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					            English 学内発表会

 An Opportunity to Improve Your Oral Presentation Skills




    日 時:平成19年3月9日 (金) 午後5時
    会 場:日本歯科大学新潟生命歯学部 アイヴイホール




             日 本 歯 科 大 学 歯 学 会



                English学内発表会
An Opportunity to Improve Your Oral Presentation Skills
                            5
日 時:平成19年3月9日(金) 午後5時00分
会 場:日本歯科大学新潟生命歯学部 アイヴイホール
発 表:10分、質疑応答:5分




【Opening address】
17:00


【Oral presentation sessions】
17:05~17:50
                                                                                   Chairperson:Hiromi Shimomura
1.Pharmacological study of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.
    Shin Soma
   Department of Pharmacology, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata


2.Evidence for inclusion of a segment of Escherichia coli genomic DNA in bovine tooth germ mRNA encoding
   salivary proline-rich protein P-B.
    Ritsuko Sato
   Department of Dental Hygiene, The Nippon Dental University College at Niigata


3.Effects of fiber and abrasive in a medium on occlusal wear.
    Kiyoshi Kakuta, Mihoko Kon and Hideo Ogura
   Department of Dental Materials Science, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry   at Niigata



【Educational session】
17:50~18:20
                                                                                       Chairperson:Koichi Shinkai
    The oral medicoscientific presentation: preparation and delivery.
   A brief guide for presenters
    R Glen Calderhead
    Japan Phototherapy Laboratory, Tokyo; and SG Biomedical, Tochigi, Japan
【Oral presentation sessions】
18:20~19:05
                                                                                   Chairperson:Makoto Tsuchimochi
4.Morphological analysis of the incisive canal with cone beam CT imaging.
   Rieko Asaumi1, Taisuke Kawai1, Iwao Sato2, Shunji Yoshida2 and Takashi Yosue1
   1
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Tokyo
   and 2Department of Anatomy, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Tokyo

                                                            6
5.Functional reconstruction of the maxilla with a revascularized fibular osteoseptocutaneous flap combined with
   endosseous implants: case report with ten-year follow up.
   Kazunori Ninomiya1 and Izumi Mataga2
   1
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Nippon Dental University Niigata      Hospital and 2Department
   of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery II, The Nippon Dental University    School of Life Dentistry at Niigata


6.Functional clinical assessment in patients followed for more than 10 years after placement of dental implants with
   bone grafts.
   Eizaburo Kobayashi1, Izumi Mataga1 and Fumihiko Watanabe2
   1
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery II, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata
   and 2Department of Oral Implant Center, The Nippon Dental University      School of Life Dentistry at Niigata


【Closing address】




                                                          7
1. Pharmacological study of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.


Shin Soma


Department of Pharmacology, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata




Objectives: The Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX), an ion transporter, exchanges Na+ and Ca2+ bidirectionally
through the forward mode (Ca2+ extrusion) or the reverse mode (Ca2+ influx), and plays an important role in
the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. SEA0400 potently inhibits Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake
through the reverse mode of the NCX in neuronal cells and cardiomyocytes. In this study, we examined the
effects of SEA0400 on Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake and catecholamine (CA) release in Na+-loaded cells. The
effects of SEA0400 were compared with those of another NCX inhibitor, KB-R7943. Furthermore, the effects
of a protein kinase C (PKC) activator and inhibitors on Na+-dependent CA release were examined to clarify
the role of PKC in the activation of the NCX.


Materials and methods: Cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells were used. Na+-loaded cells were prepared
with the treatments of the Na+ pump inhibitor ouabain and the Na+ channel activator veratridine. 45Ca2+
uptake was measured under the condition in which the cells were incubated with a Na+-free solution
containing 45Ca2+ and NCX inhibitors in the presence of Ca2+ channel antagonists. Under the same condition,
CA released into the Na+-free solution was also measured. Moreover, the effects of NCX inhibitors on CA
release induced by nicotinic receptor agonists and on 3H-nicotine binding were examined in intact cells.


Results:
1) In Na+-loaded cells, Na+-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake and CA release were mostly due to the activation of the
   NCX working in the reverse mode.
2) SEA0400 inhibited the NCX-mediated responses, and its potency was about 40-fold that of KB-R7943.
3) In intact cells, SEA0400 inhibited CA release induced by ACh and DMPP, and its potency was about
   one-half that of KB-R7943.
4) SEA0400 inhibited 3H-nicotine binding, and its potency was about one tenth that of KB-R7943.
5) NCX-mediated CA release was inhibited by PKC inhibitors or long term treatment with the PKC
   activator, and enhanced by short term treatment with the PKC activator.


Conclusions: These results indicate that SEA0400, unlike KB-R7943, has a potent and selective action on
the NCX in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, and suggest the contribution of PKC to the activation of the
NCX.




                                                      8
2. Evidence for inclusion of a segment of Escherichia coli genomic DNA in bovine tooth germ
  mRNA encoding salivary proline-rich protein P-B.

Ritsuko Sato

Department of Dental Hygiene, The Nippon Dental University College at Niigata



Objectives: This study was carried out to reveal the chimera structure composed of segments specific to
human P-B cDNA and to E. coli genomic DNA in bovine genomic DNA as well as in bovine tooth germ
cDNA.


Materials and methods: (1) Fractionation of Sau3AI digests of bovine genomic DNA by gel electrophoresis.
(2) Nested PCR using the gel extracts of a fractionated bovine genome digest as the template and the pairs
composed of P-B specific- and E. coli genome specific- nucleotides as primers. (3) Sequencing of PCR product.


Results: In the course of cloning of bovine cDNA for proline-rich protein P-B from bovine tooth germ cDNA,
we found that one clone with 662 bp contained a 5’-terminal 393 bp (1-393 bp) sequence essentially identical
to that of human P-B cDNA and a sequence of 233 bp (394-626 bp) highly homologous to the segment of E.
coli K12 genomic DNA, the region containing lactose operator. To exclude the possible artificial formation of
the chimera structure during a cloning process, nested PCR using Sau3AI digests of bovine genomic DNA as
the template was performed. PCR gave the product of an expected size and the nucleotide sequence of the
PCR product had the chimera structure.


Conclusions: Bovine tooth germ cDNA and bovine genomic DNA contained the chimera structure composed
of P-B specific- and E. coli specific segments.




                                                     9
3. Effects of fiber and abrasive in a medium on occlusal wear.


Kiyoshi Kakuta, Mihoko Kon and Hideo Ogura


Department of Dental Materials Science, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata




Objectives: During mastication, dental restorations come into contact with teeth or other restorations
through food which include many types of substances. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect
of substances such as a fiber or an abrasive particle in a medium on simulated occlusal wear of resin
composites.


Materials and methods: Five percent cornstarch solution was used as a solvent for the experimental media.
The fiber-containing medium included 0%, 4% and 8% methylcellulose as a fiber. For the
abrasive-containing medium, 0%, 4% and 8% calcium diphosphate was added to the solvent. Four
commercial resin composites, Clearfil AP-X, Z100, SOLARE P and SOLIDEX F were used for the wear
specimens. The occlusal wear test was performed using a ceramic antagonist with the experimental medium.
The volume of wear and maximum wear depth of the resin composites were evaluated using a computed
measuring microscope.


Results: When the medium contained fiber, the wear volume and maximum wear depth of the resin
composites significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with the exception of SDX. The medium containing fine
abrasive particles produced significantly greater wear volume and maximum wear depth in the resin
composites.


Conclusions: The volume of wear and maximum wear depth of resin composites decreased in contact with a
fiber-containing medium whereas they increased in contact with an abrasive-containing medium. The
effects on wear of the fiber and abrasive particle in their respective medium were different among the resin
composites.




                                                    10
The oral medicoscientific presentation: preparation and delivery.
A brief guide for presenters

R Glen Calderhead


Japan Phototherapy Laboratory, Tokyo; and SG Biomedical, Tochigi, Japan


Oral presentations are often based on a written article, but they are two completely different approaches.
Having an original paper on which to base an oral presentation has both good and bad points. All the basic
research or clinical studies have been completed so the data are all there, but they have to be distilled down
to the essentials for the oral presentation. First extract the main points from the abstract as a bulleted list.
Ten minutes of presentation should require 10-15 slides. Avoid cramming in too many slides, because you
will surely overrun your allotted time which must never happen. PowerPoint® has become the gold
standard for computer slide presentations, so learn the program basics. First, create a Slide Master and
background: darker colours are better. Choose a clear, bold font in bright colours, but not white, with legible
point sizes. Each slide should have a maximum of 7-8 headings, with 14-20 lines of text as an acceptable
maximum. Use Animation to bring points up one at a time, and use the same simple slide transition
between all slides. Avoid the pitfall of cutting large sections of text from your paper, pasting them into a slide,
and reading it out. Try not to use the usual paper headings, i.e., Introduction, Materials and Methods, and so
on. It should be clear from the slide what stage of your presentation you are at without telling your audience.
Make sure your presentation has a beginning, middle and end, and they are all connected. Do use graphics
or photographs to make points clear, and again use Custom Animation to make them appear in the
appropriate order. Practice your presentation, then practice it again and again so you know what is coming
next and use your slides for your talk, not sheets of paper. When actually presenting, stand up straight,
speak clearly, using the microphone properly, and establish eye contact with the audience. They will not bite
(usually). Use a laser pointer to pinpoint salient parts of the slides, but try not to aim it at the audience. In
summary, oral presentations should be assiduously practised until word-perfect, should be clear and concise,
and must not exceed the allotted time. The presenter should look good and sound good, and should involve
the audience. Follow these simple rules, and oral presentations become a pleasure and not a pain.




                                                        11
4. Morphological analysis of the incisive canal with cone beam CT imaging.


Rieko Asaumi1, Taisuke Kawai1, Iwao Sato2, Shunji Yoshida2 and Takashi Yosue1


1Department   of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at
Tokyo and 2Department of Anatomy, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Tokyo




Objectives: To assess the typical form of the incisive canal and surrounding bone with respect to the
presence/absence of upper incisors, using cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the Japanese dry skulls.


Materials and methods: The sixty-eight Japanese dry maxillas were divided into the dentate and the
edentulous group. The CBCT images of the anterior region of the maxilla, especially around the incisive
canal, were acquired using the standardized methods. To perform the analysis, the anterior nasal spine was
regarded as the reference point. The ten measurement points, located around the incisive canals and the
surrounding bone, were measured and analyzed statistically.


Results: In the edentulous compared with the dentate group, the bone quantity of alveolar bone in the
incisor region was greatly reduced from the alveolar ridge and labial surface, the alveolar ridge was located
in the palatal position, and the vertical position of the incisive foramen was superior (p<0.05). It was also
quantitatively confirmed that the distance of the alveolar ridge and the incisive foramen decreased, and the
angle from the horizontal plane of the alveolar bone increased following the loss of the incisors.


Conclusions: The nondestructive assessment of the incisive canals and surrounding bone with CBCT
derived two typical shapes for the presence or absence of the incisors. The findings showed that the
importance of image diagnosis before esthetic restoration should be recognized.




                                                      12
5. Functional reconstruction of the maxilla with a revascularized fibular osteoseptocutaneous
  flap combined with endosseous implants: case report with ten-year follow up.

Kazunori Ninomiya1 and Izumi Mataga2


1Department   of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Nippon Dental University Niigata Hospital and
2Department   of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery II, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at
Niigata




Objectives: The revascularized fibular osteoseptocutaneous flap has been recently employed for the
reconstruction of various bone and soft tissue composite defects following resective surgery for oral cancer.
Recontour of the shape with maxillary reconstruction using the osteotomy technique for the fibula combined
with endosseous implants has enabled better facial cosmesis and function such as the masticatory and
phonetic functions. A case is reported with reconstruction using this combination technique from the point of
cosmesis, function and bone resorption of fibula with a ten-year follow-up.


Subject and methods: A 59-year-old female patient underwent surgical resection as the initial treatment of
squamous cell carcinoma originating at the anterior site of the maxillary gingiva. Prosthetic rehabilitation
was tried but failed to achieve a satisfactory result because of water and air leakage. Six months after the
partial maxillectomy, the resultant defect was reconstructed with a fibular osteoseptocutaneous flap with an
osteotomy at the oral and sinus sites with the simultaneous placement of four endosseous implants directly
in the fibular defect. A de-epithelized cutaneous flap covered both the oral and sinus regions. Nine months
later, abutments were set and the thickness of the flap was coordinated to prepare the implants for the
prosthesis. The superstructure was fabricated using the milling-bar attachment system.


Results and conclusions: After a ten-year follow, and based on the cosmesis and function, the patient was
satisfied, radiography confirmed no bone resorption of the fibula and no peri-implant hyperplasia has been
observed.




                                                     13
6. Functional clinical assessment in patients followed for more than 10 years after placement
  of dental implants with bone grafts.

Eizaburo Kobayashi1, Izumi Mataga1 and Fumihiko Watanabe2


1Department   of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery II, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at
Niigata and 2Department of Oral Implant Center, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at
Niigata




Objectives: In patients with orofacial bone loss following tumor resection, trauma or absorption of alveolar
bone, stability of dentures is difficult to achieve. However improvement of the masticatory function has
become possible through dental implant placement. In some cases, however, bone resorption occurs around
the implant, leading to osseointegration failure. The present study reports on the clinical findings in patients
with more than ten years’ follow-up following bone graft and implant placement.


Subjects and methods: Bone grafting was performed in 211 cases treated at the Niigata Hospital, School of
Life Dentistry at Niigata, the Nippon Dental University, in the 16 years from 1989 through 2005, and the
subjects of this study comprise ten cases with a follow-up of more than ten years.


Results and discussion: The ten cases consisted of 4 males and 6 females, ages ranging from 14 to 67 yr,
average 48.3 yr. Bone grafting was required following malignant tumor surgery in 5, absorption of alveolar
bone in 3 and traumatic injury in 2 cases.
As for the autogenous bone graft material, vascularized bone grafts were used in 3, iliac PCBM in 2, iliac
block in 2, and mandibular chin bone and wisdom tooth bone in 3 cases. The average period from the bone
graft to implant placement was about 1 year and 2 months, the average period from implant placement to
the secondary operation was about ten months, and the average period from implant placement to time of
writing was 12 years and 5 months.
A total of 62 implants were placed in the engrafted bone, among which success was achieved in 58 (93.5%)
but 4 implants failed (6.5%). Of those which failed, 1 implant was placed in a sinus lift (10 months from
placement to failure) and 3 (same patient) in vascularized bone immediately after the transplant (7 months
from transplant to failure). Cases will be presented and discussed.




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