Chicago Public Radio, WTTW 11, the Chicago Public Library, the Chicago Reporter, an
han 7 million. What can be done to “reconnect” youth to school, putting them back on the path toward successful adulthood? Visit the
re. Visit http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/misc/lista/chlista.htm
 for the presence of youth related issues and explores their ramification in the PIP process.
ate information and resources can help enhance coping skills, self-esteem and positive help-seeking behaviors” is an important remind
stem of care that can help parents improve their ability to care for their children. From the Arizona , with technical assistance from
es, along with select resources and references on post permanency issues.



 nd avoiding litigation.” She recommends nine steps for building partnerships for initiating and sustaining family group conferencing.
l as an opportunity to submit written comments, can be found at the above link. Several witnesses spoke to systemic challenges and s
s of the child welfare community regarding racial disproportionality. It emphasizes the need for stronger administrative support, inc
meet this need, they funded 12 projects to design competency-based training for workers of adolescents transitioning from foster c
by Federal staff on the AFCARS Reviews, SACWIS Reviews and Title IV-B and IV-E Reviews.

actical, concrete, and effective tools for creating court improvements in the handling of child abuse and neglect cases.

e Courts and the National Council of Juvenile & Family Court Judges, Fostering Results surveyed over 5,000 judges across the count
finding was that the most frequently requested and used and most highly rated services were parent support groups and parent tra

es are present in all cases where ICWA may be applicable.
rcent fewer violent crimes than peers in standard group residential treatment.
eck http://www.npr.org/about/sirius.html for details. Additionally, the program will be transmitted nationwide earlier that week, and stations in
 adoption of children from foster care. The campaign uses print, radio, television and internet PSAs to encourage prospective parent

des resources for grandparents who are the primary caregivers for their grandchildren.
ned show considerable early promise, and encouraging track records are beginning to emerge
 o the state include: invest in research-proven prevention and early intervention programs; avoid spending money on programs where t
and professionals to benefit the children in their care. Save $$ by ordering before September 30.
 families. Partnering successfully requires not only a philosophical commitment to the value, but also intentional, specific steps to red
mation both birth families and resource families can use in articles such as “Why is a Family Story Book Important?”
 dfathers do so as well. The brief presents a statistical snapshot of grandparental child care in American families, including who prov

reviewed by an advisory group of experts. The report provides an overview of child abuse prevention and describes each of the selec
 Reception, both Tribal and Federal representatives will be available to informally discuss the following programs: Administration for
 can enhance the educational experience of children in foster care. The lessons — including how to facilitate school registration and h
ering of hundreds of publications distributed by the Clearinghouse.
 has decided to alternate publishing the more detailed report with this new condensed version that highlights selected indicators.
 gation developments, and other information about the Center, as well as announcements of upcoming conferences and useful publicat

ng from the care of a child welfare agency, whether through running away, abduction, or inattentiveness of the custodial agency. It w
 half of children. These strategies are the result of 30+ interviews with leading experts in marketing, advertising, communications, an
 with a smooth transition in all aspects of life. The tools are designed to help a youth get the accessible, coordinated, comprehensive
not readily available. The results of the survey are presented in the report. The report covers the period from January 1 to June 30
e international refugee services arena and within U.S. child welfare practice ,and it concludes with questions regarding service areas
 nterviewed adolescents with chronic AWOL histories as well as staff at foster care facilities. The report shows that most teens goi
f children in care are incarcerated for 30 days or more, the number of affected children is significant enough to justify programs th
 e NYC ACF and the New York Police Department that aims to have child protective workers, police, and, when appropriate, prosecuto
healthy marriage and a stable family life. Visit this website for information and publications on Building Strong Families from Mathem

 can be used by public child welfare agencies throughout the country to improve practice. We believe that such a framework for pra

ograph is structured around the four core principles that NRCYD maintains are critical for the successful delivery of services to you
s that were initially made among family members. While there are two types of caregiving arrangements, formal and informal, this st
 ent children of color from remaining in foster care because adoptive parents of their own race are not available. The data show that
ommunity. The Action Kit lists good arguments for focusing on disconnected youth, and addresses the topics of education, workforce connec

 nts. It was designed to expand knowledge on adolescent, family, and systems factors associated with successful adoptive placements
rial environment, with time dedicated to reaching an acceptable plan. Look under Office of Dispute Resolution Reports.
 e with nonrelatives were significantly more likely to be arrested—as juveniles, as adults, for a violent crime, and for any crime. More
t of institutional care on children, this report reveals growing efforts across the country to create new institutions that will house f
in child protective proceedings, a model forensic interviewing protocol, an article on child development, and sample orders and report
ated or implicated by the research. Evidence-based practices are those practices, documented in the research literature, that have
  location, number served, and purpose of the program; how the study was conducted, who was involved, what instruments were used,



adoptions into permanent families and to celebrate adoption. On Saturday, November 20, 2004, courts, judges, attorneys, child welf



p to age six and of family and neighborhood characteristics that affect children's readiness for school. In addition to presenting dat
 immediate enrollment in a new school. The act also provides a stream of federal funding for an array of supports, including but not limited to
  for Foster Youth with Disabilities: Are We Falling Short?”



ventions and treatment at various stages of development.
 for the Community Living Exchange Collaborative. The guide was written to help advocates and consumers use their skills to change g
 is lacking in a youth's life that may contribute to that youth's tendency to engage in negative health behaviors. While this approach
or each federal fiscal year since 1995, one file containing the adoption data and the other the foster care data. Visit the Archive W
ive learning. CLWA welcomes proposals focusing on juvenile justice and child welfare system integration and the connection between
10 critical ingredients of a healthy marriage. The brief is part of Child Trends' ongoing conceptual and methodological work on health
to permanent homes. Under the waiver, Minnesota will be able to use federal foster care dollars more flexibly so it can increase the
 dependency courts aiming for more timely permanency for abused and neglected children. Courts and child welfare agencies can use
 ncy Planning) reflects an expanded focus on helping child welfare agencies provide safe, permanent homes for children, either by rem

nizational Improvement); ACTION for Child Protection (NRC for Child Protective Services); Child Welfare League of America (NRC
el data show how many States were in substantial conformity with the outcomes and indicators, common challenges faced by the Sta



g out of the foster care system for independent living
me more independent, successful adults. The fyi3 Binder is sturdy vinyl covered, and features metal 3 ring construction. Easily custom
oximately 4 hours to complete. It is appropriate for new treatment counselors and as online training for individuals who have been wo

d networks, who are currently in their final year of college or a technical program, and who can verify their status as having aged out



s, or share some combination of these characteristics, according to a report by The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abu

on at three pilot sites
unlimited email accounts, an integrated content editor, and 25 MB of virtual file storage. Eligible organizations must be designated a




ental health services for American Indians" are both available online.
 family strengths, assets, or competencies; resilience; and empowerment or self-determination. Positive strategies also seek to harne




 children and families by mainstream child welfare workers.”
Secretary for Planning & Education, DHHS, contracted with Mathematica Policy Research Inc. and Child Trends to produce a chart
st must close the experience gap. This must be done not only through education policy and schooling but also through larger social po
/Manager; Deanna Grace, MA - Family Decision-making Coordinator - DSHS Region IV - Office of African American Children's Servi

 cus on public child welfare agency leadership and the development of public-private partnerships; and 3) to develop specific strategie
nections with siblings, birth parents, extended family and a network of other significant adults; and education and/or employment, life skills, su
buse, and limiting youth behaviors such as suicide, teen births and substance abuse. The article features Vermont’s efforts to embed
mmunities and seeks to overcome or mitigate manageable individual causes of child neglect and abuse such as parental isolation, lack o
re issues, the change in name signals a new, expanded focus on the role of the family in providing safety, permanence and well-being f
  of 727 children who have been in foster care for one year. The second, Foster Children’s Caregivers and Caregiving Environments, p
 ystem can exchange ideas about foster care in North Carolina .
  more troubled and traumatized than those youth placed prior to the change in policy.
 on of Part C eligible children within the child welfare system.
ne of nine $25,000 national scholarships! Funds may be used for college or vocational training after high school. The deadline to appl
ng Coordinator - DSHS Region IV - Office of African American Children's Services (OAACS); and Pattie Elofson - Director of Child
 n, a description of the strengths and limitations of potential adoption data sources, and a review of how the information was collecte
doptive families for children in foster care, especially families for older children, those with special needs, and Hispanic and African-
ast majority of adoptions from foster care are remaining intact over time, notwithstanding concerns by many professionals that the



 ht promising practices tribes have adopted to meet unique challenges they face in managing services to strengthen tribal families, ch
 fings and updates, the site offers links to other resources, including funding opportunities.
ds facing kinship care and elderly or grandparent-headed families.
ocial and emotional competency, and approaches to learning. The profiles include information such as the purposes of the measure, th
alth Bureau's national 800 number for childhood issues, through the more general 2-1-1 number for community-based services, and by
 rm Outcome Study, and background about Family Group Conferencing.
allenges confronting child welfare and educational systems in their attempts to develop strategies to work together more productive
 final report provides a number of recommendations to address the challenges posed by this population.
 d to each charge; provides a summary of testimony, including concerns, criticisms, feedback, opinions, observations, and recommenda
 with children, has provided services to nearly 800 parents and approximately 2,000 children. This article in NIDA Science & Practic
ctitioners, documents relating their experiences regarding the topic, and resources produced by local practitioner bodies to support
a case study about actual teens in the child welfare system. Each topic ends with questions that will facilitate discussion.

oviders to notify CPS of “infants born and identified as being affected by illegal substance abuse or withdrawal symptoms resulting f
 ative includes an easy-to-use, downloadable, web-based family history tool, "My Family Health Portrait," in English and Spanish. Can
 the presence of special needs that may require professional attention in children at higher risk of developmental delays, such as tho
nd on their website, including announcements, registration forms, handouts, and evaluation forms.



 oster homes. See Summary 106.
  th. This issue brief offers an overview of the challenges and promising practices. (sort publications by title)
 the state and local levels and to improve existing processes for monitoring states’ progress in meeting the needs of current and form
 youth, many of the funding streams provide recipients the flexibility to determine the specific uses of program funds. The narrative
  luation methods are not applicable to family support services. Instead, assessments should consider the impact of relationships and p
 es around the country. The guide covers issues in housing, health, education, employment, undocumented youth, parenting youth, and t
 udents money to continue their education. This program has impacted the way states provide post-secondary education services to a
and explores their ramification in the PIP process.
om the Urban Institute document the amount states spent on child welfare activities in state fiscal year (SFY) 2002, the funding sou
me based practice in child welfare. It contains outcome based training modules along with train-the-trainer guides, general informatio
  violence committed in the presence of a child.
mportant issues in children, youth, and family services. Our inaugural edition focuses on services for children and youth with behavioral and emotion
 al health services for teens could help reduce the need for some child welfare or juvenile justice placements.
 University, the U.S. Department of health & Human Services, and the Annie E. Casey Foundation.




 ntial and progress; to enhance professionalism and professional competence in helping families engage in the process of change; and to enhance und
maries and final reports for the 32 states assessed so far, visit http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/cwrp/staterpt/
 outh early - perhaps when they are beginning high school. This helps youth to use the information in the preparation for their transi
otential mentors for child and domestic abuse and other criminal history. Mentors will be required to make at least a one-year commi
 ts, or even, for immigrants, stay in the same country as their children. These eight two-page fact sheets detail the scope of the chal

ut in place to help States respond to the Campaign, and how States can access technical assistance and training services through Ado
 six tripled and two quadrupled their adoption performance. By totaling the peak yearly performance for each of the states and the D
he educationally disadvantaged population.
edgeable staff or volunteers; a social benefit focus/mission; relevant curriculum (driven by local demand); and well-maintained, reliab


  awards, photos, videos and transcripts from most plenary sessions, and materials from many presentations. Presentation abstracts a

 hout the process of the FTCs
 oster care and another 180,000 in informal kinship care in 1999.



 nce Abuse Treatment (CSAT) and the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), Children's Bureau, Office on Child Abu



 raumatized by the loss of their families. This paper summarizes some of the issues around state TANF decisions that have conseque

e emotional and psychological affects of the change process. In light of this philosophy, the Fund primarily supports projects and pro
and promising practices to promote permanency. Emphasis will be placed on states that have successfully addressed common issues. S
essing a content area, and recommendations concerning enhancement of the states’ visiting policies. It includes a checklist of 30 cont
pecific information on academic achievement programs, mentoring programs, civic engagement programs, employment programs, and p



 and promising practices to promote permanency. Emphasis will be placed on states that have successfully addressed common issues. S
 al experts will use Census results to stimulate a discussion of the policies and practices needed to improve adult success among childr
 on of an appeal. Some appellate courts are recognizing this concern and are beginning to address it by developing procedures that lim



es the wide variety of FGC programs in Hampshire. Besides providing FGCs in child welfare, youth justice and education applications, H
" a description of work being done by Catholic Community Services of Western Washington; "Permanency Hearings: Strategies to Ac



elfare on July 14 and 15, 2004, in Baltimore, MD. Proposals are being sought for workshops and symposia that will address policy and
ur first webcast, on Concurrent Planning, is archived on the home page of our website at http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/. It will
 s role in ensuring the reliability of those data; and practices that child welfare agencies use to overcome challenges associated with
pate on 11/18, you can view the presentation at the following sites: using Windows Media at: streaming.simworld.com/eku/111803.asx,
e successful transitions into adulthood.
  web links related to community development issues. The website also features discussion forums to foster interactive exchange of i
  in funding to charitable organizations across the country during the holidays. Visit any Wal-Mart store nationwide to find out more




workers. The current issue focuses on Family-Centered Supervision in Child Welfare. "Training Matters" provides training information

 g Permanency for Older Adolescents," from Director Gerald Mallon, discusses what permanency means for young people; various path

 plans by providing a structured tool for making case decisions and service plans, a training guide for staff development, and a means
 s Education Week feature includes tips for helping youth who injure themselves



 w foster parents can help children handle the disruption in the family and the transition to foster care. Finally, it discusses the ways
he application process by allowing applicants to download, complete, and submit applications for specific grant opportunities from any

ederal law she was entitled to negotiate for Title IV-E funding up to the level available to foster parents. The State argued that the
 out-of-home-care. This conference provides an opportunity for you to learn about the most recent developments regarding the Chaf
d faculty and program staff in the research process.
al pathways. It suggests the beginnings of a typology that defines and organizes the varieties of educational alternatives. Youth leavi




er Americans Act now provides some support for grandparent caregivers 60 years and older, how many younger grandparents are bei
the public child welfare system. The characteristics of children adopted from other nations are examined in the context of the child
 home due to the parent's disability.

opulations” should be youth who are already in public institutions – youth in foster care (particularly those aging out of foster care),

ription on Children, Resilience and Risk.
eviews proves; and “When You're Not a Parent, But Your Client Is,” helpful tips for anyone without parenting experience who is worki
he webcast will be conducted by NRCFCPP consultants Jenifer Agosti and Susan Dougherty
child with special needs regardless of whether they have qualifying expenses. The first part of the publication is for persons who hav
 ervices regularly. The brief describes the well-being of children living in foster homes. It also provides a set of potential policy sugg
cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/training.html. And if you have any questions you’d like to submit in advance for a Q-and-A portion of the webcast, please




 ages 12 and under. The book contains specific advice for parents about how to encourage their children to feel hopeful about the future, listen to




91 and 1996. This report presents the rates of conviction and incarceration of mothers of children in foster care and examines the sequence in whic


mmunities of color about their unique strengths and opportunities for nurturing healthy children and youth.
sters and lapel pins with the new logo, email info@nfpainc.org or call 800-557-5238.
ddress foster children's educational needs.



er development of positive attitudes about adoption, a child's birth parents, and himself or herself." The report also states that adopted children's
t order to develop a sibling visitation plan with prospective adoptive parents before the children were permanently placed. Moreover, the Court reje




ren to be living with kin caregivers or foster parents – “a finding which means that caretakers who are not parents may need supportive services to
 his service, the therapists receive weekly group consultations with senior clinicians.
eform efforts.




 hildren’s health, education, and well-being

isit the link above to view archived versions of all of our webcasts.

at tells more about that state's program




e Alabama Department of Human Resources, and Johnna Breland, President of the Alabama Foster and Adoptive Parent Association. L
rves as a template for analysis needed at the state level. The paper is intended for use by policymakers, researchers, and others in t
es, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

art of sibling groups that seek to be adopted together. Eligible Applicants: Tax-exempt organizations in the U.S. and Canada. Applica
s, and Johnna Breland, President of the Alabama Foster and Adoptive Parent Association. Learn what you can do to make Foster Care Month 2004 a
o ask and the resources that can address the special needs of infants in foster care and their families. It was jointly published by the New York St



derstanding issues affecting Native communities; and Cross Cultural Training for Federal Criminal Justice Personnel.



he Youngest Children, Permanence for Adolescents, and Community Involvement.


ce of collaboration in getting the work done.




house summarizes State statutes regarding requirements for placement with and adoption by relatives.




nce about the intersect between substance abuse and child welfare involved families. July 14-25, 2004; Baltimore, MD.



oners, researchers, and others concerned with child well-being.


 of householders (5%). Over three-quarters of a million children lived with "other non-relatives." Of children living with relatives, 4.4 million were
nce of professional education for child welfare practice.


rger context. The handbook includes basic facts on child abuse and neglect and foster care, as well as quick references to sources of




ract with area human services workers. A final article profiles three more promising personnel reforms.

ach State, Territory, and the District of Columbia
Welfare from the menu on the left side of the screen
 in foster care for one year. The information provided here was collected from child welfare workers; current relative, foster paren
 ); and additional efforts ACF has taken beyond the CFSR to help ensure that all states meet federal goals related to children's safe
s. Topics will focus on integration and coordination between child serving systems as well as traditional juvenile justice topics
 groups; to enhance ability to present appropriate information to the court to support sibling groups; and to increase knowledge of policy and legisla


out child protective services, the service planning process, home- and community-based services, out-of-home placement services, choices for perm


need through school-based mentoring programs and activities and provides these students with mentors. These programs and activities must serve
 t the 2004 conference is May 14th, 2004.
ying and Children in the Child Welfare System; and Achieving Permanency After Parental Rights are Terminated.

413-7377 or 281-353-7459. Emails: sfranzmeier@adoptuskids.org <mailto:sfranzmeier@adoptuskids.org> To view the program announ
 parties are invited to submit an abstract for a paper to be included in this issue. Nine to eleven papers in APA style of approximately
ment scale to measure family functioning
 004. The grantee must match at least 10% of the total approved cost of the project. Approximately $1 Million will fund one award. T

 presented. The conference will be September 27-28 in Chicago, IL. For complete info on agenda, sponsorship, and registration, see s

ses over the course of a year. Agencies must demonstrate a commitment to improving the way they identify, support and serve kinshi



 care and is a critical first step to solving many other problems that plague the child welfare system.
states meet federal goals of safety, permanency, and wellbeing for children.




 five reports to be produced by the project.
 . It is not specifically designed for distribution to foster parents, child care workers, or health care practitioners, though some info

  funded under this initiative must:(a) Develop and implement an evidence-based project with specific components or strategies that a

 nts? Many states have developed innovative services and programs to address this very question, expanding the continuum of care to provid
 n foster care; increase permanency for children in foster care; reduce time in foster care to reunification; reduced time in foster ca
 s need more support.
 n-making; and transitioning from foster care.




 ncing affects child welfare services, and describe financing reform proposals being discussed on Capitol Hill.
  Opportunity," explores how these disconnected youth face a particularly tough transition to successful adulthood and presents exam

Adoption Services,” these papers provide a road map for states interested in establishing program and budget priorities to fund comp
ww.legis.state.il.us/legislation/93/SJR/PDF/09300SJ0058lv.pdf
 imulating, and enjoyable event
ublic Library, the Chicago Reporter, and the Chicago Community Trust.
ard successful adulthood? Visit the link above to sign up to listen or to get an audiotape ($16 for either).
g behaviors” is an important reminder to those who work with these young people
 na , with technical assistance from the National Resource Centers on Foster Care & Permanency Planning and Family-Centered Practic




taining family group conferencing.
spoke to systemic challenges and suggested changes, information worth considering in any jurisdiction.
tronger administrative support, increased staff training in both general child welfare issues and cultural competency, and more inter
escents transitioning from foster care. The National Resource Center for Youth Development now has links to information about each



se and neglect cases.

 ver 5,000 judges across the country. Specifically, questions explored the information made available to juvenile court judges, the tim
rent support groups and parent training. Survey findings indicated that among the families that had a child at risk of out of home pla




 de earlier that week, and stations in other cities will be free to air it any time through next spring.
As to encourage prospective parents to realize that they "don’t have to be a hero to be a hero," and "don't have to be perfect to be a




pending money on programs where there is little evidence of program effectiveness; keep abreast of the latest research-based findin

 o intentional, specific steps to redesign services and reallocate resources so as to remove logistical and interpersonal barriers that i
 Book Important?”
merican families, including who provides this care, what type and how much is provided, and what some of the financial benefits of suc

 on and describes each of the selected programs.
owing programs: Administration for Native Americans, Child Care and Development Funds, Child Support, Child Welfare, Community S
 facilitate school registration and how to increase adult attendance at parent/teacher conferences — can be adapted for use in any c

t highlights selected indicators.
ng conferences and useful publications. Past issues are available online. The April-June 2004 issue contains the fourth in a series of a

veness of the custodial agency. It will be followed by coordinated guidelines from CWLA and the National Center for Missing and Exp
 ng, advertising, communications, and community outreach, survey responses to individual concepts for communication, and learnings f
ssible, coordinated, comprehensive, youth/family-centered care they deserve. These pages were designed to help provide answers an
  period from January 1 to June 30, 2003.
 questions regarding service areas to be strengthened in meeting the needs of this vulnerable population in the United States.
e report shows that most teens going AWOL from group care stay with friends and return to care voluntarily but that one-third are
cant enough to justify programs that allow them to visit their mothers in jail or prison. The report also supports earlier research sho
e, and, when appropriate, prosecutors respond to reports of severe child abuse or neglect within two hours and to conduct joint inter
ilding Strong Families from Mathematica.

eve that such a framework for practice, combined with a way to measure results, will be particularly helpful to States seeking to pre

ccessful delivery of services to youth; youth development, collaboration, permanent connections, and cultural competence. In addition
ments, formal and informal, this study focuses on informal arrangements, those begun informally among family members without child
e not available. The data show that African American/black children stay in foster care longer compared to their white peers. In add
 opics of education, workforce connections, and transitions from public care. On September 28, Connect for Kids will host a conference call w

 ith successful adoptive placements for adolescents. It includes a variety of recommendations to improve practice in the adoption fie
e Resolution Reports.
 ent crime, and for any crime. Moreover, children who were initially left with a primary caregiver when the abuse or neglect was ident
 e new institutions that will house foster children for most or all of their childhood. The authors report that institutions have been e
ment, and sample orders and reports.
the research literature, that have demonstrated replicable, reliable outcomes. These practices may be direct service practices or ad
 lved, what instruments were used, and the rates of and reasons for attrition; and outcomes of the study and possible implications fo



ourts, judges, attorneys, child welfare agencies and advocates in all 50 states across America will finalize the adoptions of thousands



chool. In addition to presenting data, the chartbook includes brief research-based explanations of the importance of these indicator
 supports, including but not limited to tutoring, transportation, and cash assistance to ensure the participation of homeless children and youth




nsumers use their skills to change government actions that affect their lives.
 th behaviors. While this approach is useful for identifying any correlation between negative aspects of a youth's environment -- whe
 ter care data. Visit the Archive Web site at for additional information about the AFCARS data and to learn how to obtain the datase
ration and the connection between child maltreatment and juvenile delinquency. Priority to practice-oriented proposals or those that
l and methodological work on healthy marriage for research and intervention evaluation studies among low-income couples, funded by
 ore flexibly so it can increase the rates paid by the state to adoptive parents or relatives who assume legal custody for children in t
and child welfare agencies can use selected statistics and information to improve dependency case processing in general and to estab
t homes for children, either by remaining with their birth families, temporarily in foster care, or permanently through reunification,

 Welfare League of America (NRC for Child Welfare Data and Technology); American Bar Association for Justice and Education (NRC
ommon challenges faced by the States, and relationships between systemic factors and outcomes for safety, permanency, and well-be




al 3 ring construction. Easily customizable to include information regarding your program or state / local resources. Youth can downlo
ng for individuals who have been working in the field, but could benefit from a better understanding how the child welfare system an

rify their status as having aged out of the US foster care system. OFA can offer up to $5000 towards unmet tuition need or outsta



er on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University. The report found that 1.9 million of 2.4 million juvenile arrests



organizations must be designated as 501(c)(3) nonprofits, have operating budgets of less than $1,000,000, have 30 employees or less




itive strategies also seek to harness the therapeutic and development-enhancing power of positive emotional states such as optimism




d Child Trends to produce a chart book of Indicators of Child, Family, and Community Connections. The chart book presents illustrat
g but also through larger social policies and programs that address the environment in which students learn when they are not at sch
African American Children's Services (OAACS); and Pattie Elofson - Director of Child Welfare for the Lower Elwha Tribe in Port An

and 3) to develop specific strategies for ensuring that youth permanence is a core outcome to which child welfare systems are comm
 tion and/or employment, life skills, supports and services.” (http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/permanence-for-youn
atures Vermont’s efforts to embed positive outcome and indicators into data tracking, policy and practice across systems and agencie
se such as parental isolation, lack of knowledge about child development, and mental, physical, or financial crisis in the family, rather
afety, permanence and well-being for children. Our website is in the process of being updated to reflect our new mission. Our new “a
ers and Caregiving Environments, provides some information about the families who care for children in foster care, children’s perce




er high school. The deadline to apply is January 7, 2005.
 Pattie Elofson - Director of Child Welfare for the Lower Elwha Tribe in Port Angeles, WA.
f how the information was collected also are included.
 al needs, and Hispanic and African-American children. 88% of states are working to improve their child welfare case management sys
ns by many professionals that the failure rate of such adoptions would rise as a result of huge increases in their numbers during the



es to strengthen tribal families, children, and youth.



as the purposes of the measure, the population it was developed with, the age range intended for, key constructs covered, who admin
r community-based services, and by backing up each line with a Web site that can serve parents any time of the day or night.
 to work together more productively to improve educational outcomes for them.

ons, observations, and recommendations to alleviate the problematic issues of each charge; and concludes with recommendations for
 article in NIDA Science & Practice Perspectives discusses the philosophy behind FIT’s family-focused residential treatment progra
cal practitioner bodies to support their work, the best available research literature (with a focus on the United Kingdom, and issues
ll facilitate discussion.

or withdrawal symptoms resulting from prenatal drug exposure.” This paper from the National Conference of State Legislatures desc
trait," in English and Spanish. Can we find ways to use this tool to benefit the children in our care?
f developmental delays, such as those with birth complications, early institutionalization, or other risk indicators. The website contain




 ting the needs of current and former foster care youth.
es of program funds. The narrative includes an overview of the federal funding sources specifically targeted to foster care youth an
er the impact of relationships and practices to outcomes, as well as the importance of a systemic response to the multiple needs of f
ented youth, parenting youth, and tribal youth, among others.
-secondary education services to adolescents in many ways. The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Youth Development has

 l year (SFY) 2002, the funding sources they used, how funds were used, and how funding has shifted since federal welfare reform a
e-trainer guides, general information on the federal Child and Family Services Review, links to outcome-based resources, and perform
 and youth with behavioral and emotional disturbances




 process of change; and to enhance understanding of benefits and stages of family meetings to address safety, permanency and developmental well-


in the preparation for their transition, and not just as a tool afterward.
 to make at least a one-year commitment and to meet at least once weekly with his or her child. They will also be encouraged to form
sheets detail the scope of the challenges these families face and offer solutions for federal, state, and local policymakers.

  and training services through AdoptUSKids to fully utilize the Campaign products as well address recruitment/retention challenges
 ce for each of the states and the District of Columbia, the nation’s child welfare system was able to double the number of adoptions

demand); and well-maintained, reliable computer equipment, peripherals, and connectivity. Microsoft will consider the following CTLC o


entations. Presentation abstracts and presenter contact information also are available for all sessions.




dren's Bureau, Office on Child Abuse and Neglect (OCAN). Proposals are sought that address policy and programmatic issues related



TANF decisions that have consequences for households headed by grandparents and other kin. While the emphasis is on states in whic

primarily supports projects and programs that focus on transition - the internal process of how one responds to change. Applications
 ssfully addressed common issues. Shaun Donahue, Director of Field Services in Vermont, will describe step-by-step how this state ac
 . It includes a checklist of 30 content areas that might be addressed in policy
grams, employment programs, and programs for educationally disadvantaged older adolescents.



 ssfully addressed common issues. Shaun Donahue, Director of Field Services in Vermont, will describe step-by-step how this state ac
 improve adult success among children in care. Registration is free and you can register online using the above link.
 t by developing procedures that limit time extensions, set specific time goals for resolution, and more. This National Center for Stat



 ustice and education applications, Hampshire has instituted a project that is using FGCs in domestic violence cases. They are also wor
 anency Hearings: Strategies to Achieve Permanence" by Mini Laver of the ABA Center on Children and the Law; and "Non-Traditiona



mposia that will address policy and programmatic issues related to working with children and families who are affected by substance
 ter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/. It will soon be joined by our second webcast, conducted November 17, on Placement Stability. The third in th
ercome challenges associated with SACWIS development and data reliability.
ming.simworld.com/eku/111803.asx, or using Real Media at: streaming.simworld.com/eku/111803.ram

 to foster interactive exchange of ideas and peer-to-peer learning
 store nationwide to find out more about the Holiday Grant program and other grant programs available from the Wal-Mart in your c




 ters" provides training information for agency workers.

 eans for young people; various pathways to permanence; and how to work with youth to help them achieve permanency. Also from the

or staff development, and a means for achieving agency-wide consistency in case planning.




  care. Finally, it discusses the ways in which the professionalism of foster care is being expanded, with examples of new and innovativ
 cific grant opportunities from any federal grant-making agency.

 arents. The State argued that the statute merely set a permissible rate structure with a cap on payments subject to the foster car
 t developments regarding the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program and the federally funded transitional living program. Get th

 ducational alternatives. Youth leaving foster care are one of the vulnerable populations included in the discussion.




many younger grandparents are being excluded? This issue brief takes a cursory look at these questions using data from the Integrat
xamined in the context of the children adopted from the public child welfare system. In addition, the policies related to internationa



 ly those aging out of foster care), and juvenile justice youth.



 parenting experience who is working with parents

e publication is for persons who have recently adopted a child, are in the process of adopting a child, or are considering adopting a ch
 vides a set of potential policy suggestions that include more support and training for foster parents and better service integration f
Q-and-A portion of the webcast, please email them to: susan@doughertyconsultants.com or reply directly to this newsletter. We want to hear from




eel hopeful about the future, listen to their children, comfort their children, help their children feel good about themselves, help their children fe




care and examines the sequence in which maternal arrest, incarceration, and foster care placement occurred.




ort also states that adopted children's search for biological families is "a sign of healthy emotional growth in the search for identity."
 ently placed. Moreover, the Court rejected the state's argument that releasing the adoption records would make families less likely to adopt.




 rents may need supportive services to ensure timely and appropriate help for the children in their care.”




 and Adoptive Parent Association. Learn what you can do to make Foster Care Month 2004 a success!
akers, researchers, and others in taking important steps toward developing an integrated child and family service model



 ons in the U.S. and Canada. Application Deadline: April 9, 2004
 do to make Foster Care Month 2004 a success!
s jointly published by the New York State Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children. “Questions Every Judge and Lawyer Should ask A




en living with relatives, 4.4 million were grandchildren of householders, and fewer than 1 million (845,000) children lived with uncles and/or aunts. T



 l as quick references to sources of information that can help journalists develop a deeper understanding of the complex issues relat




ers; current relative, foster parent, or group caregivers; and the children themselves
ral goals related to children's safety, permanency, and well-being. Go to GAO Reports > Find GAO Reports > search GAO Reports > an
onal juvenile justice topics
ncrease knowledge of policy and legislation affecting sibling placements in participants' jurisdictions.


e placement services, choices for permanent placements, the Indian Welfare Act, parents' rights and responsibilities, and approaches used by chil


ese programs and activities must serve children with the greatest need in one or more grades 4th through 8th living in rural areas, high-crime areas
e Terminated.

ds.org> To view the program announcement, visit the link below and click on the "Click Here" link under "Parent Resources."
apers in APA style of approximately 12 to 15 double-spaced pages will be published. Abstracts of 200 to 250 words will be accepted

ly $1 Million will fund one award. To request an application, contact ACYF Operations Center, c/o The Dixon Group, Inc., ATTN: Child

sponsorship, and registration, see site above.

y identify, support and serve kinship families, and to making small-scale tests of change that will lead to system-wide improvements. T




are practitioners, though some information may be appropriate to share with these individuals. The policies, protocols, and legal footn

fic components or strategies that are based on theory, research, or evaluation data; or, replicate or test the transferability of succe

nding the continuum of care to provide post-permanency services. In this teleconference, representatives from national organizations and fro
ification; reduced time in foster care to adoption; increase placement stability; and reduce placement of young children in group hom




essful adulthood and presents examples of public and private initiatives around the country that reflect more effective investments

and budget priorities to fund comprehensive post-adoption services and strategies with a blend of state and federal dollars that are
anning and Family-Centered Practice.




ultural competency, and more internal and external resources to better serve families.
 has links to information about each of the curricula.




ble to juvenile court judges, the time-frames for reviewing and acting on information presented, and the degree to which these jurist
d a child at risk of out of home placement when they called for services, 73% reported that the child was able to remain in the home




d "don't have to be perfect to be a perfect parent." Visit the link above to view an example of one of the television PSAs.




of the latest research-based findings from around the United States to determine where there are opportunities to use taxpayer do

al and interpersonal barriers that impede family and youth participation. The articles also highlight new thinking about responses to t

me of the financial benefits of such care are



pport, Child Welfare, Community Services (LIHEAP, CSBG, IDA, CED, JOLI, CCF), Administration on Developmental Disabilities, Hea
s — can be adapted for use in any community. They are drawn from the experience of Safe and Smart, a joint project of the Vera In



contains the fourth in a series of articles analyzing the federal Child and Family Services Reviews. Previous articles examined the fin

ational Center for Missing and Exploited Children to enhance agencies’ capacity to monitor the whereabouts and safety of children in
for communication, and learnings from the Ad Council's 8 years of Commitment to Children campaigns. The goal of this report is to g
esigned to help provide answers and resources to some of the changes taking place or going to take place as youth with special needs

ulation in the United States.
 voluntarily but that one-third are involved in high-risk situations such as drug use or physical violence. The study suggests that grou
t also supports earlier research showing that the majority of women were incarcerated after their children were placed in care.
wo hours and to conduct joint interviews of victims. The report found a measurable impact on services to children, and staff from all
rly helpful to States seeking to prepare and implement Program Improvement Plans in response to the Child and Family Service Review

nd cultural competence. In addition, the literature addressing the needs of older youth aging out of care has been reviewed. Informa
 mong family members without child welfare involvement. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of these older re
mpared to their white peers. In addition, it takes longer from termination of parental rights to the finalization of adoption. Research
  for Kids will host a conference call with interested local affiliates and advocates to walk people through the Action Kit and provide targeted t

mprove practice in the adoption field.

hen the abuse or neglect was identified, and who were subsequently moved to foster care, showed even greater levels of arrest in al
eport that institutions have been established in Florida, Mississippi and California since 2000. Similar efforts in Minnesota, Georgia,

 y be direct service practices or administrative/policy practices.
  study and possible implications for the field. They also include evaluations to help the reader evaluate the usefulness of the full pub



finalize the adoptions of thousands of children from foster care and celebrate and honor all families who adopt. Visit the website abo



 the importance of these indicators and considers possible steps policy makers, practitioners, and parents can take to improve childr
ation of homeless children and youth in elementary and secondary school. Although the act was developed for children who are homeless, c




 ts of a youth's environment -- whether it be individual, family, school or community -- it only presents half of the picture of an intric
 d to learn how to obtain the datasets for use in your own research.
e-oriented proposals or those that focus on integration and coordination between child welfare and juvenile justice systems. Click on
 ong low-income couples, funded by the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Servic
sume legal custody for children in their care. Currently, in Minnesota, adoption and relative custody assistance benefits are up to fift
  processing in general and to establish benchmarks which permit them to identify individual dependency cases in need of special atte
permanently through reunification, adoption, guardianship, or other planned, permanent living arrangements. We will continue to provi

 ion for Justice and Education (NRC on Legal and Judicial Issues); Spaulding for Children (NRC for Special Needs Adoption); and Univ
 or safety, permanency, and well-being. Case-level analyses provide information on cases involving children in foster care and in-home




/ local resources. Youth can download more pages for FREE at fyi3.com
ng how the child welfare system and dependency court operate. A tutorial for child welfare workers is expected soon; one for judicia

wards unmet tuition need or outstanding student loans on a one-time-only, first-come, first-served basis.



illion of 2.4 million juvenile arrests had substance abuse and addiction involvement and that only 68,600 juveniles receive substance a



00,000, have 30 employees or less, and pay a $40 monthly hosting charge. Visit the above website for more information, or to regist




 emotional states such as optimism, hope, joy, efficacy, and accomplishment.




 The chart book presents illustrative examples of how currently available data can be used to generate indicators of the social conte
ents learn when they are not at school. The report also emphasizes the goal of helping all students achieve "intellective competence,"
r the Lower Elwha Tribe in Port Angeles, WA.

ch child welfare systems are committed. Read the reports of convenings from 2002 through 2004; click on “National Convening Repo
p/info_services/permanence-for-young-people.html). Two new reports discuss the importance of connectedness for children and youth: Youn
 ractice across systems and agencies in the state.
 nancial crisis in the family, rather than removing children from their homes.
 eflect our new mission. Our new “address” will make it easier to remember how to find us on the web; a search engine at the bottom
 en in foster care, children’s perceptions of their caregivers and living arrangements, and reunification plans for this group of childre




 child welfare case management systems, including reorganizing staff, creating specialized adoption divisions and positions, and provid
reases in their numbers during the last decade. It also raises questions about the effectiveness of state data-collection systems on a




key constructs covered, who administers the measure and the skill level required, what is required of the child during administration
y time of the day or night.
ncludes with recommendations for legislation to address these issues in law.
 used residential treatment program, characterizes its participants, describes its challenges and successes, and points out research n
on the United Kingdom, and issues raised by service users and caregivers in relation to this topic as described by the literature.



ference of State Legislatures describes the new law, provides an overview of existing state reporting laws, discusses the role of CPS

risk indicators. The website contains links to reports on the development and testing of this instrument, in addition to referrals to p




y targeted to foster care youth and other vulnerable youth versus those funding streams that have the potential to support this pop
 esponse to the multiple needs of families. In addition, results should be defined in the context of benefits to the community and soc

Center for Youth Development has analyzed how states have implemented the program and have evaluated what areas seem to be wor

ted since federal welfare reform and ASFA.
come-based resources, and performance data specific to Illinois at the regional, agency, and team level. Training modules can be down
 y, permanency and developmental well-being



hey will also be encouraged to form a relationship with the whole family in order to ease the transition when the incarcerated parent
e, and local policymakers.

  recruitment/retention challenges identified in the federal CFSR process. The Campaign itself is set to debut in March 2004. This b
 to double the number of adoptions from 28,000 to over 58,000.

 t will consider the following CTLC organizational types eligible for funding: nonprofit (501(c)(3) designation in the U.S.) or nongovernm




cy and programmatic issues related to working with children and families involved in the child welfare and dependency court systems



 le the emphasis is on states in which Casey Family Programs will be operating, the issues are relevant in all states.

e responds to change. Applications are accepted year around and reviewed quarterly. For more information, visit the above website.
ribe step-by-step how this state achieved significant improvement in foster care placement stability through careful analysis, connec




 ribe step-by-step how this state achieved significant improvement in foster care placement stability through careful analysis, connec
g the above link.
more. This National Center for State Courts report examines the effectiveness of these procedures to expedite appeals in dependenc



ic violence cases. They are also working to involve children and families in all phases of the FGC process, from direct self-referral to
n and the Law; and "Non-Traditional Recruitment for Teens and Pre-Teen" by Pat O'Brien, Executive Director of You Gotta Believe! D



 es who are affected by substance abuse and involved in the child welfare and dependency court systems. Submissions are encouraged
on Placement Stability. The third in this series, scheduled for January 29, 2004, will introduce a new way of providing technical assistance, th




ilable from the Wal-Mart in your community.




achieve permanency. Also from the above link, the Minnesota Department of Human Services developed a "Practice Guide for Using L




 with examples of new and innovative programs.



ayments subject to the foster care limit and that the rate structure in effect at the time of her adoption of the child did not requi
d transitional living program. Get the latest from ACF federal officers, participate in timely workshops, participate in site visits of lo

 the discussion.




stions using data from the Integrated Public Use Microdata [IPUMS] data set provided by the University of Minnesota Population Ce
the policies related to international adoption are addressed. 2. A State Profiles section includes contact information and a web link to




d, or are considering adopting a child. The second part is for employers who provide adoption assistance payments to workers
ts and better service integration for parents and children.
his newsletter. We want to hear from you!




out themselves, help their children feel safe, give their children age-appropriate information, make a plan with their children for emergencies, and




 the search for identity."
make families less likely to adopt.




d family service model
s Every Judge and Lawyer Should ask About Infants and Toddlers in the Child Welfare System” is a technical assistance brief from the National C




ldren lived with uncles and/or aunts. To read the report, go to the link above; select Census 2000 Special Reports in the list on the left; and then t



anding of the complex issues related to child welfare.




Reports > search GAO Reports > and type in the report number: GAO-04-333




nsibilities, and approaches used by child welfare agencies to help families reach their goals. It is intended for use by families, agencies serving child


h living in rural areas, high-crime areas, or troubled home environments, or who attend schools with violence problems. Non-profit community-based
 der "Parent Resources."
200 to 250 words will be accepted on the following topics, as they relate to immigrant and refugee families, children and youth: Iden

The Dixon Group, Inc., ATTN: Children's Bureau, 118 Q Street, NE., Washington, DC 20002-2132; Telephone: (866) 796-1591.




ad to system-wide improvements. The agencies will be selected through a competitive application process. Additional information and




e policies, protocols, and legal footnotes are specific to New York State’s locally administered, state supervised foster care system. H

or test the transferability of successfully evaluated program models;(b) Determine the effectiveness of the model and its componen

s from national organizations and from state agencies will present various strategies and initiatives for maintaining permanent families, spec
ent of young children in group homes and institutions. Additional information from the Child and Family Service Reviews (CFSRs) pro




eflect more effective investments in our most at-risk young adults.

 state and federal dollars that are currently available to support these urgently needed services
nd the degree to which these jurists feel prepared to make the decisions asked of them.
hild was able to remain in the home as a result of the help and support they received from the agencies. The cost of providing the se




 of the television PSAs.




re opportunities to use taxpayer dollars wisely; and consider a strategy to encourage local government investment in research-proven

t new thinking about responses to the complex needs of children and families




 on Developmental Disabilities, Head Start, NEW, Tribal TANF, and Youth Development Programs. The Smithsonian’s National Museum
mart, a joint project of the Vera Institute and the New York City Administration for Children's Services that placed caseworkers in



. Previous articles examined the findings related to placement stability, sibling contact, and foster parent training. Also in this issue,

ereabouts and safety of children in foster care and to effectively respond when a child in care is missing.
gns. The goal of this report is to give advocates - from large organizations to small groups - new communication tools and ideas with w
e place as youth with special needs transition their way through life.



ence. The study suggests that group care staff could provide more activities to counteract the boredom that drives many teens to ru
r children were placed in care.
 ices to children, and staff from all three agencies express support for the program.
the Child and Family Service Reviews. The experience and expertise in permanence for young people represented at the meeting prov

f care has been reviewed. Information on current trends among the general adolescent population today is presented to help us unde
e the experience of these older relative caregivers and make recommendations according to the findings. The areas selected for exa
 finalization of adoption. Research shows that if adoptive parents maintain an open dialog about the differences between their race a
 the Action Kit and provide targeted tips for it in contacting and meeting with local city leaders. They will be able to provide hard copies of the




  even greater levels of arrest in all forms than victimized children who were moved right away or who remained with their primary ca
ilar efforts in Minnesota, Georgia, Ohio and Texas are still pending as they face financial challenges and, in some cases, local oppositi



uate the usefulness of the full publication. This section highlights, for instance, readability, the significance for practice, and the ap



es who adopt. Visit the website above to learn how you can participate.



 parents can take to improve children's outcomes in these areas.
ped for children who are homeless, communities nationwide have applied McKinney-Vento eligibility to young people who have run away from




ents half of the picture of an intricate psychological and social environment in which a youth exists. It is difficult to explain why som

d juvenile justice systems. Click on the link above for more information and to submit a presentation proposal.
tment of Health and Human Services through the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Family and Child Well-B
y assistance benefits are up to fifty percent lower than foster care rates.
dency cases in need of special attention. At this conference, attendees will learn about and start the collaborative process necessary
ngements. We will continue to provide training, technical assistance, and information services as we strive to build the capacity of Sta

 Special Needs Adoption); and University of Oklahoma (NRC for Youth Development).
hildren in foster care and in-home cases reviewed across all States. Analyses also examined key characteristics of these cases (e.g.,
rs is expected soon; one for judicial officers is expected to be ready in Spring 2005; and one for legislators in Spring 2006.




8,600 juveniles receive substance abuse treatment. Many young people in the juvenile justice system have also had involvement with c



 for more information, or to register.




erate indicators of the social context of families, and assesses the need for additional data and measures in several domains. A selec
 achieve "intellective competence," which means not just academic achievement but also the ability to think critically about and apply



4; click on “National Convening Reports.”
ctedness for children and youth: Young Children Develop in an Environment of Relationships http://www.developingchild.net/reports.shtml Th



web; a search engine at the bottom of our home page will make it easier to find what you are looking for on our site; our “About Us” p
ation plans for this group of children.




n divisions and positions, and providing additional training on adoption.
 state data-collection systems on adoption terminations and offers recommendations to improve policies and practices.




 of the child during administration and about how long administration takes, the age ranges it is appropriate for, and a summary of re
uccesses, and points out research needs that have come to light through experience with mothers and children in treatment
as described by the literature.



ting laws, discusses the role of CPS, and highlights the importance of prevention.

ument, in addition to referrals to professionals, community agencies, and other websites. Organizations can pay a fee for members, st




e the potential to support this population, an analysis of the funding programs and specific categories and subcategories of youth de
benefits to the community and society.

aluated what areas seem to be working for states and areas that should be focused on for additional study.



 evel. Training modules can be downloaded and adapted to meet an agency’s specific needs
tion when the incarcerated parent is released. The grantees will monitor and assist the mentors on an ongoing basis



et to debut in March 2004. This broadcast has been designed for foster care and adoption program managers, their staff, Children’



signation in the U.S.) or nongovernmental organizations that hold charitable status in their country; school-based (a nonprofit or gov




are and dependency court systems who are affected by substance abuse. For more information or to download the call for papers bro



ant in all states.

ormation, visit the above website.
 ty through careful analysis, connecting staff to problem-solving activities and system change. Visit the link above to register!




ty through careful analysis, connecting staff to problem-solving activities and system change. Visit the link above to register!

es to expedite appeals in dependency cases (e.g., child abuse and neglect, children in need of special assistance, foster care, or adopt



ocess, from direct self-referral to staff hiring.
ve Director of You Gotta Believe! Download this issue at the link above, and sign up to subscribe to future issues while you're there.



stems. Submissions are encouraged from front-line practitioners and administrators of child welfare and substance abuse services a
 of providing technical assistance, the Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) process. Visit the link above to learn more about the BSC an




oped a "Practice Guide for Using Long-Term Care." While the focus is on long-term foster care, it also serves as a model for guides t




adoption of the child did not require assistance to be negotiated up to the foster care rate. The Oklahoma Court of Appeals agreed
hops, participate in site visits of local programs, and hear motivational speakers. April 13 -15, 2004 in Washington, DC




 versity of Minnesota Population Center. The data constitutes about 1% of the U.S. population and includes data drawn from the “long
ontact information and a web link to state agency home pages for each state.




stance payments to workers
th their children for emergencies, and share their faith with their children. Resource parents as well as biological parents will find it useful
l assistance brief from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.




ports in the list on the left; and then the title of the report on the right.




r use by families, agencies serving children and families, educators, and others in building positive relationships and increasing family participation i


problems. Non-profit community-based organizations, including faith-based organizations, are eligible to apply. Partnerships between local educatio
 families, children and youth: Identifying the Special Needs of Immigrant and Refugee Families, Children and Youth: Assessment Is

 Telephone: (866) 796-1591.




process. Additional information and the application are available at online




te supervised foster care system. However, it contains some more general information and serves as an excellent model.

 ess of the model and its components or strategies; and (c)Produce materials that will enable others to replicate the model. Deadline:

maintaining permanent families, specifically addressing a range of post-permanency and post-adoption services. For PowerPoint materials to
amily Service Reviews (CFSRs) provides context for the results observed in each State.
 ncies. The cost of providing the services is a fraction of the cost of out of home care, especially group or institutional care.




ment investment in research-proven programs. Pages 6 and 7 of the report give a Summary of Benefits and Costs in 2003 dollars.




 The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian celebrates its Grand Opening on the National Mall the following day. This
 rvices that placed caseworkers in schools to support foster children.



 parent training. Also in this issue, an article on Foster Parent Bills of Rights.



ommunication tools and ideas with which they can reach out to the public on behalf of children.




redom that drives many teens to run away.
 e represented at the meeting provide the guidance to develop this comprehensive national framework and outcome measures.

today is presented to help us understand this age group in light of their cultural context and age-group norms
ndings. The areas selected for examination were caregiving arrangements, services utilized, services needed, knowledge about servic
e differences between their race and their child's race, their children have better outcomes. Issues such as discrimination and diff
be able to provide hard copies of the Action Kit to local activists who join the call. If you plan to participate, contact jan@connectforkids.org C




who remained with their primary caregiver until the age of 18. This finding suggests that further research is needed to understand t
es and, in some cases, local opposition.



 gnificance for practice, and the applicability of the results.




oung people who have run away from a foster home, group home, or other placement, and children in a number of temporary living arrangem




 . It is difficult to explain why some children are at risk for negative health behaviors while other children successfully negotiate ado



evelopment Family and Child Well-Being Research Network.

 he collaborative process necessary for effective data driven reform through two days of presentations and workshops.
  strive to build the capacity of State, local, Tribal and other publicly administered or supported child welfare agencies to institution



haracteristics of these cases (e.g., age of child, race, caseworker visits), as well as the relationships between these characteristics a
legislators in Spring 2006.




 m have also had involvement with child welfare.




easures in several domains. A selection of important areas for further development are discussed in the Companion Volume of Related
y to think critically about and apply knowledge to new and changing situations outside of the classroom.




.developingchild.net/reports.shtml The National Scientific Council on the Developing Child in this report says that healthy child development d



g for on our site; our “About Us” page describes the work we will be doing. In the coming weeks look for easier navigation and other




olicies and practices.




ppropriate for, and a summary of reliability and validity data for the measure.
and children in treatment




tions can pay a fee for members, staff, and clients to use the tool free of charge.




ries and subcategories of youth development activities for which funds may be available, and the implications for accessing funding. (
n an ongoing basis



am managers, their staff, Children’s Bureau staff, adoption exchanges, and any other organizations involved in recruiting foster and a



y; school-based (a nonprofit or governmental organization that provides services to the community during non-school hours such as ev




to download the call for papers brochure on-line visit the link above. The deadline for workshop proposal submission is December 5, 2




t the link above to register!




t the link above to register!

al assistance, foster care, or adoption) in State courts. The first section of the report describes all such procedures in State courts




 future issues while you're there.



are and substance abuse services and the dependency court, as well as policy makers and researchers. Deadline: December 5, 2003.
bove to learn more about the BSC and all our training and technical assistance services.




 also serves as a model for guides that relate practice to State and Federal legislation.




Oklahoma Court of Appeals agreed with the plaintiff and ordered the State to allow her to negotiate for a subsidy rate up to the leve
4 in Washington, DC




 ncludes data drawn from the “long form” used in the 2000 census.
ogical parents will find it useful
ps and increasing family participation in service planning.


y. Partnerships between local education agencies and faith-based or community organizations are strongly encouraged.
hildren and Youth: Assessment Issues; Immigrant and Refugee Youth in Foster Care: Special Considerations for Permanency Plannin




as an excellent model.

s to replicate the model. Deadline: July 12, 2004

ervices. For PowerPoint materials to be used by Gerald P. Mallon, Director, National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Pla
 roup or institutional care.




 fits and Costs in 2003 dollars.




National Mall the following day. This ACF Tribal Consultation has been scheduled to allow attendees to be a part of this historic event
ork and outcome measures.

group norms
es needed, knowledge about services, concerns, feelings about caregiving, quality of life of caregivers and the grandchildren in care,
ues such as discrimination and differences in appearance must be addressed. After logging onto the site as a guest, select “Publicatio
 e, contact jan@connectforkids.org Call in 800-238-0210; passcode 409649.




research is needed to understand the characteristics of families and children removed from parental custody; to determine what typ




 number of temporary living arrangements including shelters, foster homes, group homes, and evaluation centers. Each school district is req




children successfully negotiate adolescence relatively unscathed. These differing outcomes raise questions about youth vulnerability




ations and workshops.
hild welfare agencies to institutionalize a safety-focused, family-centered, and community-based approach to meet the needs of child



ps between these characteristics and outcomes and indicators.
in the Companion Volume of Related Papers




says that healthy child development depends on the quality and reliability of a young child’s relationships with the important people in his or h



ok for easier navigation and other upgrades designed to serve you better.
mplications for accessing funding. (sort publications by title)
s involved in recruiting foster and adoptive families for children waiting in the foster care system for permanence. Register by visitin



 during non-school hours such as evenings and weekends); and government funded and operated.




oposal submission is December 5, 2003.




all such procedures in State courts across the country and reviews their implementation. The second section focuses on specific illust




ers. Deadline: December 5, 2003.
te for a subsidy rate up to the level of the maximum state foster care rate. The Oklahoma Supreme Court denied the State's reque
siderations for Permanency Planning; Public Child Welfare and Ethnic Community-Based Organizations: developing Collaborative Partn




or Foster Care and Permanency Planning, send an email to weeklyupdate@doughertyconsultants.com.
s to be a part of this historic event. Attendance is free, but registration through the above website is required.
vers and the grandchildren in care, and demographic information.
 e site as a guest, select “Publications” to go to the Issue Briefs.




tal custody; to determine what types of behavior lead to the removal of a child; and to discover which factors influence whether a c




n centers. Each school district is required to appoint a McKinney-Vento liaison. Your state education coordinator




questions about youth vulnerability and resiliency to life's stressors. Professionals who work with adolescents in targeting effective




pproach to meet the needs of children, youth and families. The NRCFCPPP is a service of the Children’s Bureau - ACF/DHHS.
with the important people in his or her life, both within and outside the family, and that even th
for permanence. Register by visiting the link above. Registrat




nd section focuses on specific illustrations of how St
me Court denied the State's request that it review the
ons: developing Collaborative Partnerships; Training an
te is required.
hich factors influence whether a child is placed in fo




adolescents in targeting effective preventi




dren’s Bureau - ACF/DHHS.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:197
posted:5/16/2012
language:English
pages:106
fanzhongqing fanzhongqing http://
About