2008-2009self_study-econ

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					            Department of Economics
            Program Review Self Study

                    2008-2009




                  December 2008



Prepared by Dr. Bob Carbaugh and Dr. Koushik Ghosh,
          with the help of Ms. Shirley Hood
                         Table of Contents
Introduction
      2004 Program Review
      Program Revisions in Response to 2004 Program Review

1.    Department of Economics
      a.   Mission
      b.   Brief Description of Department of Economics
      c.   Governance and Structure

2.    Economics Programs and Assessment

3.    Student Advising

4.    Faculty Retention and Promotion Criteria

5.    Effectiveness of Faculty Instruction

6.    Effectiveness of Faculty Scholarship and Service

7.    Student Accomplishments, 2004-2008

8.    Student Assessment of Economics Program

9.    Library, Technology, Facility Resources

10.   Future Direction and Challenges of Economics Program

11.   Appendixes
      1.   Course Catalog—Economics Specializations
      2.   Jobs for Economics Students
      3.   Student Comments-SEOI
      4.   Vitaes
                    Department of Economics Program Review Self Study
                                       2008-2009


       The Department of Economics (DOE) of Central Washington University has attempted to show
continuous improvement over time. The most recent external review of the DOE was conducted by Dr.
Thomas Trulove (Chair, Department of Economics, Eastern Washington University) in March 2004. In
response to his comments, as well as those of Dean Roy Savoian of our College of Business and our
accreditors from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), the DOE has made
three major revisions to its program which became effective in academic year 2007-2008. This section
of the DOE’s self-study report contains the external review of Dr. Trulove and the follow-up revisions
by the DOE.

External Review of Dr. Trulove

        In preparing this report I studied the “Program Review”, a 2004 self-review by the Central
Washington University Economics Department as well as other documents provided and collected. I
also had the benefit of numerous discussions with the department co-chairs, faculty, students, Dean of
the College of Business and the Provost and an onsite visit of two evenings and a day and a half. As
additional background, my own department has just completed a major revision of our curriculum and
program which has given me the opportunity to compare the programs of several peer institutions.
My overriding conclusion is that the CWU Economics Department is an exceptional small department
with a very strong and respectable program.

Student Centered

         As I began my review of the department’s self-evaluation I was struck by their early and
continued emphasis on teaching, high quality education and student success. Phrases such as
“Teaching is our priority,” “highest emphasis on excellence in teaching,” “students and faculty work
actively together,” “concern for students at the individual level,” “personalized, innovative
instruction,” as well as references to constant availability for advising and mentoring by faculty raised
my level of skepticism. In my experience most departments make such claims, but few deliver. During
the site visit and by carefully reading student program and course evaluations I set out to verify these
claims. My conclusion is that this department appears to be the exception.
         The department has a well thought out advising and mentoring program which is carried out
daily. Faculty members uniformly appear to put extraordinary effort into teaching strategies and
activities. They make use of innovative methods and take advantage of the wonderfully outfitted
electronic classrooms. When asked to comment on the strongest element of their department and the
one in which they take the most pride, faculty members and the co-chairs immediately cited the
personal attention given to students. They commented on their universal open door policy and their
intention to differentiate the department by developing a reputation for being more student friendly
and supportive than other departments.
         Their approach is working. When I asked students the same question they similarly identified
the open door policy, dedication to students, good advising and close personal support from faculty as
the best aspects of the department. They also liked their courses very much despite the fact that they
were perceived as more difficult than most others at the university. Moreover, written student
evaluations regularly emphasize these features. In fact, students feel very positive about the
department. Comments are rarely negative. They seem to like their professors and courses, believe
they learn more than in courses in other departments, and find the course expectations rigorous.
Consequently, they especially appreciate the help and support they get from faculty. Remarkably,
when compared with student evaluations I have seen from other departments, almost all comments
are positive and the criticisms offered tend to be suggestions for improving some minor aspect of the
course. Comments also indicate that majors and minors feel they have a “home” in the economics
department, a place they can count on for help and support beyond the classroom. The department’s
career and graduate school counseling is among the best I have seen. Their advising system is
comprehensive and excellent. The student experience is clearly a good one and is justifiably a source of
departmental pride.

The Faculty

         The department has a strong faculty. All seven full-time tenure track members have Ph.D.
degrees in economics. All have impressive records in teaching, scholarship and service which indicate
continuous professional activity and dedication to the discipline. More than half have won CWU
teaching and/or research awards. In addition, I found the department uncommonly collegial.
Members seem to have a high level of mutual respect and a willingness to work together for the
benefit of the department. They seem to have strongly shared goals. Communication among
members is good and they see themselves as a team rather than as a collection of individuals.
         One area in which this collegiality shines is the faculty mentoring program. This program has
senior faculty working with junior faculty to demonstrate the possibility of a fulfilling career at CWU as
well as how to meet the requirements for promotion. This is particularly important to align the
expectations of young faculty fresh from graduate school with the realities of an undergraduate
program at a regional university. The program seems effective in bringing faculty into the
department’s student centered approach, helping to develop excellence in the classroom, encouraging
a productive research agenda and continuing the department’s commitment to service. It also appears
to tighten collegial bonds within the department and enhance the faculty evaluation process. Many
senior faculty elsewhere would consider this type of mentoring beyond their job. Those at CWU
appear to participate with enthusiasm and pride. Not only does this help the junior faculty, but also
makes the department a more cohesive unit.
         The high degree of collegiality also appears to support another department innovation, the dual
chair arrangement. When I first learned of the dual chair arrangement I had reservations about its
viability. In many departments such an arrangement would simply invite division with faculty lining up
behind one chair or the other to opportunistically press their agendas. There is also the possibility that
communication to and from the administration might be negatively impacted. Just as individual faculty
might choose to work with one chair or the other, so might the administration. Or, leadership might
suffer.
         My concerns appear misplaced with respect to the CWU Economics Department. Their
collegiality and open communications as a department allow this arrangement to work. They take the
function of chair seriously and believe that discharging it adequately requires so much time and effort
as to preclude serious research. By dividing the time required between two people, both are able to
maintain a scholarship agenda while devoting full attention to chairmanship duties during their
quarters of service. Each can also maintain department expectations with respect to scholarly output
and service thereby serving as role models for other faculty as they lead by example. Faculty members
seem universally supportive of this shared leadership arrangement. In fact, some feel it will lead to
greater continuity as they believe the “stress” of the job prematurely burns out a single chair leading to
more frequent turnover and less experience in the position. Moreover, all faculty feel included in all
departmental matters due to the open approach of the current chairs. In this small, collegial
department which has frequent informal communication and a spirit of respect and goodwill, this
arrangement appears both to make sense and to be working well. I would not recommend any
change.
        The resumes of the seven faculty members document an impressive array of professional
activity in all areas when compared with faculty at many other regional universities. Departmental
expectations are high, especially regarding teaching effectiveness and scholarship. The department’s
criteria for merit and promotion codify an ambitious set of requirements in the areas of teaching,
scholarship and service. If followed, these expectations easily meet or exceed AACSB accreditation
requirements.
        Departmental standards for promotion to Associate Professor and Full Professor equal or
exceed those of most economics departments at regional universities. Commendably, the
requirements for promotion to Full Professor equal or exceed those for advancement to Associate
Professor. Weighting of activities follows the department’s teaching priority (40%) and seems to be
equal for scholarship and service (25-35%). I suspect that this overstates the weighting typically given
to service given the strong culture of scholarship among the faculty, although these faculty show that
they are very good campus and off-campus citizens through an impressive array of service activities.
The service area also incorporates rewards for student advising according to the department’s strategic
plan.
        Teaching is closely monitored for all faculty including the usual student evaluations as well as
the less usual requirements of classroom visitation and documentation of teaching approaches.
Faculty are also expected to use their scholarship in teaching activities. The faculty mentoring process
also helps insure that a high level of success is achieved in this area. Many departments who want
teaching to be most important struggle to find ways to objectively measure teaching effectiveness and
differentiate among faculty members. Often they end up simply requiring faculty to meet some
threshold and then finding all who do to be equally good teachers. This, in turn, tends to put most of
the weight for differentiation on scholarly activities which then become the only major determinants
for promotion and tenure. faculty soon learn to give teaching lip service, but to spend their real energy
in research and publication. I was unable to determine if this is the case at CWU. However, the
department goes further than most to collect meaningful information on teaching and appears to work
closely enough with each faculty member so as to be capable of objective ranking. Certainly, the
extent of favorable student comments indicate teaching priority and quality control.
        Requirements for scholarship are rigorous and appropriate. They also appear to set higher
expectations for the department when compared with other similar departments. Most interestingly,
the expectations appear to apply to tenured senior faculty as well. The department takes seriously the
designation “academically qualified,” one I have not heard used much elsewhere. In many other
universities, and I am sure in many other CWU departments, tenured senior faculty choose not to be
professionally active or to worry much about their teaching, while using their job security to engage in
mostly service, if in anything at all. Surprisingly, the CWU Economics faculty appear unanimous and
enthusiastic in their support for the standards they have adopted. Consequently, a much higher
proportion of the economics faculty are publishing and deemed to be “academically proficient. ” The
two returning administrators who are not yet so classified appear to be on accelerated programs to
meet the requirement. Such universal agreement concerning a potentially onerous requirement, even
by senior faculty, is remarkable.
         The economics faculty are obviously valued as resources by other departments and programs at
CWU. This is commonly the case on most campuses with economics having more interdisciplinary
connections than most other departments, except perhaps mathematics and writing. CWU programs
such as SOURCE, the Douglas Honors College, Asia-Pacific Studies, REM, environmental studies and
others depend on contributions from the Economics Department. Economics courses are required by
17 programs outside the College of Business, 10 within the COB and as elective or suggested courses in
3 others. This demonstrates the broad interdisciplinary demand for economics as well as the role
played by the department as an ambassador for the COB to the rest of the campus. These are vital and
valuable linkages.
         Without careful attention these important connections can be threatened, especially for an
economics department within the COB. Economics departments housed in liberal arts colleges
typically find interdisciplinary work somewhat easier. Those in business colleges can easily fall victim
to the anti-professional program bias of the liberal arts if they do not, or are unable to, make the effort
to be visible outside the COB. Economists can do many useful things within the COB such as teaching
statistics and finance courses. In times of tight budgets it is tempting not to staff economics
departments adequately for interdisciplinary work and to divert the already strained resources to
internal COB needs. These tendencies need to be resisted at CWU, especially since the state’s budget
woes and the push for accreditation might make such actions tempting.
         Economics Department faculty indicated to me a fear that due to their small size they might be
asked to merge with another department. I think a merger would be risky and a mistake. Their
current collegiality which makes possible things such as shared leadership and achievement of AACSB
accreditation standards might not survive such a move. Currently the department appears willingly to
be one of the most productive, if not the most productive, department within the COB and CWU, as
measured by publications, numbers of students taught and average class size. There is much pride of
discipline and pride of departmental identity at work here. Unbalancing such a well running machine
might not be such a good idea.
         Teaching loads in the department, as in the COB, are 6 five credit courses plus any
individualized instruction. The official CWU teaching load is typically 36 credits per year. The
reduction of one course per year for COB departments is justified to recognize the importance of
scholarship and publication in securing and maintaining AACSB accreditation. This is very appropriate
for Economics Department faculty given their high level of scholarly performance as well as their
volume of individualized instruction. Departmental teaching loads seem well justified and appropriate.

The Program

       The department offers an undergraduate degree with specializations in either General
Economics or Managerial Economics. The General Economics track is designed to prepare students for
more demanding analytical careers or, when augmented by more math courses, for graduate programs
in economics. The Managerial Economics track is designed for students interested in more general
employment opportunities in the private or public sectors and those intending to pursue graduate
study in some professional program. Not surprisingly, this option includes about two-thirds of the
majors. These options make sense and are consistent with practices at other regional universities.
         In addition, the department has a fairly standard minor program, with the exception that a
somewhat narrow range of upper-division courses are permitted. The department is also very active in
the general education program and in teaching introductory courses required for preadmission to the
COB. Courses meeting the university’s breadth requirements appear to be a good recruiting tool for
the major as well as tying the department to the rest of the campus by serving a wide body of
students.
         Recruiting majors and minors is always a challenge for most economics departments. We all
would like to discover how to be more successful. CWU’s approximately 35 majors and 30 minors are
comparable to numbers in other universities of this size. Although these might be considered modest
numbers, it must be remembered that the department is one of the leading departments on campus
when it comes to total numbers of students taught, largely because of its general education and
service courses. The department appears to put concerted effort into recruiting from the introductory
and general education courses as well as by sending personalized letters to promising students. COB
readmission requirements might discourage a few liberal arts type students from discovering the field.
I, who cannot discover how to be more successful in this area, have no advice to give.
         The department also participates in the COB degree programs offered at SeaTac and Lynnwood
Centers as well as offering an outreach minor there. A much smaller distance education program is
offered in Yakima, Wenatchee and Moses Lake. It is very difficult for me to see how they can
adequately and successfully carry out this mission with their current number of faculty. Westside
enrollments are apparently growing. Quality control seems to be of major importance to the
department. Hiring acceptable quality adjunct instructors is always a problem, even in the Puget
Sound region. Regularly monitoring them creates an almost impossible scheduling problem for the
chairs. Full class schedules and research expectations on the Ellensburg campus make it extremely
difficult, at best, for regular faculty to teach Westside courses in person. Teaching entirely by two-way
video is hardly satisfactory. The department, thanks to extraordinary efforts by some of its faculty, has
devised what they call a “blended” approach using a combination of live instruction and two-way
video. I question whether this is adequate or truly sustainable given the current level of staffing.
         The department appears to be struggling with this problem. They indicate that the off-campus
program seems to be their best opportunity for growth. They see it as an opportunity, but, in my
opinion, one for which they have not yet worked out a viable strategy. This is apparently a major topic
of discussion within the department and a high priority for them to solve. However, I believe for them
to be successful in this area they will need more staffing. That might entail hiring some adjuncts and
assigning regular faculty to monitor them closely, or hiring more regular faculty. I do not see how a
program can be conducted and expanded without adding to an already more than fully employed staff,
especially when that program is beyond commuting distance.

The Curriculum

        The department offers a fairly traditional and sound curriculum. Its preadmission requirements
parallel those at other schools or the prerequisites and core requirements where preadmission course
completion is not required. Requiring Intermediate Microeconomic and Intermediate Macroeconomic
theory courses of all majors is sound standard practice everywhere. The prerequisites for the programs
and for each course seem standard and reasonable. The quantitative requirements of Econometrics
and Economic Research make for a strong General Economics option and are a more rigorous approach
than that taken by many undergraduate programs. These requirements are exactly where the
economics profession is going and are essential if students are to be competitive with those from other
universities and in the job market. The Managerial track appears to be entirely appropriate to
accomplish the goals for it set out by the department.
        Limited staffing levels appear to drive the availability of upper-division economics courses.
Compared with many other schools, the number and proportion of required economics courses for the
General track seem large (7 required and 2 electives). This produces a very constrained curriculum,
although the required courses clearly contribute to a solid understanding of the discipline and a sound
major. While the Managerial track appears to give students more freedom to choose electives, I
suspect limited staffing means that their electives are mostly the same as the General track’s
requirements. Despite the fairly rigid requirements and limited offerings, these are sound and
defensible majors.
        The small faculty size appears to have related effects. Many of the economics courses listed in
the catalog are not taught and have not been for some time. These are courses such as U.S. Economic
History, Labor, Government and Business, European Economic History, Development of Economic
Thought, Agricultural Economics, Economic Development, Comparative Systems, Energy, Resources
and the Environment, etc. Specialties of some faculty are not likely to be taught. This narrows the
breadth of offerings and eliminates courses that might be of most interest to non-COB minors or
courses most useful in recruiting majors from liberal arts fields. It also tends to be misleading to
students. In addition, most required courses are offered but once a year. The one complaint I heard
most often from students was that this once a year scheduling, especially with the theory courses,
often makes it impossible to finish the major in four years. In fact, some said they were taking an extra
year due to scheduling difficulties. Almost all students said they would like to see more elective fields
offered.
        Course scheduling and frequency problems are certainly no mystery. They are directly related
to staff number limitations. All other measures show a very productive department. Their courses
often fill to classroom capacity. The average class sizes exceed the COB and the university by
substantial and consistent margins. Offering more fields or required courses with more frequency
simply requires more faculty. As compared with other similar departments this one appears
understaffed to me, especially considering that one member is away on military leave. Even with his
return, the department needs one additional faculty member just to provide an adequately varied
program on the Ellensburg campus.
        It is not uncommon for departments to require a core of the theory and quantitative courses
and then allow students to choose the remainder of their economics courses from upper level
electives. It is more unusual, such as at CWU, to require International, Money and Banking and Public
Finance as part of the core. While these requirements do not weaken the program, they do limit the
choice and potential breadth of the graduates. However, with a small number of majors and without
demand from outside departments, minimum class size requirements do impose limitations.
Nonetheless, when reviewing its curriculum the department might want to consider the ratio of
required to elective courses and its frequency of theory offerings.
        A rather unique feature of the CWU curriculum is the department initiative to internationalize.
This appears to mean including international topics throughout the principles courses, inserting them
in many upper level courses and requiring majors to take International Economics. The faculty seem
well trained and quite interested in this approach. It should be of benefit to CWU graduates as they
confront an increasingly globalized world. This appears to be one way of differentiating CWU students
from those at other universities. Some in the Economics Department voiced concern that international
requirements were being dropped by other COB departments and they worry that this could negatively
impact their initiative. This internationalization seems to me to be something worth preserving.
        Library resources are very important to successful programs, although for the economics
discipline much more of our work, especially data based, relies on the internet. The department finds
library resources at CWU adequate to support an undergraduate program. Students during my
interviews with them voiced no complaints and similarly found the library adequate. It appears that
given the local collection, quick inter-library loans and resources available over the internet, the
necessary library resources are currently available. However, the department’s library budget
allocation appears to be pretty bare bones. With journal subscription and book costs escalating
dramatically over the past few years, this is an area that deserves careful monitoring. Most regional
university libraries are experiencing budget difficulties. Cost reducing measures such as electronic
journal subscriptions or budget augmentation may need to be explored in the near future.
        The department seems to be aggressively using computer and information technology in their
program. The COB also makes available an information technology systems specialist to provide
support. The classrooms economics faculty teach in are superbly outfitted to allow use of the internet
and the most current electronic techniques. Making even more use of technology is a major part of
the department’s future plans. This is commendable and sets CWU apart from many regional
universities.

Assessment

         Assessment requirements have burgeoned over the past few years. Meeting all the formal
requirements can quickly overburden departmental resources and even detract from course content.
Finding a proper balance is a challenge. Every good teacher constantly assesses their courses and
student achievement while making continuous adjustments. All indications are that the CWU
economics faculty are excellent. This, and the high degree of student satisfaction with economics
courses and professors, indicates that the best form of assessment is carried our regularly.
         The department has thought about the more formal aspects of assessment, and as with all of
us, is trying to get viable systems in place that are effective without overwhelming individual faculty or
department resources. They have initiated a pre and post testing scheme whereby pre-tests are given
in their introductory courses (ECON 201 and 202) and then again as a post-test to those students
completing the intermediate theory courses (ECON 301 and 302). This is designed to measure the
growth in economic literacy of some of their majors, but not all as some transfer from community
colleges and do not take the pre-test. It is a little surprising that they do not administer the post-test
to all introductory students at the end of ECON 201 and 202. However, this is a common technique
used to satisfy the assessment bureaucracy. We also use it in my department, but I have difficulty
understanding how it tells us much of use to guide course or program improvement. For that we have
to rely on the evaluation of student work by individual professors and focused discussion during faculty
meetings. I suspect that this is the case at CWU as well.
         Perhaps because they have such a good rapport with their students, the department appears to
have an unusually extensive ability to do program assessment using student letters, student e-mails,
exit surveys of graduating seniors and alumnae surveys. I am impressed by the willingness of students
to write fairly lengthy letters evaluating the department and their experiences at CWU. These sources,
as well as individual course evaluations, provide very useful information on which to base assessment
and continuous improvement.
         The assessment bureaucracy always seems to think we should do more formal assessment and
rarely recognizes how much meaningful informal assessment occurs in good classrooms and successful
departments. Success is not possible without it and formalizing requirements often does little more
than increase burdens and siphon time from course content and real assessment. In the formal and
bureaucratic sense, the department’s assessment, like that in every department of which I am aware,
is not particularly strong. However, given the overwhelmingly favorable student reaction to their
courses and program, as well as their success in placing graduates, the traditional informal assessment
program at CWU must be sound and used to make improvements.
         Additional assessment techniques are possible, but their cost in terms of time and program
impact must also be evaluated. Some departments require majors to enroll in a capstone course
during their senior year where part of the course content is assessment of the main program goals.
This requires that the goals be clearly stated and the body of work completed by students since the
beginning of the program, as well as their ability to demonstrate certain skills, be evaluated and rated.
Other departments have required each professor to keep track of assessment activities in each class
and then have an assessment meeting each year where this information is shared and discussed by all
faculty members with some formal record being kept.
         I would not recommend more formal assessment exercises for the CWU Economics
Department. However, if they are required to enhance this function I would caution them not to fall
into the trap of devising assessment exercises that in practice force faculty to teach a rigid set of
concepts in a rigid way. If such standardization is what we want, why hire expensive professors?
Finally, assessment results should never be used in faculty evaluation, but rather only to guide
improvements in course and program design. Sorry that I do not have the correct attitude to be of
more help in this area.

The Future

        Commendably, the department is giving much thought to the future. They recognize the need
for continuous evaluation and improvement. The internationalization of the economics curriculum,
more emphasis on writing and continued integration of computers and quantitative approaches are
mentioned. They are initiating a comprehensive curriculum review. They are putting in place systems
to improve advising, thinking about how to better provide individual studies and internships and
wrestling with strategies to make distance learning an opportunity for them. The department appears
to have identified the key issues and is proactive in addressing them, another indication of the
department’s strength.
        As indicated earlier, I think the department is understaffed and that this problem will need to
be addressed before they can successfully solve the problems of upper level course offerings and
distance education. The department has a very tight schedule (especially with one member on leave),
yet is unable to offer required courses more than once a year or to offer much variety in upper level
courses. They struggle to offer enough upper division courses to meet the needs of majors. Students
indicate they would like more variety and some worry about delayed graduation. While the current
program is a sound one within the current staffing constraints, I strongly recommend that a curriculum
review be initiated to confront these problems of variety and frequency. Dealing with these issues is a
prerequisite to solving the distance education problem and I believe both will require staff
augmentation.

Conclusion

        This is a very good department with a sound program and an outstanding faculty. It compares
favorably with other regional universities and often sets standards of excellence for the others to try to
achieve. The faculty’s relationship with students and their high degree of collegiality are to be envied.
Their record of publication and requirements for being “academically proficient” make them one of the
most accomplished departments in comparable institutions, and surely the main engine in the COB
drive for accreditation. They have a strong commitment to service and have earned a high level of
respect, both on campus and in the wider community. The department has made thoughtful choices in
order to maintain a professionally respectable program within some pretty severe staffing constraints.
Other than the need for more staff and the few minor suggestions made in this report, I can think of
nothing about the department needing change or which triggers criticism. In fact, I would recommend
this department and program to students interested obtaining a superior education and degree.

Revisions to Economics Program: 2004-2008

      In response to the comments of Dr. Thomas Trulove, Dean Roy Savoian, and representatives of
AACSB, the DOE has made three revisions in its program which became effective in academic year
2007-2008.

      A new specialization was developed, Economics and Business Forecasting. There were two
       motives behind the development of this specialization. First, our faculty wished to provide a
       quantitative specialization in economics that would appeal to our students who are interested
       in business and economics forecasting as well as economic research. Second, by including the
       business core of courses in this specialization, the Economics Department will be judged by its
       accreditor (AACSB) as being fully integrated into the College of Business.

      To improve the assessment of the DOE’s degree programs, a new course was developed, EC
       406: Economic Assessment. This course provides a review of major topics that our students
       have learned in microeconomics and macroeconomics. The course also includes end-of-major
       assessment activities including students taking the Economics Major Field Exam during their
       senior year, as developed by the Educational Testing Service. Moreover, the course requires
       students to prepare a resume for their entry into the job market, write a research paper on a
       contemporary economic topic, and complete a DOE exit questionnaire.

      The replacement of the DOE’s internally developed assessment exam for economics majors
       with the Economics Major Field Exam as noted above. This will provide more comprehensive
       data concerning the performance of our economics students relative to that of students at
       other universities. During spring quarter 2008, two DOE students completed the Economics
       Major Field Exam: One student performed at the 75th percentile on the exam, while the other
       students performed at the 35th percentile. During Fall 2008, six additional students completed
        the Economics Major Field Exam. When we receive their scores from ETS, we will add this
        information as an addendum to this report.

       The absorption of the Business Statistics program and faculty into the Department of
        Economics.

The rest of this document provides a self study of the DOE for the academic year 2008-2009.

1. THE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

        The DOE is part of the College of Business (CB) at Central Washington University. Consistent
with the CB, the DOE aspires to be a distinctive scholarly community from which students reach their
full potential. The objective of the DOE is to create value and opportunity for our students by
providing a high quality education at the Ellensburg campus and university centers in the Puget Sound
and central regions of Washington State.

a. Mission

       Although the Department of Economics does not have a mission statement of its own, its
mission is consistent with the strategic mission statement that was developed by the CB in 2001. The
CB also has articulated shared values, which encapsulate our shared core beliefs and commitments.
These values include assertions of shared beliefs and shared commitments.

       We believe in student success, lifelong learning, integrity and ethical behavior, and excellence.
       We commit ourselves to prepare students for the future, impart knowledge on which students
        can build, treat everyone with respect and fairness, exemplify our values by serving as teachers
        and role models, and remain current in our academic disciplines and professional fields.

                    College of Business Mission and Vision Statement

        CWU's College of Business faculty and staff create value and opportunity for our students by
focusing on quality in undergraduate education at the Ellensburg campus and university centers in the
Puget Sound and central regions of Washington State. We accomplish this through emphasis on
excellence in teaching, which is strengthened by faculty research and supported by professional
service. CWU's College of Business will be recognized as a premier learning community creating an
environment in which students, faculty and staff reach their full potential.

Value

       We are affordable and accessible to an increasingly diverse student population.
       Through curricula based on theory and on practice, we prepare students with the knowledge,
        competencies and skills that are necessary for productive careers in a dynamic and changing
        environment.
      Undergraduate and niche graduate degree programs are delivered by faculty who are
       dedicated to using their academic preparation and business experience to enhance student
       learning and career preparation.

Opportunity

      We are a university of choice to students and an employer of choice to faculty and staff.
      We transform lives through a learning environment built on a foundation of teaching
       excellence, effective curricula and state-of-the-art physical facilities.
      We serve students in Washington State through programs and courses delivered at well-
       established University Centers co-located on dynamic community college campuses.

Quality in Education

      Teaching is our priority. We foster a learning environment characterized by an accessible
       faculty and a high degree of faculty and student interaction.
      Curricula reflect current needs and developments in business and promote an understanding of
       theory and its practical application.
      Education at a high level of quality derives from concern for students at the individual level, and
       personalized, innovative instruction supported by appropriate learning technologies.
      Important linkages are developed with alumni, College of Business Advisory Board, employers
       and other professionals in business and education.
      We are committed to outcomes assessment and continuous improvement in order to provide a
       high quality education

b. Brief Description of Department

        The Department of Economics currently consists of eight tenured and tenure-track faculty, two
annual contract faculty and a department secretary. The academic disciplines of the department’s
faculty include economics, business forecasting, and statistics.

       The department offers coursework leading to the Bachelor of Science in Economics degree
which includes three specializations-General Economics, Managerial Economics and Economic and
Business Forecasting. In addition to including the University’s general education requirements, the
Economics major is comprised of three principal components: 1) pre-admission courses that provide
foundation knowledge and skills needed for further study in economics; 2) economics core courses
that build on the pre-admission courses and focus on decision making in the main functional areas of
business; and 3) courses that allow for advanced study in one of the three specializations. The
department also offers coursework leading to a minor in Economics. The Economics I minor is for
students majoring in a discipline within the College of Business. The Economics II minor is for all other
majors at Central Washington University.
        Teaching is our priority. We foster a learning environment where students and faculty work
actively together. Curricula reflect current needs and developments in business and promote an
understanding of theory and its practical application. Education at a high level of quality derives from
concern for students at the individual level, and personalized, innovative instruction supported by
appropriate learning technologies. Important linkages are developed with alumni, The College of
Business Advisory Board, employers and other professionals in business and education. We are
committed to outcomes assessment and continuous improvement in order to provide a high quality
education.

       A main goal of the DOE is to help students understand economic principles in a local, national,
and international setting. In addition, the DOE provides a real-world learning environment for the
student to ease the transition into the workplace. Besides preparing students for business, financial,
and government employment, an economics major is excellent preparation for law schools, Master=s
of Business Administration programs, and graduate programs in economics and agricultural economics.
Students outside the COB often take economics courses to improve the economic literacy as well as
employment possibilities.

        The DOE stresses the quality teaching and advising of students. However, scholarship and
service to the university and community are expected of the faculty. Concerning scholarship, all
tenured and tenure-track members of the DOE are expected conduct scholarship which leads to
publications in outlets such as refereed journal articles and books.

       All students majoring in economics must complete a structured core curriculum that includes
contemporary theory and economic institutions. After completing basic required core classes in
economics, statistics and required specialization courses, majors take upper-level courses as electives
to complete the Bachelor of Science major. In addition to emphasizing economic theory in classroom
lectures, DOE faculty members regularly provide practical illustrations of theoretical techniques.
Several examples may help illustrate this point:

      Faculty members routinely bring examples of contemporary economic problems into the
       classroom that illustrate the relevance of theory to the real world.
      Case studies are used in many economics classes.
      Students are encouraged to participate in internship programs with government agencies,
       financial institutions, public utilities, hospitals, and so on.
      Microcomputers have been integrated into the curriculum.
      An economics research methods course is available for our students. This course is designed to
       familiarize them with a systematic approach for utilizing economic principles and quantitative
       techniques as a frame of reference in conceptualizing, designing, and carrying out analyses of
       problems.
      The DOE has internationalized its curriculum by including international topics throughout the
       material taught in the principles of macroeconomics and microeconomics courses. Upper level
       economics courses with international themes are part of the curriculum. DOE majors have
       participated in foreign exchange programs with universities in the Pacific Rim countries and
       Europe. Foreign students interact with American students on a regular basis in economics
       courses.
        The economics faculty maintains that their students should be exposed to a variety of
traditional and innovative teaching methods, as dictated by the skills and needs of both students and
faculty. For example, information technologies have become an important aspect of the economics
program. Computers, Internet connections, DVDs, and overhead projections are commonly used to
deliver at least portions of classroom lectures and discussions. Course web sites have become an
important method of providing information and materials to students. Students frequently
communicate to their instructors via the email.

c. Departmental Governance

        A dual chair arrangement exists for the Department of Economics. Currently, Bob Carbaugh
chairs the department during the Summer and Fall quarters and Koushik Ghosh chairs during the
Winter and Spring quarters. This arrangement allows these individuals to not stagnate in university
administration while maintaining themselves as productive scholars. This structure is an organizational
innovation at Central Washington University which manages a department through shared leadership.
The department chairs are able to retain maximum scholarly productivity which allows them to serve
as role models for faculty peers.

The Department of Economics includes two working groups:

      Department Faculty Committee--meets periodically to discuss departmental matters and form
       policies concerning curriculum, allocation of funds, purchase of equipment, and the like. This
       committee includes all faculty members of the Department of Economics. Because the
       Department of Economics is relatively small, the chairs are able to discuss many issues with
       faculty on a frequent and informal basis. Therefore, formal meetings involving the Department
       Faculty Committee are held to a minimum and used only when topics of major importance are
       considered.

      Personnel Committee--establishes policies and procedures concerning teaching, scholarship,
       and service for department members. The committee also makes recommendations regarding
       reappointment, promotion, and merit salary increases as well as conducts faculty searches. The
       members of this committee include all tenured faculty of the Department of Economics.

                        The Structure of the Department of Economics
       ________________________________________________________________________
                                      Department Chairs
                                     Dr. Robert Carbaugh
                                      Dr. Koushik Ghosh

       Tenured, Tenure-track faculty           Lecturer                   Classified Staff
       Dr. Timothy Dittmer                    Ronald Elkins                Shirley Hood
       Dr. David Hedrick                      Peter Gray
       Dr. Tyler Prante
       Dr. Peter Saunders
       Dr. Thomas Tenerelli
       Dr. Charles Wassell
2. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS: PROGRAMS, CURRICULA, AND ASSESSMENT
       The DOE offers a Bachelor of Sciences degree in Economics with specializations in General
Economics, Managerial Economics, and Economic and Business Forecasting and two minors in
Economics; one is designed for students seeking degrees in other departments in the College of
Business and one for students in other disciplines. Econ 101, Economic Issues, Econ 102, World
Economic Issues, Econ 201, Principles of Microeconomics, and Econ 360, Contemporary Economic
Problems satisfy requirements for Social and Behavioral Sciences under the General Education
Program. Econ 310, International Economics, Econ 330, Money and Banking, Econ 332, Public Finance,
Econ 352, Managerial Economics, and Econ 360 Contemporary Economic Problems are offered at the
Lynnwood and Des Moines Centers. Students are able to earn a minor in Economics while attending
those centers. The following tables provide information regarding the number of students served by
the DOE.

                       Central Washington University Economics Department
                                     State-funded Course FTE
                          Annual Averages for Academic Years 2004-2008
                                    2003-2004    2004-2005     2005-2006    2006-2007    2007-2008
        All        Lower Division     108.7        106.4         109.8        123.1        146.9
     Locations     Upper Division      40.6         49.9          52.3         57.8         50.9
                       Total          149.3        156.3         162.1        181.0        197.8
    Ellensburg     Lower Division     108.7        106.4         109.8        123.1        146.9
                   Upper Division      34.8         39.4          42.3         48.0         48.5
                       Total          143.4        145.9         152.1        171.1        195.4
    Des Moines     Upper Division       2.9          3.9           3.2          4.2         0.6
    Lynnwood       Upper Division       3.0          6.6           4.9          4.1         0.9
    Moses Lake     Upper Division                                  0.4          0.4         0.2
    Wenatchee      Upper Division                                  0.8          0.6         0.1
      Yakima       Upper Division                                  0.7          0.6         0.7


                       Central Washington University Economics Department
                                     State-funded Course FTE
                                    General Education Courses
                          Annual Averages for Academic Years 2004-2008


                                    2003-2004    2004-2005     2005-2006    2006-2007    2007-2008
    Ellensburg       Econ 101         108.7        106.4         109.8        123.1        146.9
                     Econ 102          40.6         49.9          52.3         57.8         50.9
                     Econ 201         149.3        156.3         162.1        181.0        197.8
       Total                           76.5         75.4          79.5         64.9         82.5
                        Central Washington University Economics Department
                                      State-funded Course FTE
                                       Business Core Courses
                           Annual Averages for Academic Years 2004-2008


                                  2003-2004      2004-2005      2005-2006      2006-2007       2007-2008
                     Bus 221                                                      32.1            34.8
                    Econ 201         60.0           56.3           65.1           54.7            68.7
                    Econ 202         32.2           31.0           30.2           26.1            29.6
  All Locations     Econ 310          2.6            4.4            4.0           5.1             5.1
                    Econ 330          9.4           14.0           16.9           15.1            10.8
                    Econ 332          5.3            6.9            6.4           7.8             5.6
                  Econ 352/452        3.3            5.3            4.2           5.2             4.3
                      Total          112.9          118.0          127.0         146.1           158.8
                     Bus 221                                                      32.1            34.8
                    Econ 201         60.0           56.3           65.1           54.7            68.7
                    Econ 202         32.2           31.0           30.2           26.1            29.6
  Ellensburg        Econ 310          2.6            4.4            4.0           5.1             5.1
                    Econ 330          6.6            8.8           10.3           10.1            9.8
                    Econ 332          3.7            4.1            3.9           4.6             4.1
                  Econ 352/452        2.0            2.9            3.3           3.7             4.3
                      Total          107.0          107.6          117.0         136.3           156.3
                    Econ 330          1.4            1.6            1.9           1.8
    Des Moines      Econ 332          0.7            0.8            0.8           1.8             0.6
                  Econ 352/452        0.8            1.6            0.6           0.7
                      Total           2.9            3.9            3.2           4.2             0.6
                    Econ 330          1.4            3.7            2.8           1.8
    Lynnwood        Econ 332          1.0            2.0            1.8           1.4             0.9
                  Econ 352/452        0.6            0.9            0.3           0.9
                      Total           3.0            6.6            4.9           4.1             0.9
    Moses Lake      Econ 330                                        0.4           0.3             0.2
    Wenatchee       Econ 330                                        0.8           0.6             0.1
     Yakima         Econ 330                                        0.7           0.6             0.7


Department of Economics Specializations

        The General Economics specialization is recommended for students desiring a traditional
economics major with a quantitative emphasis. In particular, students are required to take
Introduction to Econometrics which uses cross-section regression analysis and Economic Research
which uses time-series regression analysis. Students desiring to pursue graduate school in economics
are encouraged to complete this specialization along with at least a minor in mathematics. This
specialization is also attractive for students desiring to take jobs involving economic research.

        The Managerial Economics specialization is for students with an interest in either governmental
or private-sector employment. It also provides solid foundation for students who wish to attend law
school.
         The Economics and Business Forecasting Specialization is designed for students who which to
 attain a strong set of statistical tools that can be applied to business and economics research and
 decision making. Besides completing the business core set of courses, students gain learn about a
 variety of forecasting techniques, cross section and time series regression, and operations analysis.

        Students at Central Washington University may choose to minor in economics. The Economics
 Minor I is designed to accompany the Business Administration and Accounting majors. The Economics
 Minor II is designed for all majors with the exception of Business Administration and Accounting. Refer
 to Appendix 1 for details concerning the course requirements for majors and minors offered by the
 DOE. Descriptions of economics courses can also be found in this appendix.

 The DOE aims to help its students develop competencies, among the most important ones being:

        Thinking critically, which involves checking one’s assumptions, considering multiple perspectives
         from various sources, and the like.
        Communications, which involve oral and written communications and the ability to listen
         effectively.
        Quantitative reasoning, which consists of the application of quantitative tolls and computer skills
         to solve problems.
        Economic literacy, which involves the understanding of economic principles and how to use
         them in decision making.

                                                  Table 1
                        Department of Economics Assessment Plan Preparations Form
              Business and Economic Forecasting, General Economics and Managerial Economics

 Dept Goals               Related           Related        Method of     Who Assessed   When          Criterion of
                          College Goals     University     Assessment                   Assessed      Achievement
                                            Goals
1. Knowledge-Based        Value             Maintain and   Major Field   Students       Fall and      To be
   Outcomes. Upon         Through           strengthen     Test in       enrolled in    Spring        determined
   Completion of the      curricula         an             Economics     Econ 406       Quarters
   Economics program      based on          outstanding
   students               theory and on     academic and
   Should have the core   practice, we      student life
   knowledge and          prepare           on the
   competencies from      students with     Ellensburg
   economics              the               campus
                          knowledge,
                          competencies
                          and skill that
                          are necessary
                          for productive
                          careers in a
                          dynamic and
                          changing
                          environment.
2. Have a working         Quality           Provide for    Curriculum    Feedback       In            To be
   knowledge of           Curricula         an             Review        from alumni    conjunction   determined
   economics that will    reflect current   outstanding                  survey         with
       aid them in private,    needs and         academic and                                        program
       government, or non-     developments      student life                                        review.
       profit careers and/or   in economics      at the                                              At least
       prepare them for        and promote       University                                          biannually
       additional education    an                centers          Syllabi for all                                 100%
                               understanding     Achieve          sections of                        Each         compliance
                               of theory and     regional and     the                                quarter
                               its practical     national         Economics
                               application.      prominence       course will
                                                 for the          identify
                                                 university       common
                                                                  learning
                                                                  outcomes
                                                                  and
                                                                  assessments
3.   3.Demonstrate               Strategic       Goal I           Rubric Peer,      Assess written   Econ 406,    Rubric will
     effective oral/written      Objective 3     Maintain and     self and          and oral         426          assess oral,
     communications             To create and    strengthen an    instructor        presentation                  communication
                                deliver high     outstanding      assessment                                      skills
                                quality          academic and     of team
                                curricula based student life      projects
                                on planning      on the
                                and evaluation. Ellensburg
                                To ensure that   campus.          Rubric to
                                undergraduate                     assess oral
                                Economics        Goal IV          presentation
                                curricula        Build            skill/written
                                                 mutually         skills
                                provide a broad
                                                 beneficial
                                context within
                                                 partnerships
                                which            with the
                                education for    public sector,
                                business is set. industry,
                                Strategic        professional
                                Objective 4      groups,
                                To manage,       institutions,
                                deliver and      and the
                                evaluate         communities
                                effective        surrounding
                                instructional    our
                                programs by      campuses.
                                each academic
                                unit.            Goal VI
                                To ensure        Build
                                                 inclusive and
                                faculty
                                                 diverse
                                responsibility
                                                 campus
                                and              communities
                                involvement in   surrounding
                                activities that  our campuses
                                improve course
                                content and
                                teaching
                                quality.
     4.Apply quantitative                        Goal VI          Rubric            Assess ability   All          Rubric that
       and qualitative                           Build            applied to        to apply         Economics    will assess
       critical thinking skills                  inclusive and    case analysis     Economic         classes      ability to use
to access, develop,                       diverse           Rubric            analysis to                      data from
and use information                       campus            applied to        comprehensive                    comprehensive
to analyze Economic                       communities       assess            Economic                         case studies
problems.                                 surrounding       Economic          problems and                     and determine
                                          our campuses      analysis          determine                        feasible
                                                            skills            feasible                         business
                                                                              solutions.                       solutions.


                                                   Table 2
                            Degree Programs Offered by the Department of Economics

  Degree       Delivery          Instructional       # Students in Major                           # Degrees Awarded
 Program       Location          Staff FTE
 Economic                                              Yr       Yr       Yr     Yr    Yr      Yr     Yr   Yr     Yr     Yr
 and                                                    1        2        3      4     5       1      2    3      4      5
 Business
 Forecasting   Ellensburg                        7                               4    7
 General
 Economics     Ellensburg                        7               9       14     14    9       4      6     7      7      7
 Managerial
 Economics     Ellensburg                        7              34       33     41   39       14    16    19     13     29
 Pre-Majors    Ellensburg                                                 6     13    9
 Minor
 Programs
 Econ I        Ellensburg,
               Des Moines,
               Lynnwood                          9              13       15     43   20             19    19     37     38
 Econ II       Ellensburg,
               Des Moines,
               Lynnwood                          9              22       16     38   20             11    20     17     31


       The program goals for each of the three degree programs of the DOE are summarized as
follows:

1. Economic and Business Forecasting
       a. Graduates shall be able to help prepare forecasts used in decision making in business and
          government.
       b. Graduates will become familiar with the major statistical techniques that are useful in the
          analysis of economic and business data.
       c. Graduates will develop critical thinking skills that will be useful as they professionally grow
          throughout their forecasting career.
2. General Economics
      a. Graduates will acquire a broad knowledge of economic institutions, theory and policy
          applications.
      b. Graduates will be able to understand and apply economic theories to a wide range of public
          policy, business and individual decision making.
      c. Graduates will develop critical thinking skills to analyze economic problems faced by public
          entities and individuals.
      d. Graduates will be able to analyze statistical data.

3. Managerial Economics
     a. Graduates will be able to analyze statistical data used for making managerial decisions.
     b. Graduates will be able to use to economic theories to make business decisions.
     c. Graduates will develop critical thinking skills to analyze economic problems faced by firms
        and consumers.

         To meet these goals, students enrolled in the three degree programs of the DOE have student
learning goals:

1. Business and Economic Forecasting
       a. Complete a written exam and prepare an economic or business forecast using these
           techniques.
       b. Complete homework assignments based on forecasting techniques.
       c. Prepare a written report concerning their forecast and present it to their instructor and
          members of their class.
       d. Use computer programs such as Eviews to assist calculation of data when preparing a
          forecast.
       e. Use cross-sectional and time series regression techniques to plan, construct, and implement
          a forecasting project.
       f. Develop an awareness of how forecasters conceptualize their models as applied to particular
          situations (e.g. auto sales, tax revenue, etc.)
       g. The Economics Major Field Exam.

2. General Economics
      a. Strive to arrive at optimum solutions to problems posed in exams.
      b. Read and interpret computer printouts for homework assignments and during final exams.
      c. Answer exam questions using economic models. Students will answer short essay questions
          in exams.
      d. Answer short essay questions in exams.
      e. Contrast and compare alternative solutions.
      f. Interpret regressions printouts.
      g. Compare and explain macroeconomic models.
      h. Solve and interpret microeconomic problems.
      i. Take the Economics Major Field Exam.
3. Managerial Economics
     a. Strive to arrive at optimum solutions to problems posed in exams.
     b. Read and interpret computer printouts for homework assignments and during the final
        exam.
     c. Answer exam questions using economic models.
     d. Answer short essay questions in exams.
     e. Interpret regressions printouts.
     f. Contrast and compare alternative equilibriums solutions.
     g. Perform risk analysis.
     h. Take the Economics Major Field Exam.

       A more detailed description of the DOE’s degree specializations, and their requirements, can be
found in Appendix 1 of this report.

       It should be noted that the curriculum strategy of the DOE is supported by the academic
standards of several professional organizations: (1) the Committee on Economic Education, which is
part of the American Economic Association; (2) the National Council on Economic Education; (3) the
National Association for Business Economists. Each of these bodies has developed expectations
concerning appropriate curriculum for collegiate economics programs. The DOE has incorporated the
essence of these expectations into its curriculum. Moreover, the DOE has undergone much scrutiny
from faculty representatives of AACSB, our accreditor. The only reported concern of AACSB regarding
the DOE has been that it was not sufficiently academically integrated into our College of Business to be
assessed for accreditation; this led to the DOE’s introduction of the Economics and Business
Forecasting Specialization in 2007-2008, which includes the business core of courses, and thus
integrates the DOE into the rest of the College of Business curriculum.
       The DOE is headquartered at the Ellensburg campus of Central Washington University. In
addition, the DOE participates in the CB degree programs located at the SeaTac Center and Lynnwood
Center where majors are offered in Accounting and Business Administration. The DOE uses a
combination of live instruction and two-way video to offer its classes. Live instruction is the method
used to serve students at the main Ellensburg campus. The DOE uses two-way video to offer classes to
students at both West Side Centers—Lynwood and Des Moines.
       The Department of Economics offers four courses via distance education. Economics 352,
Managerial Economics is offered yearly fall quarter originating from Ellensburg and via distance
education to Lynnwood and Des Moines. Economics 330, Money and Banking is offered yearly winter
quarter originating from Ellensburg and via distance education to Yakima, Moses Lake and Wenatchee.
Economics 330 is also offered winter quarter originating from Lynnwood and via distance education to
Des Moines. Economics 332, Public Finance is offered yearly spring quarter originating from Ellensburg
and via distance education to Lynnwood and Des Moines. Economics 360, Contemporary Economic
Problems and Economics 310 International Economics are offered at Lynnwood and via distance
education to Des Moines alternate summer quarters. Concerning online programs, the DOEs does not
offer online courses.
3. STUDENT ADVISING
         The DOE provides for advising by full-time faculty members, which enables students to
formulate a program of study to meet their individual needs and desires. All students receive advising
upon expressing their intent to major or minor in economics. After initial advising, individual degree
plans are formulated for the remainder of the students’ tenure at CWU. Career orientation and
flexibility are stressed when formulating programs of study. A report, Jobs for Economics Students, is
prepared by the DOE and made available to our students. Refer to Appendix 2 to see this report.
         The DOE recognizes that certain students may have special educational needs. Efforts are
made by the DOE to deal with these students. The DOE makes available academic support services
including study skills and individual tutoring. DOE advisors help students select career paths and refer
them to the CWU Financial Aid Office to obtain information concerning scholarships.
         Students majoring in economics generally have one of four objectives: (1) graduate school in
economics; (2) MBA programs; (3) law school; (4) job market. DOE faculty works with the economics
majors in identifying their objectives as soon as feasible. For those students pursuing graduate school
or MBA programs, quantitative courses are recommended. Students pursuing law school are
encouraged to emphasize courses involving critical thinking skills as well as English composition.
Students destined for the job market are encouraged to pursue a managerial economics major, which
emphasizes statistical techniques and computers.
         DOE faculty members work closely with students in fulfilling the above objectives. The faculty
helps students prepare for the GRE exam, GMAT exam, and Law School Admissions Test and advises
them concerning the selection of schools to which they apply. Having contacts at many graduate
schools, the DOE faculty helps students obtain graduate assistantships. Students destined for the job
market receive advice in resume-writing and interviewing techniques. DOE faculty members regularly
write letters of recommendation to help students obtain jobs.

4. FACULTY RETENTION AND PROMOTION CRITERIA
        Consistent with the COB, the DOE has developed criteria for retention and promotion
evaluations of its faculty members. These criteria include effectiveness in teaching, scholarship, and
service.

a. Criteria for Promotion to Associate Professor or Granting of Tenure
       The tenured full and associate professors of the Department of Economics will constitute the
Personnel Committee for determining whether the candidate has continued his or her professional
development beyond the requirements for the assistant professor rank. In addition to meeting the
University standards presented in the Faculty Code, the candidate will have accomplished the
following:

      Teaching: Satisfied the Personnel Committee teaching requirements based upon standardized
student evaluations, at least one annual classroom visit by a senior economics faculty member,
documented innovational approaches to teaching.
      Scholarship: Undergraduate faculty members are expected to make 4 intellectual
contributions with 2 coming from Category A and the other 2 from Category A* or Category B*.
Graduate faculty members are expected to make 4 contributions with at least 3 coming from Category
A*. (The definitions of Category A and Category B are contained on the next page of this document).
  Service: Annually served on one major university committee and one COB committee, unless
opportunities for such service were limited. Performed student advisement and other departmental
responsibilities to the satisfaction of the DOE Personnel Committee.

b. Criteria for Promotion to Full Professor
       The tenured full professors of the Department of Economics will constitute the Personnel
Committee for determining whether the candidate has continued his or her professional development
beyond the requirements for the associate professor rank. In addition to meeting the University
standards presented in the Faculty Code, the candidate will have accomplished the following:

     Teaching: Show evidence of quality teaching, as specified above.
     Scholarship: Since being promoted to Associate Professor, undergraduate faculty members are
      expected to make 4 intellectual contributions with 2 coming from Category A* and the other 2
      from Category A* or Category B**. Graduate faculty members are expected to make 4
      contributions with at least 3 coming from Category A*.
     Service: Show evidence of leadership in service activities as well as membership in one
      major university and one COB committee (unless opportunities for such membership
      were not available), student advising, and other department responsibilities to the
      satisfaction of the Personnel Committee.

       *Category A Intellectual Contributions

             Refereed journal articles (peer and nationally-recognized editor-reviewed academic,
              professional and pedagogical journals)
             Research monographs
             Scholarly books
             Text books

       **Category B Intellectual Contributions

             Refereed proceedings from national, international or regional scholarly meetings (full
              papers)
             Refereed papers presented at academic or professional meetings
             Chapters in textbooks or book of readings
             Publicly available research working papers
             Papers presented at faculty research seminars at other universities or other
              academic settings outside CWU
             Publication in trade, in-house and other editor-reviewed journals
             Book reviews published in a journal
             Written cases with instructional materials published by a publishing house,
              academic journal or proceedings
             Instructional software that is published by a publishing house
             Conference presentation
             Course materials (study guides, test banks, etc) that are published by a publishing
              house
5. EFFECTIVENESS OF FACULTY INSTRUCTION

        The strength of the DOE comes from its faculty. Concerning instruction, the DOE maintains that
faculty members should actively share their educational background as well as research experience
with their students. Not only do faculty members maintain formal office hours, but they have and
open door policy and are willing to help students throughout the day. Faculty members integrate their
research findings into their economics lectures. Faculty members also direct students with research
projects, some of which have led to publications and presentations at professional meetings.
Periodically, faculty members of the Department of Economics participate in the Douglas Honors
Program and SOURCE. Through a grant from the National Science Foundation, Dr. Richard Mack took
students to rural China for research and study during 2005, and 2007.

        At the end of each quarter, the DOE faculty members conduct student evaluations in each
section of each course. Students are requested to fill out a questionnaire as well as write a short essay
concerning their overall impression of the instructor. These results are tabulated and made available
to the instructor after the quarter has been completed and student grades are turned in. Results of
faculty evaluations are a major part of the criteria used in evaluating faculty for retention, promotion,
and salary increases.

       Economics faculty members typically score high on student evaluations. One question on the
student evaluation form reads: In comparison to other instructors, I rate this one as

5 = Truly outstanding
4 = Superior
3 = Good
2 = Fair-Average
1 = Below Average

        The table below summarizes the DOE’s teaching effectiveness during 2003-2008. Appendix 3 at
the end of this document provides student’s comments regarding the teaching effectiveness of DOE
faculty during Spring Quarter, 2008.

                            Student Evaluation of Instruction
            Average Response to Question 29-Instructor’s Teaching Effectiveness

             Academic                                    Fall             Winter          Spring
                 Year
             2003-2004        Economic Classes           N/A               4.46            4.21
                            All College of Business       4.17             4.20            4.13
                                       All CWU           4.36              4.33            4.38
             2004-2005         Economic Classes          4.14              4.39            4.32
                            All College of Business      4.00              4.15            4.16
                                       All CWU           4.30              4.33            4.35
             2005-2006         Economic Classes          4.35           4.37            4.43
                      All     College of Business        4.05           4.12            4.05
                                       All CWU           4.31           4.43            4.35
             2006-2007          Economic Classes         4.29           4.57            4.40
                            All College of Business      4.09           4.26            4.17
                                       All CWU           4.30           4.33            4.33
          2007-2008          Economic Classes         4.24             4.19            4.30
                            All College of Business    4.13            4.13            4.17
                                   All CWU             4.30            4.33            4.35


        Besides Student Evaluations of Instruction, the DOE use other methods to evaluate faculty
effectiveness as educators. These include collaborative research between students and faculty, use of
field experiences, and innovations in teaching methods.

         In addition to providing classroom instruction to economic students, the DOE sponsors two
academically oriented student organizations--The CWU Economics Club and Omicron Delta Epsilon, the
national economics honorary society. Traditionally, the CWU Economics Club has provided intellectual
activities for its members such as speakers visiting our campus and conference phone calls with
notable economists. Club members also participate in the Federal Reserve Open Market Simulation at
the annual Pacific Northwest Regional Economic Conference each May; this activity allows students to
increase their knowledge of the formation of monetary policy and the work of the Federal Reserve.
The club also sponsors a graduation party to honor our student graduates. As for Omicron Delta
Epsilon, our chapter of the national economics honorary society is headed by Dr. David Hedrick. ODE
doesn’t have formal meetings but instead Dr. Hedrick meets with the individual members on a regular
basis to discuss career and or graduate school plans. Members of ODE are given honor cords to wear at
commencement as recognition of their academic accomplishments.

6. EFFECTIVENESS OF FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP AND SERVICE

       The recent performance of DOE faculty in consistent with the long-run tradition of the
department regarding distinguished faculty. Prior to 2004, three members of the DOE were selected at
the “Distinguished Professor” of Central Washing University regarding teaching (Bob Carbaugh)
research (Bob Carbaugh, Richard Mack, and Don Cocheba) and service (Wolfgang Franz). More
recently, several members of the DOE have received awards university awards. The most notable has
been Dr. Peter Saunders who received the CWU Distinguished Professor Award for Research in 2007.
Other recent awards granted to DOE faculty include:

Faculty awards for distinction: instruction, scholarship, and service
       2003-04
              Dr. Peter Saunders, College of Business Faculty Research Award
       2004-05
             Dr. David Hedrick, College of Business Excellence in Advising Award
       2005-06
             Dr. Koushik Ghosh, College of Business Faculty Research Award
             Dr. Peter Saunders, College of Business Faculty Research Award
       2006-07
             Dr. David Hedrick, College of Business Excellence in Teaching Award
             Dr. Charles Wassell, Alumni Award for Excellence in Teaching

       The DOE faculty maintain currency in their disciplines by conducting scholarly research that is
published in books and refereed journals, and they make presentations at professional conferences.
Appendix 4 contains the vitas of DOE faculty. Also, several DOE faculty have served as consultants for
the State of Washington Horsepark, Franklin County Sheriff’s Department wage negotiations, and
provided economic impact information for Kittitas County regarding a proposed wind farm by enXco.

7. STUDENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS, 2004-2008
       The high majority of our students take jobs upon graduation from CWU, although some go on
to graduate school in economics, business, and law. Below are some examples of our economic
graduates during 2004-2008.

Tiffanie Beyer        Graduate School, Statistics, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Michael Boitano       1st Lt., United States Army (Iraq)
Casey Campbell        Economic Analyst, State of Alaska Office of Economic Development
Lance Carey           Economic Analyst, State of Washington Employment Security
Christina Ghan        MATCH Charter Public High School, Boston, MA teacher development program
Raleigh Hayter        Graduate School, Human Ecology, Cornell University
Michael Jandl         Supplier Management, The Boeing Company, Everett, WA
Tim Kroll             Economic Analyst, San Francisco Federal Reserve, Seattle branch
Shawn Krannich        Construction Management, Stellar J Construction, Vancouver, WA
Kristina Larkey       Financial Representative, Russell Investments, Tacoma WA
Caleb Ledford         Personal Banker, Wells Fargo, Seattle, WA
Michael McCarty       Gonzaga School of Law
Gabriel Mendoza       Store Management, Costco, Yakima, WA
Nicole Oliver         Customer Service Representative, Symetra Financial, Bellevue, WA
Maria Dal Maso        Deputy Assessor, Thurston County Assessor’s Office
Tyler Naab            Customer Service Representative, Efinancial, Seattle, WA
Greg Pyle             Project Manager, Regency South Land Development, Issaquah, WA
Lindsay Tucker        Customer Service, US Bank
Chris Ward            Financial Management, Wenatchee, WA
8. STUDENT ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMICS PROGRAM
      This section includes several sources of information that provides student assessment of our
economics program: Student letters (email messages); Exit Survey of graduating seniors; and the
Alumnae Survey. Below are several students’ comments.

1.      AThe education that I have received from the Economics Department has been both thorough
and informative. I feel that I have been taught quite well in the areas that I have studied. Some of the
classes that I have taken include, Introduction to Micro/Macro Economics, Money and Banking,
International economics, Intermediate Micro/Macro Economics, Econometrics and I am currently
attending Managerial Economics.

       I always had a strong curiosity and interest in Economics, since Economics has a very strong
presence in our daily lives. After taking Economics 202 from Dr. Carbaugh, it was then, that I decided to
pursue an Economics minor. I proceeded to take Money and Banking and International Economics. I
enjoyed both of these classes. Additionally, they also happen to be my favorites thus far. After
obtaining my minor, I took a break off from Economics and focused on my Business Administration
degree, which I finished Fall Quarter 2002. When I completed my business classes, I then decided to
complete an Economics major with a specialization in Managerial Economics.

       I have taken mostly Economics classes this academic year. Some of the material has been
challenging, but very informative. I have definitely seen a change from the Business program to
Economics. I feel that all of my Economics professors are hard working, dedicated to their teaching and
advising, and always seem to have their doors open for the students. I feel like I have more of a
belonging in Economics than I had in Business Administration.

        Professors= Wassell, Elkins, Dr. Carbaugh and Dr. Ghosh, have been excellent Professors and
advisors. The only Professor I didn=t quite connect with, was Dr. Dittmer. He was an excellent
Professor, who I had the utmost confidence in, but didn=t really seem too personable. On the other
hand, I do know he had a lot of things on his mind. Moreover, Intermediate Micro has definitely been
my least favorite class in the Economics program.

         In summation, the Economics Department has been wonderful to me. Everyone from the
Professors to the Office Administrators has been helpful. Everyone has helped me out when I had a
problem, and has gone above and beyond my expectations. I feel that the program has been beneficial
to me in many ways. I feel more confident in my education and more marketable as a future employee.
I also feel that I have more of a direction in what I want to pursue as a career, since working towards
my Economics degree. Marketing was fun and enjoyable, but Economics has more prepared me for life
after college. I have more of a direction. Also, Economics has been influential in my personal life as
well. I recommend an Economics degree to anyone who is interested. Thank you for all of the support,
guidance, education and direction.@ Dar=Ka Johnson, 4/23/03

2.     AOverall, Central=s Economics major is very satisfactory on my scale. It contains the
fundamental courses requirement that includes intermediate micro and macro economics. The
majority of the Econ courses were adequately lectured by knowledgeable professors. I think all Econ
courses that I took helps to encourage interest in economics when the topics discussed in class
involved current events and/or real world issues. The best feature of this department is the eclectic
group of professors ranging from different backgrounds and ages. I enjoyed taking Econ classes from
these professors even though sometimes I feel not like studying. This department could be even better
if they change a few things in my opinion.

        The things to change are credits requirement for the major and strict courses plan. To complete
the Econ degree we need 74-75 credits after the admission requirement, however I think we should
increase the credits requirement to 90 in order for students to really have a grasp for Economics.
Likewise, a good courses plan is essential for students to finish the degree within their junior and
senior year. Also I recommend that Econ 324 (Econometrics) should be taken before Econ 452
(Managerial Economics) because the econometrics materials in Econ 452 becomes more transparent,
hence a strict courses plan is important. If a student follows a strict course plan, he or she will be able
to finish 90 credits in the Econ degree within two years. In every quarter that I took Econ classes there
was still extra room for me to take other subjects. If the purpose is to diversify a student=s education
then the current schema works really well.

       In general, the Economics department did a respectable job. I enjoyed being one of the
students at CWU=s Economic department.@ Minh Lam, 6/03

3.      AAfter enrolling in Econ 201 my freshman year, I found the subject so interesting that I chose
economics as my minor to my already decided history major. Over the course of the following year,
while fulfilling my required courses for the econ minor I decided to pursue a full major in the topic.

         CWU offers a fabulous assortment of economics courses that are all appealing and important
to students who are interested in any kind of business market job. The economics courses that are
offered prepare the student for life in the Areal world@ while developing an appreciation for the field.
CWU has a program that is both challenging and highly intellectual which pushes the student and
prepares them for any job or future in business. I personally have found the program to be highly
educational as well as professional. The professors that I have taken all explain the material
thoroughly and furthermore take a personal interest on the student=s success in the program. A high
level of professionalism is always prevalent in the classroom.

         The courses that I have taken have all been very informative about the different aspects of the
world economy and how it is structured. In addition, several out of classroom opportunities have been
made available to give students personal experience with different economists and job fields. I would
highly recommend the economics program at CWU to any individual that asks me about it or is
considering an education at CWU.@ Cliff Brooke, 6/03

End of Program Review Questionnaire
Which courses in the Economics curriculum most helped you prepare for graduate education?

Micro and Macro econ courses, Managerial Economics
                                                             Nick Ricketts

Econ 401 and 402; These were some of the most difficult courses that I took. The analytical challenge
presented will most likely help me for graduate level work.
                                                            Nick Loveless
Econ 352 with Dittmer, Econ 401 with Dittmer/Hedrick, Finance 470/370
                                                         Anthony Melchior

Forecasting, History of Econ, 401, 402
                                                            Kris Foster
Economic Assessment, Econ 406
                                                            Saori Mizugaki

Money and Banking, Econ 330
                                                            Michael McCartney

Econ 401/402
                                                            Student 3

Econometrics, money and banking, 401 and 402
                                                            Student 4
I believe it will be Economics 406.
                                                            Student 5
Intermediate Macro, International, Money and Banking
                                                            Student 6
Econ 402
                                                            Student 7


How would you compare your education with that of students in other majors at CWU (difference is
quality of education, characteristics, atmosphere, etc.)


I think it is definitely of the highest quality. However, certain professors in the department have taken
away from that experience as a result of the unfriendliness and power struggles it seems they have.
(Mr. Elkins)
                                                                Nick Ricketts

I believe that the econ dept is one of the more challenging majors at CWU. Also, I believe the quality of
education is high enough that people who aren’t naturally intelligent can succeed with the right
amount of determination.
                                                            Nick Loveless

I feel the econ students are not only brighter, but also know a great deal more about what goes on
with real world issues. It seems our curriculum is also more challenging which I feel is a good
representation of the field. We all don’t get free rides with easy A’s like in the Education program.
                                                              Anthony Melchoir

Very close student pop. Harder than most other disciplines. Coupled with history it’s a top program.
                                                           Kris Foster
Ours was one of the tougher programs, but we seem to learn a lot more real world issues and the
information sticks.
                                                        Drew Whittail

Economics is a difficult subject. I felt that the classes are harder than any other classes in other majors.
                                                                Saori Mizugki

Hands down, far and above superior to that of the rest of the business school. You guys have
completely changed the way I think about the world. It’s hands down the best experience I had with
any department on campus. I was confident in all the instructors’ knowledge and capabilities and
thoroughly enjoyed my time here.
                                                           Caleb Ledford

I would say that I was very lucky to be in such a good major. I feel the atmosphere was far superior
than the Political Science atmosphere. I also feel that the quality of education was greater, I always felt
that the professors of the Econ department always wanted to ensure that the students were learning.
                                                             Michael McCartney

I think it has been better than most. It’s not easy to just breeze through and pass with a good GPA.
Smaller class sizes are nice. Professors have been more accessable than other departments I’ve taken
classes from.
                                                               Casey Campbell

I thought my education was great in a more relaxed atmosphere.
                                                         Student 1

Very similar, although some other majors seem more close-knit and have a strong focus on internships.
The Econ dept. has great teachers that are easy to get to know.
                                                            Student 2

I think the quality was on par with every other major if not better. Instructors are more in tune with
the topics.
                                                             Student 3
I think my education at CWU is of much higher quality than other Central programs. I think that I got a
lot more one-on-one time with my professors and my classes were very focused and informative. My
classes had a fun atmosphere, but I learned a lot!
                                                             Student 4
I believe its very similar because professors I other programs are just as good.
                                                             Student 5
I thought the Econ major was very effective overall. The faculty were knowledgeable, helpful and nice.
                                                             Student 6
I would rate the overall Econ program a 4 on a 1-5 scale only because there aren’t many strictly econ
classes.
                                                             Student 7
Which one or two classes were the most helpful to you in reaching your goals, and why?

Both the Micro and Macro classes at the 200 and 400 levels were both really interesting and offered
lots of valuable life tools. For management purposes I found Managerial Economics was also a great
course. It offered a lot of insight into real management situations.
                                                             Nick Ricketts

I’m not exactly sure what this question is asking....My goal was to graduate with a degree in
economics, so they were all helpful. I suppose that 40 and 402 once again would be included. These
were the most challenging analytically, so I received the most satisfaction and encouragement when I
completed them.
                                                             Nick Loveless
All of my classes with Dr. Bob, Dittmer and Hedrick. They really make me appreciate the field and gain
a high level of understanding with the materials.
                                                             Anthony Melchoir

History of Econ- being a history enthusiast I was able to combine both disciplines. Poli Sci Global
Political Economy- should be in the curriculum, and gave the history of GATT, WTO, IMF; all very
helpful and interesting.
                                                            Kris Foster

Government and Business and Econ 401. Both were contact loaded and involved real world issues or
issues applicable to other real world situation.
                                                      Drew Whittail

Economic Assessment. I could see how I was doing in economic classes through this class. This class
helped me a lot to remember what I’ve learned.
                                                         Saori Mizugki

Managerial Economics: I really enjoyed the real world application and game theory. Intermediate
Micro and Macro: They taught me to challenge myself and think outside the box.
                                                           Caleb Ledford

Money and Banking- this class focuses with issues that everyone has to deal with. The knowledge that
was gained from this class was very beneficial to me. I will use it all throughout my life. Government
and Business- this class focuses on how the government played a role in how business was conducted
in America, plus the legal information on monopoly cases was very interesting.
                                                             Michael McCartney

Natural Resource Economics, Econometrics. Natural Resource Econ. Helped me find a subject I cared
about in school. Econometrics helped me learn skills that can be applied in the work place. I learned
how to do something not just theory of why someone thought something worked.
                                                            Casey Campbell
My goal was a degree. So all were helpful
                                                             Student 1

Coms 301 at Cal Poly- we gave several individual speeches in front of class and on video tape and we
focused on interviewing techniques. The class helped me with the skills I will need to get a job. Also
Econ 409 at Cal Poly because the computer applications felt like what I would actually do in an Econ
job.
                                                           Student 2

Econ 401/402. Really worked the analytical thinking, and application of the materials.
                                                           Student 3

Money and Banking and Econ 402. One of my goals has been to better understand the current
economy and these classes really helped! I feel like I can read the paper now and really understand
what’s going on.
                                                             Student 4

Money and Banking, Econ 406, and International Econ.
                                                             Student 5

International, Money and Banking and Econ History were informative for both my everyday life and
future careers. Intermediate Macro with Dr. Wassell was also very helpful in understanding Economic
events in the news.
                                                          Student 6
Econ 402 was the class that was most helpful.
                                                          Student 7


Which one or two classes were the least helpful, and why?

Statistics-Elkins was a horrible professor for me, he discouraged my learning and as a result I was so
bitter I really got nothing out of his class.
Money and Banking-for the most part everything covered in this class was already covered in other
classes I had.
                                                             Nick Ricketts

Econ 348- I enjoyed this class and especially Dr. Mack, but I don’t believe that it is going to be anything
that I will remember or use again. I should have challenged myself and taken econometrics.
                                                             Nick Loveless

The structure of Econ 402 with Wassell was kind of difficult to follow. We seemed to jump around the
material a lot.
                                                            Anthony Melchoir
MIS 386- just didn’t see the benefit of it.
                                                             Kris Foster

Managerial Economics-it was very similar to Econ 401, a lot of the course subject was repetitive.
                                                           Drew Whittail

Public Finance: Simply because I took it my last quarter here and most of it was review. However, I did
enjoy my conversations with Dr. Ghosh. He is an excellent resource.
                                                            Caleb Ledford

Econ 352- this class was too deep into the mathematical equations that economists could use. Plus, I
didn’t find it useful to me.
                                                          Michael McCartney

Any business class. They didn’t teach me anything that isn’t common sense. All they really did was tech
me new words.
                                                            Casey Campbell

The ones I took outside my major.
                                                             Student 1

MIS 386 was a class I didn’t find very helpful for an economics student.
                                                            Student 2

Econ 348 (Economic history of the US) was a history class.
                                                             Student 3

Forecasting-the class was brand new when I took it, so it definitely needs improving. I felt like I did not
learn as much as I thought I would.
                                                            Student 4

Econ 401 because I have to do all the homework and not getting to know whether I got it right or
wrong.
                                                         Student 5

Intermediate Micro was least aligned with my personal interests
                                                            Student 6
I think Econ 401 was least helpful because I get by with my math background so it didn’t force me to
learn very much.
                                                            Student 7
What do you think are the strong features of the department?

The secretary, Shirley Hood is really good at holding the whole department together. The department
also has some of the most intellectual professors and I typically find myself very confident in their
knowledge.
                                                            Nick Ricketts

The quality of instruction. I have been all over CWU, and I would argue that the econ department has
some of the best faculty.
                                                             Nick Loveless


The faculty are awesome! I feel their intelligence and teaching abilities far exceed other department at
CWU
                                                            Anthony Melchoir

Close relationships of faculty and students. Academic prowess of faculty being continually published.
                                                          Kris Foster

Faculty. There is a weeding out process but it seems fair. The professors are good at making sure
everyone understands everything, and are available if needed.
                                                             Drew Whittail

All professors in Economic Department are great. They will always be there and help students.
                                                         Saori Mizugki

You all have outstanding credentials and good reputations on campus.
                                                          Caleb Ledford

The staff
                                                             Michael McCartney

Flexability, small size, professor accessability, helpful secretary.
                                                                Casey Campbell

High quality instruction.
                                                             Student 1

The professors, the ease of receiving academic advising, the hands on course work (ie online
experiments)
                                                           Student 2
Professors publishing papers and writing books.
                                                           Student 3
Outgoing professors, small classes, very intelligent professors
                                                             Student 4

Having great professors like Dr. Bob
                                                             Student 5

The helpfulness and support of faculty such as Dr. Carbaugh, Dr. Mack, Dr. Saunders, and Dr. Wassell.
                                                          Student 6

Professors are charismatic speakers and make you want to learn and the coursework is challenging but
not overwhelming.
                                                         Student 7


What do you think are the weakest features of the department?

Elkins! I almost dropped out of the business department because of him.
                                                          Nick Ricketts

The number of courses offered. It would have been nice to have more to choose form. Also, more
classes aimed specifically at preparing students for graduate school study.
                                                            Nick Loveless

The fact that it still relies upon the business department for its prerequisites. A good portion of the
classes I’ve taken in the business core section are a huge waste of time and resources.
                                                              Anthony Melchoir

Small still, and need to include some classes like Poli Sci and history ones in curriculum.
                                                              Kris Foster
Everyone is leaving!
                                                              Drew Whittail

Class schedule. It was hard to make academic schedule because some classes are offered only once a
year.
                                                         Saori Mizugki

Try doing more career counseling. I also wish Forecasting would have been offered multiple times. I
had conflicts that didn’t permit me to take it.
                                                           Caleb Ledford
The limitations of availability of classes.
                                                           Michael McCartney
Lack of classes in different disciplines within econ. I would like to see classes help students develop
their report writing skills, along with research skills. I also would like more work like projects in
classes.
                                                                Casey Campbell
Small department with few classes.
                                                                Student 1

Could use a greater focus on world issues, more group work would be beneficial
                                                         Student 2

Need a little more variety I courses available-no female professors!
                                                            Student 3
Maybe we don’t have enough recognition.
                                                            Student 5

Use of Aplia did not seem especially helpful or cost-effective
                                                             Student 6
In some classes professors focus so much on the math the concepts are lost.
                                                             Student 7

What advice can you give the Economics department to improve its programs?

Some classes fill up fast, so more classes or bigger rooms.
                                                              Student 1

More group work/projects. More frequent offerings of courses needed for major. More focus on how
the U.S. interacts with the world.
                                                        Student 2

Group activities, working on communication skills.
                                                              Student 3

Define a specific curriculum for the forecasting class. Offer a wider variety of classes (intro to labor
econ, environmental econ. Etc)
                                                              Student 4

Offer Econ 352 twice a year instead of once a year.
                                                              Student 5
Get bigger so you can offer more classes.
                                                              Student 7
           Central Washington University –Department of Economics
      Summary of Alumni Responses to Radio Button and Check Box Questions
                        2003-2007 Alumni Survey

1. What year did you graduate or complete your program from CWU?

                                            -n-                                 -%-
                2003                         5                                  8%
                2004                         9                                 15%
                2005                        13                                 21%
                2006                        15                                 25%
                2007                        19                                 31%
                Total                       61                                 100%

2. Which Economics degree program/s did you complete?

        -n-             -%-
         7              12%                          B.S. General Economics
         19             32%                          B.S. Managerial Economics
         0              0%                           B.S. Economics and Business Forecasting (Program began in
                                                     2007)
          34            57%                          Minor in Economics
          60            100%

3. How important are each of the following competencies to your career?

                                                  Not at all          Not       Somewhat          Very
                                                  important        important    important       important   Critical        Mean    Median   St Dev
 a.   Thinking critically-check your and
      other’s assumptions; consider
      multiple perspectives from various
      sources, etc.                                            1           0                3           9              7    4.050        4    .999
 b.   Communications-use appropriate
      oral, written, and visual means for
      each audience; listen effectively
                                                               1           0                1           6              12   4.400        5    .995
 c.   Quantitative reasoning-apply
      Quantitative tools and computer
      skills
      To solve problems; comprehend
      symbolic representations                                 1           3                1          12              3    3.650        4   1.089
 d.   Economic literacy-critically evaluate
      data sources as I gather relevant
                                                               1           1                6           8              4    3.650        4   1.040
      information
4. How well did Economics prepare you for each of these competencies?

                                               Not at all          Not       Somewhat            Very
                                               important        important    important         important   Critical        Mean    Median         St Dev
 a.   Thinking critically-check your and
      other’s assumptions; consider
      multiple perspectives from various
      sources, etc.                                         0           0                 2            8              10   4.400        4.5       0.681
 b.   Communications-use appropriate
      oral, written, and visual means for
      each audience; listen effectively
                                                            0           0                 2           14               4   4.100            4       .533
 c.   Quantitative reasoning-apply
      Quantitative tools and computer
      skills
      To solve problems; comprehend
      symbolic representations                              0           0                 2           12               6   4.200            4     0.616
 d.   Economic literacy-critically evaluate
      data sources as I gather relevant
                                                            0           0                 2            8              10   4.400        4.5       0.681
      information


Comparison of Question #3 “Importance” vs. Question #4 “How Well Prepared”

                                         “How          “How well                         “How       “How well                    “How             “How
                                         important”    Prepared”                       important”   Prepared”   Difference     Important”          well
                                         Median         Median        Difference         Mean       Mean                         StDev          Prepared”
                                                                                                                                                  StDev
 a.   Thinking critically-check your
      and other’s assumptions;
      consider multiple perspectives
      from various sources, etc.                  4             4.5          -0.5         4.050       -0.350          0.999        0.999          0.681
 b.   Communications-use
      appropriate oral, written, and
      visual means for each
      audience; listen effectively                5              4                 1      4.400       4.100           0.300        0.995          0.553
 c.   Quantitative reasoning-apply
      Quantitative tools and
      computer skills
      To solve problems;
      comprehend symbolic                         4              4                 0      3.650       4.200           -0.550       1.089          0.616
      representations
 d.   Information literacy-critically
      evaluate data sources as I
                                                  4             4.5          -0.5         3.650       4.400           -0.750       1.040          0.681
      gather relevant information


5. What are your suggestions for improving the quality of your degree program in Economics?

       Enforce how important Forecasting is to the individual business success.
       Having a text for Econ 402 that relates to the material that is being taught.
       Higher level of Excel competency and mathematical rigor! Students should be required to take
        calculus and be masters in Excel.
       I really enjoyed the courses in economics that I completed at CWU. I suppose a suggestion
        would be to integrate more computer based assignments to the curriculum.
       I think more education in gathering data for forecasting would have helped me. I learned what
        to do with the numbers-just where to get them or which will be most relevant.
       I wanted to learn much about finance things from economic perspective so business and
        economic department should incorporate more in order to make a strong degree which is
        useful in real life.
     Include more math courses to help students further understand how math and economics play
      roles together in the field.
     Introduce students to business professionals who apply economic thinking in their careers. Case
      studies w/local businesses.
     Keep Dr. Carbaugh no matter what! He is one of the best professors I’ve ever had!
     Less focus on book memorizing for tests and more projects that accurately depict the practical
      applications of the theories.
     More interaction regarding career prospects after completed the degree.
     More job placement seminars
     More micro-based classes/electives available.
     Offer more online programs. The teachers were great, but the classes I needed were not
      offered so I stopped three classes short of an Economic Major.
     Require calculus as a condition for acceptance into the economic majors.
     Teach on topics that are more related to the workplace, as opposed to theory.
     There was some questions as to the credibility of the Economics degree due to not required
      calculus.
     Upper level courses should include more projects requiring presentation of findings. Also
      development of a course which teaches students how to apply excel and other software
      packages to business and economic problems.
     Use computer applications in class. Econ Profs were very professional and always willing to help
      or answer any questions.
     Use grade students to develop discussion groups and tutoring sessions. Offer more stimulating
      extra-curricular activities (like the conference with Uncle Milty back in the day).
     While the Economics department placed a great deal of emphasis on forecasting and
      mathematic problems solving, it rarely provided the opportunity to present and/or
      communicate proposals for solving real world issues. I believe the only paper I wrote in this
      regard was in Dr. Ghosh’s class regarding Social Security.

Other comment for the Economics Department at CWU?

     All the teachers I had in the Economics department were great at providing different
      explanations when needed.
     Great faculty. I wish there were more opportunities for students and alumni to get involved
      with research projects and generally more “hands on” learning experiences.
     Great program-have positive marks for the educational curriculum @ CWU-Ellensburg.
     Great program- I wish you offered a graduate course.
     I appreciated the efforts from the Economics department going beyond the call of duty to help
      me finish my degree.
     I believe that both Money and Banking and International Economics should be required courses
      for business majors (assuming the same quality of teaching is available as in 2007). In light of
      current events, these two classes are essential to understanding the global business
      environment.
     I believe that it may be beneficial for students to have classes that are more engaging. That
      being having participation and original though be the goal, instead of simply presenting
      material from a book, which can be done online by a virtual teacher anyway.
           I enjoyed the Economics Program at CWU very much. It helped expand my “accountant” mind
            in many directions and I am very grateful for all that I have learned. Thanks!!
           I got all of the attention, help and assistance from the Econ Department that I could have asked
            for. All of my professors were encouraging and accommodating as I worked and raised a child
            while I was finished y degrees. I double majored In Business as well; that program was
            overcrowded and classes were brought down by students who didn’t care. I am afraid for that
            program as CWU’s attendance brows much faster than the school itself.
           I learned so much from my Economics studies at CWU, my only regret is that I had no more
            time for additional classes. Between having Dr. Ghosh as a professor and using Dr. Carbaugh’s
            International Econ text, I can’t imagine getting better value for my time and cost. Recently I
            have been taking my CPA exams, in which numerous sections have been made much easier by
            my economics studies. Thanks to all the staff!
           I wish I could have taken more classes in Economics at CWU. I really respected and enjoyed the
            Professors and I believe the classes I took will only help my future.
           It is imperative that students are prepared to present and communicate their proposals for real
            world problem solving to their peers and superiors. The Economics department was severely
            lacking in group collaboration and peer evaluations. This is imperative in the business and
            political world. Please strongly consider this when developing future lesson plans and
            assignments!
           Just continue to employ top quality professors. Ghosh, Carbaugh, Dittmer, Elkins etc all were
            wonderful. Top to bottom the Econ program at Central is very strong (unlike the Business Dept.
            where it good at the top and horrible at the bottom.)
           Stress the need for calculus as part of the pre-major course work to get into the Economics
            department. Calculus would have helped my do better while in the major and after graduation.
            Now I have to take calculus classes at a community college.
           Thank you, I would love to hear about the progression of the program. I think the staff couldn’t
            be better and there wasn’t an econ class I didn’t enjoy!
           You should have a monthly or quarterly virtual meeting discussing economic issues to keep
            alumni active interested I our past learnings. I would like to see the results of this survey,
            maybe find a way to keep Econ alumni connected to each other and Econ dept.

6. Please select the response that best describes your opinion about your Economics education at CWU.

                                                                                                                          N/A's not included in
                                                                                                                         statistics
                                                         Strongly                                Strongly
                                                         disagree   Disagree   Neutral   Agree   agree      N/A          Mean    Median   StDev
    I am very satisfied with my education from the
    Economics program at Central Washington
    University.
                                                                                                              Not an
                                                                                                            option on
                                                                                                               this
                                                         0           1          2         25      33        question     4.475    5        0.648
    The Economics curriculum provided useful                                                                  Not an
    perspectives on critical issues facing my                                                                option on
    profession.                                                                                                 this
                                                         0           0          4         23      33         question    4.483    5        0.624
    My Economics major provided adequate
    preparation for Graduate (e.g. M.S., M.B.A., J.D.,
    or Ph.D.) programs attended after graduation
    from CWU.                                            1           0          12        8       10        29           3.839    4        1.003
8. What is your highest level of education?

                       -n-               -%-
                       55                90%              Bachelor’s degree
                                                          Master’s degree
                       5                 8%               (including MBA)
                       0                 0%               Doctorate
                       1                 2%               Professional (e.g. J.D.)


9. Are you

                               -n-       -%-
             Male              45        74%
             Female            16        26%
                               61        100%


13. What is your race or ethnicity? Please select all that apply.
                     -n-               -%-
                      0                0%     American Indian or Alaskan Native
                      5                8%             Asian
                      2                3%             Black or African American
                      4                6%             Hispanic/Latino
                      0                0%     Native Hawaiian or other Pacific
                                                      Islander
                      51               82%            White


 14. These questions relate to CWU’S Mission and General Education goals.
     How strongly do you agree that your education from CWU helped you


                                         Strongly                                    Strongly
                                         disagree   Disagree   Neutral   Agree          agree   Mean    Median   StDev
become a responsible citizen
                                                0          2        13      37             9    3.869        4   0.695
become a responsible steward of the
earth
                                                2          3        25      23             8    3.525        4   0.906
become a productive and enlightened
(informed, good learner, insightful)
individual

                                                0          1         5      40            15    4.131        4   0.618
value different perspectives
                                                0          0         6      31            24    4.295        4   0.641
appreciate the breadth and depth of
scientific and human knowledge


                                                0          1        10      32            18    4.098        4   0.724
increase your sense of the
interconnectedness of knowledge


                                        1    1       11    34        14       3.967     4    0.795
integrate knowledge from diverse
fields to solve problems


                                        0    1       7     39        14       4.082     4    0.640
increase your awareness of the many
ways that knowledge evolves


                                        0    0       12    37        12       4.000     4    0.632
ask incisive and insightful questions


                                        0    1       13    32        15       4.000     4    0.730




9. LIBRARY, TECHNOLOGY, FACILITY RESOURCES
        The DOE relies on the library of CWU for books, journals, and government documents needed
to support teaching and research. Interlibrary loan is another source of information for economics
faculty and students. Each year, the l8brary provides the DOE $4,000 for the purchase of books and
$1,743 for subscriptions to journals.

        Our library faculty is adequate for an undergraduate program in economics. The faculty has
reported that the library is prompt in ordering materials that are needed for courses in economics.
The library does not carry the kind of holdings that provide support for widespread faculty research in
economics. This is not the fault of the library, but a reflection of limited budgets. The DOE bears some
of the cost of subscriptions to journals and books necessary for teaching and research.

         Concerning facilities, the DOEs faculty, staff and students enjoy adequate facilities at all
program locations. Significant improvements of the physical facilities have been completed at all CB
sties in recent years.

        Shaw-Smyser Hall An extensive remodeling of Shaw-Smyser Hall, home of the College of
Business at the main campus in Ellensburg was completed in 1994. The present configuration of Shaw-
Smyser includes 13 classrooms, with seating capacity from 25 to 109. There are 6 computer labs with a
total 168 computers available for students. Computer labs are able to be reserved for classes per the
needs of the faculty. Software available includes the Microsoft Office suite, Eviews, and various other
web design programs.

        All classrooms in Shaw-Smyser are equipped with computer technology. Faculty members make
regular use of the audio-visual-computer equipment in the classroom. This equipment supports the
use of Powerpoint presentations, both on-line and VCR-based videos, audio clips from NPR, and Excel-
based analysis. The equipment used for distance education is continually being reviewed and
upgraded. The new facilities at most of our CWU centers has greatly improved delivery of these
courses.
        Several of faculty members are using Aplia, an innovative on-line homework/tutorial program,
in the principles courses. Aplia requires students to complete one or more exercises each week that
support classroom instruction. It is especially helpful in encouraging the growing number of students
who are weak in quantitative and graphical analysis to address their deficiencies in these areas.


10. FUTURE DIRECTION AND CHALLENGES OF ECONOMICS PROGRAM

In the past two years, the DOE has undergone significant revisions of its program:


      A new specialization was developed, Economics and Business Forecasting. There were two
       motives behind the development of this specialization. First, our faculty wished to provide a
       quantitative specialization in economics that would appeal to our students who are interested
       in business and economics forecasting as well as economic research. Second, by including the
       business core of courses in this specialization, the Economics Department will be judged by its
       accreditor (AACSB) as being fully integrated into the College of Business.

      To improve the assessment of the DOE’s degree programs, a new course was developed, EC
       406: Economic Assessment. This course provides a review of major topics that our students
       have learned in microeconomics and macroeconomics. The course also includes end-of-major
       assessment activities including students taking the Economics Major Field Exam during their
       senior year, as developed by the Educational Testing Service. Moreover, the course requires
       students to prepare a resume for their entry into the job market, write a research paper on a
       contemporary economic topic, and complete a DOE exit questionnaire.

      The replacement of the DOE’s internally developed assessment exam for economics majors
       with the Economics Major Field Exam as noted above. This will provide more comprehensive
       data concerning the performance of our economics students relative to that of students at
       other universities. During spring quarter 2008, two DOE students completed the Economics
       Major Field Exam: One student performed at the 75th percentile on the exam, while the other
       students performed at the 35th percentile. During Fall 2008, six additional students completed
       the Economics Major Field Exam. When we receive their scores from ETS, we will add this
       information as an addendum to this report.

      The absorption of the Business Statistics program and faculty into the Department of
       Economics.




These changes will provide an era of programmatic stability for the DOE over the next several years.
However, the DOE is forward looking and will continue to assess its future direction in several critical
areas:
Curriculum
Integration:

The DOE will continue to emphasize core competencies in the areas of principles of economics,
quantitative methods, critical thinking, and communication. It will also strive to strengthen students’
understanding of a multicultural, and increasingly globalized world. The DOE will continue to
emphasize communication skills in the classroom. Students will be expected to write research papers
and essays that deal with the application of economic concepts to real world problems. Oral
presentations will also be encouraged whenever appropriate. Computer use will continue to be
integrated into economics courses, and use of statistical software, spreadsheets and PowerPoint will
be introduced in appropriate courses.

Internationalization:

Internationalizing the economics curriculum will continue to be an important goal of the DOE. The
faculty of this department is exceptionally equipped to achieve this objective. We have already begun
this process by creating new courses, such as the World Economic Issues course, and in incorporating
international topics in the curriculum, whenever relevant. We are presently discussing ways to
incorporate more of such material in our courses. Our department is uniquely positioned to deliver
such content due to both our training, as well as our close association with a group of faculty on this
campus who are committed to internationalizing the curriculum.

Distance Learning:

Serving our place-bound students at the Centers, and in particular the West Side which is experiencing
FTE growth, is a special challenge for the COB and hence the DOE as well. While students at our centers
need to be served, there is usually no technological substitute for time with an instructor. One way of
preventing the degradation of the learning experience, which can happen in the distance environment,
is to create a "blended learning" environment. Blended learning within the distance learning
framework would create an integrated approach involving, face-to-face interaction, web-based
instruction, as well as traditional distance learning.

Student Interaction
Advising:

All members of this department take advising seriously. In order to distribute the advising load
equitably, we create an Advising Schedule each quarter. This allows us to be available to students so
that there is at least one faculty member who is always available to advise students during the times
when we expect a higher density of student visits. We take pride in such availability to our students.
Periodically, we also publish a list of our majors and minors. This allows colleagues to share this
information and begin a process of redistribution of loads when the loads become inequitable. The
collegiality of this department is such that most individual members step forward with suggestions for
sharing arrangements, without the chairperson having to take any initiative beyond the generation of
this document.
There is, however, a more complex issue related to advising which we need to discuss…"quality." Are
we able to advise "deeply" thus helping some students define their occupational choices and careers or
are we succumbing, due to time pressures, to advising by signatures? Some students only require help
with their schedules, but then there are those others who need guidance in order to define their
choices. This requires repeat and more intense interaction. Given the size of the department, the
significant amount of campus activity that all of us pursue, and the active research agendas that all of
us maintain, how are we constrained in this role? In order to address this question in a more
systematic fashion, we are developing a student database, which will serve as an excellent monitoring
system for our advisees, and help us track the quality of our interaction more efficiently. As we begin
to use this system we hope to learn how to improve the quality of our interaction, both individually as
well as cooperatively.

Individual Studies and Internships:

In informal exit interviews, several students have expressed the need and an appreciation for
independent study opportunities. It is both a tradition of this department to extend ourselves to
students in this fashion, as well as a present need. These are valuable skill deepening experiences. Our
better prepared students have mentioned on occasion, how they prefer challenges which separate
them from the broad under-prepared (on occasion) audience that we meet in some of our courses. It is
not feasible to create separate courses for this small band of students, whose needs, however, we
must attend to. The attention that was paid to several such students in previous years has invariably
led to career possibilities for these students which they may not have been able to access without such
special attention. These students are self- selected and more likely to obtain the better jobs and/or
continue with higher studies. With our help they are far more likely to succeed in this endeavor. We
need some coordination in this area. We have to consider how we can actively seek them out and
create these learning opportunities. By creating a tighter advising sequence, we can begin identifying
these students in the spring of their junior year or fall of their senior year. We could share this
information and develop a tracking mechanism for these students and pair them with faculty by winter
quarter of the senior year. These individual studies projects can also be developed into presentations
for SOURCE, or into papers for presentation in regional, and national meetings. This has been one of
our best traditions in this department and it will be
important to encourage the incoming faculty to continue with this effort.

Accreditation
One important goal of the College of Business is to achieve AACSB accreditation. As part of the College
of Business, the DOE will continue to help the college strive to attain its goal. In particular, the DOE will
help the college attain accreditation in two ways: (1) by employing faculty members holding Ph.D.
degrees in economics; (2) by generating quality research that is published in refereed outlets such as
academic journals and books. Recognizing that the primary goal of our university is to educate
students, the DOE faculty will maintain a proper balance in teaching, service and scholarship
objectives, and abide by the standards of the college.



Personnel
The DOE faces some significant challenges in the areas of recruitment, hiring, and retention of
terminally qualified faculty. An inadequate salary structure of the university is often an obstacle for
making competitive offers to qualified candidates. Hiring faculty at the Ellensburg campus is difficult
because Ellensburg offers few job opportunities to the spouse/partner of a faculty member. In
combination, these two factors remain challenging constraints for making this an attractive living
environment for many promising academics.

In conclusion, it is worth noting that all members of this department have flourished academically in
the recent years. The department at this present time is attempting to incorporate an increasingly
integrated approach to decision making. This is a reasonable goal due to the cooperation that exists
among colleagues. In the face of changes and emergent needs which are inevitable institutional
realities, the challenge of adhering to the twin principles of “maximum flexibility for all" and of
assigning tasks with attention to "comparative advantage” will remain.




             Appendix 1: DOE’s Degree Specializations—Course Catalog
     The Economics Department offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics with specializations
in Managerial Economics, General Economics, and Economic and Business Forecasting. Economics
minors are offered to complement accounting, business administration, and other majors.

       The economics department requires that all university general education requirements be fully
met. In addition to these requirements, the BS Economics major is comprised of the following
components: 1) pre-admission courses providing necessary theoretical and quantitative skills to
pursue studies in economics, 2) core courses in both micro and macro economic theory, and 3) a
choice of supporting courses for each of the three economics major specializations.

Transfer Credits
       Equivalent lower division (100-200 level) courses may be transferred toward meeting the pre-
admission requirements for any BS degree in the College of Business. Upper division (300-400 level)
courses may be transferred toward meeting the major requirements only with the approval of the
department chair and the college dean or designee.

       Transfer students must earn a minimum of 45 quarter credits at CWU to be eligible for the BS
Economics degree. Transfer students earning fewer than 45 quarter credits in their major at CWU must
receive approval from the college dean prior to graduation.

Service to Other Majors
        Students majoring outside the College of Business who are required to take courses in this
college for either their major or minor will be eligible to enroll on a space-available basis. These
students will be given priority over other non-college majors wishing to enroll in courses.

Bachelor of Science Economics Major with Specialization

        Coursework counting toward the major cannot be taken credit/no credit by economics majors.
Double majors are available. Interested students should consult with their advisor or the department
chair for details prior to enrolling.
The economics faculty have determined the following objectives which apply to all BS Economics
graduates:
Students completing an economics degree will possess the tools which enable them to analyze and
understand macro and micro economic problems and policies.

      Students will possess qualifications and knowledge which will help them to find employment in
       fields related to economics.
      Students will acquire and be able to use basic tools to enable them to carry out quantitatively
       oriented tasks in their employment or their field of graduate studies.
      Students completing the program should possess the communication and economic skills
       desirable in their future employment or graduate studies.



Economics Pre-admission Requirements
       Students must apply and be admitted to the major prior to beginning 300-400 level courses in
the CB. At the time of application all pre-admission requirements should be substantially completed.
Application forms are available in the department offices. The completed form must be accompanied
by transcripts that reflect all prior work.

      Admission will be based on grades earned the following pre-admission courses. ENG 101 and
ENG 102 must also be completed before admission.

Pre-admission Requirements

      BUS 221- Introductory Business Statistics           5
       (Prerequisite, MATH 130)
      ECON 201- Principles of Economics Micro             5
      ECON 202- Principles of Economics Macro             5
      MATH 153-Pre-Calculus Mathematics I                 5
       OR
       MATH 170-Intuitive Calculus I                       5
       OR
       MATH 172- Calculus I                                5
       Pre-admission Total Credits: 20

Additional Admission Information

        A cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the above courses must be achieved with a
minimum grade of C– (1.70) in each course. The credit/no credit option will not be accepted for any of
these courses. The applicant must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 in all collegiate
study. These criteria also apply to equivalent course transferred from other institutions.

        Students who have met all of the above requirements will be admitted unless the number of
eligible applicants exceeds available spaces. In that case, acceptance will be competitive, based on a
selection index. Students who have not met all of the above requirements may be admitted
provisionally by permission of the College Dean or designee.

Economic and Business Forecasting Specialization

       This specialization is for students who seek careers involving research in economics and
business, including forecasting.

Required Courses                                         Credits
Pre-admission requirements                                 20
      ACCT 251-Accounting I                                5
      ECON 324-Introduction to Econometrics                5
      ECON 325-Introduction to Forecasting                 5
      ECON 352-Managerial Economics                       5
      ECON 401-Intermediate Microeconomics                5
      ECON 402-Intermediate Macroeconomics                5
      ECON 406-Economics Assessment                       5
      ECON 426-Economic Research                          5
      FIN 370-Introductory Financial Management           5
      MGT 382-Principles of Management                    5
      MIS 386-Management Information Systems              5
      MKT 362-Essential Marketing Concepts                5
      OSC 323-Operations Management                       5
      OSC 435-Advanced Operations Management              5
        Select one of the following
      ADMG 385-Business Com. and Report Writing           5
      COM 345- Business and Professional Speaking         5
      ENG 310-Technical Writing                           5
                                                           Total Credits 92-93

Additional Graduation Requirements
        A cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the above courses must be achieved with a
minimum grade of C– (1.70) in each course. The credit/no credit option will not be accepted for any of
these courses. The applicant must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 in all collegiate
study. These criteria also apply to equivalent course transferred from other institutions.

General Economics Specialization

       This specialization is for students who seek careers involving research in economics and
business, including forecasting.

Required Courses                                        Credits
Pre-admission requirements                                20
      ECON 310-International Economics                    5
      ECON 324-Introduction to Econometrics               5
      ECON 330-Money and Banking                          5
      ECON 332-Public Finance                             5
      ECON 401-Intermediate Microeconomics                5
      ECON 402-Intermediate Macroeconomics                5
      ECON 406-Economics Assessment                       5
      ECON 426-Economic Research                          5
      MIS 386-Management Information Systems              5
        Select one of the following
      ADMG 385-Business Com. and Report Writing           5
      COM 345- Business and Professional Speaking         5
      ENG 310-Technical Writing                           5

Department-approved electives selected from the following
                                                        10
Any 300-400 level economics courses or one accounting course
                                                            10
                                                            Total Credits 77-78

Additional Graduation Requirements
       A cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the above courses must be achieved with a
minimum grade of C– (1.70) in each course. The credit/no credit option will not be accepted for any of
these courses. The applicant must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 in all collegiate
study These criteria also apply to equivalent course transferred from other institutions.

Managerial Economics Specialization
         This specialization is for students with an interest in both public and private sector employment
and preparation for law school. High recommended supporting courses: MATH 170 or MATH 172. The
managerial economics specialization can be used as part of a double major. See your advisor for
details.

Required Courses                                      Credits
Pre-admission requirements                              20
      ACCT 251-Accounting I                             5
      ACCT 252-Accounting II                            5
      ECON 352-Managerial Economics                     5
      ECON 401-Intermediate Microeconomics              5
      ECON 402-Intermediate Macroeconomics              5
      ECON 406-Economics Assessment                     5
      FIN 370-Introductory Financial Management         5
        Select one of the following
      ADMG 385-Business Com. and Report Writing         5
      COM 345- Business and Professional Speaking       5
      ENG 310-Technical Writing                         5
Department-approved electives selected from the following
                                                        20
300-400 level Economics courses
(except ECON 396, ECON 490, ECON 496)                   15
300-400 level accounting, business and economics courses 5
                                                        Total Credits 77-78

Additional Graduation Requirements
        A cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the above courses must be achieved with a
minimum grade of C– (1.70) in each course. The credit/no credit option will not be accepted for any of
these courses. The applicant must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 in all collegiate
study. These criteria also apply to equivalent course transferred from other institutions.


Economics Minor I
      This minor is designed to accompany the business administration and accounting majors. Prior
approval of electives by the economics advisor is required.
Required courses
      ECON 201- Principles of Economics Micro             5
      ECON 202- Principles of Economics Macro             5

        Select from the following
       ECON 310 International Economics                5
       ECON 330-Money and Banking                      5
       ECON 332-Public Policy                          5
       ECON 401-Intermediate Microeconomics            5
       ECON 402- Intermediate Macroeconomics           5
Additional credits                                     10
Select 10 additional credits from the above list
OR
Other 300-400 level economics courses with departmental approval
                                                        Total credits            25

Additional Graduation Requirements
        A cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the above courses must be achieved with a
minimum grade of C– (1.70) in each course. The credit/no credit option will not be accepted for any of
these courses. The applicant must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 in all collegiate
study. These criteria also apply to equivalent course transferred from other institutions.

Economics Minor II

      This minor is designed to accompany the business administration and accounting majors. Prior
approval of electives by the economics advisor is required.

Required courses
      ECON 201- Principles of Economics Micro            5
      ECON 202- Principles of Economics Macro            5
       Select from the following
      ECON 310 International Economics                   5
      ECON 330-Money and Banking                         5
      ECON 332-Public Policy                             5
      ECON 401-Intermediate Microeconomics               5
      ECON 402- Intermediate Macroeconomics              5
       Additional credits                                10
       Select 10 additional credits from the above list
       OR
       Other 300-400 level economics courses with departmental approval
                                                          Total credits          25
Additional Graduation Requirements
       A cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the above courses must be achieved with a
minimum grade of C– (1.70) in each course. The credit/no credit option will not be accepted for any of
these courses. The applicant must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 in all collegiate
study. These criteria also apply to equivalent course transferred from other institutions.

Economics Courses

ECON 101.       Economic Issues                                   5
For the student who desires a general knowledge of economics. Applications of economic principles to
current social and political problems. ECON 101 cannot be substituted for either ECON 201 or 202.

ECON 102.     World Economic Issues                                 5
An introduction to current international issues related to international trade and finance, economic
development, and comparative economic systems.

ECON 201.       Principles of Economics Micro                      5
The function of the market system in the allocation of scarce resources, determination of prices and
output in competitive and monopolistic markets, and distribution of income. The role of government in
the market economy.
ECON 202.       Principles of Economics Macro                      5
Organization of the U.S. economy structure and role of the monetary system, problems of employment
and inflation, overall impact of government spending, and taxation on the economy. Economic growth,
world economic problems, and a comparison of capitalism with other economic systems. Prerequisite,
ECON 201 or permission of instructor.

ECON 298.     Special Topics                                      (1-6)

ECON 310.      International Economics                             5
International trade and monetary theories, analyzing economic relationships and adjustments within
and among trading nations, specialization, tariffs, balance of payments, and international monetary
systems. Prerequisite, ECON 202.

ECON 324.      Introduction to Econometrics                      5
Computer application of statistical and mathematic techniques to business and economic problems.
Prerequisites, ECON 201 and BUS221 or permission.

ECON 325.     Introduction to Forecasting                        5
An introduction to methods employed in business and econometric forecasting. Topics include time
series modeling, Box-Jenkins models, and seasonal adjustments. Covers data collection methods,
graphing, model building, model interpretation, and presentation of results. Prerequisites, MATH 170
or MATH 172, ECON 324.



ECON 330.     Money and Banking                                  5
The supply of money and the Federal Reserve System, financial intermediaries and financial
instruments, macroeconomic theory, and policy. Prerequisite, ECON 202.
ECON 332.      Public Finance                                        5
Rationale of public sector, effect of government expenditure and taxation on resource allocation and
income distribution, structure of federal, state, and local tax systems. Emphasis is on current policy
problems. Prerequisite, ECON 202.

ECON 340.       Development of Economic Thought                   5
The historical development of economic concepts and their classification into schools of thought.
Contributions to economics from medieval to modern time and relationships among various economic,
social and political philosophies. Prerequisite, ECON 202.

ECON 346.      Comparative Economic Systems                     5
Compares the capitalist market economy to the centrally planned system and considers a variety of
mixed systems. Economic structure and performance of select countries, emphasizes economies in
transition, and the Pacific Rim. Prerequisite, ECON 202.

ECON 348.     Economic History of the United States             5
Economic factors in the development of the American nation, from the European background to the
present. ECON 348 and HIST 348 are equivalent courses. Students may not receive credit for both.

ECON 352.      Managerial Economics                             5
Application of microeconomic theories to managerial decisions and planning utilizing the case method.
Prerequisite, ECON 202 and BUS 221.

ECON 355.      Economics of Labor                                  5
Economics of the labor market, labor, productivity, investment in human capital, manpower problems,
and public policy. Prerequisite, ECON 202.

ECON 356.    Government and Business                             5
The development and current status of relations between the U.S. government and business firms.
Government regulation of competition and monopoly, subsidies and public enterprise.

ECON 360.      Contemporary Economic Problems                   5
An examination of selected current economic issues concerning the U.S. and world economies and its
relationship to economic theory.

ECON 398.      Special Topics                                        1-6

ECON 401.       Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis                   5
Markets as mechanisms for organizing and directing human activities, production of goods and
services, the allocation of labor, capital and natural resources to various productive activities, and the
distribution of income. Relationship between microeconomics theory and contemporary thought,
practical problems and government policies. Prerequisite, ECON 201.

ECON 402.      Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis                   5
Analysis and measurement of determinants of income, employment and prices under the Classical and
Keynesian systems, problems of inflation, economic growth and stabilization policy. Prerequisite, ECON
202.

ECON 406.      Economics Assessment                                3
End of program assessment activities including the taking of the Education Testing Service exam in
economics. Preparation of resumes for future entry into the job market. Prerequisite, economics
major, senior standing, ECON 401 and 402 (or concurrent enrollment).
ECON 426.      Economic Research                                   5
Designed to familiarize students with an understanding of econometric theory and testing procedures.
The course uses time-series approach in econometric hypotheses testing. A completion of an economic
research project is required. Prerequisite, ECON 202 and BUS 221.
ECON 462.      Economics of Energy, Resources and Environment 5
Economic decision making related to issues of pollution, energy, resource use, and external effects.
Benefit/cost analysis, cost effectiveness, and other economic methods. Prerequisite, ECON 201 or by
permission of the instructor.

ECON 490.      Cooperative Education                               1-12
An individualized contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service
agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer
supervision, and faculty coordination. Prior approval required. May be repeated. Grade will be S or U.

ECON 496.      Individual Study                                   1-6
Prerequisite, permission of instructor.

ECON 498.      Special Topics                                     1-6

ECON 499.      Seminar                                            1-5




                         Appendix 2 JOBS FOR ECONOMICS STUDENTS
                                           By: Bob Carbaugh
                                       Department of Economics
                                     Central Washington University

Many occupations today require college educated individuals who have strong analytical and problem-
solving skills, can write and speak well, and can work with others on a team. Besides searching for
“economist” positions, you might consider searching career titles that are related to economics, such
as:

Statistician                  Actuary                              Financial planner
Forecaster                    Auditor                              Healthcare administrator
Data analyst                  Business forecaster                  Industrial economist
Market research               Commodities trader                   Securities trader
Financial analyst             Foreign currency trader              Technical writer
Banking                       Loan officer                         Transportation specialist
Credit Analyst                Public utilities analyst             International trade specialist
Labor economist               Underwriter                          Urban/regional planner
Treasury management           Cost analyst                         Bond trader
Consumer affairs director     Securities salesperson               Institutional research director
Litigation analyst            Populations studies analyst          Information scientist
Bank examiner                 Pricing analyst                      Supply-chain analyst
Rate analyst                  Economic analyst                     Tax economist
Investment analyst            Research data analyst                Research assistant
Futures analyst               Risk analyst


Below is a list of jobs that I have obtained from various want-ads. You can use this list for ideas when
developing your job search strategy. Some of these jobs require education beyond a Bachelor’s
degree; investing in a Master’s degree (Master’s in economics, MBA) might be a good career
investment. I found many of the jobs listed below on www.indeed.com. Also, if you are considering
getting a Ph.D. in economics, you can search the publication Job Openings for Economists (JOE)
www.aeaweb.org/joe/ for jobs requiring this level of education.

Credit union examiner sought by National Credit Union Administration. The job entails analysis of
credit union operations from a managerial and financial standpoint, recommendation of changes to
improve credit union operations, and providing oversight of credit unions to assure financial safety and
soundness. Examiners in the State of Washington should expect to travel, up to 50% of the time, with
some weekend travel required. Job qualifications include completion of a bachelor or higher degree in
economics, accounting, finance, or business administration. This education must have included 10
quarter hours of coursework in accounting and 5 quarter hours of coursework in introductory
auditing. NCUA will allow applicants an opportunity and will fund the course, if needed, to complete
the 5 quarter hours of introductory auditing within 10 months after beginning employment at NCUA. A
credit check and background review are required prior to hiring. Please send a resume and transcripts
to National Credit Union Administration, 1230 W. Washington Street, Suite 301, Tempe, AZ 85281,
Attention--DMS, Seattle, WA--CU Examiner Vacancy.
Tacoma Power is seeking economic analysts with strong quantitative skills to join its Power Supply
Planning Group. The duties of these positions include financial and economic analysis, statistical
modeling, and forecasting to support long-term resource planning including analysis of power supply
generation and conservation resources. The ideal candidate will have a bachelor's degree in
economics (forecasting), finance, or statistics, with a strong preference for an advanced degree.
Experience using statistical analysis computer programs such as SAS and advanced capability with
Microsoft Office Suite products such as Excel is desired. Contact Tacoma Power, 3629 St. 35th St.,
Tacoma, WA 98409, Phone 253-502-8363, www.tacomapower.com.

Market research analyst sought by LaCrosse Footwear Inc. of Portland, Oregon. The position will be
responsible for the development and execution of a strategic market research strategy for LaCrosse
Footwear and Danner. The position will work on collecting and analyzing data on our brands, the
marketplace, demographics, trends and competitors. It will also perform segmentation studies and
provide statistical reports to management in assisting marketing plans and new business
opportunities. Candidate must have a bachelor's degree in economics or market search plus 1-3 years
of experience on consulting or market research. Courses or formal training in economic and business
forecasting and market research preferred as well as strong skills with MS Office applications (Word,
PowerPoint, Outlook and Access). To apply visit www.lacrossefootwear.com. The corporate
headquarters for LaCrosse Footwear Inc. is located at 17634 N.E. Airport Way, Portland, OR 97230,
phone (503) 262-0110.

Financial advisor sought by Morgan Stanley for its Spokane, WA location. Financial advisor will build a
client base of high net worth individuals and provide clients with a high level of individualized customer
service, full service brokerage services and investment strategies consistent with their individual
financial goals and needs. Requirements include Bachelors degree in economics, business, or related
field, demonstrated ability to sell, and interest in investment and financial markets. Contact Morgan
Stanley & Co., 201 W. North River Drive, Spokane, WA 99201, Phone (509) 328-3500.

 Russell Investments of Tacoma, WA seeks a product analyst to provide analytical support for Russell's
U.S. Private Client Services Products group, supporting product development and management efforts
for mutual funds, model strategies, and retirement products. The successful candidate will have a
bachelor's degree in economics or finance; CFA, CIMA, FINRA series 7, 66 preferred; also, proficient
with Microsoft Office applications, especially Excel, Access and PowerPoint. The corporate
headquarters for Russell Investments is located at 909 A. Street, Tacoma, WA 98402, telephone (253)
572-9500.

 Wells Fargo Bank of Washington recruits entry-level professionals to work in its international banking
department. Activities include data analysis, problem solving, customer service, and foreign exchange
trading. Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor's degree in economics, or a related field, and a
strong background in finance, accounting, and personal computers. Contact: Human Resource
Department, Wells Fargo Financial; 721 3rd Ave.; Seattle, WA 98104. www.wellsfargo.com

 Revenue analyst (analyst II) sought by Alaska Airlines. The successful candidate will dissect monthly
financial performance to understand year-over-year revenue deficiencies; forecast and model revenue
variables to determine areas of leverage at Alaska and Horizon; maximize Alaska revenue performance
through the coordination of testing, risk assessment, and initialization of leveraged revenue
management technologies. The candidate must have extensive knowledge of statistical databases,
strong analytical capabilities, and strong communication and interpersonal skills. Undergraduate
degree required in Economics, Statistics, or Business, with an MBA preferred. Contact Human
Resources Department, Alaska Airlines, 19300 International Boulevard, Seattle WA, 98188, Phone (206)
433-3200.

 Market analyst sought by Seafood processing company in Redmond, Washington. Will study market
condition both domestic and international, monitor marketing trends and find new markets for
company's products. Candidate must have a Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or
Economics and 2 years of experience. Please send resumes to: HFI Foods, Inc. 17360 NE 67th Court,
Redmond, WA 98502. Phone: (425) 885-3358

 Public utility analyst sought by Puget Sound Energy. Qualified candidates will have a Bachelor's
degree in Economics, Marketing, or Business. Requires good supervisory skills. Must have
demonstrated technical abilities in data analysis and statistical techniques and the ability to use
sophisticated computer software tools in the process of data/statistical analysis. Technical abilities in
utility sales and economic forecasting, forecast econometric model development, and market research
techniques are desirable. Contact: Puget Sound Energy, 10885 NE 4th Street; PO BOX 97034; Bellevue,
WA 98009-9734. www.pse.com

 The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation recruits entry-level bank examiners. Minimum
qualifications include a bachelor's degree in economics, or a related field, with a strong background in
accounting, finance, and personal computers. Report writing skills are necessary. Contact: Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation; Human Resources Branch; 25 Jessie St. at Ecker Square; 12 th Floor; San
Francisco, CA 94105. www.fdic.gov. Phone: (415) 808-8142.

 Business forecaster sought by PACCAR Inc., which manufactures premium trucks sold under the
Kenworth, Peterbult, and DAF nameplates. Responsible for forecast for automobile parts inventory
planning system. Duties also include monthly presentations to division management, special projects,
and reports. Qualifications include knowledge of truck parts and components. Familiarity with
computer processes and logic. Highly Advanced PC skills in Excel and Access. College degree in
statistics, economics, business, or related field. Contact: PACCAR Inc.; 777 106th Ave. NE; Bellevue, WA
98004. www.paccar.com Phone: (425) 468-7400 fax: (425) 468-8216

 The sales finance team of T-Mobile seeks a statistician/forecaster to provide analysis into topics such
as customer sales trends and churn. Participating on cross functional teams with Marketing, Financial
Planning, and Credit/Portfolio Analysis, this person will analyze trends and make recommendations
that drive customer growth. Qualifications include strong background in regression and predictive
statistical modeling and analysis; Master's degree in a quantitative discipline such as Economics,
Statistics, or Mathematics; strong software skills including Excel, Access, SQL, SAS, and Business
Objects. Contact T-Mobile, 3720 128th SE Ste D, Bellevue, WA 98006-5256, Phone 425-641-1140.

Financial analyst sought by Comcast Cable TV for its Spokane, WA office. Analyze and develop reports
to assist in the financial planning, budgeting and forecasting process, perform financial trend analysis
and forecasting, complete cost/benefit analysis, and analyze cost savings and operational alternatives.
Requirements include a BS degree in accounting, finance, or economics and knowledge of accounting
theory and practice. Strong analytical, interpersonal and verbal/written communication skills.
Experience in forecasting and financial modeling of operating trends. Strong PC skills, including
Microsoft Excel, Word, Access and Powerpoint. Contact Comcast Cable West Division, 621 W. Mallon
Ave., Spokane, WA 99201, Phone (509) 484-4128.

Economic analysts sought by the Labor Market and Economic Analysis branch of the Employment
Security Department of the State of Washington. Responsibilities include data analysis, ranging from
econometric program evaluation studies and developing forecasting models to produce web articles
describing labor market characteristics to a lay audience. Presentation of analysis to the public is also
part of the job. Successful applicants might have a bachelor's degree in economics, or a master's
degree, or a Ph.D. Contact Greg Weeks, Ph.D., Director of Labor Market and Economic Analysis,
Employment Security Department, P.O. Box 9046, Olympia, WA 98507-9046.

 Economic development specialist. This position plans and implements economic development
programs. Specialized knowledge of financial analysis and business development techniques is
required. Duties performed are in the following areas: design economic development or neighborhood
commercial revitalization programs; analyze proposed commercial and industrial development
projects, market City's economic development programs; preparation and submission of proposals;
and develop the City's statistical indicators. Candidates should have a bachelor's degree in economics,
planning, or business administration. Contact: Personnel Office; City of Hayward; 22300 Foothill Blvd.;
Hayward CA 94541. General Address: City of Hayward; 777 B. Street; Hayward, CA 94541-5007.
www.cityofhayward.com

Market research analyst. It will be your responsibility to develop and maintain econometric and
mathematical models used to formulate telecommunications policy. This involves determining market
elasticity for service offerings, developing incremental cost studies, analyzing the impact of competitive
and regulatory influences on the company, plus providing specialized demand forecasts. You'll also
develop studies and present management with results. You must possess a bachelor's degree in
economics or related field and quantitative analysis experience, which demonstrates knowledge of
econometric modeling and forecasting. Additionally, we require mainframe and PC skills. Contact:
Pacific Telecom Inc.; 805 Broadway; Vancouver, WA 98668-8701. Phone: (360) 905-5800

 The Oregon Public Utility Commission recruits research economists to conduct applied research
concerning the development of long-range policies for utility regulation. Responsibilities include
research on a wide range of current concerns in energy, and aiding the Commission in evaluating the
role of regulation and in developing policies. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree in engineering,
economics, or a relevant scientific discipline. Contact: Human Resources Department; PUC; PO BOX
2148; Salem, OR 97308. www.puc.state.or.us Phone: (503)373-1368.

Credit Analyst. The Washington Trust Bank of Spokane seeks a credit analyst for income
property/builder services loans. Will assist loan officers in evaluation of commercial loan requests,
prepare and analyze financial statements, projections and spreadsheets. Prepares financial
presentations, develops and maintains automated reports on key indicators of loan quality.
Requirements include strong accounting aptitude and demonstrated analytical/problem solving ability.
Bachelors degree in Finance, Economics, or Accounting preferred. Contact Washington Trust Bank, 717
W. Sprague Ave., Spokane, WA 99205, Phone (509) 353-4204.

 The City of Seattle recruits analysts who will be responsible for statistical, financial, and economic
analysis of department rate structures and related expenditures and revenues. Examples of duties:
analyze existing and proposed rate structures and related fees; perform cost allocation studies;
develop economic and statistical models to support rate-making analysis; make formal presentations
of a technical nature to a variety of groups; participate in the rate review process with the City Council
and the Citizens' Rate Advisory Committee. Candidates must have a bachelor's degree in economics or
a closely related field, which emphasizes quantitative analytical techniques. Contact: City of Seattle,
Norma McKinney Personnel Department; Dexter Horton Building; 710 2nd Ave; 12th and 13th Floors;
Seattle WA 98104. www.seattle.gov/personnel Phone: (206)684-7664 fax: (206) 684-4157

 The Motor Vehicles Division of the Department of Transportation recruits research analysts who will
conduct quantitative evaluation research projects concerned with traffic safety legislation and
programs. Major duties include: plans research studies and prepares statistical forecasts; analyzes
survey data and calculates factors; writes computer report generator language programs, uses
computer statistical software packages to tabulate data, writes statistical reports and articles for
publication; consults with agency personnel; prepares and delivers presentations. A candidate should
have training and experience in economics, research design and methods, project management,
applied statistics, and social science research computer applications. The candidate should have
extensive knowledge in microcomputer applications. Contact: Systems and Planning Section;
Department of Transportation, Motor Vehicles Division; 1905 Lana Avenue NE; Salem OR 97314
www.oregon.gov/ODOT

 Life Insurance Underwriter. PEMCO Mutual Insurance Company seeks an Underwriter to joint its
team. This position is responsible for recommending the proper premium for eligible risks.
Responsibilities include select/reject individual life insurance applications and ensure accuracy of
calculated rates and premiums. Requirements include Bachelors in Economics, Business, or related
field, knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology; certifications in life insurance
preferred (CLU, FLM). Must have the ability to use desktop computers. Contact PEMCO Mutual
Insurance Company, 325 Eastlake Ave. E., Seattle, WA 98109, Phone (206) 628-4000.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a contract research laboratory in Richland, Washington, seeks
entry-level individuals to participate in marketing research. Openings are with a multidisciplinary
research team investigating energy conservation, consumer attitude, and technology adoption.
Background or experience in market research, survey techniques, experimental design, and statistical
analysis desired. Experience with computer analysis packages is preferred. Contact: Pacific NW
National Laboratory; Human Resources Department; Richland WA 99352. www.pnl.gov

 Pacific Gas and Electric Company recruits economic analysts for its Corporate Planning Department.
These people will be responsible for key technical and coordination activities supporting the Planning
Support system development and operation. Bachelor's degree in economics, math or computer
Science preferred. Contact: Management Recruitment Department B-68; 77 Beale Street; Room
F1079; San Francisco CA 94106

 The Public Power Council, an association of 115 consumer-owned electric utilities, recruits economists
to conduct technical studies and appear as an expert witness on Bonneville Power Administration rates
and other issues. Applicants should have strong quantitative analytical skills, especially in economic
analysis, ability to initiate independent research, prepare professional reports, and represent technical
matters to non-technical audiences. Knowledge of Northwest Power regulations necessary. Contact:
Northwest Public Power Association; 9817 NE 54th St.; Vancouver WA 98662-6064. www.nwppa.org
nwppa@nwppa.org

 Natural gas utility seeks a marketing research specialist for its corporate headquarters located in Las
Vegas, Nevada. Bachelor's degree in marketing research or economics necessary. Candidate will be
responsible for gathering and analyzing data specific to the development and implementation of
marketing programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. Proficient in personal
computer applications. Experience in benefit cost analyses is a plus. Good written and oral
communication skills necessary. www.swgas.com Employment hotline: (702) 365-2085

 The International Monetary Fund invites applications from BA students with superior academic
records to serve as research assistants. Appointments are limited to two years. Candidates should
have at least a 3.5 GPA in both their principal field of study and in their overall program. Candidates
must have a Bachelor's degree in economics, statistics, computer science, math, or business
administration. Contact: Chief, Recruitment Division; International Monetary Fund; 700 19th Street
NW; Washington DC 20431. www.imf.org. Phone (202) 623-7422. Fax (202) 623-7333

 The Directorate of Intelligence has openings for economists to engage in economic research and
current reporting on foreign economies and on such worldwide issues as food, energy, and finance.
Basic requirements for these positions include a sold grounding for economic theory, analytical ability,
writing skill, and a bent for research. An advanced degree in economics is encouraged, although
exceptional candidates having bachelor's degrees will be considered. Applicants should submit resume,
transcripts, and writing samples such as term papers or thesis. Contact: Central Intelligence Agency;
Office of Public Affairs; Washington, DC 20505. www.cia.com. Phone: (703) 482-0623 fax: (703) 482-
1739

 Futures analyst. The Research Department of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange has openings for
entry level persons with skills relevant to understanding the futures and options industry. A strong
bachelor's or master's degree in economics is desired. The Research Department designs new financial
futures contracts and performs timely economic analysis of related markets. Specifically desirable
areas of expertise include options pricing models and international finance as well as strong analytical
skills in microeconomics and finance. Contact: Employment Manager; Chicago Mercantile Exchange;
30 South Wacker Drive; Chicago, IL 60606. Phone: (800) 331-3332. info@cme.com

Market research analyst sought by Avista Corp., the energy utility of Spokane, WA. Must have strong
background in data analysis and statistical techniques including econometrics as well as the ability to
use computer software tools in data analysis. Strong software skills also desired including Excel,
Access, and SAS. Undergraduate degree required in economics or business, with a Masters degree
preferred. Contact Avista Corp., 1411 E. Mission, Spokane, WA 99220-3727, Phone (509) 495-4817.

 The Peterson Institute for International Economics is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit center
devoted to research on a wide range of international economic policy issues including Third World
debt, macroeconomic policy cooperation, the exchange rate system, trade, and global energy
problems. We are seeking research assistants who will work closely with out senior fellows. A master's
degree in Economics is preferred, but strong bachelors candidates are encouraged to apply. Good
computer and econometric skills are essential and a programming background is desirable. Contact:
Institute for International Economics, 1750 Massachusetts Ave, NW; Washington, DC 20036-1903.
www.iie.com.

Loan Analyst. 1st Security Bank of Washington has a career opportunity for a loan analyst in its
consumer lending department. Responsible for reviewing, analyzing, approving and underwriting
requests for credit in accordance with company policy. Duties include reviewing credit applications,
credit bureau information, collateral valuation, and the like to recommend/approve requests within
decision authority. Bachelors degree in economics, finance, business preferred. Must have a minimum
of 2 years of underwriting experience, proficiency on a personal computer (Excel, Word), and
experience analyzing tax returns. Contact 1st Security Bank of Washington, P.O. Box 97000, Lynwood,
WA 98046-9700, Phone 425-771-5299.

Children's Hospital seeks research data analyst to help design studies, perform power calculations,
analyze data, write reports describing data analysis results, and help write portions of manuscripts.
The research data analyst would be involved primarily in clinical studies, including outcome studies,
but would also collaborate on some basic science and experimental studies. Requirements include a
Bachelor's degree in Statistics, Forecasting, or related field; preference will be given to a Master's
degree in this areas. Contact Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, 4800 Sand Point Way
NE, Seattle, WA 98105, Phone 206-987-2024.

 Research analyst. Harborview Medical Center seeks a research analyst to conduct data analysis.
Duties include extracting data from electronic medical record systems and survey databases, preparing
data for analysis, conducting statistical analyses with appropriate software, and conducting reviews of
literature. Requirements include a Bachelor's degree in forecasting or statistics, experience in
extracting and preparing data for analysis with either SPSS, SAS, or Stata,, knowledge of Word, Excel,
and Power Point, and basic knowledge of medical terminology. Contact Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Harborview Medical Center, 325 Ninth Ave, Seattle, WA 98104.



 The Commodities Trade Division of the U.S. Department of Commerce seeks an economist to analyze
trade and commercial policy issues arising in international commodity organizations and bilateral trade
relations. This includes quantitative analysis, participation in international negotiations, and
development of positions on legislative and policy proposals. Master's degree with some experience in
international trade policy and industry studies is desirable. Contact: Director, Commodities Division;
US Department of Commerce; 1401 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20230. www.doc.gov
 The Research Department of the Oregon Department of Revenue seeks tax economists. This research
position requires development of large-scale mainframe data bases for tax programs, preparation of
annual statistical reports, and analysis of special taxation issues. Applicants must have a bachelor's
degree in Economics with emphasis in public finance and econometrics; 3 years experience is desirable.
Student internships may substitute for job experience. Contact: Personnel Section, Oregon Department
of Revenue; 155 Cottage St. NE, Salem OR 97301. www.dor.state.or.us. Phone: (503) 378-3622 fax:
(503) 378-6879

 The Idaho Public Utilities Commission seeks a public utility economist to work on various issues
involving the regulation of electric, gas, and telephone utilities operating in Idaho. The successful
candidate will be expected to present direct and rebuttal testimony on issues assigned to him/her.
Candidates should have a bachelor's degree in economics with a solid back round in econometrics,
statistics, and microcomputers. Contact: Idaho Public Utilities Commission; PO BOX 83720, Boise, ID
83702, or- Idaho Public Utilities Commission; 472 W. Washington, Boise, ID 83702. Phone: (208) 334-
0300 fax: (208) 334-3762.

 Our internationally acclaimed SWAPS group is seeking research associates in the Los Angeles office.
This person will support the origination team in the development of analytical models and economic
research. Bachelor's degree with strong quantitative background, preferably in economics,
mathematics, or finance. Strong interpersonal skills are important. Contact: Security Pacific Merchant
Bank; Human Resources; 40 E 52nd Street, HNY-104; New York, NY 10022

 The Utilities and Transportation Commission of the State of Washington recruits policy research
specialists. These specialists assist in the preparation of original research studies and policy analysis
projects in the field of public utility or transportation regulation. The Commission prefers candidates
with a master's degree in economics or a related field. Experienced applicants with a bachelor's degree
in economics or a related field may also apply. Contact: Personnel Officer, Human Resources
Organization; Utilities and Transportation Commission; 1300 S Evergreen Park Dr SW; Olympia, WA
98504. www.wutc.wa.gov. Phone: (360) 664-1160. info@wutc.wa.gov

 The Utilities and Transportation Commission of the State of Washington recruits revenue
requirements specialists who assist senior level specialists in the preparation of financial, economic,
and accounting studies and investigations in the field of public utility and transportation regulation.
Minimum qualifications include a bachelor's degree in economics or an allied field which includes a
minimum of 36 quarter hours of accounting courses. Contact: Personnel Officer, Human Resources
Organization; Utilities and Transportation Commission; 1300 S Evergreen Park Dr. SW; Olympia, WA
98504. www.wutc.wa.gov. Phone: (360) 664-1160. info@wutc.wa.gov

The Washington State Office of Risk Management recruits risk analysts who assess insurance
programs. The analysts identify risks and recommends courses of action designed to maintain the
effectiveness of specific State risk management and insurance programs. A bachelor's degree in
economics or an allied field is required. Contact: Personnel Officer, Office of Employee Services,
Department of General Administration, Olympia WA 98504.
 The Washington State Health Care Authority recruits research analysts to perform professional
research, statistical, or data analysis work. Minimum qualifications include a bachelor's degree in
economics or an allied field, and eighteen months of professional work in research and/or statistical
analysis, and one year of experience using computer including using one of the following types of
software: database, spreadsheets, or statistical/analytical software. Contact: Personnel Officer, Health
Care Authority; 676 Woodland Square Loop SE; Lacey, WA 98503. www.hca.wa.gov

 The Research Department of the Washington Department of Revenue recruits tax economists. These
individuals develop statistical data, analyze taxation issues, and prepare annual statistical reports.
Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor's degree in Economics or a related field with strong
accounting background. Student internships may substitute for job experience. Applicants are
encouraged to send their resumes to the Research Department; qualified applicants will receive job
notifications. Contact: Personnel Officer, Department of Revenue; General Administration Building;
Olympia, WA 98504. www.dor.wa.gov

Weyerhaeuser Company recruits individuals to work in their economic research and marketing
research departments. These individuals develop forecasts for Weyerhaeuser products and analyze
regional economic conditions pertinent to the firm. The economics research department prefers
individuals who hold an advanced degree (Masters or PhD) in economics, while the market research
department prefers individuals who hold an MBA degree. Contact: Department of Economic Research;
Weyerhaeuser Company; Tacoma, WA 98401. www.weyerhauser.com

 Verizon West Coast Inc. (Verizon) seeks entry-level economists to work in their economic forecasting
and market research departments. Minimum qualifications are a Bachelor's degree in Economics or a
related discipline with a strong background in statistics, including econometrics, and personal
computers. Student internships are available with Verizon. Contact: Verizon West Coast Inc., 1800 41st
St. Everett, WA 98201-5072.

 Qwest Communications, a major international telecommunications corporation, conducts market
research to support the needs of its communications, data solutions, and marketing services and
financial services businesses. Most of the market research is conducted at Qwest's headquarters in
Denver, although some is conducted at regional U.S. West offices. Candidates should have an
undergraduate degree in Business and Economic Forecasting or Marketing, or a related field, with
strong background in finance, marketing, and statistics; an MBA degree is preferred. Student
internships are available for undergraduate students. Contact: Quest Communications: Corporate
Headquarters, 1801 California St. Denver, CO 80202, Phone (303-992-1400.



 The International Banking Division of Bank of America recruits professionals to work in its
international banking division. To obtain a position in the Division, one first is hired in the bank's
managerial trainee program and then is promoted to the Division. Minimum qualifications include a
bachelor's degree in economics or a related field. Contact: Human Resources Department, Bank of
America, Seattle WA 98124-0146. www.bankofamerica.com
 The Governor's Internship Program is a prestigious internship administered by the Office of the
Governor of the State of Washington. Undergraduate interns serve in capabilities such as research
analysts, systems analysts, budget analysts, aides, assistants, and policy researchers. Undergraduate
internships are 3-6 months in length with the possibility of extension. Contact: Division of Vocational
Rehabilitation; 612 Woodland Square Loop SE, Building C; Lacey, WA 98504. Phone: (360) 438-8046

 The State of Washington's Office of Financial Management recruits entry level economists for several
positions: Research Analyst. Outlines, organizes and conducts research, data/statistical analysis work
concerning State of Washington finances. Research Investigator. Performs statistical analyses of data
and designs research studies concerning State of Washington finances. Economist. Develops forecasts
concerning State of Washington revenues and testifies at legislative hearings on results. Minimum
qualifications include a Bachelor's degree in Economics, or a related field, and a strong background in
computers and statistics. Undergraduate student internships are available. Contact: State of
Washington, Office of Financial Management; Insurance Building; Olympia, WA 98504

The Washington State Department of Trade and Economic Development conducts research and
analysis of domestic and/or international markets and facilitates trade opportunities. It recruits entry-
level international trade specialists to conduct such work. Major responsibilities include: (1) evaluation
of foreign markets/industries; (2) advises exporters/importers; (3) evaluates marketing methods of
Washington products in foreign markets; (4) develop foreign trade missions and trade shows. Contact:
Communications Office; Department of Trade and Economic Development; 101 General Administration
Building; Olympia, WA 98504. www.cted.wa.gov

 The Washington State Department of Trade and Economic Development recruits entry-level
professionals for its economic development program: Industrial Marketer. Determines the potential
for attracting specific industries to Washington State. Strategic Planner. Studies Washington's
business climate, develops economic development strategy, and advises the Governor/legislature on
economic development issues. Industrial Development Business Consultant. Plans attractions for out-
of-state industries to Washington. Industrial Promotion Analyst. Promotes Washington State to
industry and trade associations. Minimum requirements for these positions include a bachelor's degree
in economics or a related field. Experience in industrial promotion, marketing, or public relations work
desirable. Student internships may apply as job related experience. Contact: Communications Office;
Department of Trade and Economic Development; 101 General Administration Building; Olympia, WA
98504. www.cted.wa.gov

Safeco Insurance Companies recruits entry-level professionals to work as underwriters, claims
adjusters, actuaries, and investment analysts. Individuals with a Bachelor's degree in Economics are
encouraged to apply for these positions. Depending on the position, additional qualifications are
necessary; strong background in finance, statistics, etc. Contact: Human Resources, Safeco Insurance
Companies; Safeco Plaza; Seattle, WA 98185. www.safeco.com. fax: (206) 925-0165

The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco recruits entry-level professionals in its bank examination
and economic research departments. Bank Examiner. Federal Reserve bank examiners, who examine
banks in Washington State, are headquartered in San Francisco. Minimum qualifications include a
Bachelor's degree in economics, or a related major, and strong background in accounting, finance, and
report writing. Economist. Participates in the formulation of economic studies dealing with a variety of
monetary issues relating to the domestic/international economy. Minimum qualifications include a
bachelor's degree in economics and strong background in statistics, computers, and report writing.
Contact: Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco; 101 Market Street; San Francisco CA 94105.
www.frbsf.org.Phone: (800) 722-2678

The Comptroller of the Currency, a division of the U.S. Treasury Department, recruits entry-level
professionals for its bank examiner program. Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor's degree in
Economics, Accounting, or Finance and two accounting courses (1 0 credits); skills in report writing and
personal computer desirable. The Comptroller's field managers’ conduct job interviews in the Pacific
Northwest while the main Personnel Department is located in San Francisco. Contact: Assistant
Deputy Comptroller, Nancy Wilson; 1000 2nd Ave., Suite 3300; Seattle, WA 98104. www.occ.treas.gov

Boise Cascade Corporation recruits entry-level professionals to work in its planning department at
forecasters/market researchers. Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor's degree in Economics, or
a related major, and strong background in report writing, statistics, and personal computers. Contact:
Boise Cascade Corporation Headquarters; 1111 West Jefferson St, PO BOX 50; Boise, ID 83728-0001.
Http://boise.bc.com. Phone: (208) 384-6161 Fax: (208) 384-7189. E-mail: bcweb@bc.com

The Bonneville Power Administration recruits entry-level professionals to work in its Portland office as
economists and rate analysts. Minimum qualifications include a bachelor's degree in economics plus
background in calculus and statistics, and accounting. Student internships are available. The main
personnel office's address is: Bonneville Power Administration, Personnel Office; PO Box 3621;
Portland, OR 97208-3621. www.bpa.gov

 Seattle City Light Inc. recruits entry-level professionals to work in economic forecasting and rate
research. Minimum qualification's include: a bachelor's degree in economics or related major, a
background in statistics, finance, accounting, and computers. Student internships are available.
Contact: Department of Rate Analysis, Seattle City Light Dept.; 700 5th Ave. Suite 3300; Seattle WA
98104-1198. www.seattle.gov/light

 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recruits entry-level analysts to assist in the preparation of feasibility
studies of water resource projects in the Pacific Northwest. Minimum qualifications include a
bachelor's degree in economics and background in research methods, statistics, and personal
computers. Strong writing skills desirable. Student internships and summer jobs are available. Contact:
Chief of Economics and Social Evaluation; Army Corps of Engineers; 4735 E. Marginal Way S., Seattle
WA 98134. www.usace.army.mil. Phone: (206) 764-3772

The Port of Seattle recruits professionals to work in its international marketing and tourism
departments. Minimum qualifications include a bachelor's degree in economics or a related major. The
Port prefers experienced employees. Student internships are available with the Port and may
substitute for work experience. Contact: Human Resources Department; Port of Seattle; PO Box 1209;
Seattle, WA 98111. www.portseattle.org
Seattle Times Inc. recruits professionals to work in its marketing research department. Minimum
qualifications include a bachelor’s degree in marketing or economics or a related major with a
background in research methods and report writing. Student internships are available. Contact:
Research Manager, Marketing Services Department; Seattle Times; PO Box 70; Seattle, WA 98111.
www.seattletimes.com. Phone: (206) 464-2111

 The Federal Home Loan Bank of Seattle provides wholesale credit to area savings and loan
associations and credit unions. The Bank recruits entry-level professionals to work the areas of
financial analysis and collateral. Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor's degree in Economics,
Finance, or a related major with strong background in finance and accounting. Summer student
internships are available. Contact: Federal Home Loan Bank of Seattle; 1501 4th Avenue, Suite 1900;
Seattle, WA 98101-1693. www.fhlbsea.com. Phone: (800) 973-6223 Fax: (206)340-2485

The Department of Natural Resources and Conservation in Helena, Montana, recruits natural resource
economists to analyze energy issues, evaluate studies, collect data, and conduct economic analyses of
natural gas and coal producers, transporters, and consumers. A master's degree is preferred. Good
analytic and research skills, computer programming a must. Contact: Department of Natural Resources
and Conservation, Personnel; 1625 Eleventh Ave., PO BOX 201601; Helena, MT 59620-1601.
www.dnrc.state.mt.us. Phone: (406) 444-2074

 The Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. recruits public utility economists to analyze company financial and
statistical data, econometric modeling, rate design, pricing policies, rate and economic research.
Applicants must have strong writing, organization, and analytical skills. Knowledge of personal
computer operations required. Master's degree and experience in utility analysis preferred. Contact:
Montana-Dakota Utilities Co, Attn: Human Resources Dept, 400 North 4th St, Bismarck ND 58501.
www.montana-dakota.com. Phone: (701) 222-7909

 The Internal Revenue Service recruits tax economists to work in the Economist Group of the Western
U.S. region, headquartered in Los Angeles, CA. Applicants are expected to apply their analytical skills to
external and internal pricing practices of multinational corporations as well as the valuation of assets.
Applicants are expected to have a graduate degree in economics or a closely related subject, and have
some experience in applied microeconomics. Contact: Internal Revenue Service, Economist Group; 225
West Broadway; Glendale, CA 91204-1331. www.irs.gov

Ernst & Young is one of the nation's largest consulting organizations providing services to a variety of
public and private sector clients. E&Y Wires consultants in its Sacramento office to work in several
areas: economic and financial analysis, financial modeling, research of regulatory issues, and statistical
analysis. Applicants should have an advanced degree in Economics or an MBA, ability to analyze
problems and formulate solutions, and excellent skills in oral and written communication. Contact:
Ernst & Young, 555 Capital Mail, #650, Sacramento CA 95814. www.ey.com

Walt Disney Company employs an exceptionally creative and astute team of professionals who are
dedicated to quality entertainment. It recruits financial analysts who assist in the preparation of
annual operating budgets, analyze monthly operating variances, forecast expenditures, etc. A
bachelor's degree in economics, finance, or accounting is required along with background in
budgeting/forecasting. Personal computer proficiency is necessary. Contact: The Walt Disney
Company, Professional Staffing; 500 S Buena Vista St; Burbank, CA 91521. http://disney.go.com

 Microsoft Corporation has an opening in their international cash management and multi-currency
investment program. Primary duties would include identifying foreign currency exposures, managing
the currency risk program, and coordinating Strategies with the tax, accounting, and budgeting.
Applicants must have at least four years experience managing currency risk strategies, Familiarity with
foreign investment vehicles, PC software skills, and excellent communication skills. An MBA is
desirable. Contact: Microsoft Corporation, Recruiting; One Microsoft Way; Redmond, WA 98052-
6399. www.microsoft.com

The Washington State Department of Health in Olympia has an opening for a research analyst.
Primary duties would include conducting professional research, statistical or data analysis. Applicants
must have a bachelor's degree and 1 1/2 years' experience in research and/or statistical analysis.
Relevant graduate training may be substituted for experience. Contact: Washington Department of
Personnel; PO BOX 47500; Olympia, WA 98504-7500. www.doh.wa.gov. Phone: (360) 664-1960. E-
mail: information@dop.wa.gov

 The Washington State Department of General Administration in Seattle-King County has an opening
for a bank supervising analyst. Primary responsibilities include the examination and analysis of banks
whose assets exceed $300 million. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree in banking, finance,
business administration, economics, or a related field, which includes 18 quarter hours of accounting
and four years of bank examination experience. Contact: Washington Department of Personnel; PO
BOX 47500; Olympia, WA 98504-7500. www.ga.wa.gov. Phone: (360) 664-1960

 Immunex Corporation, a leading biotechnology company focused on the research, development,
marketing and manufacturing of immunological therapeutic products, is searching for qualified persons
to join their Marketing Department. These persons will be responsible for designing and implementing
a market research plan for products and/or company performance, identifying, evaluating, and
recommending potential new markets and assessing market size and potential. Applicants must have a
bachelor's degree and at least 5 years' experience in pharmaceutical research. Thorough
understanding of market research study design, strong analytical skills, excellent organization, written,
and verbal communications and interpersonal skills- are essential. Contact: Human Resources
Department; 51 University Street; Seattle, WA 98101

 The City of Bellevue is looking for individuals with degrees in economics, business administration,
finance, accounting, or related fields to work in the Financial Planning. Division of the Finance
Department. Applicants must have two years of relevant work experience. Contact: Personnel
Department, City of Bellevue; PO BOX 90012; Bellevue, WA 98009-9012. www.ci.bellevue.wa.us.
Human Resources: (425) 452-6838

 The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is seeking applicants from outstanding
scholars to join the Seattle office's Economic and Market Analysis Staff. Applicants must have a
bachelors degree in economics and a 3.5 GPA or have graduated in the upper ten percent of their
class. Contact: Personnel Division, US Department of Housing & Urban Development; 909 First Ave.,
Suite 200; Seattle, WA 98104-1000. www.hud.gov. Phone: (206) 220-5101

The City of Seattle hires urban economists to work in the Office of Management and Budget. Duties
include assisting in the preparation and planning of the City's annual budget, forecasting tax revenues,
prepare economic feasibility studies, evaluating State legislative proposals. Applicants must have a
bachelor's degree in economics, finance, or closely related-field & two years of experience in economic
analysis. Contact: City of Seattle, Personnel Department; Dexter Horton Bldg, 12th Floor; 710 Second
Ave.; Seattle, WA 98104-1793. www.seattle.gov/personnel

 CH2M Hill, Inc., one of the nation's leading environmental consulting engineering firms, has
opportunities for individuals with an extensive economics background in the electric utility industry.
Candidates should have good management skills and experience in the following: rate making,
forecasting, financial planning, demand-side management, and integrated resource planning. Contact:
H.R. Manager, CH2M HILL, Inc, PO Box 91500, Bellevue WA 98009-2050. www.ch2m.com.
HR@ch2m.com

 San Diego Gas & Electric, a leading energy management company servicing over 2.7 million customers
in Southern California, has an immediate opportunity for a Pricing Analyst in San Diego. Selected
candidate will prepare gas and electric studies for average and marginal cost of service, rate design,
and rate research. Requires a Bachelor's degree in Economics, Engineering or Business Administration;
advanced degree desirable. Experience with computers also required. Contact: San Diego Gas &
Electric, Employment Office, PO Box 129831, San Diego, CA 92123. www.sdge.com

 Financial Consulting Solutions Group (FCSG) is a Redmond, Washington based management consulting
firm specializing in. (1) utility, municipal, and general government financial planning, cost of service,
rate, and user fee studies; (2) utility appraisals; (3) closely-field business appraisals. FCSG recruits
entry-level analysts to conduct research studies in the above areas. Qualified applicants will have a
Bachelor's degree in Economics, Business, Engineering, or Mathematics; an MBA degree is desirable. In
addition, candidates should have strong backgrounds in statistics and microcomputers as well as
excellent verbal and writing skills. Contact: Financial Consulting Solutions Group Inc., 8201 164th Ave.
NE, Suite 300; Redmond, Washington 98052. www.fcsgroup.com. Phone: (425) 867-1802 Fax: (425)
867-1937. info@fcsgroup.com

Department of Labor and Industries seeks analysts for its Olympia, Washington office. Qualified
applicants will hold a Bachelor's Degree in Math, Actuarial Science, Statistics, Economic Forecasting, or
Physical Science. In addition, applicants will have completed 1 -actuarial exam. Application required.
Contact: Department of Personnel, State of Washington, PO BOX 44000, Olympia WA 98504-4000.
www.lni.wa.gov. Phone: (360) 902-5800 Fax: (360) 902-5798

 The U.S. Department of State recruits college graduates with strong economics background to become
economic officers concerned with issues involving international trade, investment and monetary
matters, energy, and economic development. The economic officers are headquartered in Washington
D.C. as well as abroad. All applicants for this position must take the Foreign Service Examination.
Information concerning the exam is available at the CWU Career Planning and Placement Center.
Contact: U.S. Department of State, Office of Recruitment, Employment and Examinations, P.O. Box
12226, Arlington VA 22209

 Applied Materials, the leading independent manufacturer of semiconductor equipment, seeks a
finance professional. You'll analyze worldwide foreign currency exposures for a company where over
60% of the business is outside U.S. borders. This includes analyzing and defining exposure management
strategy, evaluating appropriate hedging techniques and products, and managing necessary banking
support relationships. Investigation of foreign currency exposure analysis and accounting software and
development of databases to monitor positions will also be part of your responsibilities. We seek an
MBA/Finance or equivalent, and experience in foreign currency exposure management. A high degree
of professionalism, strong writing and verbal presentation skills, and advanced PC spreadsheet
knowledge are required. Contact: Professional Staffing, Applied Materials, M/S 0561/FL, 3340 Scott
Blvd;, Santa Clara, CA 95054.www.appliedmaterials.com

California Commerce Bank is a medium sized commercial bank with it's corporate office in downtown
L.A. CCB has an opening for a trader in its foreign exchange (FX) department. This position combines
both hands on currency trading duties along with business development activities for both foreign
(Mexico) and domestic F/X clents. Heavy telephone work with some travel is involved. English and
Spanish skills at the business level are a must. Contact: California Commerce Bank, 2029 Century Park
East, 42nd Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90067. www.ccbusa.com. Phone: (800) 222-1234

 The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Los Angeles Branch, has immediate openings for bank
examiners in the International Unit. The Fed's wide perspective of the American banking system offers
you a unique opportunity for career growth. You will coordinate details of examinations, supervise and
train examiners, act as examiner-in-charge of on-site inspections and conduct discussion with senior
management. Qualified applicants must possess a Bachelor's degree in Finance, Accounting, Economics
or equivalent experience in international business or administration, excellent oral/written
communication skills and willingness to travel approximately 30-50% of the time. Contact: Los Angeles
Branch Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, P.O. Box 2077 Terminal Annex, Los Angeles, CA 90051.

 Microsoft has an opportunity in the Seattle area for an experienced analyst to provide key business
management services for our Product Support Services organization. You will develop standard
statistical models to predict incident volume and required staffing levels to facilitate short/long term
planning. This will involve creating forecasting models to analyze the impact of alternative support
policies on resource requirements and costs. Qualified candidates will have 3-5 years experience in
regression analysis and econometric techniques, especially time series analysis and queuing theory.
Contact Microsoft Corporation, Recruiting, Dept. One Microsoft Way, STE 303, Redmond, WA 98052-
8303. www.microsoft.com

PricewaterhouseCoopers Inc. seeks economists to work in its intercompany (transfer) pricing division,
a multi-disciplinary group integrating economic expertise with business, legal, and tax issues. Positions
are available in all major U.S. cities including Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Jose.
Candidates should have a mastery of applied microeconomics, strong writing and interpersonal skills,
creative analytical skills, and familiarity with accounting, econometrics, finance, industrial organization,
and public finance. This position requires frequent travel to client sites in the U.S. and abroad.
Candidates should possess a Master's degree or Ph.D. degree in economics. Contact:
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 1177 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-1917.
www.pwcglobal.com

Economic consulting firm seeks natural resource economists. Experience in economics of natural
resources, energy, utilities, transportation, or community and infrastructure development. Ability to
use and develop models for tasks such as cost-benefit analysis, feasibility studies, and economic impact
assessment. Excellent computer, analytical, and communication skills. Contact: Northern Economics,
880 H Street, Suite 210, Anchorage, AK 99501 www.northerneconomics.com. Phone: (907) 274-5600.
mail@norecon.com

Economic consulting company has offices in Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. Also has
international offices in Argentina, Canada, England, and New Zealand. Seeks candidates for economist
to work in areas including antitrust, environmental economics, finance, damages analysis, industry
deregulation, telecommunications, and public policy. Position requires a Master's degree in economics
or finance or an MBA. Contact: Recruiter, LECG, 2000 Powell St., Suite 600, Emeryville, CA 94608.
http://www.lecg.com. Phone: (510) 985-6700

The Democratic Staff of the federal government's Joint Economic Committee seeks economists and
research assistants to conduct public policy research. Positions require independent research as well
as working closely with economists in the federal government and throughout the country. Contact:
Staffing Coordinator, Joint Economic Committee-Democratic Staff, G-01 Dirksen Senate Building,
Washington, DC 20510. Jec.senate.gov. Phone: (202) 224-5171

 Economic consulting firm seeks applications for economists and research assistants. Requirements
include strong skills in microeconomics, quantitative and statistical methods, computer spreadsheets,
databases, and modeling. Contact: ECONorthwest, 99 West 10th, Suite 400, Eugene, OR 97401

 The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is an international organization
that brings together 30 advanced countries in the Asian, Pacific, European, and North American
regions. The OECD is headquartered in Paris. Its mission is to contribute to an expansion of world trade
on a nondiscriminatory basis, high economic growth and employment, and a rising standard of living in
member countries.. The OECD seeks economists with at least a Master's degree to work on multi-
cultural teams regarding public policy research. Contact: www.oecd.org

 The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is an independent federal government agency
that conducts foreign assistance and humanitarian aid to advance the political and economic interests
of the United States. USAID seeks international economists, with specialties in agricultural economics,
development economics, and energy economics. Contact: U.S. Agency for International Development,
M/HR/POD/SP, 2.08, RRB; Washington, DC 20523-2808. http://www.usaid.gov/

 The Department of the Navy seeks entry-level economists to perform analysis involving officer and /or
enlisted force management, military compensation, and military personnel financial management. The
incumbent will use statistical models (econometric, time series, or probit-logit) as part of the analysis.
Qualified applicants must have an undergraduate degree in Economics with a strong background in
statistics. Contact: U.S. Department of the Navy, Bureau of Naval Personnel, Institute for Personnel
Planning and Policy Analysis, Washington, D.C.

 The Washington State Department of Licensing seeks an economic analyst for its Olympia office.
Responsibilities include economic and financial analyses, studies, and revenue forecasts critical to
statewide transportation and public safety programs. Requirements include Bachelor's degree in
economic forecasting, statistics, or equivalent, experience in econometric modeling and time series
analyses, skills using Excel and statistical database tools. Contact Washington State Department of
Licensing, Human Resources, P.O. Box 6007, Olympia, WA 98507-6007, Phone 360-664-1510.

 The Valley Medical Center of Renton, WA seeks a business development analyst to research
benchmarking data and establish performance measures. The role must take the initiative in seeking
out new and better ways to perform functions within the operations at VMC to create a higher level of
efficiency; also responsible for assessing the company's financial needs and finding ways to create the
net income necessary to support those needs. Bachelors Degree in Economics, Finance, or Accounting
is required with a Masters Degree preferred. Contact Valley Medical Center, 400 South 43rd Street,
Renton, WA 98055-5010. Telephone 425-228-3450.

Research analyst sought by Spokane Teachers Credit Union. Responsibilities include the application of
MCIF technology and other research tools to prepare reports that assess the credit union’s
performance and opportunities in serving members with financial products and services. Qualifications
include an undergraduate degree in economics or business administration and experience in market
research techniques including statistical principles and procedures. Demonstrated aptitude for
learning and implementing current and future computer software and technologies. Contact Spokane
Teachers Credit Union, P.O. Box 1954, Spokane, WA 99210-1954, Phone (509) 326-1954.

Providence Health and Services of Spokane seeks a data analyst for its Sacred Heart Medical Center.
The data analyst is responsible to maintaining the integrity of patient related data. This position
requires a Bachelor’s degree in Business, Economics, Accounting, or Finance and experience in hospital
patient accounting. Contact Providence Health and Services, 9 East 9th Ave., Spokane, WA 99205,
Phone (509) 474-7337.




             Appendix 3: Students’ Comments from Spring 2008 SEOIs

Econ 202.01
Spring 2008
Dr. Robert Carbaugh

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
Always took the time to explain and was so nice!
The instructor is enthusiastic and I trust that he is very knowledgeable about the material.
Materials outside the book.
Everything! CWU is lucky to have Carbaugh! He is by far a school favorite---thank you!
Great lectures
Journal articles, extra handouts to supplement readings, SI sessions, many things. After this course I
chose economics as a minor because it was so intriguing!
Book relation and comparative examples.
They study guide was very helpful.
Carbaugh was a phenomenal teacher. My Econ 201 class made things seem so confusing, but 202 was
awesome. I never missed a class. He was clear and super easy to talk to. I would recommend him.
Knowledgeable prof.
Real life examples
The teacher was the best part, his examples and explanations helped a lot and you could tell he really
cares about students and if they learn which is reassuring.
Carbaugh was one of the best teachers I have had at Central. He explained things very clearly and really
cared that we learned.
Dr. Carbaugh is one of the best professors I have had so far.
Outstanding teacher. Dr.Carbaugh is one of the best I’ve ever had. Really knows his stuff and treats us
good. I can tell he enjoys doing what he does.

2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?

Maybe go a little faster but more in depth.
Possibly have group assignments.
Nothing
Better study guides for exams.
It is great as it is.
The tests did not really fairly ask the questions, it was taught one way then asked in a way that didn’t
make sense.
Teacher is very repetitive
I would review before test days, or go thru sections of McConnell more.
He presents the info so it’s easy to understand but it makes it hard because he doesn’t present it to
you the way you’re tested on it, which makes it difficult I believe.
Maybe make the homework worth possible points. It might help to break up all the test grades.
Other grades besides just tests and quizzes.
A few less handouts
Econ 201.02
Spring 2008
Dr. Timothy Dittmer

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
N/A
I liked the teaching style; I learned what was necessary to succeed
Dittmer is a great prof. it’s be a mistake to let him go overseas although if I had to pick a leader over
there I’d want him.
I really liked the test structure.
Good explanations, relation to the real world
Dittmer: he used excellent examples/stories when teaching, very good instructor. Wassell: I liked that
he used different colored markers b/c I am a visual learner; handouts were very helpful
Dittmer was great, I liked the Fri. quizzes but final should be optional. Having teachers change sucked
though!
Instructor taught well, bus should explain things the way they will appear on quizzes and tests.
The practice quizzes and aplia questions were very useful and provided good practice. Illustrations with
graphs made information clearer. Wassell, I liked that you wrote the main points out on the board.
Also, I liked having weekly quizzes instead of a few tests.

2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?
N/A
Just having quizzes and final exam is not an effective way of evaluating the knowledge of a student.
There should be occasional assignments or in-class projects, etc.
Nada.
Don’t change Profs in the middle of the course.
Actual textbook (not on line) more handouts and sample problems
I would have liked a homework grade to help me focus more on relevant topics.
The questions on the quizzes were very ambiguous at times, most of the questions were not taught in
class, maybe extra study guides would help.
Never make two chapters on 1 test. It is difficult to study two chapters and read in 4 days.
Switching teacher half way through class was difficult to cope with. Both teachers have different
teaching methods.

Bus 221.02
Spring 2008
Professor Ronald Elkins

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
He was very thorough and created shortcuts to make the material easier; also used real life scenarios
to relate the material.
Emailed packets were useful.
Instructors teaching and expectations were straight to the point. I learned so much without even
realizing it.
Make sure you grasped the material-very good teacher
I learned the most in this class than any other class so far here. I really liked his teaching style and
explanations to the problems.
Test and knowledge requirements clearly stated. No BS. Instruction was thorough and complete.
Elkins provided any help you needed on understanding the homework or classwork. Seemed like an
intimidating class and teacher but was very easy to get a hold of and extremely nice.
Prof. Elkins always went the extra mile to ensure those who wanted extra help and assistance go it, on
top of the fact that I think he really cared about whether or not we learned anything.
2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?
Give a little when you grade tests
Doing more actual problems as homework would have been helpful, then going over those problems
as the example problems in class.
At the beginning of the quarter, I felt the instructor’s style of grading was very difficult to understand
and I really had no idea what he was asking for on the exams. As the quarter went on, he seemed to be
a little more informative on his grading.
Sometimes (often actually) the book did not really correlate to either Prof. Elkins’ style and methods or
how we were doing the work in class.
Prof. Elkins was not always personable.
Better office hours, make more times available.
More time to finish test.
None
None, great class!
I cannot think of any.
Less test or more time. Didn’t feel like I could fully show what I learned.

Econ 332.01
Spring 2008
Dr. Koushik Ghosh

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
Ghosh is great with presenting the material to real world issues.
I really enjoyed your real world examples and willingness to give meaningful answers to student’s
questions.
I really enjoyed your class. I learned a lot about various economic issues and believe I will be able to
use these concepts throughout life. Thanks for a great quarter.
Lectures were very informative and interesting.
Tough class
I really enjoyed how engaged Professor Ghosh was and how enthusiastic he was. He truly cared about
whether we learned and about having discussions to solidify our knowledge. We watched fascinating
videos and I really enjoyed coming to class!
I feel that the lectures were well organized, but sometimes too fast, that is the material covered could
have used further explanation.
Talking theoretical concepts and applying them to real world.
The mock tests were very helpful in studying/preparing for the tests.
Real life examples were helpful.
2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?
Grading was exceptionally hard.
Maybe some actual homework or smaller quizzes in between the main exams to help with
comprehension of subject.
More real world relations to material could be given. Less straight from book lecturing. Very poor
lectures. Un effective teaching style.
More changes to cushion over grades, through homework or discussions. More experience working
through actual problems, using and manipulating the graphs and more interaction and feedback for
the short answer/essay questions. I felt so lost when it came to questions that were not multiple
choice.
More assignments and/or things to be graded on! Economics especially this class, deals with complex,
subjective issues and more stuff to grade and get graded on would alleviate some pressure on the
tests. Only having three tests, if you mess up on one, like I did, you can’t get a good grade in the class.
I studied very hard and didn’t feel I did all that well on the test.
Tell students what material to really focus on.
More homework and make it part of the grade.
MC questions could be more clear on test.
I don’t like how there was no structured syllabus that we followed. I thing power points would be very
helpful during lectures; it’s hard to stay focused when the only visual is when notes are written on an
overhead.
Easy concepts emphasized too much in lecture, but difficult concepts emphasized more on test-
balance it out.
Covering material in the last 15 minutes of class in the class before tests and making those questions
worth 25% of the test was unreasonable. There was material covered extensively in class that wasn’t
on the test. Material that was barely covered weighted heavily.

Econ 355.01
Spring 2008
Dr. David Hedrick

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
Good visual examples and explanations
Real life examples
The study guide was helpful.
Hedrick is an excellent professor. His lectures are always a joy to attend.
Dr. Hedrick is a great lecturer, much like other econ professors. He uses good, engaging and original
examples to teach material that is otherwise dry and monotonous.

2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?
Explain Excel more
More help with Excel projects
Make review questions shorter
When using abbreviations writing out what they mean when first starting may help students who the
concept is new for.
Offer it at 11:00 instead of 9:00
It was hard to understand your handwriting. Could you write words bigger?
You have got to drop the excel bit. Ok, it is important to know how to use it, but we all learned excel in
middle school. The reason we get poor graphs on excel assignment is because they are pointless and
poorly explained.

Econ 201.05
Spring 2008
Dr. Peter Saunders

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
Study packets
Very good relation to real world issues
Prof. Saunders seems to be very interested in real world issues and shared them with the class.
I appreciate Prof. Saunders passion for economics. He brought real-life issues to class. I like review
sheets.
Lecturing right out of the book made it easy to follow during lecture. The study guides were extremely
helpful as well.
Nice that everything related to current issues.
Great teacher really enjoyed his class
Great teacher! I enjoyed coming to class
The study guides
The teacher was very knowledgeable and showed a lot of appreciation for the topic.
Highly informative class, if eel all content is especially good. I think everyone should take this class, not
enough people are educated in this important area.

2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?
As a whole Econ 201 has a lot of information that I don’t feel can be really understood with one class. I
think it should be divided into two parts.
More handouts explaining graphs
There were several off relevant topic discussions which took up a lot of class time.
He was late by about 3 minutes most days. His accent is very thick.
A weekly quiz would help
When reviewing a study guide for a test, give the answers first and then see which questions students
need help on.
I felt you over helped and re-explained things to people who skipped class and I felt that was unfair
because I attended class everyday and had to hear it twice.
Professor Saunders speech made it hard to understand lectures.

Econ 325.01
Spring 2008
Dr. Thomas Tenerelli

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
He gave us good explanation.
Enthusiastic, energetic
2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?
Write on the board more
Stay a little more objective. Less tangents.
N/A
Better structure, stay on topic
Econ 402.01
Spring 2008
Dr. Charles Wassell

1. What aspects of the teaching or content of this course do you feel were especially good?
The homework was very relevant to information that students were tested on and helped with the
learning process.
He gave us good feedback on homework and exams.
HMK assignments
Out of class hw was relevant to work on exams.
Real world applications and techniques were excellent.

2. What changes could be made to improve learning in this course?
Having examples worked out ahead of time. When you get halfway through an analysis and say wait,
this is wrong, it’s pretty discouraging. Makes me wonder how I will ever understand the concepts if you
have a Ph.D and still get it mixed up sometimes.
Possibly try and simplify explanations, despite the fact that the material is pretty complex.
He can make the stuff easier. He goes too detailed and sometimes students are lost.
Add weekly quizzes
Not have it in spring in the afternoon.




                Appendix 4: Department of Economics Faculty Vitae
                                 ROBERT J. CARBAUGH


                                 PERSONAL BACKGROUND


                   Home Residence: 1202 Vista Road, Ellensburg, Washington 98926
                        Phone: Office: (509) 963-3443      Home: (509) 962-5871
                                       Email: Carbaugh@cwu.edu


                                    EDUCATION (Degrees)


                          Colorado State University: Ph.D., Economics, 1974*
                           Colorado State University: M.S., Economics, 1972
       Gonzaga University: Bachelor of Business Administration (Business Economics), 1969
    *Fields: Economic Theory, International Trade and Finance, Monetary Economics, Industrial
                                          Organization


                               PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
                                               Academic
          Central Washington University, 1985-present, Professor. Received tenure in 1987.
  University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 1975-1985, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor. Received
                                         tenure in 1981.
                    South Dakota State University, 1974-1975, Assistant Professor
                          Colorado State University, Spring 1974, Instructor
                 Colorado State University, 1970-1974, National Science Foundation
                Fellow, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Graduate Research Assistant


Teaching Experience: International Economics, Government and Business, Managerial Economics,
     Industrial Organization, Money and Banking, Intermediate Macroeconomics, Intermediate
Microeconomics, Microeconomic Principles, Macroeconomic Principles, Economic Issues, Consumer
                                          Economics
Administrative Experience: Acting Chair, Department of Economics, Central Washington University,
                          1990 calendar year. Co-Chair, 1999-present.
Consultant to News Media: Preparation of Selected Articles and Broadcasts
Chicago Tribune, Boeing-Airbus Subsidy Dispute at WTO, June 2005
       Russian Business Newspaper Kommersant, Boeing-Airbus Subsidy Dispute, June 2005
       Washington Observer, Boeing-Airbus Subsidy Dispute, June 2005
       Newark Star Ledger, Airlines’ Behavior in Response to Terrorist Attack, September      2001
       Oregon Observer, Mexican Truck Rules and NAFTA, August 2001
      LA Times, Effects of International Economic Sanctions, January 2001
      Fortune Magazine, International Trade Positions of George Bush and Al Gore, November
      2000
      Bicycle Retailer and Industry News, Strong Dollar Hurts U.S. Bike Industry, August 2000
      Oregon Observer, Employment Effects of NAFTA, July 2000
      Lansing State Journal, China and Permanent Normal Trade Relations, May 2000 Roanoke (VA)
      Times, Globalization Causes Failure of Tultex Co., February 2000
      Airline Financial News, Asian Economic Recovery, January 2000
      Australian Financial Review, Reforming the International Financial System, December 1999
      Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, U.S./EU Trade Dispute in Bananas,
      April 1999
      West Virginia Public Radio, Steel Imports Surge into the U.S., March 1999
      Smart Money Magazine, Should the World Return to the Gold Standard? January 1999
      KUOW Public Radio, Iraqi Sanctions, February 1998
      CNN Financial News, Asian Financial Crisis, July 1998
      Knight-Ridder News Service, Clinton's Personal Problems and the Dollar's Value,
      January 1998
      K-News Radio (Portland, OR), Trade Agreements and Fast Track, November 1997

       Other Consulting
       Editorial Consultant: McGraw-Hill, Inc.; John Wiley, Inc.; Addison-Wesley, Inc.; Little Brown & Co.;
       Random House, Inc.; Prentice-Hall, Inc.; Scott Foresman and Co.; Worth Publishers, Inc.; St. Martins
       Press; Wadsworth Publishers; W. W. Norton and Co.; D. C. Heath and Co.; Richard Irwin Inc.; Business
       Publications Inc.; and Harper and Row Publishers International Marketing. Small Business Development
       Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1979-1980. Export Promotion and Trade Adjustment
       Assistance, Small Business Development Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Summer 1979 and
       Summer 1980 Economic Indicators, Eau Claire Industrial Development Council, 1976-1977
                                                  AWARDS

2004 Lecturer at the Oxford Round Table, Oxford University, England. I was invited by the Directors of the
Oxford Round Table to present a lecture, “Trade and Environmental Frictions in the Global Steel Industry,” The
                                    lecture occurred on August 13, 2004.

2001 Distinguished Professor of the University–Research/Artistic Accomplishment and Invention award at
Central Washington University. A committee of CWU faculty select the outstanding researcher as nominated by
                                               colleagues.

         1996 Scholar of the Year. Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Society, Central Washington University.

    1993 Distinguished Professor of the University--Teaching award at Central Washington University. A
             committee of CWU faculty select the outstanding teacher as nominated by colleagues.

1984 Excellence in Teaching Award, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Designated as one of four runners-up
    for the award in 1981, 1982, and 1983. Each year the alumni from the three previous graduating classes,
   approximately 5,000 former students, are asked to select the teacher of the year from a ballot consisting of
                 approximately 600 teaching faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

  Honored Faculty Member Award, 1984-1985. Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society, University of Wisconsin-Eau
                                       Claire, May 1985

                                                    BOOKS

     International Economics. Cengage Learning/SouthWestern, 12th edition, 2009; the publication date is
                                          September 15, 2008.

               Contemporary Economics: An Applications Approach. M. E. Sharpe Inc., 2008.

  Instructor's Manual for International Economics. Cengage Learning/SouthWestern, 12th edition, 2009; the
                                   publication date is September 15, 2008.

      Inside the Global Economy: A Case Study Reader and Review Guide, Thomson/SouthWestern, 1995.

 The International Monetary System, with Liang-Shing Fan. The University Press of Kansas. Lawrence, KS,
                                                 1976.

   "Welfare Effects of International Joint Ventures in the World Auto Industry" (co-authored). Published as a
 chapter in International Trade: Existing Problems and Prospective Solutions, Khosrow Fatemi, Editor (New
                                        York: Taylor and Francis, 1989).

  "The Dollar's Depreciation and the U.S. Trade Deficit." Published as a chapter in International Trade and
  Finance: A North American Perspective. Khosrow Fatemi, editor (New York: Praeger Publishers, 1988).
                   Presented at the Western Economics Association Meetings, June 1987.

   Guest author of two chapters, "International Trade" and "International Finance," published in Principles of
                   Economics, Robert Thomas (Hinsdale, Illinois: The Dryden Press, 1990).

                                          REFEREED ARTICLES

  “Losing Faith in the Dollar: Can it Remain the World’s Dominant Reserve Currency,” Challenge, May-June
                                        2008, Vol. 51, No. 2.

      “Is International Trade a Substitute for Migration?” Global Economy Journal, Vol. 7, No. 3, Fall 2007.
                 “The Future of the U.S. Postal Service,” Cato Journal, Vol. 27, No. 3, Fall 2007.

  "Reducing America's Oil Dependence: An Overview of the Options," Challenge, November-December 2006
                                             (coauthored).

            "Are College Textbooks Priced Fairly?" Challenge, September-October 2005 (coauthored).

           “Boeing-Airbus Subsidy Dispute: A Sequel,” Global Economy Journal, Vol. 4, Issue 2, 2004.

             “U.S. Steelmakers in Recurrent Crisis,” Challenge, January-February 2004 (co-authored).

“Boeing-Airbus Subsidy Dispute: An Economic and Trade Perspective,” Global Economy Quarterly, December
                                         2002 (co-authored).

"Competition in the World Jetliner Industry," Challenge, July-August 1999 (co-authored).“ Also presented at the
                             Western Economics Association Meetings, July 1998.

“Are Large Current-Account Surpluses Good for Japan?”Business and Economics Review,” Vol. 12, No. 1, 1998
                                               (coauthored).

 “Do Sanctions Work? The Case of Iraq,” accepted for publication, International Review of Economics and
Business, Vol. 45, No. 3, September, 1998. Also presented at the Western Economic Association Meetings, July
                                             1997 (co-authored).

      “Trade Policy and Long-Term Macroeconomics Stability: The Case of Japan,” International Review of
                      Economics and Business, Volume 44, No. 3, 1997 (co-authored).

      “Tariff-Rate Quotas and the Uruguay Round,” The Journal of Economics, Volume 23, No. 2, 1997.

   “The Appreciating Yen and Japanese Automaker Cost-Cutting Strategies,” Challenge, May-June 1996 (co-
                                               authored).

     “Cost-Cutting Strategies of Japanese Auto Companies in Response to Yen Appreciation,” The Journal of
                              Economics, Vol. 22, No.2, Fall 1995 (co-authored).

 "Exchange Rate Fluctuations and Foreign Sourcing," The International Trade Journal, Vol. 8, No. 4, Winter
                                           1994 (co-authored).

   "Bank Mergers: Effects on National Welfare," Business and Economic Review, Vol. 7, No. 1, Fall 1993.

"Strategic Trade Policy and Commercial Jet Aircraft," The International Trade Journal, Vol. 8, No. 4, Summer
                                                     1993.

         "Countervailing Duties Recommended for U.S. Lumber Imports," The Margin, Spring 1993.

   "Environmental Standards and International Competitiveness," World Competition: Law and Economics
                                  Review, September 1992 (co-authored).

"International Dumping: Final and Intermediate Products," Journal of Asian Economics, Vol. 3, No. 2 (1992).
                                               (co-authored).

              "Toyota and Mazda Dump Minivans in the United States," The Margin, Fall 1992.

"The Effects of Steel Import Restraint Agreements and Steel-Using Industries," Journal of World Trade, August
           1991 (co-authored). Presented at the Western Economic Association Meetings, July 1991.
  "Experience of EEC Trade Growth and Implications for U.S./Canada Free Trade Agreement," International
                       Review of Economics and Business, May 1991 (co-authored).

           "Sanctions Hurt, But Didn't Cripple Iraq," The Margin, March/April 1991 (co-authored).

 "Dollar-Yen Exchange Rate: Effects on Trade," International Review of Economics and Business, December
  1989 (co-authored). Presented at the Midwest Economics Association Meetings, March 1990 (co-authored).

"Evaluation of the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement," Journal of Economics, Fall 1989. Also presented at the
                       Missouri Valley Economics Association Meetings, February 1989.

 "International Economic Sanctions and Economic Theory," International Review of Economics and Business,
                                         March 1988 (co-authored).

 "International Joint Ventures and the U.S. Automobile Industry," The International Trade Journal, Fall 1986.
            Presented at the Midwest Economic Association Meetings, Chicago, Illinois, March 1986.

"Joint Ventures, Voluntary Export Quotas, and Domestic Content Requirements," Quarterly Journal of Business
 and Economics, Spring 1985. Presented at the Eastern Economics Association meetings, Pittsburgh, PA, 1985
                                               (co-authored).

   "The Consequences of Local Content Protection," Business Economics, September 1983. Presented at the
                      Midwest Economic Association Meetings, St. Louis, MO, 1983.

              "The High Cost of Local Content Protection," The Collegiate Forum, Spring 1983.

                     "A Trigger to Limit Dumping," Business Economics, January 1982.

            "Restricting Auto Imports," Nevada Review of Business and Economics, Winter 1982.

"The National Debt: Added Costs of External Financing," The Wisconsin Dialogue, Winter 1982 (co-authored).

"The Impact of International Trade on the Future of American Business," The Collegiate Forum, Fall 1981 (co-
                                                  authored).

"Reference Prices: Effects on National Welfare and Efficiency," Nebraska Journal of Economics and Business,
    Fall 1980. Presented at the Midwest Economic Association Meetings, Chicago, IL, 1979 (co-authored).

  "Policy Mix Towards a Global Equilibrium," Rohilkhand University Economic Journal, January 1978 (co-
                                               authored).

"The Weakened Snake: Exchange Market Adjustments," Nebraska Journal of Economics and Business, Winter
                                              1977.

"International Oil Market: Policy Considerations," International Review of Economics and Business, June 1975
                                                 (co-authored).

"The Managed Float: Exchange Market Adjustments," Nebraska Journal of Economics and Business, Summer
                                                1975.

 "Policy Considerations in International Monetary Crises," International Review of Economics and Business,
                                         October 1974 (co-authored).

   "An Expanded EEC: Implications for the United States,"Intermountain Economic Review, Spring 1972.

         "British Entry into EEC: Causes and Effect," Intermountain Economic Review, Spring 1972.
         "Balance of Payments Deficit and Dollar Devaluation," Colorado Agricultural Roundup, Summer 1972 (co-
                                                        authored).



                PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS: PRESENTATIONS (UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPTS)

"International Dumping: Apples and Antifriction Bearings." Presented at the Midwest Economics Association Meetings,
                                                 March 1990 (co-authored).

        "Entry Limit Pricing as Market Strategy for OPEC." Presented at the Midwest Economic Association Meetings,
                                                  March 1983 (co-authored).

         "Trade Policy for the U.S. Auto Industry." Presented at the Midwest Economic Association Meetings, March
                                                            1982.

          "OPEC: Cartel or Conservator?" Presented at the Western Economic Association Meetings, July 1980 (co-
                                                        authored).

              "Community Development: Estimation of the Demand for Community Projects." Presented at the
                   Midcontinental Regional Science Association Meetings, April 1978 (co-authored).

        "Trade-off Dilemma and Society's Choices." Presented at the Rocky Mountain Social Science Convention, June
                                                   1972 (co-authored).

                                                  RESEARCH GRANTS

         "Community Development: Estimation of the Demand for Community Projects," 1977-1978. Title 1 - Higher
              Education Act of 1965. Published as an Extension Report by the University of Wisconsin, 1978.

       "Economic Development: Cumberland Township," 1975-1976.            Title 1 - Higher Education Act of 1965.
       University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

          "Seasonal Recreational Property Study: Colorado Ski Resorts," 1973. Assisted in Faculty Research Grant.
                                                 Colorado State University.

         "Primary and Secondary Benefits of Weather Modification to the Agricultural Economy of the Great Plains of
                      Colorado," 1972. Assisted in Faculty Research Grant. Colorado State University.

                                                MANUSCRIPT EDITOR

                                               15 Global Economy Quarterly
                                                  International Trade Journal
                                                Business and Economics Review
                                                Journal of Economic Education


                                   PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS & SOCIETIES

          Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Sigma Nu, Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta Epsilon, Western Economics Association,
           Midwest Economic Association, Missouri Valley Economics Association, International Trade and Finance
                                                      Association.
                                      Timothy P. Dittmer

CONTACT INFORMATION

Department of Economics
Central Washington University
Shaw-Smyser 426
400 East 8th Avenue
Ellensburg, WA 98926-7486
(509) 963-1941
Dittmert@CWU.edu


EDUCATION

Ph.D., Economics, University of Washington, 1998
Fields: Industrial Organization, Public Finance
B.A. Cum Laude, Philosophy, Wheaton College, 1988

DISSERTATION

A Property Rights Approach to Antitrust Analysis

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Associate Professor, Department of Economics, Central Washington University, September 1999 to
present. Tenured 2006. Duties include teaching introductory Microeconomics and Macroeconomics,
and upper divisional classes in Government & Business, History of Economic Thought, Intermediate
Microeconomic Analysis, Comparative Systems and Econometrics.
Economic Consultant, 1995-present. Perform research for antitrust litigation, interest arbitration and
management consulting. Use theoretical and econometric tools to analyze market share, industry pricing
behavior, damage estimates, comparative wages and alternative legal rules. Collect and analyze data in
the petroleum, health care, tobacco, residential construction, asbestos, nuclear security, equestrian, and
insurance industries.
Partner, DBL Property Management, 2001 to 2007. DBL is a LLC owning and managing a mixed use
building in Deerfield, NH. Responsibilities include financial management and reporting.
Non-Commissioned Officer, United States Army and Washington National Guard. 2001-present.
Duties included serving in a leadership position in an infantry platoon engaged in stability and support
operations in Baghdad, Iraq. Multiple responsibilities related to all phases of infantry combat. Received
Combat Infantry Badge and Army Commendation Medal.
Instructor, University of Washington. Taught two introductory Microeconomics classes, 1996.
Designed and taught an experimental self-paced course, 1997.
Programmer, Federal Aviation Administration, 1990-91. Designed and created a database program
used in managing aviation facility construction costs.
Private Investigator, Washington, D.C., 1989-90. Provided investigative services to court appointed
defense attorneys.

INTELECTUAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Journal Publications

“The Fallacy of Sustainable Biofuels Feedstock: You ARE Putting a Tiger in Your Tank” with Charles
Wassell. Challenge. Forthcoming.

“Are Subsidies for Biodiesel Economically Efficient?” with Charles Wassell. Energy Policy, Volume
34, Issue 18, 2005.

 “Diminishing Marginal Utility in Economics Textbooks,” The Journal of Economic Education, Volume
36, Number 4, Fall 2005.

 “Does Regime Type Really Matter for Economic Growth?” with Paul Nicks. Growth and Change: A
Journal of Urban and Regional Policy, Volume 35, Number 2, Spring 2004.

“Technological Economies and Industry Structure: The Case of Standard Oil,” Pennsylvania Economic
Review, Volume 11, Number 2, Fall 2002.

“The Dominant Firm Model and Vertical Integration?” Journal of Business Economics Research,
Volume 4, Numbers 1 & 2, October 2002-April 2003.

Unpublished Manuscripts Presented at Professional Conferences

“Promotion of Industry: The Case of Washington Biodiesel Mandates,” with Chad Wassell. A draft was
presented at the 2006 Western Economic Association Annual Meeting.
“An Empirical Analysis of the Economic Performance of Governments Subsequent to Military Coups,”
with Ron Elkins. A draft was presented at two conferences; the July 2002 Western Economic
Association Annual Meeting and the December 2001 University of Washington Conference Honoring
Yoram Barzel.
“Substitutes for the Sword: A Measurement Cost Explanation of Voting.” Presented at the 1997
Western Economic Association Annual meeting.


Unpublished Reports Resulting from Economic Consulting Contracts

“Financial Feasibility and Economic Impact of the Washington State Horse Park,” with Richard Mack.
Contractor Report for the Washington State Horse Park Authority. Fall 2006.
“Wage Comparability Study for United Steelworkers Local 12-369/Franklin County Interest
Arbitration,” with Richard Mack. Report was prepared for potential binding interest arbitration
proceedings Spring 2006.
“Wage Comparability Study for United Steelworkers Local 12-369/Energy Northwest Interest
Arbitration,” with Richard Mack. Report was presented for binding interest arbitration proceedings
December 20 and 21, 2005.

“Property Rights in the Firm.” Preliminary work done for a paper presented by Yoram Barzel at the
Hoover Institute. Spring 2000.

“Why Opportunity Cost is the Correct Measurement in Predatory Pricing Cases.” Report was written as
part of ongoing litigation involving the Rebel Oil Company. 1998.

“Reputation and Predation: An Analysis of Strategic Interaction in the Retail Gasoline Market.” Report
was written for the Western Oil Marketing Association. 1995.

Other Data Analysis for Economic Consulting Contracts

Replication and refutation of econometric damage estimate for California hospital insurance economic
damage case, with Dr. Keith Leffler. Discovery of coding error led to a multiple million dollar change in
liability. 1998.

Regression analysis of price data in price fixing case, with Dr. Keith Leffler. Provided econometric
analysis of price correlation in multi million dollar building materials price fixing case. 1997.

Market share/Input-Output analysis for Seattle, WA hospital merger case, with Dr. Keith Leffler. Used
billing records from area hospitals to perform input/output LIFO/LOFI test to determine market share.
1995.

RESEARCH GRANTS

2002 CWU Seed Grant Proposal.

AWARDS
Office of Alumni Relations 2001 Excellence in Teaching Award in the College of Business.

PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
Western Economics Association.

REFERENCES

Dr. Keith Leffler, Department of Economics, Box 353330, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
98195, (206) 543-5795.

Dr. Yoram Barzel, Department of Economics, Box 353330, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
98195, (206) 543-2510.

Dr. Fahad Khalil, Department of Economics, Box 353330, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
98195, (206) 543-5836.
                                                VITA

                                    KOUSHIK GHOSH

Home Address:                                                             Department Address:
1602 Glen Drive                                                           Department of Economics
Ellensburg, WA 98926                                                      Central Washington Univ.
Phone: (509) 925-1523                                                     400 E. University Way
                                                                          Ellensburg, WA 98926-7486
                                                                          (509) 963-1014


                                            PERSONAL
Date of Birth: November 2, 1960

                                           EDUCATION
Ph.D. (1994) in Economics, Washington State University.
       Dissertation Title: The Long-Run Impact of Early Employment Experience of American Youth.
       Committee Chairman: Duane Leigh
       M.A., (1990) in Economics, Washington State University
       B.A., (1982) in Economics, Jadavpur University, Calcutta, India.


                                      FIELDS OF INTEREST
Primary: Labor Economics/Industrial Relations, Money/Macro
Other: Public Finance, Econometrics, Development, International

                                       COMPUTER SKILLS
SPSS, SAS. Worked extensively with the National Longitudinal Survey of Survey of Youth (NLSY)
      data for dissertation.
                                       CURRENT POSITION
Professor and Chair, Department of Economics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA
98926 (September 1993 to present). Duties include teaching introductory courses, and intermediate level
courses in Managerial Economics, Public Finance, Macroeconomics, Mathematical Economics,
International Economics, and World Economic Issues.

                                    PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE
Visiting Professor: Department of Social Sciences, Ferris State University Big Rapids, MI 49307
(September 1990 to August 1993). Duties included teaching courses in Microeconomic Theory,
Macroeconomic Theory at the introductory level and those in Labor Economics, and Collective
Bargaining/Industrial Relations at intermediate/senior level.

Research Assistant:
Project: (Summer 1989): "The Impact of Nuclear Power on the Systematic Risk and Market Value of
Electric Utility Common Stock"
       Supervisor: Thomas Lowinger
Project: (Summer 1988): "Deregulation and Mergers in the Trucking Industry"
       Supervisor: Fred Inaba
Project: (June 1987-May 1988): "Assisting Displaced Workers: Do the States Have a Better Idea"
       Supervisor: Duane Leigh
Teaching Assistant: August 1985 to May 1986; August 1986 to May 1987; August 1988 to May
1989; August 1989 to May 1990, Department of Economics, Washington State University, Pullman.
Duties included assisting with lectures and grading for graduate level courses in Macroeconomics, and
senior level undergraduate courses in Development Economics, Collective Bargaining, Labor
Economics, Comparative Economic Systems and Microeconomics.
Instructor (Summer 1990): Introductory Microeconomic Theory
Instructor (Spring 1988): Introductory Macroeconomics Theory
Journalist (1984-85): Economic Times (India)
Editor (1981): Departmental Magazine, Department of Economics, Jadavpur University, Calcutta,
India.

      PUBLISHED ARTICLES, INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL & RESEARCH NOTES
The Effect of Social Security on Personal Saving in the Short-Run and the Long-Run: A Time Series
Analysis with Dr. Peter J. Saunders, Journal of Economics Vol. XXXII, No. 1, 2006.
Do Imports Cause Economic Growth? with Dr. Peter J. Saunders, Journal of Business and Industry,
Vol 6., Fall 2005.
Are College Textbooks Priced Fairly?” with Dr. Robert Carbaugh, Challenge September 2005.
Instructor’s Manual and Test Bank for International Economics, Thomson Publishing Company, 2005.
An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Sage Differentials, Productivity Growth, and
Trade, with Dr. Peter Saunders. (Contemporary Economic Policy, Vol, January 2002.
Trade and Wage Differentials: Is There a Relationship? with Dr. Peter Saunders. Atlantic Economic
Journal, September 2000.
Trade and Wage Differentials: Are They Related? with P.J. Saunders and B. Biswas, International
Advances in Economic Research, Vol. 6, No. 1, February 2000.
Does Early Work Experience Matter? Journal of Economics, Vol. XXV, No.1, 1999.
Study Guide for Contemporary Economics, Southwestern Publishing Co., 1999.
“Theory and Calculation of Hedonic Damages” (co-author Dr. Wolfgang Franz), 1996 Wiley Expert
Witness Updates: New Developments in Personal Injury Litigation, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons.
Protectionism: Panacea or Poison, (1996), The Daily Record, Ellensburg, Washington.
Problems in the Power Industry, (1985), The Economic Times, Calcutta, India.
Obsolescence in the Paper Industry, (1982), The Statesman, Calcutta, India.


                            LECTURES, SEMINARS, & WORKSHOPS
Participant: Northwest Economics Educators Conference, Seattle University, Seattle, 2004.
Participant: Northwest Economics Educators Conference, Seattle University, Seattle, 2003.
Participant: Northwest Economics Educators Conference, Seattle University, Seattle, 2002.
Participant, “Continuities and Crises: The Interplay of Religion and Politics in China,” National
Endowment for the Humanities Seminar, East-West Center, Hawaii, 2001.
Participant: Northwest Economics Educators Conference, Seattle University, Seattle, 2001.
Assessment Workshop, University of Washington, Seattle, Summer 2000.
Lecture: “NAFTA 2001,” Latin American Studies Programs, 2001.
Workshop Facilitator: “Boeing Materials Management Council,” CWU, 2000.
Lecture: “Marxism Today,” Douglas Honors College, 2001.
Lecture: “NAFTA: 1999,” Latin American Studies Program (1999).
Lecture: “India: A Land Afar,” Intercultural Studies, 2001.
Lecture: “The Relevance of Marx, “ Douglas Honors College (1999).
Lecture: “India and the United States: In Two Words at the Same Time,” Intercultural Studies, (1999).
Participant: Communication: Making Meaning of Diversity in Higher Education, CWU, (October1998).
Participant: Research seminar, SBE (May 1998).
“The Informal Sector: Concept and Measurement Issues,” Department of Anthropology, (Fall 1998).
“India: A Different World,” Intercultural Studies, (Spring 1998).
“Post-Papal Cuba and the Future of Marxism,” DHC, (Winter 1998).
Participant: “On Common Ground,” Faculty and Staff of Color in Higher Education, TESC, (October
1997).
Participated in the Writing Portfolio Project, Institutional Assessment, CWU (May, 1997).
Participated in Active Learning Workshops, Northwest Economics Educators Conference (May, 1997).
Participated in Prior Learning Outcomes and Assessor Training Workshop (April, 1997).
“Economics and the Philosophy of Science,” a conversation with Dr. Richard Mack, Philosophy
Department, (Spring 1997).
Lecture: “Globalization From a Marxists Perspective,” Douglas Honors College, (Winter 1997).
Commentator: “Ramayana and the Bhagavad Gita,” Douglas Honors College colloquium (Winter, 1997)
Anthropology Seminar: “Immigration: Exploding Some Myths,” (Spring 1996).
Lecture: “Marx and the 104th Congress,” (1996), Douglas Honors College (Winter 1996).
Panelist: U.S./Latin American Relations: From Alliance for Progress to NAFTA (Spring 1994).
Lecture: "Politics and Economics of Marx - A Tenuous Connection,”Douglas Honors College (Winter
1994).

                                  BOOK and JOURNAL REVIEWS
Reviewer: Contemporary Economic Policy journal.
Reviewer: Managerial Economics, McGraw-Hill, 1999.
Reviewer: Managerial Economics by Mark Hirschey, The Dryden Press, 1998.
Reviewer: Managerial Economics by Samuelson and Marks, The Dryden Press, 1998.
Reviewer: "Modern Managerial Economics" by William F. Shugart, William F. Chappel and Rex L.
Cottle (publisher: Southwestern Publishing Co.), 1995.
                             CONFERENCES & PRESENTATIONS
Discussant, Western Economic Association International Conference, Vancouver, Canada, Summer
2004.
“The Effects of Social Security on Personal saving in the Short-Run and Long-Run: A Time Series
Analysis,” with Dr. Peter Saunders. Presented at the Western Economic Association International
Conference, Seattle, Washington, Summer 2002.
“Productivity Growth, Wage Inequality and Trade,” with Dr. Peter Saunders. Presented at the Western
Economic Association International Conference, Vancouver, Canada, Summer 2000.
“Trade and Wages: Is There a Relationship?” with Dr. Peter Saunders. Presented at the Atlantic
Economic Conference, Vienna, Austria, March 1999.
Presentation at the CWU Innovations in Teaching and Learning for Business Faculty Conference,
Seattle, 1999, “Building Student Teams,” with Dr. Peter Boyle, CWU.
Paper presented at the Western Economic Association Conference (June 28 to July 2, 1998 - Lake
Tahoe), “Selection Bias in Early Employment.”
Presentation at the CWU Innovations in Teaching and Learning for Business Faculty Conference, Seatac
Center, Seattle, April 1998, “The International Student in the Business Classroom.” With Dr. Peter
Boyle, CWU.
Participant, “Summer Institute on Infusing Asian Studies Into the Undergraduate Curriculum”, Honolulu
(July -August 1997).
“Assessment   of Managerial Economics: The Crucial Nature of Communication Within the Department.”
Presented at the Learning Outcomes Workshop, CWU (June, 1997).
“Learning Outcomes and Survey of Managerial Economics,” presented results at Faculty Forum,
Institutional Assessment, CWU (May, 1997).
Paper presented at Annual Seminar Series, West Virginia University (November 1996) “Does Early
Work Experience Matter?”
Paper presenter at the Western Economic Association Conference (July 6, 1995--San Diego) "The Long-
Run Impact of Early Employment Experience."

                                      RESEARCH GRANTS
“Do Imports Cause Economic Growth?” with Peter J. Saunders, Merrick and Summer Research Grant,
SBE, 2001.
“Social Security” Office of Graduate Studies and Research, Central Washington Univ., 2000.
“An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Wage Inequality, Productivity Growth and
Trade,” with Peter J. Saunders, Merrick and Summer Research Grant, SBE, 1999.
“Development of Program in International Business/Economics and Asian Studies in Washington
State,” with Dr. Richard Mack, et al., U.S. Department of Education, 1998.
Awarded the Instructional Innovation and Development Grant, SBE, 1998.
Awarded Summer Research/Instructional Development Grant, 1997.
Awarded ISPAC Travel Grant, 1997.
Awarded Asian Studies Program Grant, 1997.
“Differences in Early Employment Experience and Long-Term Productivity.”         Office of Graduate
Studies and Research, Central Washington University, 1996.
"Early Employment, Self-selection, and Long-Term Employment." Research and Instructional
Development Grant, School of Business and Economics, Central Washington University, 1995.

                               COMMITTEES & MEMBERSHIPS
Professional Associate, Asian Studies Development Program, East-West Center and Univ. of Hawaii
Member of the Executive Committee, School of Business and Economics.
Member of the Instructional Committee, School of Business and Economics.
Member of the University Small Grants Committee
Member of Undergraduate Research/Travel Grants Committee.
Alternate, Faculty Senate
Member of Latin American Studies Group
Member of Asian Pacific Studies Group
Member of American Economic Association
Member of Western Economic Association

                                         NOMINATIONS
Nominee, Center Teaching Excellence Award, Central Washington University, 2002.
Teaching Excellence Award, School of Business and Economics, Central Washington University, 1998.
Teaching Innovation Award, School of Business and Economics, Central Washington University, 1996.
Teaching Innovation Award, School of Business and Economics, Central Washington University, 1995.

                                    HONORS AND AWARDS
Faculty Research Award, School of Business and Economics (1999).
Merit Increase, School of Business and Economics, Central Washington University, (1998).
Professional Associateship, Asian Studies Development Program, East-West Center and Univ. of
Hawaii, (1997).
CWU Parents Association Excellence in Teaching Award, Central Washington University (1995).
Recipient of the Phi Gamma Sigma Honor (1987).
Recipient of Department of Economics Honor, Jadavpur University, Calcutta, India (1982).
Recipient of the College of Arts and Humanities Scholarship, Jadavpur University, Calcutta, India
(1981).

                        INTERNSHIPS/STUDENT-RELATED ACTIVITIES
Internship Supervisor, Timothy Kroll, (2006)
Internship Supervisor, Casey Campbell, (2004).
Internship Supervisor, Kathleen Coonan, (2004).
Internship Supervisor, Rory Kolste, (2004).
Independent Study, Richard Comeaux, (2002).
Independent Study, Chris Briggs, (2001).
Internship Supervisor: Jeffrey Fettig, (2001).
Thesis Advisor: Patricia Wehmeyer, (2001).
Independent Study, Brandon McIntosh, (2001).
Independent Study, Thomas Lang, (2001).
Advisor, Jake Santistevan, McNair Scholar’s Program, (2000).
Independent Study: Special Topics in Managerial Economics, (2000).
Supervisor: Internship for Daniel Tilton with Tacoma Power, (2000).
Thesis Advisor, Patricia Wehmeyer, Douglas Honors College, (1999).
Independent Study: A Study of the Economic Impact of Events, Jedd Lygre, (1999).
Supervisor: Internship for Kara Ward with Merrill Lynch, (1999).
Supervisor: Internship for Andrew Layland with Apartment Renovation Group, Sacramento, CA,
(1999).
Independent Study: Special topics in Mathematical Economics, Dan Axelsen, (1999).
Independent Study: Special topics in Public Finance, Chris Tobin and Dan Axelsen, (1998).
Independent Study: Special topics in Microeconomics, Tracey Gere, (1998).
Directed student research with Dr. Richard Mack, CWU. “The Role of Food Processing in
Washington’s Economy.” For the Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce (Winter 1998).
Created Student Handbook for writing papers, (1997).
Planned an internship opportunity for a student who will be developing a report to explore business
opportunities in Chile, and also develop a strategy to secure more corporate clients (Student: Greg
Chang, Fall 1996).
Assisted a student intern develop, and subsequently improve a model of lumber sales during his
internship at the Washington State Legislature. Arranged a presentation of this project in ECON 452,
Managerial Economics, Fall 1995 (Student: Brink Tully: Internship with Washington State Legislature).


                              CAMPUS/COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
India and Outsourcing: A Conversation, Economics Club, (2006).
Advisor, SOURCE, (2001).
Advisor and Session Chair, SOURCE, (1999).
Lecturer, Videmus Film Series (1998).
Advisor, Lecture and Film Series, International Programs and Douglas Honors College (Spring, 1997).
Film Series Commentator, Senior Ventures Program (Summer, 1996).
Film Series Coordinator: Senior Venture Film Series, Summer 1996.
Lecturer: “Querelle”, (Film Director: Werner Fassbinder), Lecture and Film Series, International
Programs and Douglas Honor’s College, (1996), Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA
98926.
Seminar Coordinator: “Emerging Market in India”, (Speaker: Bhaskar Das), International Programs and
School of Business and Economics, (1996), Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA 98926.
Actor, Scriptwriter: “The Fox and the Crocodile”, Children’s Theater, Celebration of Cultures, (1996),
Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA 98926.
Participant: Children’s Activity Corner, Celebration of Cultures, (1995), Central Washington University,
Ellensburg, WA 98926.
Actor: “An Indian Wants the Bronx”, (1994), Theatre Department, Central Washington University,
Ellensburg, WA 98926.
Radio Show Host (Co-Host: Stefan Kayser): Cougar International Showcase, (1988), KZUU Radio,
Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
Assisted in preparation of video for the Office of International Studies & Programs, Summer 1997.

REFERENCES
Professor Robert Carbaugh, Department of Economics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA
98926. Phone: (509) 963-3443.
Dr. Richard Mack, Department of Economics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA 98926.
Phone: (509) 963-2663.
Dr. Peter Saunders, Department of Economics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA 98926.
Phone: (509) 963-1266.
                             DAVID W. HEDRICK


ADDRESS:              Department of Economics
                      400 E. University Way
                      Ellensburg, WA 98926-7486


PHONE:                Office: (509) 963-2426
                      Fax:      (509) 963-1992


EDUCATION:            Ph.D. 1984, University of Oregon
                      M.S. 1983, University of Oregon
                      B.A. with honors, 1975, UC, Davis


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

Department of Economics, Central Washington University. Associate Professor, 1987-present.
Teaching introductory microeconomics, and macroeconomics, labor economics and intermediate
microeconomics theory.

Executive Director of the Office of International Studies and Programs, Central Washington
University, 1995–2002, Acting 1993-95. Coordinated and implemented all university-sponsored
programs that involved either CWU students or faculty in any area outside the U.S. and all
university sponsored programs that involve foreign students or professors at CWU. Chair,
Northwest Council for Study Abroad (NCSA), March 2002 – January 2003. Board Member and
Executive Committee Member (2001-2002), College Consortia for International Studies (CCIS).
Member, Academic Affairs Council, CWU. Member, University Strategic Planning Committee, CWU,
1991-1994, Chair, 1994. Member (ex-officio), International Studies and Programs Advisory
Committee, CWU, 1993-present. Board Member, Washington State Japan-America Society, 1998-
2001. Board Member, Washington State/Chile Partners of the Americas and Vice President for
Central Washington, since 1995. Member, NAFSA, Association for International Educators.
Member, Association of International Education Administrators, Member, Associación Mexicana
para la Educación Internacional (AMPEI), since 1995.

Acting Director of the Office of International Programs, Central Washington University, and
November 1993 - June 1995. Coordinated and implemented of all university-sponsored programs
that involved either CWU students or faculty in any area outside the U.S. and all university
sponsored programs that involve foreign students or professors at CWU.

Center for Economic Education, Humboldt State University, Director, 1986-87. Provided workshops
for implementation of state mandated economics instruction to area high school teachers.
Maintained normal operating activities of the Joint Council of Economic Education affiliated Center.

Department of Economics, Humboldt State University, Lecturer of Economics, 1985-87. Taught
introductory microeconomics, business cycles and forecasting, econometrics, mathematical
economics, money and banking, introductory economics for teachers and graduate managerial
economics.
Instituto de Economia, Universidad Austral de Chile, Professor Asociado de Economia, 1984-85.
Taught intermediate and advanced microeconomics theory.

Department of Economics, Western Washington University. Visiting Assistant Professor, 1982-83.
Taught introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics, managerial economics and economics
of energy.

Department of Finance, University of Oregon. Visiting Assistant Professor, 1981-82.         Taught
graduate and undergraduate managerial economics.

AWARDS:

College of Business Faculty Excellence in Teaching 2007

College of Business Faculty Excellence in Advising 2005

Excellence in Teaching, Central Washington University’s Parent Council, 1990.

Meritorious Performance and Professional Award. Humboldt State University, 1986.

GRANTS:

Associate Project Director, “Americanidad, Americanité, Americanicity”, Fund for the Improvement
of Post-secondary Education (FIPSE). CWU is the partner institution with SUNY Plattsburg, the
lead institution in a four-year North American Project. Total grant award was approximately
$230,000 of which CWU will receive approximately $100,000.

Project Director, “Sustainable Communities and Civil Societies”, Fund for the Improvement of Post-
secondary Education (FIPSE). CWU is the partner institution with Daemen College, the lead
institution in a four-year North American Project. Total grant award is $204, 468 of which CWU will
receive approximately $90,000.

Project Director, Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad, U.S. Department of Education. A $58,000
grant to provide a five-week lecture tour of Ghana for 16 CWU and Washington State K-12
teachers. Summer 1998.

Project Director, “Linking International Education to Professional Careers”; Fund for the
Improvement of Post-secondary Education (FIPSE), U.S. Department of Education. A three-year
grant for $165,494 to implement an international component for majors in sociology and law and
justice.

Project Director, Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad, U.S. Department of Education. A $51,998
grant to provide a five-week lecture tour of Chile for 11 Washington State high-school teachers.
Summer 1997.

Academic Director, Fulbright-Hays Travel Grant, U.S. Department of Education. Supervised a four-
week lecture tour of Chile for 13 Washington State high-school teachers. Summer 1993.

Principal investigator, Project Rebound Evaluation. A $12,000 contract from the Washington
State Energy Office to study the economic and programmatic contribution of an award-winning
energy conservation program. With R. Mack and D. Kauffman. Summer 1991-Winter 1992.

Coordinator, Guatemalan Community Leaders Project. U.S.A.I.D. Managed a two-week lecture
series on community development for 25 Guatemalan participants on the Central campus. Fall
1991.
Coordinator and participant, Fulbright/Hays Travel Grant. U.S. Department of Education.
Supervised a six-week lecture tour of Chile for sixteen educators from around the states of
Washington and Oregon. Summer 1991.

An Economic Impact Analysis of the Proposed Hatchery project for the Yakima and Klickitat
River Basins, 1988-89. Richard Mack, Principal Investigator, Donald Cocheba, Daniel Green and
David Hedrick, Research Associates. A $157,000 grant funded by the Bonneville Power
Administration.

Economic Literacy Project Grant, 1986-87. A $10,622 grant awarded by the Economic Literacy
Council of California to sponsor high school teacher training workshops.

Economic Literacy Project Grant, 1985-86. A $9,822 grant awarded by the Economic Literacy
Council of California to sponsor high school teacher training workshops.

SELECTED PRESENTATIONS:

“Effects of AACSB Accreditation on Faculty Salaries and Productivity”. Western Economic Association.
Honolulu, HI. June 2008.

“Is There Really A Union Premium”. Western Economic Association. Honolulu, HI. June 2008.

“Enrolling in U.S. Universities”. the Taipei Educational and Cultural Office and Ministry of Education of
Taiwan. Co-chaired the session with the Director of the Educational Affairs Office of Taiwan at the
invitation of the Taipei Educational and Cultural Office and Ministry of Education of Taiwan. October
2002, Taipei Municipal Library, Taipei, Taiwan.

“Lessons in Internationalizing a Mid-sized University”. Invited lecture to a conference on
internationalization sponsored by the Universidad de Domingo Savio. September 2002, Santa Cruz de
la Sierra, Bolivia.

“Financing International Education Initiatives” Annual meeting of AMPEI, November 2001, La Paz
Mexico.

“The Link Program: Integrating Mexican Studies into the Social Services Curriculum.” A paper (co-
authored) presented at the Global Internship Conference, Mazatlan, Mexico, and April 1999.

“Health and Safety Issues in Study Abroad” Annual meeting of the College Consortia for International
Studies (CCIS). Mexico City, Mexico. February 1999.

“Consortia Experiences of Washington State Universities” Annual meeting of the Association of
International Education Administrators (AIEA). Bandera, Texas. February 1997.

“International Education and University Administrators” Annual meeting of the Association of
International Education Administrators (AIEA). Stone Mountain, Georgia. February 1996.

UNPUBLISHED CURRENT RESEARCH:

“Are there Economies of Scale in Fighting Fires”, co-authored with Charles Wassell, CWU Faculty
Research Working Papers.

“Is There Really a Faculty Union Premium”, co-authored with John Krieg, Steven Henson and Charles
Wassell. Preparing manuscript for submission (likely submission January 2009 to Journal of Labor
Research).
 “Effects of AACSB Accreditation on Faculty Salaries and Productivity”, co-authored with John Krieg,
Steven Henson and Charles Wassell. Submitted to Journal of Education for Business November,
2008.

“The Bush Tax Cuts: What Have We Learned From Fiscal Stimulus Programs?”, with Robert
Carbaugh. Submitted to Midwestern Business and Economics Review October, 2008.

PEER REVIEWED JOURNALS AND PROCEEDINGS:

“Losing Faith in the Dollar: Can It Remain the World’s Dominant Currency?” with Robert Carbaugh.
Challenge. Challenge. May/June 2008..

“Administrative Cost in Higher Education: How Fast Are They Really Growing?” with Charles Wassell
and Steven Henson. Education Economics. Published on-line August, 2007. Hardcopy forthcoming.
(http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=g777020133~db=all)

“International Education in a Mid-sized Public University” Educación Global, Number 4, AMPEI,
April 2001.

 “The Effect of Universities on the Provision of Local Public Services: Some Cross-Sectional Evidence”
Proceedings of the Pacific Northwest Regional Economics Conference, Kennewick, WA, April
1993.

“The Effects of Universities on Local Retail, Service, and F.I.R.E. Employment: Some Cross-Sectional
Evidence” Growth and Change, Summer 1990 (co-authored).

“New Evidence on Schooling Input Effectiveness” Social Science Perspectives Journal, proceedings
of the National Social Science Association, Vancouver, B.C. meeting, February 1990.

SELECTED MEMBERSHIPS AND SERVICE:

CWU Sabbatical Leave Committee, since 2007

COB Scholarship Committee, since 2006

COB Faculty Committee, Fall 2008 – present.

COB Student Committee, Fall 2008

Faculty Advisor, Iota Chapter, Omicron Delta Epsilon, since 2005

COB Curriculum Committee, 2003-2008

Chair, Northwest Council for Study Abroad (NCSA), 2002-03.

Member (ex-officio), International Studies and Programs Advisory Committee, CWU, 1993-2002.

Board Member, College Consortia for International Studies, 1998-2002.

Board Member, Washington State/Chile Partners of the Americas, since 1995-2003

NAFSA, Association for International Educators. 1987-2003

Association of International Education Administrators. 1987-2003

Asociación Mexicana para la Educación Internacional. 1987-2003
Member, University Strategic Planning Committee, CWU, 1991-1994, Chair, 1994

Member, Academic Affairs Council, CWU, 1993-2002

Board Member, College Consortia for International Studies, 1998-2002.

Board Member, Washington State Japan-America Society, 1998-2001.
                                        Tyler Prante

Address:         Central Washington University              Email: prantet@cwu.edu
                 Department of Economics                    Phone: (509) 963-2616
                 400 E. University Way                      Website: www.cwu.edu/~prantet
                 Shaw-Smyser 424
                 Ellensburg WA, 98926


Employment:

                 Assistant Professor                       Fall 2008-present
                 Department of Economics
                 Central Washington University


Education:

   Ph.D. in Economics                                     2008
    University of New Mexico

   M.A. in Economics                                      2007
    University of New Mexico

   B.A. in Economics                                      2002
    San Diego State University

       Dissertation: Social Capital and the Policy Response to Externalities

       Fields: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics, Public Finance, Econometrics



Teaching and Research Interests:

Environmental and resource economics

Evaluation of government programs

Microeconomics

Applied econometrics and statistics

Experimental economics

Social capital and community forestry

Public finance

Sports economics
Research:

Papers published or forthcoming

Prante, Tyler, Jennifer A. Thacher, Daniel W. McCollum, and Robert P. Berrens. (2007) “Building Social
Capital in Forest Communities: Analysis of New Mexico’s Collaborative Forest Restoration Program.”
Natural Resources Journal, 47 (4), 867-915.

Prante, Tyler, Jennifer A. Thacher, and Robert P. Berrens. (2007) “Evaluating Coasean Bargaining
Experiments with Meta-Analysis.” Economics Bulletin, 3 (68) pg 1-7.

Prante, Tyler, and Alok K. Bohara. (2008) “What Determines Homeland Security Spending? An
Econometric Analysis of the State Homeland Security Grant Program.” Policy Studies Journal, 36 (2),
pg 243-256.

Research in progress

“Wildfire and Homeowners in the Wildland-Urban Interface: An Experimental Analysis of Risk Mitigating
Behavior.” (with Michael L. Jones, Joseph M. Little, Robert P. Berrens, and Michael McKee) Paper in
development (computerized experimental design completed, and data collection in progress).

 “The Case of Negative Externalities: Can the Coase Theorem be Extended?” Paper in development
(experiments in design phase).

“Regional Impact Modeling of the Collaborative Forest Restoration Program.” (with Meghan Starbuck
and Robert P. Berrens) Paper in development (data collected).

Professional Experience:

   Instructor, University of New Mexico, 2005-Present
    Independent courses taught (enrollment):

       Fall 2007             Principles of Microeconomics        (96)

       Spring 2007           Principles of Macroeconomics        (90)

       Fall 2006             Intermediate Microeconomics         (50)

       Fall 2005             Principles of Microeconomics        (96)

   Teaching Assistant, University of New Mexico, 2003-2005
       Spring 2005         Principles of Microeconomics

       Fall 2004             Intermediate Microeconomics

       Spring 2004           Principles of Microeconomics

    Fall 2003        Personal Investing

   Research Assistant, University of New Mexico, 2005-present
       o R.A. to Professors Robert P. Berrens and Jennifer A. Thacher, Funded under Research
          Joint Venture Agreements (06-JV-199 and 05-JV-257) between the Rocky Mountain
          Research Station of the United States Forest Service and the University of New Mexico.

   Affiliated Researcher, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2007-present. Experimental Economics
    Lab Grant, Grant G00003818 (P.I. Joseph M. Little).
Presentations:

“Only You Can Prevent Wildfires? The Effectiveness of Policy to Induce Risk Mitigating Expenditures.”
Western Forest Economists 43rd Annual Meeting. May 6, 2008.

“Building Social Capital in Forest Communities: Analysis of New Mexico’s Collaborative Forest
Restoration Program.” University of Colorado Environmental and Resource Economics Workshop. Vail,
Colorado. September 23, 2006.

“Building Social Capital in Forest Communities: Analysis of New Mexico’s Collaborative Forest
Restoration Program.” Invited presentation to CFRP program managers, Region 3, US Forest Service,
Albuquerque, NM. February 6, 2007.

“Building Social Capital in Forest Communities: Analysis of New Mexico’s Collaborative Forest
Restoration Program.” Southwestern Social Science Association, Annual Conference, Albuquerque,
New Mexico. March 16, 2007.

“Building Social Capital in Forest Communities: Analysis of New Mexico’s Collaborative Forest
Restoration Program.” Invited presentation, Collaborative Forest Restoration Program, Technical
Advisory Panel, US Forest Service, Albuquerque, New Mexico. April 23, 2007.

Guest Lecture. University of New Mexico. Econ 212 Society and the Environment. Spring 2007.

“What Determines Homeland Security Spending? An Econometric Analysis of the State Homeland
Security Program. Economics Department Seminar. Albuquerque, NM. July 26, 2007.

Guest Lecture, University of New Mexico. Econ 541 Sustainable Development. Fall 2007.

Awards, Recognition, and Service:

J. Raymond Stewart Award, UNM Department of Economics, 2006

Travel Grant, UNM Department of Economics, 2006

Center for Public Economics Scholarship, 2002

Susan Deese-Roberts Teaching Assistant of the Year Nominee, 2007

Omicron Delta Epsilon President, New Mexico Chapter, 2006-2007

Economics Graduate Student Organization Speaker Committee, 2006-2007

Economics Graduate Student Organization Funding Committee, 2007

References:

Robert P. Berrens, Professor                 Jennifer A. Thacher, Assistant Professor
University of New Mexico                     University of New Mexico
Department of Economics                      Department of Economics
1915 Roma NE Room 2023A                      1915 Roma NE Room 2006
1 University of New Mexico                   1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131                        Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: (505) 277-9004                        Phone: (505) 277-1965
rberrens@unm.edu                             jthacher@unm.edu
Alok K. Bohara, Professor
University of New Mexico
Department of Economics
1915 Roma NE Room 2023C
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: (505) 277-5903
bohara@unm.edu
                        CURRICULUM VITAE OF THOMAS TENERELLI


I.     PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATION AND CONTACT INFORMATION
Department of Economics
425 Shaw Smyser
400 East University Way
Ellensburg, WA 98926-7486
Phone: 509-963-3420
Fax: 509-963-1992
Email: tenerlt@cwu.edu


II.    EDUCATION
       Ph.D. Economics; University of Chicago; Chicago, IL; 2006
       M.A. Economics; University of Chicago; Chicago, IL; 1992
       B.A. Political Economy of Industrial Economics; University of California,
       Berkeley; Berkeley, CA; 1988


III.   PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
       Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Central Washington University,
       Ellensburg, WA, 2007 – present.
       Visiting Instructor, Department of Economics, Illinois Wesleyan University,
       Bloomington, IL, 2004 – 2007.


IV.    TEACHING EXPERIENCE
       A.     Teaching Interests and Specialties:
                   Applied microeconomics, statistics, forecasting, econometrics, principles
                    of microeconomics and macroeconomics, intermediate microeconomics
                    and macroeconomics, labor, growth and development, history, history of
                    thought, health, sports, finance, investment.
       B.     Teaching and Training Grants:
       C.     Teaching Awards and Honors:
       D.     Current Graduate Faculty Status:
       E.     Number of Master Committees on which you have served:
       F.     Names of Students who have completed Master’s Theses under your direction:
       G.     Courses Taught
                   Statistics, forecasting, principles of economics, principles of
                    microeconomics, intermediate microeconomics, labor economics, sports
                    economics, public finance.
V.     SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY
       A.   Interests and Specialties:

                 Applied microeconomics, labor markets (physicians, lawyers, engineers,
                  Teachers, PhD’s), ticket pricing, housing market, determinants of political
                  affiliation, economic growth.
       B.   Current Projects:

                 “Below Market Clearance Pricing at Concerts, Sporting Events, and Other
                  Capacity Constrained Events”: A theoretical model explaining why tickets
                  for live events such as sporting events and concerts are priced below the
                  market value.
                 “Constraint of Competition in the Physician Labor market”: An empirical
                  and theoretical study of the physician labor market assessing changes in
                  constraints to entry over the 20th century.

VI.    UNIVERSITY SERVICE
       A.   University
                 2008-9: Faculty Senate Academic Affairs Committee

       B.   Faculty Senate

       C.   College
                 2008-9: CB Students Committee

       D.   Department
                 2007 Search Committee Department of Economics

VII.   PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
       A.   Membership in Professional Associations:
               American Economic Association
               Western Economic Association International

       B.   Papers and Presentations at Professional Meetings (other than those listed
            under “Scholarly Activity”)

                 2007 Western Economic Association International Conference.
                  Presentation of “Constraints Or Competition In The Physician Labor
                  Market?”.
                 2005 Midwest Economics Association Conference. Presentation of
                  “Below Market Clearance Pricing at Concerts, Sporting Events, and Other
                  Capacity constrained Events”.
                 1995 International Health Economics Association Conference.
                  Presentation of “The Labor Market for Physicians: 1929-93”.
                                 RESUME
                         Peter J. Saunders, Ph.D.
                          Professor of Economics


ADDRESS:          Department of Economics
                  Central Washington University
                  Ellensburg, Washington 98926
                  Office: (509) 963-1266
                  Fax: (509) 963-1992
                  Home: (509) 945-1872
                  E-mail: saunders@cwu.edu
BIRTHDATE:        December 31, 1950
MARITAL STATUS:   Married, no children


EDUCATION:        Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder,
                  August 1981.
                        Major: Economics.
                  M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder, December 1979.
                        Major: Economics.
                  M.A., Wayne State University, Detroit, June 1978.
                        Major: Economics.
                  B.Sc. Honours Degree, The London School of Economics and
                  Political Science, London, England, August 1974.
                        Major: Economics.
                  Higher National Diploma, Thames Polytechnic, London, England,
                  June 1971.
                        Major: Business.
FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION:
                      Monetary Economics
                      Public Finance
                      Macroeconomic Theory
                      Econometrics
DISSERTATION TITLE:   “Influence of Money on Output and the Price Level in the 1970's.”


RESEARCH:      Research Awards:
               Recipient of the 1995 Award for Faculty Research at the School of
               Business and Economics, Central Washington University.
               Recipient of the 1997 Award for Faculty Research at the School of
               Business and Economics, Central Washington University.
               Recipient of the 2004 Award for Faculty Excellence in Research in the
               College of Business, Central Washington University.
               Recipient of the 2006 Award for Faculty Excellence in Research in the
               College of Business, Central Washington University.
               Recipient of the 2007 Distinguished Professor for Research, Artistic
               Accomplishment, and Invention Award, Central Washington University.
               Refereed Journals: Articles:
               “Rationality of the Michigan Inflation Survey Data: Some Empirical
               Results.” Economic Forum, Vol. XIII, No. 3, Winter 1982-83.
               “Effects of Monetary Changes on the Price Level and Output in the U.S.
               Agricultural Sector.” Agricultural Finance Review, Vol. 46, 1986. (With
               DeeVon Bailey).
               “Estimating Employee's True Cost-of-Living Indexes in the Southwestern
               Region: Case of Metropolitan Denver.” Southwestern Review of
               Business and Economics, Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1986. (With C. A.
               Diamond).
               “Money-Income Causality: Further Empirical Evidence.” Atlantic
               Economic Journal, Vol. XIV, No. 4, December 1986. (With Basudeb
               Biswas).
               “Causality of U.S. Agricultural Prices and the Money Supply: Further
               Empirical Evidence.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 70,
               No. 3, August 1988.
“Effects of U.S. Monetary Policy on the Third World Debt.” Renaissance
Universal Journal, December, 1988.
“An Empirical Investigation of the Effects of Monetary Changes on the
U.K. Economy.” Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 35, No. 4,
November, 1988.
 “Federal Budget Deficits, Interest Rates, and Inflation: Their Implications
for Economic Growth.” Eastern Economic Journal, Vol. 15, No. 3, July -
September, 1989.
“The Money Supply, the Price Level and Real Output: A Trivariate
Analysis.” Eastern Economic Journal, Vol. 16, No. 2, April - June, 1990.
(With Basudeb Biswas).
“Money and Price Level in India: An Empirical Investigation.” Indian
Economic Journal, Vol. 38, No. 2, July - September, 1990. (With Basudeb
Biswas).
“An Empirical Note on the Relationship Between Inflation and
Productivity Growth in the United Kingdom.” British Review of Economic
Issues, Vol. 12, No. 28, October 1990. (With Basudeb Biswas).
“An Empirical Investigation of Causal Relationships Between the Money
Supply, Prices and Wages in the U.S. Agricultural Sector.” Agricultural
Finance Review, Vol.51, 1991.
“Impact of Productivity Growth on U.S. Agricultural Prices.” Atlantic
Economic Journal, Vol. XIX, No. 3, September, 1991.
“Further Analysis of the Twin Deficits.” Contemporary Policy Issues, Vol.
X, No. 1, January, 1992. (With Basudeb Biswas and Gopal Tribedy).
“Empirical Evidence on Causal Relationships Between the Money Supply,
Prices and Wages in the U.K.” British Review of Economic Issues, Vol.
16, No. 39, June, 1994.
“A Granger Causality Approach to Investigating the Impact of Fiscal
Policy on the U.S. Economy.” Studies in Economics and Finance, Vol. 16,
No. 1, Fall, 1995.
“A Time-Series Analysis of the Relationship Between Inflation and the
Productivity Growth in the U.S. Agricultural Sector.” Agricultural Finance
Review, Vol. 56, 1996.
“Inflation, Productivity, and Monetary Policy: Are they Related?” Studies in
Economics and Finance, Vol. 18, No. 2, Spring, 1998.
“Money-Income Causality: A Vector Error Correction Analysis.”Indian
Economic Journal, Vol. 46, July-September, 1997-98, (With B. Biswas).
“A Cointegration Analysis of the Impact of Real Exchange Rate Variations
on U.S. Agricultural Exports.”Agricultural Finance Review, Vol. 59, 1999,
(With B. Biswas and S. Mohapatra).

“Trade and Wage Inequality: Are They Related?” Atlantic Economic
Journal, Vol. 28, September, 2000, (With Koushik Ghosh and Basudeb
Biswas).

“An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship between Wage
Differentials, Productivity Growth and Trade.” Contemporary Economic
Policy, Vol. 20, No. 1, January, 2002, (With Koushik Ghosh and Basudeb
Biswas).

“Effects of Monetary Changes on the U.S. Economy in the Short-Run and
Long-Run.” Indian Economic Journal, Vol.50, No. 1, July-September 2002-
03.

“Do Imports Cause Economic Growth? A Time Series Investigation of the
U.S. Data.” Journal of Business, Industry and Economics, Vol. 6, Fall
2005. (With Koushik Ghosh).

“Imports and Economic Growth in the U.K. Are they Related?” Journal of
International Business and Economics, Vol. 3, No 1, 2005.

“Effectiveness of Fiscal Policy in the U.K. During the 1960-1990 Time
Period.” Indian Journal of Economics and Business, Special Issue, March
2006.

“The Effect of Social Security on Personal and Private Saving in the Short
Run and the Long Run: A Time Series Analysis.” Journal of Economics,
Vol. XXXII, No.1, 2006. (With Koushik Ghosh).

“An Optimum Currency Area in South Asia. Is it Plausible?” Journal of
World Trade, Vol. 40, No.3, 2006. (With Nilanjan Banik and Basudeb
Biswas).

“Stock Prices and Economic Growth: Are They Related?” Indian Journal of
Economics and Business , Special Issue, September 2007 (With Koushik
Ghosh).


      Refereed Journals: Abstracts:
“Comments on the Income Tax Reform.” Abstract). Encyclia, Vol. 62,
1985.
“Economic Choices Under the Revenue Maximizing Model of the
Government.” (Abstract). Encyclia, Vol. 62, 1985.
“Effects of Inflation on Productivity in the United Kingdom.” (Abstract).
Atlantic Economic Journal, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1988, (With B. Biswas).
“Money Stock and its Effects on Prices and Real Output.” (Abstract).
Atlantic Economic Journal, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1988, (With B. Biswas).
“Causality of U.S. Agricultural Prices and the Money Supply: Further
Empirical Evidence.” (Abstract). Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 27,
No. 1, March, 1989.
“An Empirical Investigation of the Effects of Monetary Changes on the
U.K. Economy.” (Abstract). Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 27, No. 3,
September, 1989.
“Effects of Monetary Changes on U.S. Agricultural Prices and Wages.”
(Abstract). Atlantic Economic Journal, Vol. 18, No. 3, September, 1990.
“Federal Budget Deficits, Interest Rates, and Inflation: Their Implication
for Growth.” (Abstract). Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 28, No. 4
December, 1990.
 “The Money Stock, the Price Level and Real Output: A Trivariate
Analysis.” (Abstract). Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 29, No. 2,
June, 1991.
“Trade and Wage Differentials: Are They Related?”(Abstract).
International Advances in Economic Research, Vol. 6, No.1, February,
2000.
Conference Proceedings:
Economic Stabilization: Success or Failure?” Social Science
Perspectives, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1986.
Nonrefereed Journals/Popular Press:
Will Reaganomics Work? The Jury is Still Deliberating. Idaho State
Journal, March 6, 1982.
Failure of Our Economic Stabilization Policies. Herald Journal, March 6,
1983.
Income Tax Simplification: At What Cost? Herald Journal, January 27,
1985.
Papers Presented and Reviewed at Economic Conferences:
“A Monetary Model of the Price Level, Interest Rate and Output
Determination for the 1980's.” Presented and reviewed at the 58th WEA
International's Conference, July 20-24, 1983, Seattle.
“Price Level Explanation in the 1970's: Alternative Approach.” Presented
and reviewed at the 58th WEA International's Conference, July 20-24,
1983, Seattle.
“Appropriateness of Economic Stabilization Under the Existing Political
Constraints.” Presented and reviewed at the May 1984 meeting of the
Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters.
“Economic or Political Business Cycle: Appropriateness of Keynesian
Economic Stabilization Policies for the 1980's.” Presented and reviewed
at the 59th WEA International's Conference, June 24-28, 1984, Las
Vegas.
“Comments on the Income Tax Reform.” Presented and reviewed at the
May 1985 meeting of the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters.
“Economic Choices Under the Revenue Maximizing Model of the
Government.” Presented and reviewed at the May 1985 meeting of the
Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters.
“Economic Stabilization: Success or Failure?” Presented and reviewed
at the 1st Annual Meeting of the National Social Science Association,
February 13-15, 1986, Seattle.
“An Empirical Note on the Effects of Monetary Changes on the Price
Level and Real Output.” Presented and reviewed at the 61st WEA
International's Conference, July 1-5, 1986, San Francisco.
“Effects of Monetary Changes on Agricultural Prices and Output.”
Presented and reviewed at the 61st, WEA International's Conference,
July 1-5, 1986, San Francisco.
“Agricultural Prices and the Money Supply: The Causality Issue
Revisited.” Presented and reviewed at the 62nd WEA International's
Conference, July 7-11, 1987, Vancouver.
“Effects of Inflation on Productivity in the U.K”. Presented at the 25th
International Atlantic Economic Society Conference, April 16-22, 1988,
London. (With Basudeb Biswas).
“Money Stock and its Effects on Prices and Real Output.” Presented at
the 25th International Atlantic Economic Society Conference, April 16-22,
1988, London.(With Basudeb Biswas).
“An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship between Federal Budget
Deficits, Interest Rates, and Inflation in the United States.” Presented at
the 4th Annual Conference of the National Social Science Association,
February 16 - 18, 1989, Seattle.
“Causality between Money, Prices, and Wages in the United States.”
Presented at the 64th WEA International's Conference, June 18 - 22,
1989, Lake Tahoe.
“An Empirical Note on the Relationship between Productivity Growth and
Prices in the U.S. Agricultural Sector.” Presented at the 64th WEA
International's Conference, June 18 - 22, 1989, Lake Tahoe.
“An Empirical Investigation of Effects of Monetary Changes on Prices and
Wages in the U.S. Agricultural Sector.” Presented at the 29th
International Atlantic Economic Society Conference, March 17 - 23, 1990,
Geneva, Switzerland.
“Money and Price Level in India: An Empirical Analysis.” Presented at
the 65th Annual Conference of the Western Economic Association
International, June 29 - July 3, 1990, San Diego, California. (With
Basudeb Biswas).
“Fiscal Deficits and Crowding out Net Exports.” Presented at the 65th
Annual Conference of the Western Economic Association International,
June 29 - July 3, 1990, San Diego, California. (With Basudeb Biswas and
G. Tribedy).
“A Granger Causality Approach to the Wage and Price Determination in
the U.S.” Presented at the 66th Annual Conference of the Western
Economic Association International, June 29 - July 3, 1991, Seattle,
Washington.
“Impact of Fiscal Policy on the U.S. Economy.” Presented at the 67th
Annual Conference of the Western Economic Association International,
July 9 - 13, 1992, San Francisco, California.
“Impact of Monetary Changes on Prices and Wages in the U.K.”
Presented at the 68th Annual Conference of the Western Economic
Association International, June 20 - 24, 1993, Lake Tahoe, Nevada.
“Exchange Rates and U.S. Agricultural Exports: A Cointegration
Analysis.” Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the Western
Economic Association International, June 29 - July 3, 1994, Vancouver,
B.C. (With Basudeb Biswas and Sarita Mohapatra).
“Impact of the Productivity Growth on Inflation in the U.S.” Presented at
the 70th Annual Conference of the Western Economic Association
International, July 5 - 9, 1995, San Diego, California.
“A Cointegration Analysis of the Impact of Inflation on Productivity Growth
in the U.S. Agricultural Sector.” Presented at the 41st International
Atlantic Economic Conference, March 12 - 19, 1996, Paris, France.
                 “Effects of Changes in Income on Exchange Rates.” Presented at the 72 nd
                 Annual Conference of the Western Economic Association International,
                 July 9 - 13, 1997, Seattle, Washington (With Basudeb Biswas).
                 “Money-Income Causality: An Investigation of India’s Data.” Presented at
                 the 73rd Conference of the Western Economic Association International,
                 June 28 - July 2, 1998, Lake Tahoe, Nevada (With Basudeb Biswas).
                 “Trade Deficits and Wage Differentials: Are They Related?” Presented at
                 the 47th International Atlantic Economic Conference, March 16 – 23, 1999,
                 Vienna, Austria (With Koushik Ghosh and Basudeb Biswas).
                 “An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship between Wage
                 Differentials, Productivity Growth and Trade.” Presented at the 75th
                 Conference of the Western Economic Association International, June 29 –
                 July 3, 2000, Vancouver, Canada.
                 “The Effect of Social Security on Personal Saving.” Presented at the 77 th
                 Conference of the Western Economic Association International, June 29 -
                 July 3, 2002, Seattle, Washington (With Koushik Ghosh).
                 “Imports and Economic Growth in the U.K. Are They Related?” Presented
                 at the 79th Conference of the Western Economic Association International,
                 June 29 – July 3, 2004, Vancouver, B.C. Canada.
                 “Effectiveness of Fiscal Policy in the U.K. During the 1960-1990 Time
                 Period.” Presented at the Applied Business and Entrepreneurship
                 Association International Conference, November 16 – 20, 2005, Kauai,
                 Hawaii.
                 “Stock Prices and Economic Growth: Are They Related?” Presented at the
                 Applied Business and Entrepreneurship Association International
                 Conference, November 15 -21, 2006, Kona, Hawaii (With Koushik Ghosh).
                 Reviewer for the Following Journals:
                 American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of
                 Macroeconomics, Review of Economics and Finance, Contemporary
                 Policy Issues, Cambridge Journal of Economics, Cultural Development
                 and Change, International Review of Applied Economics, Agricultural
                 Finance Review, Economic Issues, and Journal of Agricultural and
                 Resource Economics.
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
    6/99 to present    Full Professor, Department of Economics, Central Washington
                       University, Ellensburg, Washington. My appointment involves
                       teaching undergraduate courses in economic principles, monetary
                       theory and econometrics.
9/96 to 6/99   Full Professor and Chair, Department of Economics, Central
               Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington. My appointment
               included chairing the department of economics as well as
               representing the department on two major university committees.
               In addition, this appointment involved teaching upper division
               courses in monetary theory and econometrics.
9/91 to 6/96   Full Professor, Department of Economics, Central Washington
               University, Ellensburg, Washington. My appointment involved
               teaching undergraduate courses in economic principles, monetary
               theory, econometrics and statistics.
9/88 to 9/91   Associate Professor, Department of Economics, Central
               Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington. My appointment
               involved teaching undergraduate courses in economic principles,
               monetary economics, econometrics and statistics.
9/82 to 6/88   Assistant Professor, Utah State University, Logan, Utah. My
               appointment involved teaching undergraduate and Ph.D. courses in
               monetary theory and public finance as well as supervising doctoral
               and master's theses in these areas.
9/81 - 5/82    Assistant Professor, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho. My
               position involved teaching micro and macro economics courses as
               well as upper division courses.
9/80 - 5/81    Lecturer, Loretto Heights College, Denver. My position consisted of
               teaching micro and macro economics courses and upper division
               courses.
1/79 - 5/81    Lecturer, University of Colorado, Denver. This appointment
               involved giving mass lectures in micro and macro economics.
9/79 - 5/80    Lecturer, University of Denver. This position involved teaching
               micro and macro economics courses.
9/78 - 12/79   Lecturer, Colorado Women's College, Denver. My position
               consisted of teaching intermediate micro and macro economics
               courses.
1/78 - 5/79    Teaching Assistant, University of Colorado, Boulder. My teaching
               responsibilities included introductory micro and macro economics.


6/78 - 7/78    Teaching Assistant, Economic Institute, University of Colorado,
               Boulder. My position included teaching an intermediate macro
               economics course and an introductory statistics course.
    1/76 - 12/77    Teaching Assistant, Wayne State University, Detroit. My
                    responsibilities included teaching micro and macro economic
                    principles courses.
BUSINESS EXPERIENCE:
    10/75 - 12/75   Personal Assistant, Bell Lines, London, England.
     6/75 - 9/75    Insurance Trainee, AFIA Insurance Company, London, England.
                      CURRICULUM VITAE OF
                     CHARLES S. WASSELL, JR.


       PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATION AND CONTACT INFORMATION

       Associate Professor, Department of Economics
       Central Washington University
       400 East University Way
       Ellensburg, WA, 98926-7486
       Phone (509) 963 3056 • Fax (509) 963 1992 • E-mail wassellc@cwu.edu


       EDUCATION

1994 – 2002      University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
Ph.D. Economics: 2003
M.S. Economics, 1997
Major field of macroeconomics and monetary theory. Minor fields of mathematics and
  international trade.
Dissertation: “Three Essays in Macroeconomics: How Well Does the United States
  Unemployment Insurance System Work?”
        1. “Reforming Unemployment Insurance: Asset and Labor Market
            Implications”
        2. “How Much Can the United States Unemployment Insurance System Be
            Improved?”
        3. “Optimal Unemployment Insurance With Duration Dependence in the
            Employment Process: Incorporating Active Labor Market Policies into an
            Optimal Unemployment Insurance System”

1990 – 1993    University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California
       B.A. Economics, with Honors


       PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2008-present Associate Professor
Department of Economics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington

2003-2008 Assistant Professor
Department of Economics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington

2001 – 2003    Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Economics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington

1996 – 2001    Teaching Assistant
Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
       TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Teaching Interests and Specialties, and Courses Taught

       My teaching duties have included the following courses:
           Principles of Microeconomics
           Principles of Macroeconomics
           Economic Issues
           Introductory Econometrics
           Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
           Economics of Energy, Natural Resources, and Environment
           Labor Economics
           Independent Study: Mathematical Economics
           Independent Study: Economic Research

       I am also capable of teaching the following courses as department needs warrant:
            Time-series Econometrics
            Money and Banking
            International Economics
            Forecasting
            Economic Research
            Growth Theory
            Advanced Macroeconomic Theory
            Finance

Teaching Awards and Honors

       Recipient of 2007 CWU Alumni Association’s Excellence in Teaching Award

       Nominated 2005-2008 for CWU College of Business Excellence in Teaching
       Award

Graduate Faculty Status and Master’s Committees

       Associate Member of the Graduate Faculty at CWU

       Currently serving on three Master’s committees for Resource Management (REM)
       students
       SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY

Current Projects

       1. Continuing our research on the impacts of unions on higher education, my co-
          authors and I examine whether faculty unions impact the intra-institution
          dispersion of wages. In particular, we examine whether there are dispersion-
          reducing impacts across disciplines.

       2. Emigrants from less developed countries remit substantial funds to family-
          members in their ‘home’ nations – sometimes equating to several percent of
          GDP. We investigate whether these remittances reduce the rate of population
          growth in the emigrant nation by inducing a demographic transition. This has
          profound macroeconomic implications for social welfare in the origin nation.

Publications

       1. “The Fallacy of Sustainable Biofuels Feedstock Production: You ARE
          Putting a Tiger in Your Tank” with Dr. Timothy Dittmer, CWU
          Department of Economics; Challenge, September-October 2008, 51(5), pp.
          20-39.
       2. “Administrative Costs in Higher Education: How Fast are they Really
          Growing?” with Dr. David Hedrick, CWU Department of Economics, and
          Dr. Steven Henson, WWU Department of Economics; Education
          Economics, Published online 7 August 2007; Forthcoming in print.
       3. “Reducing America’s Oil Dependence: An Overview of the Options” with Dr.
          Robert Carbaugh, CWU Department of Economics; Challenge, November-
          December 2006, 49(6), pp. 55-77.
       4. “Are Subsidies for Biodiesel Economically Efficient?” with Dr. Timothy
          Dittmer, CWU Department of Economics; Energy Policy, December 2006,
          34(18), pp. 3993-4001.

Under Review

       1. “Faculty Unions in Higher Education: Is There Really a Salary Premium?”
          under review at Economic Inquiry.
       2. “The Effects of AACSB Accreditation on Faculty Salaries and Productivity”
          under review at Journal of Education for Business.

Conference Papers and Presentations

       1. Presented “Collective Bargaining and Collegiate Faculty: Is There Really a
          Salary Premium?” at the Western Economic Association International Annual
          Conference, Honolulu, HI 2008
       2. Presented “The Effects of AACSB Accreditation on Faculty Salaries and
          Productivity” at the Western Economic Association International Annual
          Conference, Honolulu, HI 2008
          3. Presented “Are Subsidies for Biodiesel Economically Efficient?” at the Western
             Economic Association International Annual Conference, Vancouver, BC 2004

Working Papers

          1. Wassell, Jr. and Peter Saunders. “Time Series Evidence on Social
             Security and Private Saving: The Issue Revisited.” Available online
             1/2008.
          2. Wassell Jr, Charles, and David Hedrick. “Are there Economics of Scale
             in Fighting Wildfires?” Available online 1/2008.


          UNIVERSITY SERVICE

University

             Member, Central Washington University Retirement and Insurance Committee,
              2005-present
             Member, Central Washington University Carbon Reduction Task Force, 2007

Faculty Senate

             Member, Central Washington University General Education Committee, 2003-
              present

College

             College of Business Faculty Committee, 2007-present
             College of Business Student Committee, 2001-2007

Department

             Department of Economics Personnel Committee, 2006-present
             Member, search committee for tenure track assistant/associate economics
              professor, 2006-2007

Other

             Member, Central Washington University Environmental Research and
              Education Task Force, 2006-present
             Program Faculty, Environmental Studies, 2005-present
             Program Faculty, Resource Management (REM) Program, 2001-present
             One of several co-authors of the successful (funded) 2008 CWU “Center for the
              Environment and Environmental Studies Major” Spheres of Distinction
              proposal
       PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

Membership in Professional Associations

          American Economic Association
          Western Economic Association International
          Econometric Society

Pertinent Consultantships

          Consultant (2008) enXco, Inc., Escondido, California
          Consultant (2006) Swinomish Tribal Community, La Conner, Washington
          Consultant (2004) Nakaty Enterprises, Ellensburg, Washington
          Researcher/Consultant (1995) Illinois Coal Gas, Inc., New York, New York
          Research Assistant (1994) Philip Cook, Professor of Economics, Duke
           University, Durham, North Carolina

Referee and Review Experience

          Referee for the Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics
          Referee for Education Economics
          Reviewed “Introduction to Econometrics” by Stock & Watson, in preparation
           for a second edition of the textbook
          Reviewed several chapters of “Economics: Principles and Applications” by
           Holahan

Papers and Presentations at Professional Meetings

          REM Colloquium, Central Washington University
          Forum on Central Washington biofuels use and production, Ellensburg 2006

				
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