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					Conrad Hilton …
Conrad Hilton, at a gala celebrating his
 career, was called to the podium and

asked,“What were the
    most important
lessons you learned
   in your long and
     distinguished
  career?” His answer …
  “remember
  to tuck the
shower curtain
   inside the
   bathtub.”
“Execution         is
  strategy.”
     —Fred Malek
“Execution is
the job of the
   business
leader.”                      —Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/
  Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
 “The score
takes care of
  itself.”
        —Bill Walsh
   “The art of war does not
     require complicated
 maneuvers; the simplest are
the best and common sense is
fundamental. From which one
    might wonder how it is
                     it
 generals make blunders;
 is because they try to
    be clever.”   —Napoleon
   “GE has set a
standard of candor.
There is no puffery.
… There isn’t an ounce
of denial in the place.”
      —Kevin Sharer, CEO Amgen,
     on the “GE mystique” (Fortune)
Observed closely:
The use of                                      “I” or
“we” during a job
            interview.
  Source: Leonard Berry & Kent Seltman, chapter 6, “Hiring for Values,”
                 Management Lessons From Mayo Clinic
          Tom Peters’



Excellence.
  Always.
         Apache Corporation
 2012 Strategic Planning Conference
          18 October 2011
  (Slides at tompeters.com—soon)
   NOTE:      To appreciate
this presentation [and ensure
 that it is not a mess], you need
        Microsoft fonts:
 “Showcard Gothic,”
   “Ravie,” “Chiller”
    and “Verdana”
REALLY First
Things Before
 First Things
 If the regimental commander lost most of his
2nd lieutenants and 1st lieutenants and captains

                   If he
 and majors, it would be a tragedy.

 lost his sergeants it
      would be a
catastrophe. The Army and the
   Navy are fully aware that success on the
  battlefield is dependent to an extraordinary
    degree on its Sergeants and Chief Petty
     Officers. Does industry have the same
                   awareness?
  “People leave
  managers not
companies.” —Dave Wheeler
   Do you absolutely
  understand and act
upon the fact that the
first-line boss is the …
KEY LEADERSHIP
  ROLE … in the
    organization?
XFX = #1*
  *Cross-Functional eXcellence
  % XF
lunches*
 *The “Sacred 220 Abs
    “Allied commands depend on
          mutual confidence
        and this confidence is
           gained, above all
through the    development
         of friendships.”
     —General D.D. Eisenhower, Armchair General*

          *“Perhaps his most outstanding ability [at West Point]
                  he made friends and earned
  was the ease with which

  the trust of fellow cadets who came from
widely varied backgrounds; it was a quality that would pay
          great dividends during his future coalition command.”
             XFX/Typical Social Accelerators
1. EVERYONE’s [more or less] JOB #1: Make friends in other
functions! (Purposefully. Consistently. Measurably.)
2. “Do lunch” with people in other functions!! Frequently!!
(Minimum 10% to 25% for everyone? Measured.)
3. Ask peers in other functions for references so you can
become conversant in their world. (It’s one helluva sign of ...
GIVE-A-DAMN-ism.)
4. Religiously invite counterparts in other functions to your
team meetings. Ask them to present “cool stuff” from “their
world” to your group. (Useful. Mark of respect.)
5. PROACTIVELY SEEK EXAMPLES OF “TINY” ACTS OF “XFX”
TO ACKNOWLEDGE—PRIVATELY AND PUBLICALLY. (Bosses:
ONCE A DAY … make a short call or visit or send an email of
“Thanks” for some sort of XFX gesture by your folks and some
other function’s folks.)
6. Present counterparts in other functions awards for service
to your group. Tiny awards at least weekly; and an “Annual All-
Star Supporters [from other groups] Banquet” modeled after
superstar salesperson banquets.
    The subtext of many,
if not all, of these ideas
 is moving from implicit
   to explicit focus on
  XFX—it should noisily
  intrude into [literally]
    every discussion!
“The doctor
 interrupts
   after …*
*Source: Jerome Groopman, How Doctors Think
18 …   seconds!
[An obsession with] Listening is ... the ultimate mark


                                                   of    Respect           .
Listening   is   ...   the heart and soul of Engagement.
Listening   is   ...   the heart and soul of Kindness.
Listening   is   ...   the heart and soul of Thoughtfulness.
Listening   is   ...   the basis for true Collaboration.
Listening   is   ...   the basis for true Partnership.
Listening   is   ...   a Team Sport.
Listening   is   ...   a Developable Individual Skill.* (*Though women
                       are far better at it than men.)
Listening   is   ...   the basis for Community.
Listening   is   ...   the bedrock of Joint Ventures that work.
Listening   is   ...   the bedrock of Joint Ventures that grow.
Listening   is   ...   the core of effective Cross-functional
                       Communication* (*Which is in turn Attribute #1 of
                       organizational effectiveness.)

[cont.]
Message:   Listening is a …
profession!
The 1st 98%
 of talking
is listening!
Bitch all you
 want, but
 meetings
are what you
 [boss] do!
 Meeting: Every meeting that
 does not stir the imagination
and curiosity of attendees and
   increase bonding and co-
  operation and engagement
    and sense of worth and
   motivate rapid action and
   enhance enthusiasm is a
permanently lost opportunity.
People!
People!
People!
People!
  “You have to
   treat your
 employees like
customers.”  upon being asked his “secret to success”
                                                       —Herb Kelleher,



     Source: Joe Nocera, NYT, “Parting Words of an Airline Pioneer,”
on the occasion of Herb Kelleher’s retirement after 37 years at Southwest
     Airlines (SWA’s pilots union took out a full-page ad in USA Today
  thanking HK for all he had done) ; across the way in Dallas, American
            Airlines’ pilots were picketing AA’s Annual Meeting)
"If you want staff to
give great service,
give great service to
staff."
      —Ari Weinzweig, Zingerman's
 "When I hire
someone, that's
 when I go to
   work for
them.”                 —John DiJulius, "What's the Secret to
   Providing a World-class Cust Experience"
  There are no
“bit players” in
  an effective
 organization.
“Ninety percent of what
 we call ‘management’
  consists of making it
 difficult for people to
    get things done.”
        – Peter Drucker
Brand =
Talent.
 From “1, 2 or you’re out”
 [Jack Welch/GE/1st or 2nd in market share or sell it/close it]


                          to …

 “Best Talent in
each industry segment to
  build best proprietary
    intangibles”                          [Ed Michaels]


         Source: Ed Michaels, War for Talent
           Our Mission
To develop and manage talent;
     to apply that talent,
    throughout the world,
   for the benefit of clients;
    to do so in partnership;
     to do so with profit.
               WPP
 “The role of the Director is to
create a space where the actors
               become
 and actresses can
   more than they’ve
   ever been before,
   more than they’ve
   dreamed of being.”
     —Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech
“I can’t tell you how many times we
    passed up hotshots for guys we
   thought were better people, and
watched our guys do a lot better than
     the big names, not just in the
   classroom, but on the field—and,
 naturally, after they graduated, too.
Again and again, the blue chips faded
   out, and our little up-and-comers
  clawed their way to all-conference
and All-America teams.” —Bo Schembechler
     (and John Bacon), “Recruit for Character,”
               Bo’s Lasting Lessons
Bottom
 Line I
“The   ONE Question”: “In the last year [3 years, current job],

   three   name the …




people                                    … whose growth you’ve

    most contributed to. Please explain where they were at the
 beginning of the year, where they are today, and where they are
  heading in the next 12 months. Please explain … in painstaking
  detail … your development strategy in each case. Please tell me
your biggest development disappointment—looking back, could you
or would you have done anything differently? Please tell me about
 your greatest development triumph—and disaster—in the last five
years. What are the ‘three big things’ you’ve learned about helping
                   people grow along the way?”
       Promotion Decisions


   “life and
     death
  decisions”
Source: Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management
        From
Les Wexner:
 sweaters to
   people!
Andrew Carnegie’s Tombstone Inscription …


     Here lies a man
 Who knew how to enlist
      In his service
Better men than himself.
  Source: Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management
  “In most companies, the Talent Review
 Process is a farce. At GE, Jack Welch and
his two top HR people visit each division for
a day. They review the top 20 to 50 people
    by name. They talk about Talent Pool
                  The Talent
   strengthening issues.
 Review Process is a contact
    sport at GE; it has the
intensity and the importance
  of the budget process at
 most companies.” —Ed Michaels,
               War for Talent
Evaluating people =
 #1 differentiator

Source: Jack Welch/Jeff Immelt on GE’s   #1
           strategic skill (   !!!!)
Bottom
Line II
                     The Memories That Matter

The people you developed who went on to
 stellar accomplishments inside or outside
 the company.
The (no more than) two or three people you developed who went on to
 create stellar institutions of their own.
The longshots (people with “a certain something”) you bet on who
 surprised themselves—and your peers.
The people of all stripes who 2/5/10/20 years
 later say “You made a difference in my life,”
  “Your belief in me changed everything.”
The sort of/character of people you hired in general. (And the bad
  apples you chucked out despite some stellar traits.)
A handful of projects (a half dozen at most) you doggedly pursued that
  still make you smile and which fundamentally changed the way
  things are done inside or outside the company/industry.
The supercharged camaraderie of a handful of Great Teams aiming to
  “change the world.”
“Unremarkable” except
 for RESULTS: Superb
   people developer
(her/his folks invariably
    amazed at what
they’ve accomplished!)
Joe J. Jones
 1942 – 2010
  Net Worth
$21,543,672.48
Not.
1/45
       READY.
        FIRE!
        AIM.
H. Ross Perot (vs “Aim! Aim! Aim!” /EDS vs GM/1985)
/45
   “Reward
excellent failures.
Punish mediocre
   successes.”
    —Phil Daniels, Sydney exec
 “I have missed more than 9,000
  shots in my career. I have lost
     almost 300 games. On 26
 occasions I have been entrusted
 to take the game winning shot—
and missed. I have failed over and
  over and over again in my life.
    And that is why I succeed.”
            —Michael Jordan
  Lesson45:



WTTMSW
Whoever
Tries
The
Most
Stuff
Wins
  Better yet:


WTTMSTFW
Whoever
Tries
The
Most
Stuff
The
Fastest
Wins
           “Experiment
            fearlessly”
                                                                                    Tactic #1
  Source: BusinessWeek, “Type A Organization Strategies: How to Hit a Moving Target”—




“relentless trial
   and error”
Source: Wall Street Journal, cornerstone of effective approach to “rebalancing” company
 portfolios in the face of changing and uncertain global economic conditions (11.08.10)
  “Fail.
Forward.
  Fast.”
 High Tech CEO, Pennsylvania
     Better yet:

WTTMS(ASTMSU)TFW
Whoever
Tries
The
Most
Stuff
(And
Screws
The
Most
Stuff
Up)
The
Fastest
Wins
  “You miss

100% of
the shots you
 never take.”
    —Wayne Gretzky
BLAME NOBODY.
EXPECT NOTHING.
DO SOMETHING.
Source: Locker room sign posted by NFL
        football coach Bill Parcells
TGRs
Conveyance: Kingfisher Air
Location: Approach to New Delhi
  “May I
clean your
 glasses,
   sir?”
         <TGW
              and …




>TGR
[Things Gone WRONG-Things Gone RIGHT]
LBTs
Little =
Big carts =




Source: Walmart
Bag sizes = New markets:




Source: PepsiCo
MBWA
    “Tom, let me tell you the
  definition of a good lending
officer. After church on Sunday,
   on the way home with his
 family, he takes a little detour
 to drive by the factory he just
lent money to. Doesn’t go in or
 any such thing, just drives by
        and takes a look.”
MBWA
 Managing By Wandering Around/HP
     General David Petraeus’ “White lines along the road”:

“Secure and serve the population.
 Live among the people.
 Promote reconciliation.
 Move mounted, work dismounted;
 situational awareness can only be
 achieved by operating face-to-face,
 not separated by ballistic glass.




 Walk.*”
—David Petraeus, Men’s Journal (06.08)

* “I love that last one for its simplicity.” —David Petraeus
   “If there is any one
‘secret’ to effectiveness,
    it is concentration.
 Effective executives do
 first things first … and
  they do one thing at a
        time.” —Peter Drucker
Introspection
    Is Not
  Egomania
   “To develop
others, start with
yourself.” —Marshall Goldsmith
“How can a high-level leader like _____ be so out
  of touch with the truth about himself? It’s more
 common than you would imagine. In fact, the
 higher up the ladder a leader climbs,
the less accurate his self-assessment is
  likely to be. The problem is an acute lack of
     feedback [especially on people issues].”
       —Daniel Goleman (et al.), The New Leaders
 "Everyone thinks
  of changing the
 world, but no one
thinks of changing
   himself"- Leo Tolstoy
K=R=P
“Courtesies of a small and
trivial character are the
    ones which strike
 deepest in the grateful
and appreciating heart.”
              —Henry Clay,
     American Statesman (1777-1852)
K=R=P
Kindness = Repeat business = Profit.
"Appreciative words are
the most powerful force
   for good on earth.”
   —George W. Crane, physician, columnist


“The two most powerful
   things in existence:
    a kind word and a
  thoughtful gesture.”
   —Ken Langone, co-founder, Home Depot
“I regard apologizing as the
   most magical, healing,
 restorative gesture human
 beings can make. It is the
centerpiece of my work with
executives who want to get
  better.” —Marshall Goldsmith, What Got You
  Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become
                   Even More Successful.
 With a new and forthcoming policy on
apologies … Toro, the lawn mower folks,
 reduced the average cost of settling a
        $115,000 in 1991 to
 claim from
 $35,000 in 2008 … and the
 company hasn’t been
   to trial in the last
        15 years!
 Relationships          (of all varieties):
                          THERE
       ONCE WAS A TIME WHEN A

  THREE-MINUTE
  PHONE CALL WOULD
  HAVE AVOIDED SETTING OFF THE
DOWNWARD SPIRAL THAT RESULTED
    IN A COMPLETE RUPTURE.*
*divorce, loss of a BILLION $$$ aircraft sale, etc., etc.
  THE PROBLEM IS
 RARELY/NEVER THE
   PROBLEM. THE
RESPONSE TO THE
PROBLEM INVARIABLY
 ENDS UP BEING THE
  REAL PROBLEM.*
   *PERCEPTION IS ALL THERE IS!
Up,   Up,   Up,   Up
  the Value-added Ladder.
$55B*
    *IBM Global Services/
“Systems integrator of choice”
IB  M
    to


IB       M
  “Big Brown’s New Bag: UPS Aims
   to Be the Traffic Manager for
     Corporate America” —Headline/BW
  “UPS wants to take over the
sweet spot in the endless loop of
 goods, information and capital
   that all the packages [it moves]
       represent.” —ecompany.com
(E.g.,   UPS Logistics                     manages the logistics of 4.5M
          Ford vehicles, from 21 mfg. sites to 6,000 NA dealers)
A Constant
  Battle
  “I am often asked by
would-be entrepreneurs
seeking escape from life
 within huge corporate
  structures, ‘How do I
 build a small firm for
  myself?’ The answer
      seems obvious …
  Source: Paul Ormerod, Why Most Things Fail: Evolution, Extinction and Economics
 “I am often asked by would-be entrepreneurs seeking escape from
life within huge corporate structures, ‘How do I build a small firm for



        Buy a
   myself?’ The answer seems obvious:



 very large
 one and just
wait.”                       —Paul Ormerod, Why Most Things Fail:
                Evolution, Extinction and Economics
    “Mr. Foster and his McKinsey colleagues
collected detailed performance data stretching

 back   40 years for 1,000     U.S. companies.



They found that       none
the long-term survivors managed to
                                            of

outperform the market. Worse, the
 longer companies had been in the
   database, the worse they did.”
                —Financial Times
“Data drawn from the real world
 attest to a fact that is beyond
          Everything
our control:
  in existence tends
   to deteriorate.”
   —Norberto Odebrecht, Education Through Work
Skinning
  Cats
    There is more
   than one way to
     skin a cat!*
*Every projectREQUIRES          (if you’re smart) an
  outside look by one/some Seriously Weird Cat/s
        —in pursuit of whacked-out options.
14,000
20,000
 14,000/eBay
20,000/Amazon
 30/Craigslist
 “We all agree your
theory is crazy. The
  question, which
   divides us, is
 whether it is crazy
enough.”  —Niels Bohr, to Wolfgang Pauli
  “Insanely Great”
        Steve Jobs




“Radically thrilling”
          BMW
“Let us create such
  a building that
future generations
   will take us for
 lunatics.”—the church hierarchs at Seville
“We are crazy. We should do
something when people say
          If people
 it is ‘crazy.’
 say something is
  ‘good’, it means
  someone else is
 already doing it.”
        —Hajime Mitarai, Canon
             Kevin Roberts’ Credo

1. Ready. Fire! Aim.
2.   If it ain’t broke ... Break it!
3.   Hire crazies.
4.   Ask dumb questions.
5.   Pursue failure.
6.   Lead, follow ... or get out of the way!
7.   Spread confusion.
8.   Ditch your office.
9.   Read odd stuff.

10.   Avoid moderation!

				
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