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                       THE




         SYDNEY

ÜNIYERSITY                   CALENDAR.




                   1862.




                    S Y DNE Y:
    PRINTED   BY     BEADING AND    WELLBANK,
                   BHH)OE STREET.
SYDNEY UNIVERSITY
CALENDAR.
                            TABLE                 OF          CONTENTS.


                                                                                                            Page
     I.—Sydney University Calendar .............................................................                  1
   IL—Preface            ...................................................................................     13
 III.—Charter of the University of Sydney ..................................................                     16
  IV.—Acts relating to the University :—
             1. Act of Incorporation of 1852                         .......................................     20
             2. Act to Amend ditto                    ......................................................     30
             3. Incorporation Amendment Act of 1S61                                .........................     31
             4. Act to enable the University to purchase the Sydney
                  College ................................................................................       33
    δ. Act to provide a fund for building the University ..                             ..                       37
    V.—Acts relating to Incorporated Colleges within the Uni-
    versity :—
             1. St. Paul's College Act .............................................................             42
             2. Act to enlarge the Council of ditto .........................................                    47
             3. St. John's College Act ............................................................              48
             4. Wesley College Act                    .....................................           ..     .. .52
  VI.—Deed of Grant under which the University Land is held ..                                    ..             59
 VIL—By-Laws ............................................................................................        67
VEIL—Table of Fees ....................................................................................          88
  IX.—Forms :—
             1. Matriculation..........................................................................          89
             2. Ad eundem              .....................................................................     90
             3. Prizes and Honors ..................................................................             91
             4. Degrees ..................................................................................       92
   X.—Library Rules ...................................................................................          95
  XI.—University Officers ...........................................................................           100
 XIL- Colleges :—
             1. St. Paul's College....................................................................         105
             2. St. John's College ..              ..         ..............................................    107
             3. Wesley College                 .............................................................   108
XIII.—Scholarships            ..............................................................................   109
                                                        viii
                                                                                                             Page
  XTV.-Prizes      .......................................................................................   113
   XV.—Annual Prizes                 .....................................................................   115
  XVI.—Degrees ...........................................................................................   116
 XVTI.—Annual Eeport of the University                          ..........................................   117
XVIII.—List of Members           .........................................................................   121
  XIX.—Appendix (Examination Papers.)
           SUBJECTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE.—1862.

                                       CLASSICS.
                       Aristotle, Ethics.
                     * Plato, Philebus.
                       Thucydides, T., VI., VII.
                       iEschylus, Agamemnon.
                       Aristophanes, Aves.
                       Livy, I., II., ΙΠ.
                       Horace, Sermones, and Epistolar.
                     * Plautus, Mostellaria, and Miles GUoriosus.

                                    MATHEMATICS.
                       Arithmetic
                       Algebra, to Quadratic Equations, inclusive.
                       Logarithms.
                       Euclid, Book I. to VI.
                       Elements of Statics.
                   CHEMISTEY AND EXPEEIMENTAL PHYSICS.

                                         LOGIC.



      SUBJECTS FOR COMPOSITION PRIZES, 1862-3.

UNIVEESITY MEDAL.—(English      Heroic Verse.)
                  "The Explorers of Australia."
VTCE-CHANCELLOE'S MEDAL.—(Translation   into Latim, Elegiacs.)
            " Silent o Moyle be the roar of thy waters."
                                                   Moore's Melodies.
WENTWOETH MEDAL.—(English Essay.)
            "The Roman Censorship."
HON. GEOEGE ALLEN'S MEDAL.—(Greek Iambics.)
                 Translation from King John, Act III., Scene IV.,
             " Yes, that I will ;" to " as of your child."
PEOF. WOOLLEY'S MEDAL FOE BACHELOE OF AETS.—(English Essay.)
           t " The Theory and Origin of Representative Government. ' '
    * For Honors.
    t The Essayists are required to confine themselves to the abstract question, with an
especial reference to the early History.
     MB. THOMAS SDTCXIFFE MORT has signified his intention to place at
the disposal of the Senate the sum of £315, to be awarded on Commemoration
Day, 1865, to the Graduate (not then being over twenty-five years of age,
nor having resided in England since his eighteenth year) who shall, on that
day, be declared to have attained the highest Honors in the course of his
Academic career. This sum must be expended in visiting England, and,
if possible, the Continent of Europe. The recipient is required upon his
return to present to the University, to be placed amongst its archives, a
History of his Tour, with a special reference to the iEsthetical or Mechanical
and Engineering Arts.
         gbiiejj Embersxtjj Calendar.
                 JANUARY, XXXI.


1    W    Lio.ray Couiüiiiüse saeets.    Sende meets.
 2   T
 3   F
 4   S
 5   S    Second Sunday after Christmas.
 6   M    Epiphany.
 7   T
 8   W
 9   T
10   F
11   S
12   M    First Sunday after Epiphany.
13
14   T
15   W
16   T
17   F
18   S
19   S Second Sunday after Epiphany.
20   M
21   T
22   "W
23   T
24   F
25   S·
26   S Third Sunday after Epiphany.
27   M
28   T
29   W
30   T
31   F  Profes>r>vi;u tm¿ Pretorial Boavcls meet.
           Subiwö Embersiíy Calenbar.

                       FEBRUARY, XXYIII.

1    S
 2   S    Fourth Sunday after Epiphany.
 3   M
 4   T
 5   W    'ÇSIXÏ: ί-.α; ·.
 6   T
 7   F
 8   S
     S)
 9        Fifth Sunday after Epiphany.
          7 , __ T,-   T ,„   .   .,..'-.
10   M
11   T    ^latíerfídicii £.:^.::1 .: IE;, V: '' Ί-.ζνΛ             ..::■'.:>:·. tir
                                             1 Γ:;'^- " ~)Χ''όιΙ
12   W                                                             ip,
13   T                                                             ΐ;?\>ίτ..
14   F
15   S
16   8    Septuagésima Sunday.
17   M    ï,iCeni"eï'jL-;i-lii. P-L-Í s~- ~ '. .'.-z~~. VJ         .•Γ; SO-'irir
                                                                   ,
18   T
19   W
20   T
21   F
22   S
23   8    Sexagésima Sunday.
24   M
25   T
26   W
27   T
28   F       ^:3¾¾;¾ c^ñ Trœ:zz?kl Ty.z:;i\ ■ :.:.
          SyÎwejr WínibaBÜs Caunbar.

                    MARCH, XXXI.

1    S

 2   S   Quinquagesima Sunday.
 3   M
 4   T
 5   W   Ash "Wednesday.         Senate ioeste,
 6   T
 7   F
 8   S
 9   S   First Sunday in Lent.      Quadragesima.
10   M
11   T
12   W
13   T
14   F
15   S
16       Second Sunday in Lent.
17   s
     M
18   T
19   W
20   T
21   F
22   S
23   S   Third Sunday in Lent.
24   M
25   T
26   W                                              .
27   T
28   F   Profcssorkil £xd Prcíxriá 3OHV? :>.".vt.
29   S
30   S   Fourth Sunday in Lent.
31   M
          ügbiiíg Emfrêrsiig <£alenbar.

                      APRIL, XXX.

1    T
 2   W   Ijilitt-try üoranufócí: i:it-rt>.
 3   T   tenais meets.
 4   F
 5   S
 6   S   Fifth Sunday in Lent.
 7   M
 8   T
 9   W
10   T
11   F
12   S
13   S   Palm Sunday.
14   M   ËÏStc-ï KCSC£3 1li?<ïili.S.
15   T
16   W
17   T
18   F   Good Friday.
19   S
20   s   Easter Sunday.
21   M   Easter Monday.
22   T
23   W
24   T
25   F
26   S   ¿kite1 Εεεε=.- c-ηΊ-.
27   s   First Sunday after Easter.
28   M
29   T
30   W                     -
           Sgïmin ^titifrersiíji Caíettbar.

                     MAY, XXXI.

1    T
2    F  Professorial and! Proctorial Bosrds meet.
 3   S
4    S  Second Sunday after Easter.
 5   M.
 6   T
 7   W •Senate meets.
 8   T
 9   F
10   S
11      Third Sunday after Easter.
12   s
     M
13   T
14   W
15   T
16   F
17   S  Lent Term ends.
18   i  Fourth Sunday after Easter.
19   M
20   T
21   W
22   T
23   F
24   S  Queen Victoria born, 1819.
25      Rogation Sunday.
26   s
     M
27   T
28   W
29   T Ascension Day.
30   F  Professorial r«iâ Proctorial Boards meet.
31   S
            Seimig Stnihersiig €ηίηυηΐ.

                      JUNE,      XXX.


              Sunday after Ascension.
M
T
W             ¿¡enaís msc-ts.
T
F
S
β             Whit Sunday.
M
τ :           Ti=imt~' Ter-rci bs^n
w.ι
τ ι
F       ι
S       !
0
    I
              Trinity Sunday.
M
TI!
W
TI
Fι
S
              First Sunday after Trinity.
M
T
W
T
F             P^íferr'sl "i-.i Pr-istnrM Boards meet
S
              Second Sunday after Trinity.
S
M
           SjJÏmeu Stnifwrsrfjj Calwbar.

                     JULY, XXXI.

 1    T   Library Committee meets.
 2    W   Senats meets.
 3    T
'     F
45    S
  6   M   Third Sunday after Trinity.
  7
  8   T
  9   W
 10   T
 11   F
 12   S
 13   M   Fourth Sunday after Trinity.
 14
 15   T
 16   W
 17   T
 18   F
 19   S
20    S   Fifth Sunday after Trinity.
21    M
 22   T
23    W
24    T
25    F
26    S
27    M   Sixth Sunday after Trinity.
28
29    T
30    W
31    T
            iSyiineg &%tbersttü Caletrîmr.
                                                                                       I
                         AUGUST, XXXT.


                                                                    :
                                  ■---   Ί
1    ι     '-- y    -~    .-r "              S'-:   -■..T-'r·':   ,--   -

     ρ;
           ·.. Ίν                                                                      I
 2
 3
     s3)   Seventh Sunday after Trinity.
 4   !'
     M
 5   T
 6   W     .SSWiC:- ;-.¿í'?..
 7   T
 8   F
 9   S
10         Eighth Sunday after Trinity.
11   M
12   T
13   W
14   T
15   P
16   S
17   wi)   Ninth Sunday after Trinity.
18   M
19   T
20   W
21   T
22   F
23   S
     5¾
24         Tenth Sunday after Trinity.
25   M
26   T
27   W
28   T
29   F               ?.·.'.._i_j..hl .;dr;:c::'ä'i Er,,-ai                  Γ:1Ϊί-Γ.

30   S     Vâ-i'J.Ï- T "/Ό.       ■".'?:
31    3>   Eleventh Sunday after Trinity.
          Sjrötteü Enifreratg (iatenbar.
                 SEPTEMBER, XXX.



 1   M

 2   T
 3   W   Senate meets.
 4   T
 5   F
 6   S
 7   S   Twelfth Sunday after Trinity.
 8   M
 9   T
10   W
11   T
12   F
13   S
14   S   Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity.
15   M
16   T
17   W
18   T
19   F
20   S
21   S   Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity.
22   M
23   T
24   W
25   T
26   F   Professorial R-W. Pinotoria! Bos;:·"?·. wi'>e:.
27   S
28   S   Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity.
29   M   Michaelmas Day.
30   T
              Sgïmeg WínxbnsxtO Calendar.

                                OCTOBER, XXXI.

             --,.■      ·     ..¿--    ·                 .:     ■-   !
                                                                      -\    ■       .-   L'   -V   >i   -
 1   W       -=ÎS


 2   T
 3   P
 4   S
 5   S       Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity.
             .,!■■,S"\-1:;V-:M;··-·        '.^±-i\   W-«»·
 6   M
 7   T
 8   W
 9   T
10   P
11           Inauguration of University, 1852.
12
         s   Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity.
13       s
         M
14   T
15   W
16   T
17   P
18
19   s       Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity.
20   s
21   T
     M
22   W
23   T
24   P
25
26       s
         &   Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity.
27   M
28   T
29   W
30   T
31   F       ''■.■!y/';*.'-,,.-.ι-.:'. -■„·'■ P-Jü'jt'i-Ai;l FÏ:;Ï;-."1- rn.-v-t.


     I
            jlgimcg Stnibírsilg Calwbar.
                    NOVEMBER, XXX.



1    S

 2   S     Twentieth Sunday after Trinity.
 3   M
 4   T
 5   W     Sfiíiíife iansr.-..
 6   T
 7   F
 8
 9   s     Twenty-first Sunday after Trinity.
10   s
11   M
     T
12   W
13   T
14   F
15   S
     ■Ï5
16         Twenty-second Sunday after Trinity.
17   M
18   T
19   W
20   T
21   F
22
23   s     Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity.
24   s
25   M
     T
26   W
27   T
28   F     P¡'oíe»s()i':¡ií it-i«! Proctorial Boards meet.
29   S
30   3     First Sunday in Advent.
         Süimn) Bnibfrsity Caleño ar.

              DECEMBER, XXXI.


 1   M
 2   T
 3   W             *■- ;¡icí.»r-.
 4   T
 5   F
 6   S
 7            Second Sunday in Advent.
 8   M
 9   T
10   W
11   T
12   F
13   S
14   8        Third Sunday in Advent.
15   M
16   T
17   W
18   T
19   F
20   S
21   s        Fourth Sunday in Advent.
22   M
23   T
24   W
25   T        Christmas Day.
26   F
27   S
28            First Sunday after Christmas.
29   M
30   T
31   W
                          PREFACE.

THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY was incorporated by an Act of the
Colonial Legislature, which received the Royal Assent on the
9th December, 1851. The objects set forth in the preamble are—
" the advancement of religion and morality, and the promotion of
useful knowledge." It is empowered to confer degrees in Arts,
Law, and Medicine ; and is endowed with the annual income of
£5000.
     By a Royal Charter issued 7th February, 1858 (see p. 16), the
same rank, style, and precedence were granted to Graduates of the
University of Sydney as are enjoyed by Graduates of Universities
within the United Kingdom. The University of Sydney is also
declared in the amended Charter granted to the University of
London, to be one of the institutions in connection with that
University, from which certificates of having pursued a due course
of instruction shall be received, with a view to admission to
Degrees.
     The Government of the University is vested in a Senate, con-
sisting of sixteen elective Fellows, and not fewer than three nor
more than six " ex officio " members, being Professors of the
University in such branches of learning as the Senate may from
time to time select; (see p. 101). A Chancellor and Vice-
Chancellor are elected by the Senate from their own body ; (see
p. 100).
     Under the peculiar circumstances of the Colony, it was judged
expedient to establish at first the Faculty of Arts alone, before
attempting those which are specially devoted to the professions of
Medicine and Law.         The curriculum for the degree of B. A. in-
                                    D
14                               PREFACE.

eludes the Classical Languages ; History, modern and ancient ;
Logic and Moral Philosophy ; Mathematics and Natural Phi-
losophy ; Chemistry and Experimental Physics. The teaching of
the Faculty of Arts, in addition to these subjects, will embrace
Mental and Political Philosophy ; Natural History, comprising
Mineralogy and Geology ; Botany and Zoology ; the French and
German Languages and Literature.
     In the Faculty of Medicine a Board of Examiners has been
appointed by the Senate to test the qualifications of Candidates
for Medical Degrees.
     The immediate direction of the studies in each Faculty is
entrusted to a Board of the Professors in that Faculty ; and
questions relating to the general studies are decided (subject to
the approval of the Senate) by a Board consisting of the
Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and the Professors of the three
Faculties.
     The maintenance of discipline is provided for by the appoint-
ment of a Board styled the Proctorial Board, and composed of the
Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Senior Professor of Classics,
the Senior Professor of Mathematics, and the Senior Professor
of Chemistry and Experimental Physics. Subject to the general
control of the Senate, this Board is empowered to make Rules
for the due observance of order, and to visit insubordination and
irregularity with fines or other ordinary Academic punishments.
    The Lectures of the Professors are open to persons not mem-
bers of the University upon payment of a moderate fee for each
course.
     The distinctive character of the Sydney University is the
absence of any religious test as a condition of Membership, of
honor, or of office ; it is intended to supply the means of a liberal
education to " all orders and denominations without any dis-
tinction whatever:" it possesses no Theological Faculty, but
resembles, in respect of its Secular Faculties, the Universities of
                              PREFACE.                                 15
the Continent, and Edinburgh, and of Oxford and Cambridge, as
reformed by the late Act of Parliament.
     Although the comprehensive principles on which the Uni-
versity is founded do not admit of the establishment of a Theo-
logical Faculty, the importance of religion as an element of
education is fully recognized. With a special view to this
object, a portion of the ground granted by the Government to
the University has been set apart as sites for Colleges.
     An Act to encourage the erection of such Colleges was passed
by the Legislature during the Session of 1854. Ample assistance
is offered towards their endowment ; and with an enlightened
liberality the maintenance of the fundamental principles of the
University—the association of Students, without respect of religious
creeds, in the cultivation of secular knowledge—is secured con-
sistently with the most perfect independence of the College
authorities within their own walls. Colleges in connection with
the Church of England, and with the Roman Catholic Church,
have been established.
     Under the Fifteenth Clause of the Electoral Act, 22nd Vic-
toria, Nb. 20, the University is entitled to return one Member to
Parliament, when it shall contain one hundred graduates who
have taken the Degree of Master of Arts, or any higher degree.
     An account of the several Scholarships and other Prizes for
proficiency which have been established out of the Funds of the
University, or have been founded by Private Benefactions, will
be found in this Calendar.
                     ROYAL CHARTER
                                 OF   THE

            UNIVERSITY                  OF       SYDNEY.

pidona, by the Grace of God of the United Kingd om of
Great Britain and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith, To all
to whom these presents shall come greeting : WHEREAS under
and by virtue of the provisions of an Act of the Governor and
Legislative Council of our Colony of New South Wales, passed
in the fourteenth year of our reign, No. 31, intituled " An Act
to Incorporate and Endow the University of Sydney," and to
which our Royal assent was granted on the ninth day of Decem-
ber, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-One, a Senate
consisting of sixteen Fellows was incorporated and made, a body
politic with perpetual succession, under the name of the
University of Sydney, with power to grant, after examination,
the several degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor
of Laws, Doctor of Laws, Bachelor of Medicine, and Doctor of
Medicine, and to Examine for Medical Degrees in the four
branches of Medicine, Surgery, Midwifery, and Pharmacy.
AND WHEREAS our trusty and well beloved Sir William Thomas
Denison, Knight, Commander of our most honourable Order of
the Bath, Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royal Engineers, our
Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over our said
Colony, has transmitted to us the humble petition of the Senate
of the said University of Sydney under their common seal, dated
the ninth day of February, One Thousand Eight Hundred and
Fifty-Seven, wherein is set forth a statement of the establish-
                         BOYAL CHARTE«.                             17
ment of the said University, the appointment of learned Pro-
fessors of the Faculty of Arts, and the Provisions adopted and
to be adopted in respect to the Faculties of Laws and Medicine
and the course of Education and Discipline for the Scholars,
Undergraduates, and Graduates of the said University, and in
which it is humbly submitted that the standard of acquirements
which must be attained by Graduates in the University of
Sydney, is not below that prescribed by the most learned
Universities of the United Kingdom, that the direction of the
studies in the said University has been committed to Professors
who have highly distinguished themselves in British Universities,
that the Rules under which the high standard in the University
has been fixed, cannot be altered without the approval of our
representative in the Colony, and that there is vested in him the
power of interference should the Rules laid down be unduly
relaxed in practice, and that therefore the Memorialists confi-
dently hope that the Graduates of the University of Sydney will
not be inferior in scholastic acquirements to the majority of
Graduates of British Universities. And that it is desirable to
have the Degrees of the University of Sydney generally recog-
nized throughout our Dominions. And it is also humbly sub-
mitted that although our Royal assent to the Act of the
Legislature of New South Wales hereinbefore recited fully
satisfies the principle of our law that the power of granting
Degrees should flow from the Crown, yet that as that assent was
conveyed through an Act which has effect only in the territory
of New South Wales, the Memorialists believe that the Degrees
granted by the said University, under the authority of the said
Act are not legally entitled to recognition beyond the Umits of
New South Wales. And that the Memorialists are in conse-
quence most desirous to obtain a Grant from us of Letters Patent
requiring all our subjects to recognize the Degrees given under
the Act of the Local Legislature in the same manner as if the
                                   E
18                        ROYAL CHAETEE.

said University of Sydney had been an University established
within the United Kingdom under a Royal Charter or an
Imperial enactment : And the Memorialists therefore hereby
most humbly pray that we will be pleased to take the premises
into our gracious consideration and grant to the University of
Sydney Letters Patent effective of the object therein set forth.
Now KNOW YE that we, taking the premises into consideration
and deeming it to be the duty of our Royal Office for the
advancement of religion and morality and the promotion of use-
ful knowledge to hold forth to all classes and denominations of
our faithful subjects without any distinction whatsoever through-
out our dominions encouragement for pursuing a regular and
liberal course of Education, and considering that many persons
do prosecute and complete their studies in the Colony of New
South Wales on whom it is just to confer such distinctions and
rewards as may induce them to persevere in their laudable
pursuits, Do by virtue of our Prerogative Royal and of our
especial Grace and certain knowledge and mere motion by these
presents for us, our heirs and successors, will, grant and declare
that the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor
of Laws, Bachelor of Medicine, and Doctor of Medicine, already
granted or conferred or hereafter to be granted or conferred by
the Senate of the said University of Sydney shall be recognized
as Academic distinctions and rewards of merit, and be entitled
to rank, precedence, and consideration in our United Kingdom
and in our Colonies and possessions throughout the world as fully
as if the said Degrees had been granted by any University of our
said United Kingdom. And we further will and ordain that any
variation of the Constitution of the said University which may
at any time or from time to time be made by an Act of the said
Governor and Legislature shall not so long as the same or the
like standard of knowledge is in the opinion of the said Governor
preserved as a necessary condition for obtaining the aforesaid
                          EOYAL CHAETEK.                             19

Degrees therein in any manner annul, abrogate,' circumscribe, or
diminish the privileges conferred on the said University, by these
our Royal Letters Patent, nor the rank, rights, privileges, and
consideration conferred by such Degrees. And lastly we do
hereby for us, our heirs and successors, grant and declare that
these our Letters Patent or the enrolment or exemplification
thereof shall be in and by all things valid and effectual in law
according to the true intent and meaning of the same, and shall
be construed and adjudged in the most favorable and beneficial
sense of the best advantage of the said University, as well in all
our courts elsewhere, notwithstanding any non-recital, uncer-
tainty, or imperfection in these our Letters Patent. IN WITNESS
whereof we have caused these our Letters to be made Patent.
  WITNESS ourself at "Westminster, the Twenty-Seventh day of
February, in the Twenty-First Year of our Reign.
  BT WAEEANT under the Queen's sign manual.
                                                     C. ROMILLY.
                                      20




                                ACTS
                   RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY.



       An Act to Incorporate and Endow the University of
                       Sydney, 14 Vict., No. 31.
                       [Assented to 1st October, 1850.]

Preamble.      WHEREAS it is deemed expedient for the better advance-
                  ment of religion and morality, and the promotion of
         useful knowledge, to hold forth to all classes and
                denominations of Her Majesty's subjects resident in the
                  Colony of New South Wales, without any distinction
                    whatsoever, an encouragement for pursuing a regular
              and liberal course of Education : Be it therefore enacted
               by His Excellency the Governor of New South Wales,
                  with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council
                 thereof, That for the purpose of ascertaining, by means
             of examination, the persons who shall acquire proficiency
                in literature, science, and art, and of rewarding them by
         academical degrees as evidence of their respective
          attainments, and by marks of honour proportioned
                   thereto, a Senate, consisting of the number of persons
                   hereinafter mentioned, shall within three months after
                  the passing of this Act be nominated and appointed by
                     the said Governor, with the advice of the Executive
  A body poii- Council of the said Colony, by proclamation to be duly
 poratefto °be published in the New South Wales Government Gazette,
     named "The which Senate shall be and is hereby constituted from
     ofnsydney," the date of such nomination and appointment a Body
     with'certain Politic and Corporate, by the name of " The University-
powers,        of Sydney," by which name such Body Politic shall
                   have perpetual succession, and shall have a common
            ACT OF INCORPORATION OF 1852.                                 21

seal, and shall in the same name sue and be sued,
implead and be impleaded, and answer and be answered
unto in all Courts of the said Colony, and shall be able
and capable in Law to take, purchase, and hold to them
and their successors, all goods, chattels, and personal
property whatsoever, and shall also be able and capable
in law to take, purchase, and hold to them and their
successors, not only such lands, buildings, hereditaments,
and possessions as may from time to time be exclusively
used and occupied for the immediate requirements of
the said University, but also any other lands, buildings,
hereditaments, and possessions whatsoever situate in the
said Colony or elsewhere ; and that they and their suc-
cessors shall be able and capable in law to grant, demise,
alien or otherwise dispose of all or any of the property,
real or personal, belonging to the said University, and
also to do all other matters and things incidental to or
appertaining to a Body Politic.
   II. Provided always and be it enacted, That it shallNot t0 haTe
not be lawful for the. said University tó alienate, mort- alienate or
gage, charge, or demise any lands, tenements, or }j|J¡Jjpg!
hereditaments to which it may become entitled by grant, unless with
                                                                           of
purchase, or otherwise, unless with the approval of the theG°ove        ernor
Governor and Executive Council of the said Colony for a.nd Exec?-
the time being, except by way of lease, for any term not
exceeding thirty-one years from the time when such
lease shall be made, in and by which there shall be
reserved and made payable, during the whole of the term
thereby granted, the best yearly rent that can be reason-
ably gotten for the same without any fine or foregift.
   III. And be it enacted, That by way of permanent Governor
endowment of the said University, the said Governor out of Gene-
shall be, and is hereby empowered, by Warrant under "' °Rey"_u"
his hand, to direct to be issued and paid out of the nues yearly
General or Ordinary Revenues of the said Colony, by exceeding
four equal quarterly payments,              on the first day
of*=000·tode-
January, the first day of April, the first day of July, and expenses. '
the first day of October, in every year, as a fund for
building and for defraying the several stipends which
shall be appointed to be paid to the several Professors or
22                                    UNIVERSITY

                         Teachers of literature, science, and art, and to such
                        necessary officers and servants as shall be from time to'
                       time appointed by the said University, and for defraying
                      the expense of such prizes, scholarships, and exhibitions
                         as shall be awarded for the encouragement of Students
                           in the said University, and for providing, gradually, a
                          library for the same, and for discharging all incidental
                           and necessary charges connected with the current ex-
                     penditure thereof, or otherwise, the sum of five thousand
                       pounds in each and every year, the first instalment
                           thereof to become due and payable on the first day of
                              January, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one.
         Sixteen Fei-           Γν". And be it enacted, That the said Body Politic
     stitute a     and Corporate shall consist of *sieteen Fellows, twelve of
          poweïto5"'11 wnom shall be laymen, and all of whom shall be members
      elect a Pro- of and constitute a Senate who shall have power to elect
      mitedperiod!ou^ °f their own body, by a majority of votes, a *Provost
                        of the said University for such period as the said Senate
               shall from time to time appoint ;                and whenever a
                         vacancy shall occur in the office of Provost of the said
                       University, either by death, resignation, or otherwise,
                          to elect, out of their own body, by a majority of votes,
                         a fit and proper person to be the Provost, instead of the
                                               Provost occasioning such vacancy.
      How Vacan-              V. f And be it enacted, That until there shall be one
        ed up. e ' hundred graduates of the said University who sliall have
                         taken the degree of Master of Arts, Doctor of Laws, or
              Doctor of Medicine, all vacancies which shall occur by death,
                  resignation, or otherwise among the Fellows of the said
                 Senate, shall be filled up as they may occur, by the election
                  of such other fit and proper persons as the remaining
                       members of the said Senate shall, at meetings to be duly
                  convened for that purpose, from time to time elect to fill up
                 such vacancies ; Provided always, that no such vacancy,
                  unless created by death or resignation, shall occur for any

          * Amended as respects the number of Fellows and the title of
              Provost and Vice-Provost, by an Act passed in 1861.
                          t Repealed by Act of 1861.
            ACT OF INCORPORATION OF 1852.                                   23
 cause whatever, unless such cause shall have been' previously
 specified by some bye-law of the said Body Politic and
 Corporate, dukj passed as hereinafter mentioned.
    VI. And be it enacted, That the office of Vice-Provost™^™0^
 of the said University shall be an annual office, and the annually,
 said Fellows shall, at a meeting to be holden by them
within six months after the passing of this Act, elect
out of the said Senate a Vice-Provost, and on some day
before the expiration of the tenure of the said office, of
which due notice shall be given, elect one other fit and
proper person to be the Vice-Provost of the said Uni-
'versity, and so from time to time annually ; or in case
of the death, resignation, or other avoidance of any
such Vice-Provost before the expiration of his year of
office, shall, at a meeting to be holden by them for that
purpose, as soon as conveniently may be, of which due
notice shall be given, elect some other fit and proper
person to be Vice-Provost for the remainder of the year
in which such death, resignation, or other avoidance
shall happen, such person to be chosen from among
themselves by the major part of the Fellows present at vice-Ïrooost
such meeting : Provided always, that the Vice-Provost '° te.rai|a"
shall be capable of re-election to the same office, as often election,
as shall be deemed meet.
   VII. ^Provided akvays, and be it enacted, That as soon Proviso, that
as there shall be not feiver than one hundred Graduates shall lie ove
who have taken ami or either of the Deqrees of Master ofhunYed:        ,,
      -r\      ί·   τ        ΤΙ       f -ΛΛ- 7' '   77        ·    graduates ,au
Arts, Doctor of Daws, or Doctor of aléateme, all vacancies'vacanties in
thereafter occurring in the said Senate, shall be from time ßu'edieυί" Il
to time filled up by the majority of such Gh-aduates presentthem-
and duly convened for that purpose.
   VIII. And be it enacted, That the said Senate shall Senate to
have full power to appoint and dismiss all professors, m^agenvTnt
tutors, officers, and servants belonging to the said Uni- ?°d s"Per-
                            .           o    <-J                  intenüence·
versity, and also the entire management of and superin-
tendence over the affairs, concerns, and property of the
said University, and in all cases unprovided for by this
Act, it shall be lawful for the said Senate to act in such

                    * Repealed by Act of 1861.
24                                   UNIVEESITY

manner as shall appear to them to be best calculated to
promote the purposes intended by the said University ;
and the said Senate shall have full power from time to
time to make, and also to alter any statutes, bye-laws,
and regulations (so as the same be not repugnant to any
existing law or to the general objects and provisions of
this Act) touching the discipline of the said University,
the examinations for scholarships, exhibitions, degrees,
or honors, and the granting of the same respectively,
and touching the mode and time of convening the meet-
ings of the said Senate, and in general touching all other
matters whatsoever regarding the said University ; and
all such statutes, bye-laws, and regulations, when
reduced into writing, and after the common seal of the
said University shall have been affixed thereto, shall be
binding upon all persons members thereof, and all can-
didates for degrees to be conferred by the same ; all such
statutes, bye-laws, and regulations having been first
submitted to the Governor and Executive Council of the
said Colony for the time being, and' approved of and
countersigned by the said Governor : Provided always,
that the production of a verified copy of any such
statutes, bye-laws, and regulations, under the seal of the
said Body Politic and Corporate, shall be sufficient
evidence of the authenticity of the same in all Courts
of Justice.
beTeeS'0 ^- ^°^ *>e *' enacted, That all questions which shall
by majority come before the said Senate shall be decided by the
of votes. majority of the members present, and the Chairman at
any such meeting shall have a vote, and in case of an
equality of votes, a second or casting vote ; and that no
question shall be decided at any meeting unless the
Provost or Vice-Provost and *seven Fellows, or in the
absence of the Provost and Vice-Provost unless eight
Fellows at the least shall be present at the time of such
decision,
chairman of X. And be it enacted, That at every meeting of the
mee mg».       sg^ Senate, the Provost, or in his absence the Vice-


           * Amended as respects the Quorum by art Art passed in Pec. 1852.
           ACT OF INCORPORATION OF 1852.                               25
Provost, shall preside as Chairman, or in the absence of
both, a Chairman shall be chosen by the members
present, or the major part of them.
   XI. And whereas it is expedient to extend the benefits j^6"'^
of colleges and educational establishments already colleges and
instituted, for the promotion of literature, science, and |st"bHshn-a
art, whether incorporated or not incorporated, by con- menu may
necting them, for such purposes, with the said University : ascandidates
Be it enacted, That all persons shall be admitted as Jj°er ^31"
candidates for the respective degrees of Bachelor of
Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, or Doctor of
Laws, to be conferred by the said University of Sydney,
on presenting to the said Senate a certificate from any
such colleges or educational establishments, or from the
head master thereof, to the effect that such candidate
has completed the course of instruction which the said
Senate, by regulation in that behalf, shall determine ;
Provided, that no such certificate shall be received from
any educational establishment, unless the said University
shall authorize it to issue such certificates : Provided
also, that it shall be lawful for the said Senate to apply
any portion of the said endowment fucd to the estab-
lishment and maintenance of a college in connexion with
and under the supervision of the said' University.
   XII. And be it enacted, That for the purpose of A« to Medi-
granting the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Doc-ca esrees·
tor of Medicine, and for the improvement of Medical
Education in all its branches, as well as in Medicine as
in Surgery, Midwifery, and Pharmacy, the said Senate
shall from time to time report to the Governor and
Executive Council for the time being of the said Colony,
what appear to them to be the Medical Institutions and
Schools, whether corporate or unincorporated, in the
City of Sydney, from which either singly or jointly with
other Medical Institutions and Schools in the said
Colony or in Foreign parts, it may be fit and expedient,
in the judgment of the said Senate, to admit candidates
for Medical degrees, and on approval of such report by
the said Governor and Executive Council, shall admit
all persons as candidates for the respective degrees of
26                                     UNIVEKSITY

                       Bachelor of Medicine and Doctor of Medicine, to be
                            conferred by the said University, on presenting to the
                              said Senate a certificate from any such institution or
                           school to the effect that such candidate has completed
                             the course of instruction which the said Senate, from
                               time to time, by regulation in that behalf, shall pre-
                                                                              scribe,
         senate may              XIII. And be it enacted, That the said Senate shall
  gree" for" have power after examination to confer the several
       which fees degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor
                       of Laws, Doctor of Laws, Bachelor of Medicine, and
                     Doctor of Medicine, and to examine for Medical Degrees
                        in the four branches of Medicine, Surgery, Midwifery,
                              and Pharmacy, and that such reasonable fee shall be
                         charged for the degrees so conferred as the said Senate,
                           with the approbation of the said Governor and Execu-
                           tive Council, shall from time to time direct ; and such
                                fees shall be carried to one general fee fund for the
                          payment of the expenses of the said University ; and
      Accounts ofthat a full account of the whole income and expenditure
 côme an d'ex-°f the said- University shall, once in every year, be
           benid'd"h t0 transmitted to the Colonial Secretary, for the purpose of
    fore Legisla- being submitted to the Legislative Council, or Assembly
       tive council. Qf foe saj,j Colony, as the case may be, and subjected to
                 such examination and audit as the said Legislative
                                                   Council or Assembly may direct.
        Examiners                 XIV. And be it enacted, That at the conclusion of
  names o"?           every examination of the candidates, the Examiners shall
      candidates, declare the name of every candidate whom they shall
            proficiency, have deemed to be entitled to any of the said degrees,
      ofrwhichteto an<^ *ne departments of knowledge in which his pro-
  be granted ficiency shall have been evinced, and also his proficiency
                    by Provost. m reiaj¿on ¿0 £aa£ 0f 0tQer candidates, and he shall
                            receive from the said Provost, a certificate under the
                            Seal of the said University of Sydney, and signed by
                        the said Provost, in which the particulars so declared
              shall be stated.
 Bye-Laws,                XV". Provided always, and be it enacted, That
                                                                                  all
        fubmítted to statutes, bye-laws, and regulations made from time to
   Governor & time            touching the         examination     of candidates,
                                                                                 and
           ACT OF INCORPORATION OF 1852.                           27
granting of degrees shall be submitted, for the consider- ^„""ΙΟΓ
ation and approval of the Governor and Executive approval.
Council.
    XVI. And be it enacted, That the Governor of the ¡^[,'j™ $
said Colony, for the time being, shall be the Visitor of the Univer-
the said University of Sydney, with authority to do all sl,y·
things which pertain to Visitors, as often as to him shall
seem meet.
    XVII. And be it declared and enacted, That it shall ^°{e¿¡^nd
be lawful for the Professors or Teachers in the said fees from
University, in addition to the stipends with which they "^Treasu-
shall be so respectively endowed, to demand and receive rer may
from the Students of the said University, such reason- for^ntrance,
able fees for attendance on their lectures, and for the&c·
Treasurer of the said University to collect from the
said Students, on behalf of the said University, such
reasonable fees for entrance, degrees, and other Uni-
versity charges, as shall be from time to time provided
by any statutes, bye-laws, or regulations of the said
University.
    XVIII. And for the better government of the Students Regulations
in the said University : Be it enacted, That no Student students
shall be allowed to attend the lectures or classes ofsha11 reslde·
the same, unless he shall dwell with his parent or
guardian, or with some near relative or friend selected
by his parent or guardian, and approved by the Provost
or Vice-Provost, or in some collegiate or other educa-
tional establishment, or with a tutor or master of a
boarding-house licensed by the Provost or Vice-Provost
as hereinafter mentioned.
    XIX. And be it enacted, That every person, who is Regulations
desirous of being licensed as a tutor or master of a big tutors,
boarding house in connexion with the said University, students 01"
shall apply in writing under his hand to the Provost or may reside.
Vice-Provost of the said University for his license, and
it shall be lawful for the said Provost or Vice-Provost, if
he or they shall think fit, to require of any such applicant
such testimonials of character and fitness for the office
as shall be satisfactory to such. Provost or Vice-Provost;
and the application shall specify the house or houses
28                                  UNIVERSITY

belonging to or occupied by the applicant, and intended
by him for the reception of Students, and the number of
Students who may be conveniently lodged and boarded
therein ; and thereupon it shall be lawful for the Provost
or Vice-Provost in their discretion to grant or withhold
the license for the academical year then current or then
nest ensuing, and every such license shall be registered
in the archives of the said University, and shall inure
until the end of the academical year in which it shall be
registered, and shall then be of no force, unless renewed
in like manner, but shall be revocable at any time, and
may forthwith be revoked by the Provost or Vice-Provost
in case of any misbehaviour of such tutor or master of
a boarding house or of the Students under his care,
which in the opinion of the Provost or Vice-Provost, and
a majority of the Professors of the said University,
ought to be punished by immediate revocation of such
license.
As to reiigi- XX. And be it enacted, That no reHgious test shall
ous tests. ^6 a^miuisfcered ^0 anv person in order to entitle him to
be admitted as a Student of the said University, or to
hold any office therein, or to partake of any advantage
or privilege thereof ; Provided always, that this enact-
ment shall not be deemed to prevent the making of
regulations for securing the due attendance of the
Students, for Divine Worship, at such Church or Chapel
as shall be approved by their parents or guardians
respectively.
Bye-Laws, XXI. And be it enacted, That all statutes, bye-laws,
uuies, &c, ruies an¿ regulations which shall be made and approved
to be from       > .      o.                 ·ι   η             Ί   -η
         time to time from time to time by the said üovernor and Executive
    th'i? LegSa- Council, concerning the government and discipline of
 tive Council, the said University, which shall be in force at the
            beginning of every Session of the said Legislative
                   Council, or Legislative Assembly of the said Colony, and
                      which shall not have been before that time laid before
                      the said Legislative Council or Legislative Assembly,
               shall from time to time, within six weeks after the
                   beginning of every such Session, be laid before the same
             •     by the Colonial Secretary for the time being.
              ACT OF INCORPORATION OF 1852.                              29

    XXII. And be it enacted, That the said University Proceedings
 shall, once at least in every year, and also whenever the sîtv snaii
 pleasure of the Governor for the time being shall be ?nce at least
 signified in that behalf, report their proceedings to the be reported
 said Governor and Executive Council, and a copy of '„o^&pExe-
 every such report shall be laid before the said Legisla- cutive coun-
 tive Council or Legislative Assembly, within six weeks "f 'Report py
 after the same shall have been made, if such Legislative '*id before
 Council or Assembly be then sitting, or if not, then tive Council,
 within six weeks next after the meeting of the same.
    XXIII. Provided always, and be it declared and Act may
be
enacted, That nothing herein contained shall be deemed amended"!
or construed to prevent the Legislature of the Colony
for the time being, from altering, amending, or repealing
the provisions of this Act, or any of them, as the public
interest may at any time seem to render necessary or
expedient.
    XXTV. And be it declared and enacted, That nothing Not to inter-
in this Act contained shall be deemed to affect or to rights of Her
interfere with any right, title, or interest of Her Majesty, Majesty.
Her Heirs and Successors, or in any way to limit the
Royal Prerogative.
Passed the Legislative Conn- \
  cil, this tioenty-fourth day I      CHARLES NICHOLSON,
  of September, one thousand I                        SPEAKER.
  eight hnndred and fifty.       }
WM. MACPHERSON, CLERK OF THE COUNCIL.

  In the name and on the behalf of JECer Majesty I assent to this Act.

  ^
                                     CHA3·   A.   FITZ ROY,
                                                        GOVERNOR.
Govt. Bouse, Sydney, 1st October, 1850.
30                                      UNIVERSITY



            An Act to amend an Act, intituled, " An Act to Incor-
              porate and Endow the ' University of Sydney,' "
              16 Vict. No. 28.
                             [Assented to 21st December, 1852.]
     Preamble.         WHEEEAS it is provided by an Act of the Governor and
                        Legislative Council of New South Wales, passed in the
         14 Vict., No. fourteenth year of Her Majesty's Reign, intituled, "An
                    Act to Incorporate and JEndoiv the University of Sydney,"
                           that the Senate of the said University shall consist of
                        sixteen Fellows, of whom one shall be elected by them
                    as Provost, and another as Vice-Provost ; and that no
                         question shall be decided at any meeting of the Senate
                   ■unless the Provost or Vice-Provost or seven Fellows, or,
                       in the absence of the Provost and Vice-Provost, unless
                     eight Fellows at the least, shall be present at such
                         decision : And whereas it is expedient that the number
                        of such Quorum be lessened : Be it therefore enacted
                         by His Excellency the Governor of New South Wales,
                         with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council
                                                           thereof, as follows —
        h've fth1"         ■"■" -^10™· an^ 8^r the passing of this Act, all ques-
         Senate to be tions which shall come before the Senate of the said
            fnsteXof' University may be decided at any meeting duly con-
         seven, asdi- vened, where there shall be present five Fellows of the
     νϋΐ.,Νό! 31* University, of whom the Provost or Vice-Provost shall be
                                                                             one.
            Passed the Legislative Court- \
              cil, this fourteenth day of I       CHARLES NICHOLSON,
              December, one thousand j                            SPEAKER.
              eight hundred and fifty-two. J
            WM. MACPHERSON, CLERK TO THE COUNCIL.

              In tlie name arid on the behalf of Ser Majesty I assent to this Act.
                                            CHA»-       A.   FITZ ROY,
                                                                    GOVERNOR.
            Govt. Souse, Sydney, 21s« December, 1852.
      INCORPORATION AMENDMENT ACT OF 1861.                               31



An Act to amend the Sydney University Incorporation
                              Act.
                 [Assented to 26th April, 1861.]
WHEREAS it is expedient to amend the Sydney University Preamble.
Incorporation Act, fourteenth Victoria, number thirty-
one, in respect to the Constitution of the Senate and
the mode of electing the Fellows thereof : Be it there-
fore enacted by the'Queen's Most Excellent Majesty, by
and with the advice and consent of the Legislative
Council and Legislative Assembly of New South Wales
in Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the
same as follows ;—
   I. The fifth and seventh sections of the Act fourteen Repeal of ss.
Victoria, number thirty-one, are hereby repealed.                vift/iiofsi*
   II. In addition to the number of sixteen Fellows of Certain Pro-
whom the Senate of the said University now consists, ^¾¾¾0 be
there shall be not fewer than three nor more than six Members of
ex-officio Members who shall be Professors of the said
University in such branches of learning as the Senate
shall from time to time by any Bye-law in that behalf select.
   III. Every Professor and other Public Teacher and Professors>
Examiner in the Schools of the said University, every Members
Principal of any Incorporated College within the said ^¾,¾ fuU
University, and every Superior Officer of the said Uni- Graduates,
versity declared to be such by any Bye-law duly passed
shall during his tenure of such office in the University,
but no longer be a Member of the said University with
the same rights and privileges as are enjoyed by persons
holding any or either of the Degrees of Master of Arts,
Doctor of Laws, or Doctor of Medicine within the said
University.
   rV. Every Professor or other person so declared by How future
this Act to be a Member of the said University, and IM^^O"
every person having taken the degree of Master of Arts, D<¡ filled.
Doctor of Laws, or Doctor of Medicine, and -keeping
his name in accordance with any Bye-law in that behalf
on the Register of the said University, shall have the
32                                     UNIVERSITY

                 same privilege as the existing Fellows now have of
                     attending and voting at the election of Fellows, and
                    every future vacancy by death, resignation, or otherwise
                     among the Fellows for the time being shall he filled up
                     by the election at a meeting duly convened for the pur-
                pose of such other fit and proper person as may be
                  elected to fill such vacancy by the majority of the follow-
                     ing persons present at such meetings, viz., Fellows of
                       the Senate of the said University for the time being—
                   Professors and other persons so as last aforesaid declared
                    to be Members of the said University—Graduates keep-
                      ing their Names on the Register of the University who
                    shall have taken within the said University any or either
                     of the Degrees of Master of Arts, Doctor of Laws, or
                     Doctor of Medicine : Provided that unless by death or
                       resignation no such vacancy shall occur for any cause
                  not previously specified by some Bye-law of the Uni-
                                                           versity duly passed.
       Provost and        V. The Chief Officers of the University now called
    to'°be s°y]°ed Provost and Vice-Provost respectively shall hereafter be
     Chancellor an¿ ^e sfyled Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor of the Uni-
          ciianceiior. versity : Provided that the present Provost and Vice-
                   Provost shall be the first Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor
                    respectively : And that all the provisions of the said Act
                 of Incorporation now applicable to the Provost and
                     Vice-Provost and to their respective offices shall apply
                   to the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor and their offices
                                                                   respectively.
       Not to aflèct      YJ- Nothing herein shall affect the said recited Act
        beyond ac- or any other Act or any Letters Patent or other instru-
               mentenact" ment or Bye-law of or relating to the said University
otherwise than as is by this Act expressly enacted.
Short Title.       VII. This Act shall be styled and may be cited as the
" Sydney University Incorporation Act Amendment
Act of 1861."
              In the name- and on the behalf of Ser Majesty I assent to this Act.
                                          JOHN YOUNG,
                                                        AnME.    OF   THE GuVT.
           Govt. House, Sydney, 26th April, 1861.
            PURCHASE OF SYDNEY COLLEGE.                           33



An Act to enable the University of Sydney to purchase
  the Sydney College, with the land attached thereto.—
  17 Vict., No. 18.
               [Assented to 5th September, 1853.]
WHEREAS in time past a certain Institution called the Preamble.
Sydney College was established by a certain number of
Subscribers, forming a Joint Stock Company, for the
purpose of imparting the rudiments of a liberal educa-
tion to the youth of the Colony : And whereas a parcel
of land in the City of Sydney was given as and for the
site and other necessary purposes of the said College by
the then Governor of this Colony, Sir Richard Bourke,
which land was granted by Her present Majesty, by a
Grant or Letters Patent bearing date the fifth day of
December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight
hundred and thirty-seven, to certain Trustees therein
named, and the survivor of them, and the heirs of such
survivor, in and by which said grant or Letters Patent
it is declared that such land was given and granted for
the promotion in the said Colony of Science, Literature,
and Art : And whereas a College Hall and other Build-
ings were erected on the said land by the said Company
at a great expense : And whereas after some years the
said College began to languish, and at last was tem-
porarily closed as an educational establishment, and the
said Land, College Hall, and Buildings are now occu-
pied by the University of Sydney : And whereas William
Bland, of Sydney, Esquire, is the sole surviving Trustee
named in the said Grant, and is also the last appointed
President of the said Sydney College : And whereas at
a meeting of the Proprietors of the said Institution,
held on the eighteenth day of June last, it was resolved
unanimously that the said William Bland should be em-
powered to treat with the University of Sydney for the
sale of the said Land, College Hall, and Buildings, on
behalf of the said Proprietors at the full price of all the
                                F
34                            UXIVERSITY

     shares held by the said Proprietors in the said Institu-
     tion : And whereas the Senate of the said University
     of Sydney, having had the said resolution submitted to
     them, have agreed, on behalf of the said University,
     with the said William Bland, on behalf of the said
     Proprietors, to purchase the said Land, College Hall,
     and Buildings, for the full price of all the said shares,
     together with the sum of one hundred and fifty pounds,
     the estimated expenses incurred and to be incurred by
     the said William Bland in and about carrying the said
     agreement into efíect : And whereas divers volumes of
     classical books, and certain scientific instruments and
     apparatus, and other personal property, formerly used in
     the educational establishment conducted in the said
     Sydney College, now belong to the Proprietors of the
     said Sydney College, as such Proprietors, which said
     books, instruments, apparatus, and other property are
     now in the possession of the Senate of the said Uni-
     versity, and it is desirable, and the Proprietors of the
     said College are willing, that the same shall be trans-
     ferred to and vested in the said Sydney University, for
     the use and benefit thereof: And whereas a certain
     legacy or sum of five hundred pounds, bequeathed to
     the said Sydney College, by the late Solomon Levey,
     Esquire, together with an accumulation of interest
     thereon, amounting in the whole to the sum of five
     hundred and sixty-five pounds three shillings and eleven
     pence, or thereabouts, is now in the possession of George
     Allen, Esquire, the Treasurer of the said Institution, and
     the intention of the said Solomon Levey will be best
     carried out by the said sum of money being transferred
     to the said University in manner hereinafter mentioned,
     and the Proprietors of the said Sydney College are
     willing that the same shall be so transferred for such
     purposes : And whereas such sale and purchase and the
     other above-mentioned objects cannot be perfected with-
     out the sanction of the Legislature : Be it therefore
     enacted by His Excellency the Governor of New South
     Wales, with the advice and consent of the Legislative
     Council thereof, as follows :—
            PURCHASE OF SYDNEY COLLEGE.                                    35
    I. The said William Bland is hereby empowered to J^t^'f'the
sell, and the said University of Sydney to buy the said Sydney Coi-
Land, College Hall, and other Buildings for the full S et™ps°7,;
price of all the aforesaid shares in the said Institution, and the Unl-
and the said sum of one hundred and fifty pounds, the Sydney to
aforesaid estimated amount of the said expenses incurred ^5j^esald
and to be incurred by the said William Bland as afore-
said ; and a conveyance of the said Land, College Hall,
and other Buildings, duly executed by the said William
Bland to the said University, shall be held and deemed
to vest to all intents and purposes valid and absolute
title in fee simple in and to the said Land, College Hall,
and other Buildings in the said University of Sydney
and their Successors.
    II. Upon the execution of such conveyance everyAs t0 vw-
                                                                   tnents to Dc
Proprietor of the said Sydney College shall be entitled made to the
to receive on demand from the said University or the ofThff'said
Senate thereof, and on such demand the said University College,
or the Senate thereof shall be bound to pay to every
such Proprietor the full amount of all and every share
or shares in the said Institution held by such Proprietor;
aod upon the execution of such conveyance the said
William Bland, his executors or adminisfrators, shall
also be entitled to receive on demand from the said
University or the Senate thereof, and on such demand
the said University or the Senate thereof shall be bound
to pay to the said William Bland his executors or ad-
ministrators, the aforesaid sum of one hundred and fifty
pounds.
   III. Provided always, that in case any doubt shall J"ubcaSpro"f
arise or exist as to who is or are or shall or may be prietors'
entitled to any of such shares, it shall be lawful for any pa¡d ^0 per.
person or persons claiming to be entitled as such Pro-sons <™titled
prietor or Proprietors, to demand and receive any money der of any
from the said University or the Senate thereof, under 1¾""*any
or by virtue of the provisions hereof, to apply to the Judge
Supreme Court of the said Colony or any Judge thereof, ereo '
in a summary way for an order for the payment of so
much money as such person or persons shall be so
entitled to receive, and such Court or Judge shall and
36                                         UXIYEBSITY

                               may hear and determine every such application in a
                            summary way ; and every order made by such Court or
                          Judge thereon, directing the payment of any such money
                          shall be binding and conclusive upon the said University
                         and the Senate thereof, and shall be a valid and sufficient
                            authority for any payment thereby directed to be made.
      ciassicaiand            IV. The said books, instruments, apparatus, and other
          tionaibooks^ personal property belonging to the Proprietors of the
             &c         y sa
                '' °c n » ^ Sydney College, which are now in the possession of
            vested in ° the Senate of the said University as aforesaid, shall be
                     university. an¿ y^ same ^6 b.ereby vested in the said University
                             to the intent and so that the same shall be the absolute
                             property of the said University and their Successors,
                        for the purposes of the said University.
       Levey's Ie-           V. It shall be lawful for the said George Allen or
             fraifsferred sucn other person or persons as has or have or may have
          to the Syd-the possession of the said sum of five hundred and
     "ity to found sixty-five pounds three shillings and eleven pence, or
       a scholar-          thereabouts, and he and they is and are hereby directed,
ship therein.                 '                  ■>               .   ·>           '
                so soon as a conveyance to the said university ot the
                aforesaid Land, College Hall, and other Buildings, shall,
                under and by virtue of the provisions hereof, be executed
                by the said William Bland, to transfer and pay over to
                the said University, or the Senate thereof, the said sum
                of five hundred and sixty-five pounds three shillings and
                eleven pence, or thereabouts ; and such last-mentioned
                sum shall thereupon become and be the property of the
                said University and their Successors, to be held never-
                theless by the said University and their Successors upon
                trust, to invest the same at interest upon such security
                and in such manner in all respects as the Senate of the
                said University shall, from time to time, in their absolute
                discretion think fit, and to apply the clear or net interest
                or income arising therefrom, in or towards the formation
                or endowment of a Scholarship in the said University,
                under such regulations as the said University and their
                Successors, or the Senate thereof, shall deem to be as
                nearly in accordance with the intentions of the said
                Solomon Levey in making the aforesaid bequest as cir-
                cumstances may permit : Provided always, that the said
                            BUILDING FUND.                                          37

University and their Successors, or the Senate thereof,
shall have an absolute and uncontrolled discretion in
respect of making and altering all such regulations.
Passed the Legislative Court- \
  cil, this twenty-third day of I   CHARLES NICHOLSON,
  August, one thousand eight 1              SPEAKER.
  hundred and fifty-three.        )
WM. MACPHERSON, CLERK OF THE COUNCIL.
   In the name and on the behalf of Ser Majesty, I assent to this Act.
                              CHA3· A. FITZ ROY,
                                                            GOVERNOR.
Gout. House, Sydney, 5th September, 1853.



     An A.ct to provide a Fund for Building the University
                  of Sydney.—17 Vict., No. 28.
             [Assented to 24th October, 1853.]
WHEREAS it is expedient, with a view gradually to pro- Preamble,
vide a Building Fund for the University of Sydney, that
a grant for this specific purpose should be made from
the General Revenue, payable by the amounts and at the
periods hereinafter mentioned : Be it therefore enacted,
by His Excellency the Governor of New South Wales,
with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council
thereof, as follows :—
   I. There shall be payable to the Senate of the Uni- £1^"°".
versity of Sydney, out of the General Revenue of this *?d this Ses-
Colony, or out of any consolidated Revenue Fund with a Building
which such General Revenue may be incorporated, in ^™ d fortne
addition to the sum of five thousand pounds voted this £45,000 more
Session towards a Building Fund for the said University, by^sbtealp.aid
the sum of Forty-Five thousand pounds by instalments, ments of not
not exceeding Ten thousand pounds,* nor less than Five £?o,ooonSnor
thousand pounds, in each year, until the whole sum so undf £500°
  »By a provision in a subsequent Act of Council (19 Vict. No. 38, ) the Governor
was empowered to raise the full amount by loan, and to issue it " in such sums
and at such times as to him might seem fit, notwithstanding the provision in
the Act of Council, 19th Vict. No. 28, that the sum to be paid in any one year
out of the Consolidated Revenue shall not exceed ten thousand pounds."
38                             UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

                    payable shall have been issued, all which payments shall
                      be applied by the said Senate in buildiug the University
                       of Sydney, on such site as may be fixed upon for that
                   purpose, and in no other manner.
         Detailed ac-      Π. There shall be laid before the said Legislative
       expenditure Council, or any House of Assembly, or other House that
      of Jlo'ooo'to may ^e substituted for it, accounts in detail of the
           be annually expenditure of the said sum of Fifty thousand pounds,
          the Legisla- &η& of every part thereof, within thirty days next after
                 tive Council the beginning of the Session after such
                                                                   expenditure
         Assembly shall have been made ;        and all such accounts shall be
          dayVafterrty subject to examination in the same manner as all other
the com-        accounts of expenditure chargeable on the General
  0f every       Revenue of the Colony.
session.        JJj This Act shall commence and take effect from
ment of Act. and after the first day of January, one thousand eight
              hundred and fifty-four.
           Passed tlie Legislative Chun- \
             cil, this fifth day of October, \ CHARLES NICHOLSON.
             (me thousand eight hundred 1                   SPEAKER.
             and fifty-three.                I
           WM. MACPHERSON, CLERK or THE COUNCIL.
              In the name and on the behalf of Ser Majesty, J assent to this Act.
                                      CHAS. A. FITZ ROY,
                                                     GOVERNOR-GENERAL.
           Govt. Souse, Sydney, IUh October, 1853.
                                                                      59



   ACTS     RELATING TO COLLEGES               WITHIN      THE
                   UNIVERSITY.

 An Act to provide for the establishment and endowment
    of Colleges within the University of Sydney.—18
    Vict., No. 37.
                 [Assented to 2nd December, 1854.]
WHEREAS it is expedient to encourage and assist the Preamble,
establishment of Colleges, within the University of
Sydney, in which Colleges systematic religious instruc-
tion, and domestic supervision, with efficient assistance
in preparing for the University lectures and examina-
tions, shall be provided for students of the University :
Be it therefore enacted, by His Excellency the Governor
of New South Wales, with the advice and consent of the
Legislative Council thereof, as follows :—
   I. Whenever any College shall have been established Pecuniary
and incorporated by any Act of the Governor and ¡n aid of cer-
Council, as a College within the University of Sydney, ^¾,,¾¾"
and the founders of or subscribers to such College shall University
have complied with the conditions mentioned in the next of sydney-
section, such College shall be entitled to the endowments
hereinafter severally mentioned, which said endowments
shall be paid by the Treasurer of the Colony under
warrants signed by the Governor.
   II. No such College, although incorporated, shall be Conditions
entitled to such endowments unless and until the sum aowmèntEn
of ten thousand pounds, at the least, shall have been
subscribed by its founders, and of that sum not less than
four thousand pounds shall have been paid and invested
in such manner as shall be approved of by the Governor
and the residue shall have been to his satisfaction
secured to be paid, within three years next following ;
nor unless the whole of the said ten thousand pounds
shall be devoted exclusively to the erection of College
buildings, on land granted for that purpose by Her
Majesty to the University, in trust for such College, (if
40                                 UNIVERSITY COLLEGES

           any shall be so granted, and if not, then upon land
           otherwise conveyed to and accepted by the University
           in such trust), and it shall have been agreed by the
           founders that the entire amount shall be so expended,
           if the University so require, within five years next after
           the first payment on account of either of such endow-
           ments.
                                      ΙΠ Tllere slia11 be aid out of tne
                     ftïISfn'           ·                P               General Revenue,
                        ' in aid of the Building Fund of every College, so incor-
                          porated, a sum or sums not exceeding in the whole
                        twenty thousand pounds, nor more than shall have been
                         from time to time actually expended by the College out
                              of its subscribed funds for the purpose of building.
 Endowment              TV. There shall be paid out of the said General
   pal's salary. Revenue annually to such Incorporated College,
                                                                                          in
                        perpetuity, a sum of five hundred pounds, for the use of
                          and as a salary to the Principal of such College or in
                                                                         aid of such salary.
Conditions             V. Every such Principal shall be entitled to
                                                                                         the
    Endowment, annual salary hereby provided for, on the production of
                         his own certificate, at the time of each payment, that he
                          has during the period to which it relates performed the
                       duties of his office : Provided that he shall transmit to
                      the Colonial Secretary, once in each year, a certificate to
                         the like effect, under the hands of such persons as shall
                            be for that purpose appointed, by the constitution or
                                                         rules of the particular College.
    Payment to               VI. Where any person selected to be the Principal of
                      e
          Principal'. any such College shall be out of this Colony at the time
                        of his appointment, no such certificate shall be required
                           until after he shall have actually entered on his duties,
                          but he shall be entitled to the salary, (and the College
                  . to which he shall have been appointed may receive the
                           same accordingly for his use) from the day of his em-
                       barkation for this Colony : Provided that every Principal
                        shall actually enter on his duties within six months after
            such embarkation, unless the Governor, upon being
                 satisfied that unavoidable obstacles have intervened,
                                 shall think fit to extend that term to nine months.
          Accruing            VII. Until the subscribed fund shall be required for
                          ENDOWMENT ACT.                                          41

the erection of College buildings as aforesaid, the proceeds of
interest or other proceeds accruing from the investment pVd'untii
thereof, or of the portion remaining unexpended from ^ x^°ded in
time to time, may be applied to the general purposes of
the College, as the governing body of such College may
determine.
    VIII. All students in any such College shall, im- students of
mediately upon entering therein, matriculate in the 5;°1¾¾°^
University, and shall thereafter continue to be members of university
thereof, and submit and be subject to the discipline lectures,
thereof, and shall be required duly and regularly to
attend the lectures of the University on those subjects
an examination and proficiency in which are required
for Honors and Degrees, with the exception (if thought
fit by any such College) of the lectures on Ethics,
Metaphysics, and Modern History.
    IX. And whereas it has been resolved by the Senate Certificate as
of the University of Sydney that Honors and Degrees ^^^¡^^^
shall not be given to any student who shall not produce
testimonials of compétent religious attainments, and it
is expedient to give legal permanency to such resolution:
Be ü therefore enacted, that no Honor or Degree shall
be conferred by the University on any student who shall
not produce from the Principal of his College, or (if
not belonging to a College) from some religious teacher,
or other responsible person accredited by the University,
a Certificate that he is of competent religious attainments.
    X. The term Principal shall include Master, Warden,
or any other Head of a College.
Passed the Legislative Court- \
  cil, this twenty-ninth day I           CHARLES NICHOLSON,
  of November, one thousand j                                          SPEAKER.
  eight hundred S; fifty-four. }
WM. MACPHEESON, CLERK OP THE COUNCIL.
  In the name and on the behalf of Ser Majesty I assent to this Act.
                                       CHA»·     A.   FITZ ROY,
                                                        GOVERNOR-GENERAL.
Govt. House, Sydney, 2nd December, 1854.

  By an Act passed during the Session of 1S5S, CJause IX. has been repealed.
42                            UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.


               An Act to Incorporate Saint Paul's College as a College
                  within the University of Sydney.—18 Vict.
                   [Assented to 1st December, 1854.]
Preamble. WHEKEAS considerable funds have been subscribed for
the Institution and Endowment in the Diocese of Sydney
of a College within the University of Sydney, in con-
nection with the United Church of England and Ireland,
to be called Saint Paul's College, wherein due religious
instruction, in accordance with the doctrines and dis-
cipline of that Church, shall be afforded, and provision
be made, as soon as may be practicable, for the residence
of students, under proper academical control : And
whereas it is expedient that the said College (to be
governed by a Council consisting of the persons herein-
after mentioned) should be Incorporated : Be it there-
fore enacted by His Excellency the Governor of New
South Wales, with the advice and consent of the
Legislative Council thereof, as follows :—
P1-If"*11!8 ·""■ ^0 soon as ^ snall be made to appear to the satis-
corporated. faction of the Governor that a sum of not less than ten
thousand pounds has been subscribed or contributed for
the Endowment aforesaid, and that the amount has
either been paid, or secured to be paid, for that purpose,
and that a Warden and six Fellows for the Government
of the said College, in accordance with the constitution
thereof, as in this Act set forth, have been duly
appointed and elected respectively, the same shall be
notified by Proclamation in the New South Wales
Government Gazette, under the hand of the Governor ;
and immediately upon such notification, and from
thenceforth, the Warden and Fellows of the same
College, shall be, and they are hereby constituted a
Body Politic and Corporate, by the name of " The
Warden and Fellows of Saint Paul's College," by which
name the said incorporated body shall have perpetual
succession, and shall have a Common Seal, and shall
sue and be sued, or otherwise appear and answer and be
answered ; and may take and hold to them and their
            ST. PAUL'S ACT OP INCORPORATION.                                   43

successors, by grant, will, or otherwise, in perpetuity, or
for any term of life or years, as well chattels and other
personal property, as lands, buildings, and other here-
ditaments, and the same or any part thereof may alien,
or otherwise dispose of, or demise ; and also shall or
may do all other things incident or appertaining to a
Body Politic and Corporate.
    II. Provided always, That it shall not be lawful for ^esst0™ni"fg
 the said Corporation, or any persons or person seized of Lands de-
 or entitled to Lands in trust for the Corporation, or for ïhTeec™°™.
 the purposes of the College, to alienate, mortgage,
 charge or demise any lands or hereditaments granted
 to or in trust for the Corporation, or for College pur-
 poses, by Her Majesty or Her Successors, without the
 consent in writing of the Governor, with the advice of
 the Executive Council, for the time being.
    III. The said Body Politic or Corporate shall consist garden and
 of a Warden and eighteen Fellows, of whom six shall lows to con-
 always be Clergymen in Priest's Orders of the United coundu
 Church of England and Ireland, and twelve shall be
 laymen ; * which said eighteen Fellows shall elect si®
from their own body, to be called Senior Fellows, who
shall appoint the Warden, who shall not he one of
themselves ; and the Warden and six Senior Fellows
for the time being shall together form a Council, to be
called " The Council of St. Paul's College," in which
shall be vested at all times the government in every
respect of the College, and all matters relating thereto.
    IV. The Bishop of the Diocese of Sydney shall be visitor.
 Visitor of the College, with all such powers as by law
 appertain to the office of a Visitor of College.
    V. The Warden shall always be a Clergyman in Warden and
 Priest's Orders of the aforesaid United Church : and he ^6"War"
 shall have power to appoint a Vice-Warden, who shall
 in the Warden's absence have all the powers and dis-
 charge all the duties of a Warden.
    VI. The Warden and Vice-Warden shall be respec- Removal or
 tively hable to removal or suspension, for sufficient cause,suspenslon·
 by the Senior Fellows, subject to an appeal to the
  * Repealed as regards the distinction between Senior and Junior Fellows by
an Act passed in 1S57.
44                            UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

               Visitor ; and the Vice-Warden shall also be liable to
               removal or suspension by the Warden, subject to an
               appeal to the Senior Fellows.
 Senior Fel-                  VII. Of the Senior Fellows three shall always be
 lows.
                          Clergymen in Priest's Orders as aforesaid, and the
                         other
 Vacancies.              three shall be laymen.
                 VIII. All vacancies in the office of Warden or in the
              number of Fellows, or Senior Fellows, occasioned by
              death, resignation, or removal, or other cause, shall, as
              soon as conveniently may be after the vacancy, (on
              notification of the fact under the hand of two Fellows,
              or Senior Fellows), be supplied in the manner following,
              that is to say,-—in the office of Warden by the Senior
              Fellows ; in the office or place of Senior Fellow, by the
              twelve other Fellows, from their own body ; and in the
                          place or post of Fellows, by the remaining Fellows.
Election of                  IX. Provided that the first eighteen Fellows shall
Fellows.
                         be
              elected by the subscribers to the funds of the College,
              in such manner as they shall among themselves appoint:
              And that all vacancies in the number of Fellows (not
              being Senior Fellows), so soon as there shall be twenty
              Members of the College who are Graduates of the Uni-
              versity, continuing on the books of the College, shall be
              supplied by election by such Graduates, in. such manner
Saint Paul's               as the Council may appoint.
College to be
a College of                  X. The College of Saint Paul hereby
                           incorporated
              shall be a College of and within the University of
and within Sydney ; and all Students in the College shall imme-
sity.        " diately upon entering therein matriculate in the said
University, and shall submit and be subject to the dis-
cipline thereof, and shall continue in the College so long
only as they shall be Members of the University, and
shall be required duly and regularly to attend the Lec-
tures of the University on those subjects an examination
and proficiency in which are required for Honors and
Degrees, with the exception (if thought fit by the
Council) of the Lectures on Ethics, Metaphysics, and
Modern History,
clergy resi- XI. In case a Church Constitution for the aforesaid
CoHege"the United Church within this Colony shall be hereafter
          ST. PAUL'S ACT OF INCORPORATION.                              45
 established by any Act or Statute passed for that pur-
 pose, every Clergyman resident in the College shall be
 subject to all such regulations as may (by or in pursu-
 ance of such Church Constitution) be enacted for the
 government of the Clergy in general.
   XII. The Council of the College shall have power, Power to
from time to time, to make and establish all such Bye- ™^ Bye"
Laws and Rules, for carrying into effect the several
provisions and objects for this Act, and particularly for
declaring the causes which shall create vacancies in the
office of Fellow or Senior Fellow, and directing who
shall preside at Meetings of the Council, and of the
Fellows, and for the management of the College, and
prescribing the duties of the several officers thereof, and
of the Warden and Vice-Warden, and the ordering of all
things in and connected with the College, and the disci-
pline thereof, to the promotion of Religion and Learning,
as to the said Council shall seem expedient ; and such
lawn and Rules, or any of them, from time to time to
alter or revoke, or to substitute others in their place.
   XIII. Provided that every such Bye-Law and Rule B>'e i-aws t0
shall be transmitted to the Governor, within thirty days f0re the Le-
aner being made, to be by him laid before the Legis- sislature·
lative Council or Houses of Legislature of the Colony
as soon as conveniently may be thereafter.
   XIV. Provided also that the Warden or Vice-Warden control over
of the College, subject only to the Laws and Rules so
made, shall hare the general superintendence and con-
trol of the Students, and of the Institution.
   XV. The votes at all meetings of the Fellows, or vote and
Senior Fellows, or Council, (except votes for a Senior f£,tl""L."'
FeI^v, or the appointment of a Warden,) shall be taken
exclusively of the person presiding, unless there shall
be an equality of votes ; and in every case where all the
Fellows or Senior Fellows resident within fifty miles of
Sydney, entitled to attend, shall have had notice of the
time and place of intended meeting, one Clerical and
one Lay Member of the Council, with the Warden, shall
constitute a Meeting of the Council, and two Clerical
and two Lay Fellows with one presiding Fellow shall
46                              UNrV7EESITY COLLEGES.

constitute a Meeting of the Fellows, and the votes and
proceedings of the majority at any such Meeting shall
be taken and accepted as the votes and proceedings of
the Council of Fellows respectively.
Special pow-     XYl. Provided that it shall be lawful for the Council,
er by   Bye-
Laws.         by any Bye-Law or Bye-Laws by them made, and as-
sented to by the Fellows, to ordain and appoint that the
person presiding at any Meeting, whether of the Coun-
cil, or the Fellows, or the Senior Fellows, shall have a
deliberative as well as a casting vote ; and to alter the
mode of supplying vacancies in the office of Fellow, by
ordaining and appointing that such vacancies, until
twenty Graduates have become qualified as Electors,
shall be supplied by the remaining Fellows, and the
Graduates (continuing on the books of the College)
jointly.
Temporary XVII. No temporary vacancy or vacancies in the
not*" preju- office of Warden, or in the number of Fellows or Senior
di e
  £ '.^Cor- Fellows of the College, shall be deemed in any way to
affect the Constitution of the College, or its privileges or
status as an Incorporated Body.
               Passed the Legislative Council, \
                 this twenty-eighth day of I     CHARLES NICHOLSON,
                 November, one thousand eight ι                SPEAKEU.
                 hundred mid fifty-four.       )
               WM. ItACPHERSON, CLEKK OF THE COUNCIL.
                In the name and on the behalf of Ser Majesty, I assent to this Act.
                                             CHAS. A. FITZ ROY,
                                                          GOVERNOR-GENEUAL.
               Govt. House, Sydney, 1st December, 1854.
        ST. PAUL'S INCORP. AMENDAIENT ACT.                                 47



An Act to Enlarge the Council of St. Paul's College.
               [Assented to 15th December, 1857.]
WHEKEAS by an Act passed in the eighteenth year of Preamble.
Her Majesty for the Incorporation of St. Paul's College,
it was enacted that the Fellows of the College should
elect six of their own Body, to be called Senior Fellows,
who with the Warden should form the Council of the
College. And whereas it is deemed expedient by the
Warden, Senior Fellows, and Fellows of the said College
that the Council thereof should in future consist of the
Warden and all the Fellows without distinction, but
that change can only be effected by the authority of the
Legislature : Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's
Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and
consent of the Legislative Council and Legislative
Assembly of New South Wales, in Parliament assembled
and by the authority of the same as follows :—
   I. After the passing of this Act, the distinction be- council to
tween " Fellows " and " Senior Fellows " of St. Paul's Fellows" and
College shall cease, and no Senior Fellow be elected ; senior Fei-
and the Council of the College shall consist of the War-
den and eighteen Fellows for the time being, and in
those Fellows the powers now residing exclusively in the
Senior Fellows shall be vested.
   II. Every vacancy hereafter arising in the number of X acanfj{ies lat
Fellows, shall be notified to the remaining Fellows by Fellow.
the Warden on the requisition in writing of any two
Fellows, and he shall as soon afterwards as may be
practicable, convene a Meeting of the Fellows to supply
such vacancy.
   III. Before any Meeting of the Council or Fellows Quorum of
shall take place, every Fellow resident within fifty miles
of Sydney shall have reasonable notice of the day and
place of Meeting, and two Clerical and two Lay Fellows,
exclusive of the Warden or Presiding Fellow, shall
constitute a Quorum.
48                          UXIYEESITY COLLEGES.



           An Act to Incorporate Saint John's College as a College
                        within the University of Sydney.
                         [Assented to 15th December, 1857.]
Preamble. WHEEEAS considerable funds have been subscribed for
the Institution and Endowment in the Archdiocese of
Sydney of a Roman Catholic College within the Uni-
versity of Sydney, to be called " The College of Saint
John the Evangelist," wherein the Students shall receive
systematic religious instruction and be brought up in the
doctrines and discipline of the Roman Catholic Church,
and provision be made for the residence of the Students
and their preparation for the University Lectures and
Examinations under Collegiate control. And whereas it
is expedient that the said College should be incorporated :
Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the
Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly of New
South Wales in Parliament assembled, and by the
authority of the same as follows :—-
Saint John's I. So soon as it shall be made to appear to the satis-
co°rporated" action of the Governor that a sum of not less than ten
thousand pounds has been subscribed or contributed for
the Endowment aforesaid, and that the amount has
either been paid or secured to be paid for that purpose,
and that a Rector and eighteen Fellows for the Govern-
ment of the said College in accordance with the consti-
tution thereof, as in this Act set forth, have been duly
appointed and elected respectively, the same shall be
notified by Proclamation in the New South Wales
Government Gazette, under the hand of the Governor ;
and immediately upon such notification and from thence-
forth the Rector and Fellows of the same College shall
be and they are hereby constituted a Body Politic and
Corporate, by the name of " The Rector and Fellows of
St. John's College," by which name the said incorpo-
rated body shall have perpetual succession and a common
seal, and shall sue and be sued or otherwise appear and
            ST. JOHN'S INCORPOEATION ACT.                                49

 answer and be answered, and may take and hold to them
 and their successors by grant will or otherwise in per-
 petuity or for any term of life or years as well chattels
 and other personal property as lands buildings and
 other hereditaments, and the same or any part thereof
 may alien or otherwise dispose of or demise, and also
 shall or may do all other things incident or appertaining
 to a Body Politic and Corporate.
    IT. Provided always that it shall not be lawful for the »«training
 said Corporation or any persons or person seized of or ?an5°derivéd
 entitled to'lands in trust for the Corporation, or for the l'<>m the
 purposes of the College to alienate, mortgage, charge or
 demise any lands or hereditaments granted to or in trust
 for the Corporation, or for College purposes by Her
 Majesty or Her Successors, without the consent in
 writing of the Governor, with the advice of the Execu-
 tive Council for the time being.
    III. The said Body Politic or Corporate shall consist peíjt0¿s and
of a Rector and eighteen Fellows, of whom six shall constitute a
always be duly approved Priests and twelve shall beCouncl1·
laymen, which said eighteen Fellows shall appoint the
Rector who shall not be one of themselves, and the
Rector and Fellows for the time being shall together
form a Council to be called " The Council of St. John's
College," in which shall be vested at all times the
Government in every respect of the College and all
matters relating thereto.
    IV. The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney shall visitor.
be Visitor of the College, with all such powers as by
law appertain to the office of Visitor of a College.
    V. The Rector shall always be a duly approved Priest, *?ct0' antl
and the Council shall have power to appoint a Vice-
Rector who shall in the Rector's absence have all the
powers and discharge all the duties of Rector.
    VI. The Rector and Vice-Rector shall be respectively Removal or
liable to removal or suspension for sufficient cause by susPensl0n·
the Fellows subject to an appeal to the Visitor.
    VEI. All vacancies in the office of Rector or in the vacancies.
number of Fellows, occasioned by death, resignation, or
removal, or other cause, shall as soon as conveniently
                                 G
50                         UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

                          may be after the vacancy (on notification of the fact
                         under the hand of two Fellows) be supplied in the
                      manner following, that is to say, in the office of Rector
                           by the Fellows, and in the place or post of Fellow by
                                                          the remaining Fellows.
    Election of           VIII. Provided that the first eighteen Fellows shall be
                     elected by the Subscribers to the funds of the College at a
                      meeting of the Subscribers to be convened by the Visitor
                     by notice in one or more newspapers published in Sydney
                       at least one fortnigtht before the day appointed for such
                    meeting.       And that all vacancies in the number of
                      Fellows so soon as there shall be twenty Members of the
                       College who are Graduates of the University continuing
                        on the books of the College shall be supplied by the
                 remaining Fellows, and the said Graduates in such
                                            manner as the Council may appoint,
         saint John's        IX. The College of Saint John hereby incorporated
     »"college of shall he a College of and within the University of
        and within Sydney, and all Students in the College shall imme-
           sity.         diately upon entering therein matriculate in the said
University, and shall thereafter continue to be Members
thereof, and submit and be subject to the discipline
thereof, and shall be required duly and regularly to
attend the Lectures of the University on those subjects,
an examination and proficiency in which are required
for Honors and Degrees, with the exception (if thought
fit by the Council) of the Lectures on Ethics, Meta-
physics, and Modern History.
Power to         χ. The Council of the College shall have power from
Laws. ye time to time to make and establish all such Bye-Laws
             and Rules for carrying into effect the several provisions
             and objects of this Act, and particularly for declaring
             the causes which shall create vacancies in the office of
             Fellow, and directing who shall preside at Meetings of
             the Council and of the Fellows and for the management
             of the College, and prescribing the duties of the several
             officers thereof, and of the Rector and Vice Rector, and
             the ordering of all things in and connected with the
             College, and the discipline thereof as to the said Council
             shall seem expedient, and such Laws and Rules or any
             ST. JOHN'S INCORPORATION ACT.                               51

of them from time to time to alter or revoke or to sub-
stitute others in their place.
   XI. Provided that every such Bye-law and Rule shall ***■???'*t0
                            ·*        ·?                       belaid betöre
be transmitted to the Governor within thirty days after Parliament,
being made, to be by him laid before the Houses of            »
Parliament of the Colony as soon as conveniently may
be thereafter.
   XII. Provided also that the Rector or Vice-Rector of control ovet
the College, subject only to the Laws and Rules so
made, shall have the general superintendence and con-
trol of the Students and of the Institution.
   XIII. The votes at all meetings of the Council v°'e and
(except votes for the appointment of a Rector) shall be Meetings,
taken exclusively of the person presiding, unless there
shall be an equality of votes, in which case he shall
have a casting vote, and in every case where all the
Fellows resident within fifty miles of Sydney entitled to
attend shall have had notice of the time and place of
intended meeting, one Clerical and two Lay Members of
the Council with the Rector shall constitute a meeting
of the Council, and the votes and proceedings of the
majority at any such meeting shall be taken and
accepted as the votes and proceedings of the Council or ■
Fellows respectively.
   XIV. Provided that it shall be lawful for the Council special pow-
by any Bye-Law or Bye-Laws to alter the mode of Slip- *r ^ Β^β"
plying vacancies in the office of Fellow by ordaining
and appointing that such vacancies, until twenty
Graduates have become qualified as Electors, shall be
supplied by the remaining Fellows, and the Graduates
(continuing on the books of the College) jointly.
   XV. No temporary vacancy or vacancies in the office Temporary
of Rector or in the number of Fellows of the College i"a£Cpreju-
shall be deemed in any way to affect the Constitution of &'"* ^e cor-
the College, or its privileges or status as an Incorporated pora I0n'
Body.
52                          raiVEBSITY COLLEGES.



            An Act to Incorporate Wesley College as a College
                          within the University of Sydney.
                               [Assented to 1st June, 1860.]
Preamble. WHEEEAS considerable sums have been subscribed for
the Institution and Endowment in the Colony of New
South Wales of a College within the University of
Sydney, to be called "Wesley College," wherein the
Students shall receive systematic religious instruction
and be brought up in the doctrines and discipline of the
Wesleyan Methodist Church, and provision be made for
the residence of the Students and their preparation for
the University Lectures and Examinations under Col-
legiate control. And whereas it is expedient that the
said College should be Incorporated. Be it therefore
enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty, by and
with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council
and Legislative Assembly of New South Wales in
Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same
as follows :—
Wesley Col- I. So soon as it shall be made to appear to the
iorateY.™' satisfaction of the Governor that a sum of not less than
ten thousand pounds has been subscribed or contributed
for the endowment aforesaid, and that the amount has
either been paid or secured to be paid for that purpose,
and that a Principal and twelve Fellows for the govern-
ment of the said College, in accordance with the con-
stitution thereof as in this Act set forth, have been duly
appointed and elected respectively, the same shall be
notified by Proclamation in the New South Wales
Government Gazette under the hand of the Governor,
and immediately upon such notification and from thence-
forth the Principal and Fellows of the same College
shall be and they are hereby constituted a Body Politic
and Corporate by the name of the " Principal and
Fellows of Wesley College," by which name the said
Incorporated Body shall have perpetual succession and
a common seal, and shall sue and be sued, or otherwise
             WESLEY IXCOJiPOKATION ACT.                                  53

appear and answer and be answered, and may take and
hold to them and their successors by grant, will, or
otherwise, in perpetuity or for any term of life or years,
as well chattels and other personal property, as lands,
buildings, and other hereditaments, and the same or any
part thereof may alien or otherwise dispose of or demise,
and also shall or may do all other things incident or
appertaining to a Body Politic and Corporate.
   II. Provided always that it shall not be lawful for the Restraining
said Corporation or any persons or person seized of or Lands de-
entitled to lands in trust for the Corporation or for the ^c/own.
purposes of the College to alienate, mortgage, charge, or
demise any lands or hereditaments granted to or in
trust for the Corporation or for College purposes, by
Her Majesty or Her Successors, without the consent in
writing of the Governor with the advice of the Execu-
tive Council for the time being.
   III. The said Body Politic or Corporate shall consist Principal
of a Principal and twelve Fellows, of whom four shall to constitute
always be Wesleyan Methodist Ministers in full connec- a C0"1"=»1·
tion with the Conference, and eight shall be Laymen
who shall be communicants with the Wesleyan Methodist
Church, and of whom five at least shall be members of
the "Wesleyan Methodist Society, which said twelve
Fellows, with the principal of the College, shall together
form a Council, to be called " The Council of Wesley
College," in which shall be vested at all times the
government in every respect of the College and all
matters relating thereto. Provided that the ceasing of
any person to hold the qualification under which he is
elected a Fellow, shall vpso facto vacate his seat.
   !TV". The four senior Ministers resident for the time Clerical
being in the County of Cumberland, not being Super-
numeraries, shall be the clerical members of the Council.
   V. The Principal, who shall not be a Fellow, shall Principal,
always be a Wesleyan Methodist Minister in full con-
nection with the said Conference, and shall be appointed
by the Fellows. Provided that any Minister in connec-
tion with the Wesleyan Methodist Conference in Great
Britain or Ireland, shall be eligible,                  and may be
54                             UNIVERSITY
                               COLLEGES.
appointed to the office of Principal, if after his accept-
ance of office aud before entering upon the duties
thereof, he shall become a Member of the Conference
defined in the twenty-fourth section of this Act.
visitor.        VI. The President for the time being of the Con-
                     ference or in his absence from the Colony of New South
                         Wales, the Chairman for the time being of the New
                           South Wales District shall be Visitor of the College,
                       and shall have the right to visit the College at any time,
                          to examine into the manner in which it is conducted,
               and to see that its laws and regulations are duly
                                                          observed and executed.
 Removal or           VII     The Principal shall be Kable to removal
                                                                                 or
          suspension. SUSpeiLgi0I1 from nis office as such Principal for sufficient
                       cause by the Fellows subject to an appeal to the Visitor
                      in any case involving his moral character, provided that
                     if the ground of complaint shall concern the Theological
                      or Religious Doctrines or Teaching of the Principal, the
                      Fellows shall not adjudicate thereon, but shall remit the
                          same for trial to the properly constituted Methodistic
                                           Courts, whose decision shall be final.
       Confirmation        VIII. The decision of the Fellows for the removal or
         quent meet- suspension of the Principal shall not take effect unless it
     '"£·        shall be confirmed by three-fourths of the Fellows
                         present at a subsequent meeting, of which seven days
                      previous notice shall have been given, and at which not
                       less than three-fourths of the whole number of Fellows
                                                                 shall be present,
       vacancies.          IX, All vacancies in the office of Principal or in the
                    number of Lay Fellows occasioned by death, resignation,
                    or removal, or other cause, shall, as soon as conveniently
                    may be after the vacancy (on notification of the fact
                      under the hand of two Fellows) be supplied in the man-
                     ner following, that is to say, in the office of Principal by
                        the Fellows, and in the place or post of Lay Fellow by
                                                          the remaining Fellows.
          Lay Fellows        X. The first eight Lay Fellows shall be elected by
            Contributors Ballot as hereinafter provided by the Contributors to
         by Ballot.    the Institution and Endowment of the said College,
                      whose number of Votes respectively shall be according
                WESLEY INCORPORATION ACT.                                          55

to the following scale of their paid up contributions :—
                 Amount Paid.                        Number of Votes.       Scale of
   £1 and not exceeding £5 ................................... One
   Above £5 and not exceeding £50 ......................... Two
   Above £50 and not exceeding £100 ..................... Three
   Above £100 and not exceeding £200 .............. Tour
   Exceeding £200 ................................................ Five
   XI. On or before a day to be fixed by the Provisional One Candi-
Committee, and twice advertised in one or more Sydney proposed" by
daily papers, such day not being earlier than fourteen ™y tw°sCon"
days after the first such advertisement, any two Con-
tributors entitled to vote may, in writing under their
hands addressed to such Committee, propose as a Can-
didate for such election, one layman being a communi-
cant with the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and such
proposers, shall, under their hands, state that fact, and
also whether such Candidate is or is not a Member of
the Wesleyan Methodist Society.
   XII. The Provisional Committee shall cause an List of
Can-
Alphabetical List to be made of all Candidates so¡J^nst^t
proposed, with their residences,                    designations,       and of Scruti-
qualifications, and shall on an early day appoint byneer°'
ordinary Ballot three Members of their own Body to be
Scrutineers for managing the Election, to whom copies
of such List shall be furnished.
   XIII. The Scrutineers shall cause a sufficient number List to be
of copies of such List for the purpose hereinafter J™, ^s
3
  BaI-
mentioned, to be printed with the heading " Balloting ioting Paper
Paper for Eight Lay Fellows of Wesley College," and tributor.
with an Address of the Scrutineers in Sydney so
indorsed as to serve for the return of the Paper when
folded, and shall transmit by Post or otherwise to each
Contributor one such Ballot Paper marked at the top
thereof under the hand of one such Scrutineer with a
number corresponding with the number of votes to
which such Contributor ■ is entitled. And the said
Scrutineer shall place under Seal until the Election is
completed all the remaining Ballot Papers.
   XIV. Every Contributor shall, on the Ballot Paper so How Ballot
transmitted to him, make a cross or other distinct mark marked and
56                               UNIVERSITY
                                 COLLEGES.

                in front of the names of the Candidates, not exceeding
                eight, for whom he desires to vote, and shall transmit
                such paper folded and sealed by post or otherwise to
                the address thereon indorsed before a day, to be fixed and
                advertised in manner aforesaid.
Examina-            XV. On the day so fixed as last aforesaid, or so soon
tion of Bal-
lot Papers      thereafter as conveniently may be the Scrutineers shall
and Declara     meet in Sydney, and they or any two of them shall open
tion of Elec-
tion.           and examine all the returned Ballot Papers, and shall
                make a list of all the Candidates for whom any vote
                shall have been given in the order of the collective num-
                ber of their votes, and of these Candidates the five Mem-
                bers of the Wesleyan Methodist Society who shall have
                the greatest number of votes, and after the selection of
                these, the three Candidates who shall then stand highest
                on the list, shall be declared by the said Scrutineers to
                be and shall be the first eight Lay Fellows of'Wesley
                College.
Election of        XVI. All vacancies in the number of Lay Fellows, so
Fellows.        soon as there shall be twenty Members of the College
                who are Graduates of the University, continuing on the
                books of the College and being Members of the Wes-
                leyan Methodist Church, shall be supplied by the
                remaining Fellows, and the said Graduates in such
                manner as the Council may appoint.
Wesley Col-        XVII. Wesley College, hereby incorporated, shall be
lege to be a    a College of and within the University of Sydney, and
College of
and within      all Students in the College shall immediately upon
the Univer-     entering therein, matriculate in the said University, and
sity.
                shall thereafter continue to be Members thereof, and
                submit and be subject to the discipline thereof, and shall
                be required duly and regularly to attend the Lectures of
                the„University on those subjects, an examination and
                proficiency in which are required for Honors and
                Degrees.
Power to           XVIII. The Council of the College shall have power
make Bye-       from time to time to make and establish all such bye-
I.aws.
                laws and rules for carrying into effect the several
                provisions and objects of this Act, and particularly for
                declaring the causes which shall create vacancies in the
             WESLEY INCORPORATION ACT.                                57

office of Fellow, and directing who shall preside at
Meetings of the Council and of the Fellows, and for the
management of the College, and prescribing the duties
of the several officers thereof, and of the Principal, and
the ordering of all things in and connected with the
College and the discipline thereof, as to the said Council
shall seem expedient, and such laws and rules or any of
them from time to time to alter or revoke or substitute
others in their place.
   XIX. Provided that every such bye-law and rule shall P3^jJ^8.'0
be transmitted to the Governor within thirty days after fore Pariia-
being made, to be by him laid before the Houses of ment'
Parliament in the Colony as soon as conveniently may
be thereafter, and shall also be transmitted to the
President of the Conference to be laid before the Con-
ference then next to be holden.
   XX. Provided also that the Principal of the College Control oyer
subject only to the laws and rules so made, shall have
the general superintendence and control of the Students
and of the Institution.
   XXI. The votes at all meetings of the Fellows or v°te and
Council (except votes for the appointment of a Principal) meetings,
shall be taken exclusively of the person presiding, unless
there shall be an equality of votes, and in every case
where all the Fellows resident within fifty miles of
Sydney entitled to attend, shall have had notice of the
time, place, and object of the intended meeting ; one
Clerical, and two Lay Members of the Council, with the
Principal, shall constitute a meeting of the Council, and
two Clerical and four Lay Fellows with one presiding
Fellow, shall constitute a meeting of the Fellows, and
the votes and proceedings of the majority at any such
meeting shall be taken and accepted as the votes and
proceedings of the Council or Fellows respectively.
   XXII. Provided that it shall be lawful for the Council special" pow-
by any bye-law or bye-laws to ordain and appoint, that Laws5! ye"
the person presiding at any meeting of the Council
shall have a deliberate as well as a casting vote, and to
alter the mode of supplying vacancies in the office of
Fellow by ordaining and appointing, that such vacancies
58                            UNIVEKSITY COLLEGES.

                   until twenty Graduates have become qualified as electors
                     shall be supplied by the remaining Fellows, and the
                      Graduates (continuing on the books of the College and
                   being members of the Wesleyan Church) jointly.
     Temporary           XXIII. No temporary vacancy or vacancies in the
               noMo'preiu- omce °f Principal or in the number of Fellows of the
        dice tie Cor- College, shall be deemed in any way to affect the con-
      poration.       stitution of the College, or its privileges or status as an
Incorporated Body,
interpreta- XXIV. For the purposes of this Act, the following
tion clause, terms shall have the meanings hereinafter assigned to
them respectively, so far as such meaning is not excluded
by or inconsistent with the context. The term " Con-
ference " shall mean or refer to the Wesleyan Methodist
Conference, administering the affairs of the Wesleyan
Methodist Church in New South Wales. The term
" Layman " shall mean or refer to all persons other than
Ministers in full or Preachers in probationary connexion
with the said Conference, or with any other Wesleyan
Methodist Conference, recognized by the said Con-
ference.
                      DEED OF GJiANT.




                DEED OF GRANT
UNBER WHICH THE UNIVERSITY HOLDS THE LAND GRANTED
               TO IT BT THE CROWN.

Victoria, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom
     of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen, Defender of
     the Faith, &c, &c.
  To all to whom these presents shall come—Greeting.
WHEREAS by an Act of the Governor and Legislative
Council of the Colony of New South Wales, passed in the
fourteenth year of our Reign, intituled " An Act to Incor-
porate and Endow the University of Sydney," a Senate
consisting of Sixteen Fellows to be nominated and
appointed : and also were thereafter duly nominated and
appointed, as by that Act is directed, was constituted a
Body Politic and Corporate with perpetual succession,
by the name of the " University of Sydney :" And the
said Body Politic were by that name rendered capable
in Law, to take, purchase, and hold to them and their
successors not only such lands, buildings, hereditaments,
and possessions, as might from time to time be exclu-
sively used and occupied for the immediate requirements
of the said University, but also any other lands, build-
ings, hereditaments, and possessions whatsoever, and to
grant, demise, alien or otherwise dispose of all or any
of the property, real or personal, belonging to the said
University : And also to do all other matters and things
incidental to or appertaining to a Body Politic : And
whereas provision has been made by the said Governor
and Legislative Council for defraying the cost of erecting
buildings for the purposes of the said University : And
application has been made to us for a Grant of Land
whereon to erect such buildings, and for the formation
                      TWIVEBSITY

of a Park and Gardens in connection therewith : And
whereas it is contemplated that Colleges shall be
established within the said University, in which Colleges
systematic religious instruction and domestic supervision
with efficient assistance in preparing for the University
lectures and examinations shall be provided for Students
in the said University : And the said Governor and
Legislative Council have made provision for assisting the
erection of the necessary buildings for such Colleges
upon land to be granted for that purpose by us to the
said University in Trust for such Colleges if any should
be so granted, and if not, then upon land otherwise
conveyed to and accepted by the University upon such
trusts : And whereas it is expected that Colleges con-
nected with the four several Churches or religious
denominations hereinafter particularly mentioned will
shortly be established within the said University, and
application has been made to us for land to be granted
to the said University in trust for such four several
Colleges : And whereas it has been determined on our
behalf by his Excellency Sir Charles Augustus Fitz Roy,
our Governor-General of our Australasian Possessions,
and Governor of our Territory and Colony of New
South Wales, with the advice of the Executive Council
of our said Colony, that certain lands situate near the
City of Sydney, comprising in all one hundred and
twenty-six acres, more or less, and which lands are
hereinafter more particularly described, shall be appro-
priated and granted upon the terms and conditions
hereinafter mentioned for the uses and purposes of the
said University and of Colleges within the same : And
whereas we being desirous of encouraging the said
University, and of assisting the establishment of Colleges
within the same, to the end that religion, virtue, and
sound learning may be by means of the said University
and Colleges better advanced within our said Territory
of New South Wales have approved of the said deter-
mination so made on our behalf : And whereas by reason
of the four Colleges herein more particularly mentioned
being so as aforesaid expected to be shortly established
                      DEED OF GEANT.                         61
but without the intention of thereby creating any dis-
tinction whatsoever of classes or denominations amongst
our subjects resident in our said Colony, we have
approved of the special provision hereinafter contained
being made at this time for such four several Colleges :
Now know ye that for the purposes aforesaid we of our
own special grace do for us, our heirs and successors,
hereby grant unto " The University of Sydney," so
constituted and incorporated as aforesaid : AU that piece
or parcel of land situate lying and being in the parish of
Petersham and County of Cumberland in the Colony
aforesaid, containing by admeasurement one hundred
and twenty-six acres, more or less, commencing at a
point on the south side of the Parramatta Road, distant
seventy-three links, south-westerly from the north-west
corner of the Toll Grate House, and bounded on the east
by a curved line of fence, the general bearing being
south forty degrees forty-four minutes, west four chains
twenty-four links, thence south thirty-one degrees
twenty minutes, west six chains and seventeen links,
thence south seven degrees, east five chains and eighty-
nine links, thence south eighteen degrees forty-five
minutes, west three chains and nine links, thence south"
two degrees, west five chains sixty-seven links, and
thence south fourteen degrees thirty minutes, east six
chains and fifty-two links, to the present or new New
Town Road, and thence by that Road bearing south-
westerly four chains and sixty-one links to the site
granted for an Episcopal Residence, on the south-west
by the north-east boundary line of that land bearing
north-westerly seven chains and sixty-five links, on the
south-east by the north-west boundary line of that land
bearing south-westerly four chains aud sixty links, on
the north-east by the south-western boundary line of that
land in its prolongation bearing south-easterly eight
chains and forty-eight links to a reserved street on the
south by that street dividing it from the Camperdown
Estate bearing west eleven degrees thirty minutes, south
twenty chains and fifty-one links to a reserved road,
again on the south-west by that road bearing north
62                         UNIVERSITY

     twenty-fonr degrees thirty minutes, west thirteen chains
     and seventy links, thence west thirty-eight degrees
     twenty minutes, north thirteen chains and seventy-six
     links to the southernmost corner of the Roman Catholic
     Church allotment, on the north-west by the south-eastern
     boundary lines of the Roman Catholic Church Parsonage
     and School allotments bearing north-easterly four chains,
     again on the south-west by the north-east boundary line
     of the said School allotment five chains and fifty-three
     links to the Parramatta Road, and again on the north-
     west by that Road and its embankments and cuttings
     bearing north-easterly to the point of commencement afore-
     said : With all the rights, privileges, members and appur-
     tenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining :
     To hold unto the said University of Sydney and their
     successors for ever : Yielding and paying therefore
     yearly unto us, our heirs and successors, the Quit Rent
     of one peppercorn for ever, if demanded, for the pur-
     poses and upon the trusts hereinafter mentioned, that is
     to say : As to so much of the said piece or parcel of
     land hereby granted as shall not be set apart by the
     Senate of the University for the Sub-grants hereinafter
     mentioned upon trust for the erection thereon of build-
     ings for the said University, and for the formation of a
     Park and Gardens in connection therewith ; and as to
     four several portions of the said land so hereby granted
     to consist each of not less than eighteen acres to be
     selected by the said Senate upon the trusts following,
     that is to say : As to one such portion of the said land
     hereby granted upon trust when and so soon as a Col-
     lege in connection with the United Church of England
     and Ireland shall have been duly established and incor-
     porated as a College within the said University, and the
     founders thereof or Subscribers to the same sTiall have
     complied with the conditions of public endowment, men-
     tioned in the Act of the said Governor and Legislative
     Council, passed in the present year of our reign, intituled
     " An Act to provide for the establishment and endow-
     ment of Colleges within the University of Sydney," to
     make and execute a Sub-grant of such piece or parcel
                     DEED OF GRANT.

of land to Trustees for such College for the purposes
and upon tbe conditions hereinafter mentioned : And as
to one other such portion of the said land hereby
granted to the said University upon the like trust for a
College in connection with the Church of Rome, when
the same shall have been in like manner established and
incorporated as a College within the said University,
and the founders thereof or the Subscribers to the same
shall have complied with the said conditions of public
endowment : And as to one other such portion of the
said land hereby granted to the said University upon
the like trust for a College in connection with the
Church of Scotland, when the same shall have been in
like manner established and incorporated as a College
within the said University, and the founders thereof or
subscribers to the same shall have complied with the
said conditions of public endowment : And as to one
other such portion of the said land hereby granted to
the said University upon the like trusts for a College in
connection with the Religious Society, denominated
" Wesleyan Methodists," when the same shall have been
in like manner established and incorporated as a College
within the said University, and the founders thereof or
subscribers to the same shall have complied with the
said conditions of public endowment : Provided always,
that the said University shall not be obliged to make
any such Sub-grant upon trust for any or either of such
Colleges which shall not have become so established and
incorporated, or whereof the founders or subscribers to
the same shallnothave complied with the said conditions of
public endowment within five years from the date of the
issue of these presents : Provided . also, that if any or
either of the above declared trusts shall lapse by reason
of such failure as in the preceding proviso is mentioned,
or if any or either of the said four portions of land so
set apart for Sub-grants as aforesaid, shall after the
Sub-grant thereof, in accordance herewith in trust for
any or either of the said four Colleges, become re-vested
in the said University under or by virtue of the proviso
hereinafter lastly contained, then and in either of such
C-I                         UNWEESITY

      cases the said University shall hold the portions or
      portion of and in respect of which any such lapse shall
      have occurred, or which shall have become re-vested as
      aforesaid upon trust to make and execute such Sub-grant
      or Sub-grants thereof, or of any portion or portions
      thereof respectively, as shall be in that behalf directed
      by the Governor of our said Colony, for the time being,
      with the advice of the said Executive Council upon trust
      for such College or Colleges within the said University,
      as the said Governor and Executive Council shall think
      fit, and as shall be in our behalf named and declared by
      an instrument or instruments to be executed by the
      Governor for the time being under the Great Seal of the
      Colony : And we do hereby direct that the said several
      Sub-grants shall be made upon trusts for the erection
      upon the lands thereby Sub-granted or conveyed of
      buildings for the uses and purposes of such Colleges
      respectively, and for the formation of Gardens and
      Grounds for recreation and exercise in connection there-
      with : And that each of such Sub-grants shall be made
      to five Trustees of whom two and their successors (one
      of them being the Provost or Vice-Provost of the
      University,) shall be nominated by the Senate of the
      said University : And other two and their successors
      shall be nominated by the Councils or other Governing
      Bodies of the said Colleges respectively, or by the Heads
      of the Religious denominations (if any) in connection
      with which such Colleges may respectively have been
      established, (as may have been determined by the con-
      stitutions of such Colleges respectively,) and of whom
      the fifth and his successors shall be chosen and nomi-
      nated by the other four Trustees or their successors, or
      in default thereof shall be nominated by the said Senate :
      And we do hereby further direct, that the said several
      Sub-grants shall be made upon the conditions that the
      buildings to be erected upon the lands respectively
      thereby conveyed shall be completed within five years
      from the issue of such Sub-grants respectively, or such
      more extended time as the said Senate may allow in such
      case : And that the same respectively shall be erected in
                                     DEED OF GRANT.                                   65

such positions respectively, and according to such de-
signs, plans, sections and elevations, and of such con-
struction as shall be approved by the said Senate : And
that the Gardens and Grounds for recreation and exer-
cise in connection with such Colleges respectively, shall
be laid out and made within a reasonable time in that
behalf, and according to such general designs as shall
be approved of by the said Senate : And we do hereby
further direct, that such several Sub-grants shall be
made upon conditions for securing the lands respec-
tively thereby conveyed, and every part thereof from
being applied to or used for any purpose other than
such as shall be consistent with and in furtherance of
the objects hereof, and shall be authorized by the term
of the said Sub-grants l'espectively : And also for se-
curing the maintenance of the connection of the said
Colleges respectively, with the said University in ac-
cordance with the provisions and true intent and mean-
ing of the said Act of the said Governor and Legislative
Council, passed in the present year of our reign : And
lastly we direct that in the said Sub-grants respectively
there shall be contained a provision for making void
the same respectively, and for re-vesting the lands
thereby conveyed together with all buildings, erections,
and other improvements thereon, in the said University
in the event of the trusts and conditions of the said
Sub-grants respectively not being carried out and
observed according to the true intent and meaning
thereof: In witness whereof we have caused this our
grant to be sealed with the seal of our said Territory,
witness our Trustee and well beloved Sir Charles
Augustus Fitz Roy, Knight-Companion of the Royal
Hanoverian Guelphic Order, our Captain-General and
Governor-in-Chief of our said Territory and its De-
pendencies, at Government House, Sydney, in New
South Wales, the Eighteenth Day of January, in the
year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and
fifty-five, and in the Eighteenth year of our reign.
Seal of the Colony.                     CHAS ■ A. FITZ ROY.
Entered on Record by trie in Register of Grants No. 105, pages 419 to 429 inclu-
   sive, tkis twenty-third day of January, one thousand eight hundred ¿{fifty-five.
                  C. D. RIDi)ELL, Colonial Secretary & Registrar.
                                                      H
                              INDEX TO BY-LAWS.

                                                                                                                 Page
    I.—Chancellor .........................................................................................         67
   Π.—Vice-Chancellor .................................................................................             67
 III.—Senate—                                                                                                       67
               Meetings and Rules of Procedure                              .................................       67
               Election to Vacancies.............................................................                   69
               Ex-officio Memhers ...............................................................                   70
  IV.—Superior Officers                   ...................................................................       70
   V.—Registrar        ......................................................................................       70
  VI.—Seal of the University                .................................................................       70
 VII.—Faculties        ......................................................................................       71
Vm.—Limitation of Title of Professor                     ....................................................       71
  IX.—Proctorial Board                 ......................................................................       71
   X.—Boards of Studies                 .....................................................................       72
  XI.—Terms .................................................................................................       73
 XII.—Faculty of Arts—                                                                                              73
               Subjects of Study...................................................................                 73
               Board of Examiners                     .......................................................       74
               Matriculation .........................................................................              74
               Lectures .................................................................................           75
               Yearly Examinations.............................................................                     76
               Ad Eundem Statum                       .......................................................       77
               Bachelor of Arts ....................................................................                77
               Master of Arts                    ............................................................       78
                Scholarships...........................................................................             80
XIII.—Faculty of Laws—                                                                                              81
                LL.B ......................................................................................         81
                LL.D ......................................................................................         82
XIV—Faculty of Medicine—                                                                                            83
                M.B .......................................................................................         83
                MJD..............................................................................                   84
  XV.—Register of Graduates .........................................................................               85
 XVI.—Academic Costume and Discipline .....................................................                         85
XVII.—Non-Matriculated Students                      .........................................................      87
        BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.


                                       I.
                               CHANCELLOB.
   1.—The election to the office of Chancellor shall take place
at a duly convened meeting of the Senate, to be held in the first
week in Lent term.
   2.—The Chancellor shall be elected for a period of three
years, (except as hereinafter provided), to be computed from the
date of election ; but shall be eligible for re-election.
   3.—In the event of the office of Chancellor becoming vacant
by death, resignation, or otherwise, before the expiration of the
full term of office herein prescribed, the election of a successor
shall be proceeded with at the next ensuing regular meeting of
the Senate ; and the Chancellor so appointed shall hold office
until the first regular meeting of the Senate in the Lent term
next after the expiration of three years from the date of such
election.
                                   II.
                       VICE CHANCELLOR.
        1.—The election of the Vice-Chancellor shall take place at a
   duly convened meeting of the Senate, to be held in the first week
     in Lent term, except as in cases otherwise provided for by the
 Act of Incorporation.
                                  III.
                                SENATE.
                   MEETINGS AND    RULES   OF PROCEDURE.

  1-—The Senate shall meet on the first Wednesday in every
month, or on the nearest convenient day, should such first Wed-
68                            BY-LAWS OF

nesday be a Public Holiday, and may adjourn from time to time
to conclude any unfinished business.
    2.—At any time in the interval between such monthly meet-
ings, it shall be competent for the Chancellor, or in his absence,
the Vice-Chancellor, in any case of emergency, to call a special
meeting of the Senate, to be held as soon as conveniently may
be, for the consideration of any business which he may wish to
submit to them.
    3.—Upon the written requisition of any three members, the
 Chancellor, or in his absence the Vice-Chancellor, or in the
 absence of both, the Registrar, shall convene a special meeting
 of the Senate, to be held as soon as conveniently may be after
 the expiration of nine days from the receipt of such requisition.
    4.—Except in any case of emergency as aforesaid, no motion
initiating a subject for discussion shall be made, but in pursuance
of notice given at least nine days previously ; and every such
notice shall be entered in a boot, to be kept by the Registrar for
that purpose.
    5.—The Registrar shall issue to each Member of the Senate
a summons with a written specification of the various matters to
be considered at the next meeting of the Senate, whether such
meeting be an ordinary or a special one ; and such summons,
except in any case of emergency as aforesaid, shall be issued at
least seven days previously to each meeting.
    6.—In the event of a quorum of the Senate not being present
at any monthly or other meeting, within half an hour after the
hour appointed, the meeting shall lapse, but the members then
present may adjourn the meeting to aDy convenient future day,
of which seven days notice shall be given by the Registrar in
the usual manner.
    7.—-All the proceedings of the Senate shall be entered in a
journal ; and at the opening of each meeting the minutes of the
preceding meeting shall be read and confirmed, and the signature
of the Chairman then presiding shall be attached thereto.
                                      THE UNIVERSITY.                                           69
   8.—If any elected Fellow shall, without leave from the Senate,
be absent from their meetings for six consecutive calendar
months, his fellowship shall ipso facto become vacant.

                                    ELECTION       TO     VACANCIES.

   9.—At the first meeting of the Senate, after the occurrence of
a vacancy among the Fellows, a day shall be fixed for a Convo-
cation for the election of a successor, such day to be within forty
days from the date of such Senate meeting, and to be announced
at least thirty days previously to such Convocation by notice
posted at the University, and by advertisement in one or more
of the daily newspapers.
    10.—The Convocation for the election of a Fellow shall be held
in the University, and shall be presided over in the same manner
as if it were a meeting of the Senate.
    11.—Every Candidate submitted for election must be proposed
and seconded by * legally qualified voters: and the votes shall
be given by show of hands. If the President's decision be
questioned, a Poll shall be at once taken by voting papers, to
be signed in each case by the voter, and to be handed to the
President, who shall cause the numbers to be taken down by
two Proctors or acting Proctors, and on their report shall declare
the result.
    12.—At the time fixed for a Convocation for the election of a
Fellow, the Registrar shall prepare for the President's use a
complete list of all persons entitled to vote under the provisions
of the law, and a copy of such list shall be posted in a con-
spicuous place in the University for two days at least before the
time of Convocation.

     * The legally qualified voters are Fellows of the Senate for the time being, Professors,
Public Teachers, and Examiners in the Schools of the University, Principals of Incorporated
Colleges within the University, Superior Officers of the University declared to be such by
By-Law and Graduates keeping their names on the Register of the University who shall
have taken any or either of the Degrees of M.A., LL.D., or M.D., in this University.
24 Vic, No. 13.
70                           BY-LAWS OF

   13.—None but legally qualified voters shall be allowed to be
present during the taking of a Poll.
                           EX-OFFICIO     MEMBERS.
                              (24 Victoria No. 13.)

   14.—The Senior Professor of Classics, the Senior Professor of
Mathematics, and the Senior Professor of Chemistry and Ex-
perimental Physics shall be " ex-officio" members of the Senate,
under the provisions of the " Sydney University Incorporation
Act Amendment Act of 1861."

                                IV.
                        SUPEKIOE OFFICERS.
                              (24 Victoria No. 13.)

   1.—The Registrar is hereby declared to be a Superior Officer
of the University, entitled to the rights and privileges conferred
by the " Sydney University Incorporation Act Amendment Act
of 1861."
                                       V.
                                 EEGISTEAE.
   1.—The Registrar shall keep all necessary records of the pro-
ceedings of the University, conduct all necessary correspondence,
and keep such registers and books of account as may be required.
    2.—All fees, fines, or other sums received by the Registrar
in his capacity as such, shall be paid over to the credit of the
University, in order that the same may be applied, accounted for
and audited in such manner as the Senate may from time to
time appoint.

                                  VI.
                  SEAL OF THE UNIVERSITY.
1.—The Seal of the University shall be placed in the charge
of the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor, and Registrar, and shall
not be affixed to any document except by order of the Senate.
                         THE UNIVEESITY.                            71

                                 VII.
                            FACULTIES.
  1.—There shall be three Faculties in the University, viz :—
                 1. Arts.
                 2. Law.
                 3. Medicine.

                                 VIII.
             LIMITATION OF TITLE OF PROFESSOR.
   1.—The Title of Professor shall be distinctive of Public
   Teachers in the University : and no person in or belonging to the
   University or any College within it, shall assume that Title
   without the express authority of the Senate of the University.

                                     IX.
                          PROCTORIAL BOARD.
   1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-chancellor, the Senior Professor
of Classics, the Senior Professor of Mathematics, and the Senior
Professor of Chemistry and Experimental Physics, shall form a
Board, to be called the " Proctorial Board," to which shall be
confided the duty of enforcing the observance of order on the
part of the Undergraduates of the University. This Board shall
make such regulations as it may deem expedient for the main-
tenance of discipline amongst the Undergraduates, and shall have
the power of inflicting or authorizing to be inflicted, all such
Academic Punishments as are sanctioned by the present usage
of British Universities, including Fines to an amount not exceed-
ing five pounds (£5) for any one offence : Provided however
that the Board shall not proceed to the expulsion of any Under-
graduate, or to his suspension for a period exceeding one Term,
without the express authority of the Senate.
   2.—No question shall be decided at any meeting of this Board,
unless three Members at the least shall be present.
72                              BY-LAWS.

   3.—At meetings of this Board, the Chair shall be occupied by
the Chancellor, or in his absence by the Vice-Chancellor, or in
the absence of both the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor, by the
Dean of the Faculty of Arts ; and in the event of an equality of
votes at any meeting, the Chairman shall have a casting vote.
At meetings of this Board the Registrar of the University shall
attend and record the proceedings, and it shall be his duty to
collect all fines imposed by, or under the authority of the
Board. It shall be the duty of the Registrar to convene the
Board on the requisition of any one of its members at such time
within seven days from the date of the requisition as may be
directed by the Chancellor, or in his absence by the Vice-Chan-
cellor, on whom it shall be incumbent to give such direction on
the Registrar's application. Tn the event of the absence of the
Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor, the time of meeting shall be
fixed by the Dean of the Faculty of Arts.


                                     X.
                         BOARDS OF STUDIES.
   1.—The Professors in the subjects required for the examina-
tion for the degree of B.A. shall form a Board ; of which the
Senior Professor, being a member of the Proctorial Board, shall
be President, with the title of Dean of the Faculty of Arts.
   2.—The Professors and Examiners in the Faculty of Law shall
form a Board ; of which the Senior Professor shall be President,
with the title of Dean of the Faculty of Laws.
   3.—The Professors and Examiners in the Faculty of Medicine
shall form a Board ; of which the Senior Professor shall be Pre-
sident, with the title of Dean of the Faculty of Medicine.
   4.—It shall be the duty of the above named Boards to deli-
berate and report to the Senate upon all questions i'elating to the
studies and examinations in their several Faculties.
                          FACULTY OF ARTS.                          73
   5.—The Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor, and the Professors
of the three several Faculties shall form a Board, to be called
the " Conference Board," for the consideration of all general
questions relating to the studies of the University, or which may
be referred to them by the Senate.


                                       XI.
                                 TERMS.
  1.—The Academic year shall contain three Terms, that is to
      say :—LENT TEEM—Commencing on the second Monday in
        February, and terminating with the third week in May,
        with an interval (not exceeding eight days) at Easter.
      ΤΕΙΝΙΤΤ TEEM—Commencing on the third Monday in
        June, and terminating with the last week in August.
      MICHAELMAS TEEM—Commencing on the first Monday
        in October, and terminating with the second week in
        December.
                                   XII.
                          FACULTY OF ARTS.
                            SUBJECTS    OF   SIODY.

   1.—Professors and Lecturers, appointed by the Senate, shall
give instruction in the following subjects :—
                1.   Greek Language and Literature.
                2.   Latin Language and Literature.
                3.   Ancient History.
                4.   Mathematics.
                5.   Natural Philosophy.
                6.   Chemistry.
                7.   Experimental Physics.
                8.   Mental Philosophy and Logic.
                9.   Moral and Political Philosophy.
74                       FACULTY OF ARTS.

               10. Modern History.
               11. Natural History, comprising—
                          Mineralogy and Geology.
                          Botany.
                          Zoology.
               12. French Language and Literature.
               13. German Language and Literature.

                          BOAED   OF   EXAMINERS.

   2.—The members of the Board of Studies in the Faculty of
Arts, together with such other persons as may from time to time
be appointed by the Senate, shall form a Board of Examiners
for conducting the Examinations in the Faculty of Arts, and of
this Board the Dean of the Faculty,- or in his absence the Pro-
fessor next in seniority, shall be Chairman.
   3.—The Board of Examiners shall, from time to time, and in
accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws for the time being,
frame rules, and appoint times and places for the several ex-
aminations in the Faculty of Arts.
   4.—At the conclusion of each examination the Board shall
transmit to the Senate a report of the result, signed by the
Chairman, and by, at least, two other members.

                              MATRICULATION.

    5.—Candidates for Matriculation must make application to the
Registrar before the commencement of Lent Term.
    6.—No person shall be admitted as an undergraduate of the
University, except, on certificate of having satisfactorily passed
the examination for Matriculation.
    7.—The Matriculation Examination shall take place once a
year, and shall commence on the second day in Lent Term ; but
it shall be competent to the Senate, under special circumstances,
to admit Candidates (after examination) at other periods.
                         FACULTY OF ARTS.                             75
   8.—The examination shall be conducted by means of written
or printed papers ; but the examiners shall not be precluded
from putting vivâ voce questions.
   9.—The names of all Candidates who have passed the Matri-
culation Examination, shall be arranged alphabetically ; but it
shall be competent to the Examiners to place in a separate class
the names of those who may have specially distinguished
themselves.
   10.—All Students who shall receive a testamur of having passed
the Matriculation Examination, and shall have paid a fee of two
pounds to the Registrar, shall be admitted by the Senate as
Members of the University.
   11.—The Examination for Matriculation shall be in the follow-
ing subjects :—
        The Greek and Latin Languages.
        Arithmetic.
        Algebra, to simple equations, inclusive.
        Geometry, first book of Euclid.
                                1.ECTUHES.

   12.—Lectures shall commence on the first day of Term, except-
ing in the first or Lent Term, in which they shall commence
at the conclusion of the Matriculation and Scholarship Ex-
aminations.
    13.—Lectures of an hour each shall be given, daily, by the Pro-
fessors in Classics, Mathematics, Chemistry and Experimental
Physics, at such times and in such order as the Senate may from
time to time direct.
    14.—Before the admission of a Student to any course of Lec-
tures, he shall pay to the Registrar of the University such fee
as shall have been appointed by the Senate.
    15.—The subjects of Lectures shall be publicly notified by the
Registrar before the commencement of each Academic year.
76                        FACULTY OF ARTS.

   16.—Candidates for Degrees shall attend the University Lec-
tures on the following subjects :—

                   1.   Greek.
                   2.   Latin.
                   3.   Ancient History.
                   4.   Mathematics.
                   5.   Natural Philosophy.
                   6.   Chemistry.
                   7.   Experimental Physics.

                           YEARLY   EXAMINATIONS.

    17.—Examinations of the Undergraduates of the first and second
years shall be held once a year during the last fortnight of
Michaelmas Term, and no Undergraduate shall absent himself
therefrom except under medical certificate.
    18.—The Undergraduates of each year shall be examined in the
subjects of the Undergraduate course, upon which Lectures have
been given during the year.
    19.—After examination, the names of the Undergraduates shall
be arranged in classes, and in order of merit.
    20.—Prize Books, stamped with the University Arms, shall be
given to each member of the first class in each year.
    21.—Such Undergraduates as absent themselves from the ex-
aminations, except under medical certificate, or fail to pass them
in a satisfactory manner, shall, at the discretion of the Senate on
the report of the Examiners, be required to keep additional terms
before proceeding to a B.A. Degree.
    22. Certificates of having attended Lectures, and complied
 with the Regulations of the University, shall be signed by the
 Dean of the Faculty of Arts, and by the Registrar, and granted
 to the Undergraduates on the completion of each Academic
 year.
                        FACULTY OP ARTS.                           77
   23.—No certificate shall be given to any Undergraduate who
may, without sufficient cause, have absented himself from Lec-
ture, more than six times in any one term, or who may not have
passed the Yearly Examinations.

                    ADMISSION   AD   EUNDEM STATWM.

   24.—Any person may be admitted without examination as an
Undergraduate Member of this University, who shall have kept
any number of terms at any of the undermentioned Universities,
namely, Oxford, Cambridge, Saint Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen,
Edinburgh, Dublin, Durham, London, Queen's University of
Ireland, or Melbourne ; and shall be considered of the same
standing as if he had been during the same time an Under-
graduate Member of the University of Sydney. Provided
always, that he shall give to the Registrar, to be submitted to
the Senate, evidence of his former residence (or equivalent con-
nexion with) and good conduct at any such University.

                          BACHELOR    OF ARTS.

   25.—The Examination for the Degree of B.A. shall take place
once a year, at the close of Michaelmas Term.
   26.—No Candidate shall be admitted to this examination,
unless he produce a certificate from the Dean of the Faculty of
Arts of having been a Student at the University, and of having
complied with its regulations during three Academic years, or
during the terms required when in the exercise of the powers
reserved by their By-Laws the Senate may have required addi-
tional terms, or may have allowed Students to matriculate at
other than the ordinary times of examination. This certificate
shall be transmitted to the Registrar before the day appointed
for the commencement of the examination.
   27.—The fee for the Degree of B.A. shall be Three Pounds.
No Candidate shall be admitted to the examination unless he
78                        FACULTY OF AETS.

have previously paid this fee to the Registrar. If a Candidate
fail to pass the examination, the fee shall not be returned to
him ; but he shall be admissible to any subsequent examination
for the same Degree without the payment of an additional fee.
   28.—The examination shall be conducted, in the first instance,
by means of printed papers ; and, at the termination of such
examination, each Candidate shall undergo a viva voce examina-
tion, if the Examiners think fit.
    29.—To obtain the ordinary Degree of B.A., the Candidate
shall pass a satisfactory examination in Greek, Latin, Mathe-
matics, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, Experimental Physics,
Logic, and Ancient and Modern History.
   30.—All persons who have passed the ordinary examination for
Degrees, shall be admissible for Honors in the Classical and
Mathematical schools.
    31.—The Candidates in each school shall be arranged in classes
 and order of merit.
    32.—The most distinguished Candidate for Honors in each of
the aforesaid schools shall, if he possess sufficient merit, receive
a prize of twenty-five pounds.
    33.—The Candidate most distinguished at the ordinary exami-
 nation in Chemistry and Experimental Physics, shall receive a
 prize of ten pounds.

                             MASTER   OP   ARTS.

    34.—There shall be a Yearly Examination for the Degree of
M.A. during Lent term, before the Easter recess.
    35.—Every Candidate for this examination must have his name
on the Register of the University ; he must have previously
obtained the Degree of B.A., and two years must have elapsed
since the time of his examination for such Degree. He will also
be required to furnish evidence of having completed his twenty-
first year.
                         FACULTY OF AETS.                              79
   36.—The fee for the Degree of M.A. shall be five pounds. No
Candidate shall be admitted to the examination unless he have
previously paid this fee to the Registrar. If. a Candidate fail to
pass the examination, the fee shall not be returned to him ; but
he shall be admissible to any subsequent examination for the
same Degree without the payment of an additional fee.
   37.—Candidates for the Degree of M.A. shall elect to be
examined in one or more of the following branches of
knowledge :—
        1. Classical Philology and History.
        2. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.
        3. Logic ; Moral, Mental, and Political Philosophy.
        4. Chemistry, and Experimental Physics.
And at the Yearly Examination the most distinguished Candi-
date in each branch shall, if he possess sufficient merit, receive
a gold medal.
   38.—The Senate shall have power to admit to Examination for
the Degree of Master of Arts, any person who shall have ob-
tained at least two years previously the Degree of Bachelor of
Arts, or equivalent first Degree in Arts, in this or any of the Uni-
versities hereinbefore mentioned as those from which Under-
graduates will be admitted ad Ewndein Statum. Every Candidate
for admission under this By-Law must make application in writing
to the Registrar, and supply satisfactory evidence of his qualifi-
cation as aforesaid ; and that he is a person of good fame and
character ; and upon the approval of his application shall pay to
the Registrar a fee of two pounds, for the entry of his name in
the University Register, in addition to the fee for his Degree pre-
scribed in the By-Laws for the time being, in respect to those
who have taken their first Degree in the University of Sydney.
Before the granting of the Degree, every passed Candidate will
be required to furnish evidence of having completed his twenty-
first year.
 80                              FACULTY OF AKTS.
                                       SCHOLABS HIPS.

    39.—In addition to the Private Foundations, viz. :— the Barker,
 Deas-Thomson, Gooper, and Levy Scholarships, there shall be
 seven scholarships of the annual value of £50, payable out of
 the Public Endowment.
 40.—The above Scholarships, tenable for one year, shall be
 awarded after examination in the following manner :—
 To Undergraduates of the first year,
 Three Scholarships for General Proficiency, viz. :—
 The Levy Scholarship.
 Two University Scholarships.
 To Undergraduates of the second year,
                Three University Scholarships for General Proficiency.
       To Undergraduates of the third year,
       Four Scholarships, viz. :—
                   One University Scholarship for General Proficiency .*
                   Three Special Scholarships, viz, :—
       1. For proficiency in Classics the Gooper Scholarship, founded
             in 1857.
       2. For proficiency in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy
             the Barker Scholarship, founded in 1853.
       3. For proficiency in Chemistry and Experimental Physics
         the Deas-Thomson Scholarship, founded in 1854.
41. No Student of the first or second year shall hold more than
one Scholarship ; but a Student of the third year may hold one,
■ or more, of the three special Scholarships with the ordinary
University Scholarship for general proficiency.
    42.—None of the above Scholarships shall be awarded, except
 to such Candidates as exhibit a degree of proficiency which shall
 be satisfactory to the Examiners.

     * To this University Scholarship the Senate have resolved to add two more of the
 same value in each of the years 1SG3-4, so that the reduction in the number of Third Year
 Scholarships made by this By-Law may not affect Students who entered before its passing.
                        FACULTY OF LAWS.                             81
  43.—The examinations for Scholarships shall take place at the
beginning of Lent Term.
  44.—In the first year, Candidates for Scholarships shall be
examined on the following subjects :—
       1. Classics.—Translation from Greek and Latin authors
             into English ; Greek and Latin composition, in
             prose and verse.
             Ancient History.
       2. Mathematics.—Arithmetic and Algebra;
          First four books of Euclid.
In the second and third years, Candidates for Scholarships
shall be examined in—
       1. Classics.—Translations from Greek and Latin authors
                  into English ; Greek and Latin composition, in
                  prose and verse.
             Ancient History.
             Philology.
       2. Mathematics.—The Branches enumerated for Candidates
                 in the first term, together with—
             The 5th and 6th Books of Euclid.
             Algebraic Geometry of two dimensions.
             Plane Trigonometry.
             Elements of Differential Calculus, as far as Taylor's
                Theorem.
             Statics.
       3. Experimental Physics, and Chemistry.

                                 XIII.
FACULTY OF LAWS.
LL.B.
1.—A Professor or Lecturer, appointed by the Senate, shall
give Lectures in English Jurisprudence, attendance on which
will be required from all Candidates for the Degree of LL.B.
                                     ι
82                        FACULTY OF LAWS.

   2.—Until other Professorships are established, there shall be a
Board of Examiners appointed by the Senate to test the qualifi-
cations of Candidates desirous of obtaining a Degree in Laws.
The examination for the Degree of LL.B. shall take place in
Michaelmas Term, and the Degree shall be granted in Lent Term.
   3.—No Candidate shall be admitted to the Degree of LL.B.,
until after the expiration of one Academic year from the time of
his obtaining the Degree of B.A.
   4.—The fee for the Degree of LL.B. shall be Ten Pounds. No
Candidate shall be admitted to the examination unless he have
previously paid this fee to the Registrar. If the Candidate fail
to pass this examination, the fee shall not be returned to him ;
but he shall be admissible to any subsequent examination for the
same Degree without the payment of an additional fee.
   5.—Candidates for the Degree of LL.B. shall produce certifi-
cates of having attended the University Lectures on English
Jurisprudence.
   6.—Candidates for the Degree of LL.B. shall be examined in
the following subjects :—
           Civil and International Law.
           Constitutional History, and        Constitutional    Law   of
             England.
           General Law of England.

                                   LL.D.

    7.—The Degree of LL.D. shall be conferred at the expiration
of two Academic years from the granting of the LL.B. Degree.
The Candidate shall be required to prepare and defend a Thesis
on some subject selected by himself from the Pandects, or Insti-
tutes ; such Thesis shall be in the Latin or English Language, and
if recommended by the Board of Examiners, and approved by
the Senate, may be printed. The fee for the Degree of LL.D.
shall be ten Pounds.
                     FACULTY OP MEDICINE.                           83

                                 XIV.
                      FACULTY OF MEDICINE.
                                  M.B.

    1.—À Professor, appointed by, the Senate, shall give Lectures
in Chemistry.
   2.—Until other Professorships in the Faculty of Medicine be
constituted in the University, there shall be a Board of Ex-
aminers, appointed by the Senate, to test the qualifications of
Candidates who may apply for Medical Degrees, to be granted
in accordance with the provisions contained in the Act of In-
corporation.
   3.—Such Candidates must lodge with the Registrar of the
University, satisfactory certificates of having taken the Degree
of B.A. or some equivalent Degree, in this or in any of the
Universities hereinbefore mentioned as those from which Under-
graduates will be admitted ad eundem staium. Candidates
who have not taken such Degree must pass an examination similar
to that prescribed for the B.A. Degree in this University.
   4.—The Candidate must also furnish evidence of being twenty-
one years of age, and of having diligently pursued a course of
Medical Studies extending over a period of four years, at some
Medical School of which the Senate shall approve. His certifi-
cates must shew that he has attended the following eight classes
each for a course of six months ;—Anatomy, Practical Anatomy,
Physiology, Chemistry, Materia Medica, Surgery, Practice of
Medicine, Midwifery ; and the following five classes each for a
course of three months ;—Botany, Practical Chemistry, Medical
Jurisprudence, Clinical Medicine, and Clinical Surgery :—also
that he has attended for eighteen months the Medical and Sur-
gical Practice of a Hospital containing not fewer than eighty
beds ; and that he has been engaged for six months in compound-
ing and dispensing medicines.
84                           BY-LAWS OF

   5.—Medical or Surgical Diplomas, from regularly constituted
examining Boards in Europe or America, may, at the discretion
of the Senate, be accepted as equivalent to the whole or part of
the above mentioned certificates.
    6.—As soon as the required documents have been declared
satisfactory by the Senate, the Registrar shall notify to the Can-
didate the day on which his examination will commence.
    7.—Before being admitted to examination, the Candidate must
deposit with the Registrar a fee of Ten Pounds, which will not
be returned in the event of the Candidate not passing the
examination ; but such Candidate may be admitted to any future
examination without any further charge.

                                   M.D.
    8.—The Degree of M.D. shall be conferred at the expiration
of two Academic years from the granting of the M.B. Degree.
   9.—The Candidate shall be required to prepare and defend a
Thesis on some Medical subject, to be selected by himself; such
Thesis shall be in the Latin or English language, and, if approved
by the Senate, on the report of the Board of Examiners, may be
printed.
   10.—The fee for the Degree of M.D. shall be ten Pounds.
   11.—The Senate shall have power to admit to Examination
for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine any person who shall have
obtained at least two years previously the Degree of Bachelor of
Medicine at any of the Universities hereinbefore mentioned as
those whose Bachelors of Arts will be admissible to examination
for the Degree of M. A. in this University, and who shall also
have obtained the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, or an equivalent
first Degree in Arts, at any of the said Universities, or shall
pass an examination similar to that prescribed for the B.A.
Degree in this University. Every Candidate for admission,
under this By-Law, must make application in writing                  to
                           THE UNIVERSITY.                             85
the Registrar, and supply satisfactory evidence of his qualifi-
cation as aforesaid ; and that he is a person of good fame and
character ; and upon the approval of his application, he shall pay
to the Registrar a fee of two pounds for the entry of his name
in the University Books, in addition to the prescribed fee for his
Degree. Before the granting of the Degree, every passed Can-
didate will be required to furnish evidence of his having com-
pleted his twenty-third year.

                                     XV.
                       REGISTER OF GRADUATES.
   1.—A Register of the Graduates of the University shall be
kept by the Registrar in such manner as the Senate shall
from time to time direct ; and for the retention of his
name on the Register, every Graduate must pay an annual fee
of two pounds, on or before the Commemoration day in each
year, in default of which his name shall be at once taken off by
the Registrar, but may be restored upon payment of all arrears
due, at any time, except during the four days preceding the day
fixed for a Convocation for the election of a Fellow.
   2.—The Annual Register Fee may be compounded for by a
payment of ten pounds.
   3.—The Register of Graduates shall be conclusive evidence
that any person whose name shall appear thereon as holding
the Degree of Master of Arts, Doctor of Laws, or Doctor of
Medicine, at the time of his claiming to vote at a Convocation
for the election of a Fellow of the Senate, is so entitled to vote ;
and that any person whose name shall not appear-thereon at the
time of his claiming to vote in Convocation, is not so entitled
to vote.
                      XVI.
ACADEMIC COSTUME AND DISCIPLINE.
1.—The Academic Costume shall be : for—
         The Chancellor and the Vice-Chancellor—a robe and cap
8tí                          BY-LAWS OF

          similai' to those worn by the Chancellor of the Uni-
          versity of Oxford. In undress, the silk gown worn by
          other Members of the Senate,—black velvet cap and
          gold tassel.
       A Member of the Senate—the habit of his Degree, or a
          black silk gown (of the description worn by civilians
          holding Degrees from Oxford and Cambridge), with
          trippet of scarlet cloth edged with white fur, and lined
          with crimson silk,—black velvet trencher cap.
       Doctor of Laws or Medicine—the gown worn by Gradu-
          ates of the same rank in the University of Oxford,—
          hood of scarlet cloth lined with crimson silk,—black
          cloth trencher cap.
       Master of Arts—the ordinary Master's gown of Oxford
          or Cambridge of silk or bombazine, with black silk
          hood lined with blue silk,—black cloth trencher cap.
       Bachelor of Laws or Medicine—the black gown worn by
          civilians in Oxford and Cambridge holding Degrees,
          with hood of blue silk lined with white fur,—black
          cloth trencher cap.
       An Officer not being a Graduate—a black silk gown of
          the description worn by civilians not holding Degrees,
          —black cloth trencher cap.
       Bachelor of Arts—a plain black stuff gown, with hood
          similar to that worn by the B.A. at Cambridge,—
          black cloth trencher cap.
       Undergraduate—a plain black stuff gown,—black cloth
          trencher cap.
Scholar—the same gown, with a velvet bar on the sleeve
—black cloth trencher cap.
2.—Members of the University shall, on all occasions when
convened for Academic purposes, appear in their Academic Cos-
tume.
                         THE UNIVERSITY.                         87

   3.—The Undergraduates shall, on all occasions within the
precincts of the University, wear their Academic Costume, and
whenever they meet the Fellows, Professors, and other Superior
officers of the University, shall respectfully salute them.

                                XVII.
                NON-MATRICULATED STUDENTS.
   1.—Any person desirous of attending University Lectures,
may do so without Matriculation, upon payment of the regular
fee for each course.
   2.—Such Students are exempt from examinations, are not
required to wear any Academic Costume, and are not qualified
to compete for Honors, nor to proceed to Degrees.
88




                    TABLE                  OF              FEES




                                                                        £   S.   d.
MATRICULATION ...                                                       2   0    0
LECTURE FEES, per Term—
                                                                        2   2    0
         CLASSICS
         MATHEMATICS ...                                                2   2    0
         CHEMISTRY AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS                             3   3    0
         LOGIC ...................          .........................   2   2    0
                                                                        ]   1    0
       t JURISPRUDENCE (Course of 10 Lectures)
         FRENCH                                                         2   2    0
B.A.                                                                    3   0    0
M.A.                                                                    5   0    0
LL.B.                                                                   10 0     0
LL.D.                                                                   10 0     0
M.B.                                                                    10 0     0
M.D.                                                                    10 0     0
ANNUAL FEE (for keeping name on the books)                              2   0    0

                    t For Non-Matriculated Students the Fee is £2 2s.
                   FORM FOH MATRICULATION.                           89

                              ORDO
TlRONÜM    TN ClYITATBM ACADEMICAM ADSCRIBENDORUM         IN   ÜNIVERS1-
                     TATE   SlDNEIENSI   SOLEMNIS.
   IKTRODÖCTI in Cui'iam Candidati, togis academicis induti, quum
apud eum qui est ab actis publicis (qui Registrarius vocatur) sua
nomina professi sunt, et recitatis ab illo nominibus, Becanus eos
(Cancellario sive Vice-Cancellario) in Cathedra assidenti, coram
sistet ; dextrâque manu proximè astantís dextram tenens, bis
verbis commendabit.
   D. Honoratissime Cancellarie, amplissimi Senatores, vosque
egregii Procuratores, trado vobis hosce Literarum Humaniorum et
Disciplinarum Matbematicarum et Physicarum studiosos ; quos
testor, utriusque doctrinas scientiâ tentatâ, nobis examinantibus
satisfecisse, dignosque videri qui in numerum Academicorum
referantur.
   Tum. Procurator, candidatoram Principi solemne sponsioui»
carmen prteibit.
   P- Ego M. N. fide mea spondeo huic Universitati, me ad eas
doctrinas quaa mihi ex Senatus aucfcoritate proponantur in quïbus
elaborem, operam et studium conlaturum ; necnon, quum ad-
versus Cancellarium, Vice^Cancellarium, Socios Académicos,
cseteros qui cum imperio sunt, quam par est modestiam et
reverentiam adhibiturum, tum leges, jura, instituía, qusecunque
sive ab ipsis sive Ulis auctoribus sancita fuerint, dUigenter esse
observaturum.
   Tura Procurator, ad reliquos conversus, idem sripulabituí'.
   P. Quod de se spopondit M. N., idem vos quoque, de se quisque,
spondetis, in vosque recipitis ?
    Respondebuut omues, pro se quisque, Spondeo.
   Quibus rebus rite peractis, ipse (Cancellarius sive Vice-Can-:
cellarius) candidatos in numerum civium Academicorum pro
imperio adsciscet.
                                   J
90                    FOEM FOR AD EUNDEM.

   *- · Quod vobis Matrique Academias felix fausfcumque sit : Ego,
ex meâ et Senatus auctoritate, vos Universitatis Sidneienses
civitate donatos, et in societatem rite esse adscriptos, pronuntio ;
ea lege efc conditione ut quam hodié dedistis religiose praestetis
fidem. Quare macta estote virtute et diligentia, et in bonis
artibus perseverate. Ita vobis Deus Optimus Maximus studia et
labores fortunet.

                               ORDO
 ADMITTENDOKUM AD EUNDEM GBADUM AUT STATUM STUDIOSORUM
                  AB ALILS ACADEMIIS HUC ADVENTANTIUM.
   Si quia ab aliqua üniversitate quacum nobis commercium est,
gradu aliquo insignitus, eodem apud nos honore aligere cupiet,
primum is debet per Decamim. Senatum Academicum=ut id sibi
liceat rogare : sive quod dicitur " gratiam suam in solemnem
formulara proponers."
   ΐ5· " Supplicat M. N. (Baccalaureus vel Magister Facultatis
Artium, sive quo aKo gradu fuerit) in Academia (A. B. C.) creatus,
ut bona vestra cum venia admittatur ad eundem gradum, statuta,
et dignitatem apud Sidneienses quibus ornatus est apud suos
(A. B. C)"
    Recitatam gratiam et ab Decano acceptam Procurator Can-
cellarius in manus tradet, qui Senatores sententiam rogabit his
verbis.
    C. Placetne vobis Domini, ut ista, quae petitur, concedatur
 gratia ?
    üespondebunt üli, proiit lubet Placet, aut Non placet.
    Qui si aniraermt, Decanus candidatura ita cotnmeiidabifr.
   D- Honoratissime Cancellarie, amplissimi Senatores, vosque
egregii Procuratores, trado vobis hune Magistrum Facultatis
Artium,- (sive quo alio gradu sit) in Academia (A.B.C.) creatum,
ut sit eodem gradu, statu, et dignitate apud nos Sidneienses
quibus ornatus est, apud suos (A. B.C.)
                FORM POE PRIZES AND HONORS.                                 yl

   Tum ei Procurator aponsionera iatiusmodi deferet.
   P. Magister, tu dabis fidem ad observan dura Statuta, Privilegia,
Consuetudines, et Libertates bujus Universitatis, quatenus ea
Statutis, Privilegiis, Consuetudinibus, et Libertatibus Universitatis
(A. B. C.) non repugnant.
   Denique eum Cancellarius sie admittet.
   C. Domine Doctor (sive Magister) ego admitto te ad eundem
Statum, Gradum et Dignitatem hic apud nos Sidneienses quibus
ornatus es apud tuos (A. B. G.)
   Eadem quoque formula, mutatis mutandis, adhíbenda est, si
quis nondum graduatus Terminorum apud aliam Academiam
rationem sibi apud nos Sidneienses imputandam velit.


                                  ORDO
   HONOEUM IIS QUI LIUDE       DIGNI SUNT HABLTI DEFEEENDOEUH
                            COMTITIIS MAXIMIS.
   Scripta prœmiis dignata quum suum quisque a actores recita-
verint, Dccanus eos Cancellario in Cathedra assidenti coraTii
sistet. singuiosqne ita coramendabït.
   D. Honoratissime Cancellarie, vosque dignissimi Senatores, com-
mendo vobis hune meum Scholarém in Facúltate Artiiim, ut propter
                           c musas (         ) féliciter cultas ;            ")
morum probitatem et ] -,· -, ,·                ,       ^          -, ,.,      ί
              r
                               ( aisputationem (         ; sermone nabitam ; )
prsemio munificentia viri (A. B. C.) quotannis proposito, ex-
auctoritate Amplissimi Ordinis, decoretur.
   G. Ego, áuctoritate mea et Senatus Académici, istud quo mihi
tanquam dignus commendáris prfemium libens tibi, adjudico.
   ítem cíeteris donandos honoribus, sive quis beueticium aliquod
ex iis qua? certis doctrinis assignata sunt, meruerit, sive in
classem, quam vocant, piimam, ab Examinatoribus annuis relatas
faerit Pro-'essores, suns quisque candidatos, ordinp minitiMi-
dabunt.
92                        FORM FOR DEGREES.

   Puni, Honoratissime Cancellarie, vosque digrrissimi Senatores
commendo vobis hunc meum Scholarem in Facúltate Arfcium, ut
propter morum probitatem et in
Studium positum egregiosque factos processus, beneficio annuo
munificentiâ                                                prœbito, ex
auctoritate Amplissimi Ordinis in annum proximum, ornetur.
   ΙΛ Ego, auctoritate meâ et Senatus Academici, istud quo mini
tanquam dignus commendaris, beneficium, libens tibi adjudico.
   PKL>['. Honoratissime Cancellarie; vosque dignissimi Senatores
commendo vobis hunc meum Scholarem in Facúltate Artium, ut
propter morum probitatem, et in
studium positum egregiosque factos processus, aliquâ Amplissimi
vestri Concessus gratia dignetur.
   C Ego, auctoritate meâ et Senatus Academici, hunc tibi,
librum dono, honoris ergo.

                             ORDO
              ADMITTBNDOEUM AD GRADUS CANDIDATORUM.
    Deducrá in Curinni pompa, postquam conseflerunt oniiies. et
facto silentio, Cancellnrius cnnsam babondovum Commitiorum
exponit.
    i." Habendorum hodie Comitiorum causa est ut, qui anno
superiore cursum Institutionis Academicae rite compleverint, ad
gradus promoveantur ; laude digni honoribus, prout quisque
meritus est, decorentur ; necnon ut csetera peragantur quae ad
communem Academias salutem pertinent. Ad qua? expedienda,
Ego, auctoritate meâ et Senatûs Academici, hoc concilium rite et
solemni jure esse convocatum pronuntio.
    Tuui DECANTS numina eui'uni qui honoie aiiquo dignati sunt ex
catalogo récitai ; ipsumque cataloguai, a Decano acceptum, PRO-
Τ.''ΛΑΊ(>Α St.:;iOt; Caïiieelîario in münus π%άϊΐ.
    Pu-t reeitcfr. -x'rip'ia prssiiis ditfiiîita. doraanài honoribus, s.io
quisque online, i'nTvrllrrin UP mure roîïiwpnd&ntur ; Sfiiiinet lauro
                        FORM FOR DEGREES.                                93

otTiati ; in classtmi piimam relati ; beueticiis "anauis dignati, turn
generalibas, turn iis qute certis doctrinis assignata sunt.
   Deinde DECANCS ad Gradum aliquein promovendoi'um nomina
ex catalogo récitât, et Senatui illornm verbis gratias supplient.
   D. Supplicant amplissimo Ordini À. B. O., quum, (novenos
términos in studio Artium posuerint, Professores Públicos dili-
genter audiverint, Examinatorum Academicorum qusestionibus
satis responderint, caetera, prout statuta requirunt peregerint ; ut
admittantur ad gradum (                         )
   Hecitatam suppKcaüoncm et a Decano acceptam, PKOC:L*RATUK
JUNIOR Cancellavio in roanus trad it : qui Renatore.s sententiam
l'osrat his verbis.
    C. Placetne Vobis, Domini, ut istse quas petuntur, çoncedantur,
gratiœ ?
    Respondent illi, prout lnbct, Placet, auf Non Placet. Qui si
antmeràit, concessas gratias ita pronnntiat.
   C. Concessas sunt quas petitis gratias : et sic pronuntiamus
concessas.
   Tum Decanus e curia exit, statimque reversiis, prasunte Bedello,
sequentibus Candidates, habitu ad gradum competente indutis ad
superiorem partem Domûs ascendit : et candidatorum unurn
quemque, destra manu prehensum, coram Cancellario sistit ; et
capite, qua par est reverentiâ, inclinato, solemni formula com-
metidat.
   D. Honoratissime Cancellarie, amplissimi Senatores, vosque
egregii Procuratores, commendo vobis hos meos Scholares in
Facúltate artium, quos scio tarn moribus quam doctrina idóneos
esse ut admittantur ad gradum.
   Tum praseunte PROCURATOR!·; SENIORS, omites ,fidem dant aca-
demias in lisec verba.
   P. Ad seniorem eouversus Domine Dabis, fidem te omnia
statuta, jura, privilegia et libertates istius Universitatis sanc-
tissime esse observaturum.
   KESP: Do.
94                 «   FORM FOR
                   DEGREES..
   P.- Dabis fidem te ñeque Academias pacem ultro perturba-
turum ; et si qua exarserit seditio aut contentio, pacis semper et
concordias auctorem futurum.
   BÏSP : Do.
   JP. Ad reliques con versus. Quod de se spopondit M.N. idem
vos quoque, de se quisque, spondetis ?
   BxbP : Spondeo.
   HI;GISJKAR : Testor hos omnes coram me, in publicis Aca-
demias actis nomina sua subscripsisse.
   Tum singulos, Decaaus ad Cancellarium dedueit ; qui ununs-
quemque destra manu preaensum. ita alloquitur.
   C. Domine ego auctoritate meâ et totius Universitatis admitto
te ad gradum : necnon ad omnia facienda, obeunda, usurpanda,
quse ad istum gradum spectant.
                                                                       95



                         RULES AND ORDERS
                                     OF

       THE       UNIVERSITY                      LIBRARY.


           For Boohs allowed to he taken out of the Library.
No person shall be allowed to take books out of the Library
but Fellows of the Senate, Professors, and other Public Teachers
in the University, Officers of the University, or other persons
who shall have obtained this privilege under a special resolution
of the Senate, and Graduates holding any degree above that of
B.A., and having their names on the books of the University and
being resident in Sydney or its suburbs.
   No one shall take or borrow any book out of the Library with-
out first delivering a note for the same to the Librarian or his
Deputy, expressing his Name and Residence in his own hand-
writing, the title of the book, the year and day of the month on
which such book is taken or borrowed, on pain of forfeiting £5,
or double the value of the book, at the discretion of the Library
Committee.
   The Librarian shall preserve all such notes, till the books so
taken out are returned to the Library ; and when all the books
specified in each note are returned, the notes shall be delivered
up to the persons by whom the books are brought back : when
only some books specified in each note are returned, the titles of
the books so returned shall be erased from the note at the time.
   No person shall be allowed to have in his possession at one
time more than ten volumes belonging to the Library, bnt the
Library Committee may dispense with this order in any parti-
cular case, if they shall be of opinion that sufficient reasons have
 96                     BULES AND ORDERS OF

 been assigned for such dispensation ; such dispensation, however,
 shall continue in force no longer than to the end of the current
 quarter ; but upon fresh application may be renewed by the
 same authority.
    Every one who shall borrow or take any book out of the
Library shall return it thither again on the demand of the Libra-
rian, at any time after the expiration of seven days, and without
such demand on or before the next of the four following quarter
days,-Triz. :—March 31st, June 30th, September 30th, December
31st, under penalty of Two shillings for every folio or quarto,
and One shilling for every book of less size ; all penalties to be
repeated every fortnight till the books be returned, or others of
the same editions and equal value be placed in their room, such
-fortnight heing first reckoned from the day on which the Library
is re-opened after the quarter day. If any of the Quarter Days
should fall on a Sunday, or on any other day on which the
Library is closed by Rule 20, the day appointed for returning
the books shall be the following day.
     No Books shall be taken out of the Library on the days ap-
 pointed for the return of Books.
     Every Professor shall have the privilege of obtaining Books
 for each Student attending his lectures, and being a Member
 of the University. Each order for the volumes so obtained
 shall bear the titles of the Books, and be dated and subscribed
 as follows—
                               For M. N.,
                                   C. D., Professor.
  The books so obtained shall not be taken out of the Library till
  the day after that on which the Library is re-opened for the
  Quarter ; and they shall be returned at any time after the expira-
  tion of seven days, if demanded by the Librarian, and if not so
  demanded, not later than the day before the next Quarter Day.
  The Professor shall be responsible for the books so obtained, and
                    THE UNIVEESITY LIBRARY.                             97

for the penalties prescribed by Rule 5 ; and no' Student shall
have in his possession at one time more than five volumes.
   A list of the books omitted to be returned at the end of any
Quarter, together with the names of the borrowers, shall be sus-
pended in some conspicuous place in the Library.
   No person from whom any fine is due to the Library shall be
allowed to take out books until such fine has been paid.
   If any book be injured or defaced by writing while in the
possession of any person taking it out of the Library, he shall
be required to replace it by another book of the same edition
and of equal value. Persons taking books out of the Library are
required to report, without delay, to the Librarian any injury
which they may observe in them.

  For Books not to be taken out of the Libranj without a note
       countersigned by the Chancellor or Vice-Ohancellor.
   Certain printed books, of which a list shall be prepared under
the authority of the Library Committee and be kept by the Libra-
rian, shall not be taken out except by a note countersigned by
the Chancellor or Vice- Chancellor -, nor until the day after that on
which the note is presented ; and no such note shall be given to
any Undergraduate Member of the University, nor shall any
•person have more than five volumes of such books out of the
Library at one time. A Register shall be kept of all such books
taken out of the Library, and of the date on which they are
returned, and after the books are returned the Plates in them
shall forthwith be collated, and the collation be registered ; and
until such collation shall have been made the books shall not be
accessible to persons using the Library, nor shall the counter-
signed note be given up to the persons by whom, the books are
returned, but in lieu of it an acknowledgment signed by the
Librarian or his Deputy ; and the name of the person by whom
the acknowledgment is signed shall also be registered.
98                     RULES AND ORDERS OF

  The Penalties for not returning such books at the Quarter
days shall be double of the penalties prescribed in Rule 5.
  For MSS. mid Books ?wt allowed to be taken out of the Library.
   The Library Committee may cause MSS. books containing
collections of Prints or Drawings, and other documents and books
of a nature or value to render such precaution expedient, to be
locked up in cases or compartments by themselves. These shall
not be taken out of the Library on any pretence whatever ; and
access to them shall not be allowed, unless the Librarian or some
one deputed by him be present. The Librarian himself shall
have charge of the keys.
   The Library Committee may direct that certain printed Books,
of which a list shall be kept by the Librarian, shall not be removed
from the Library.      Such Books shall be always kept there.
   Persons desirous of referring to any particular MSS., or scarce
printed Book, shall apply to the Librarian, who, if he see cause,
may allow such MSS. or Books to be consulted, but not in the
compartment in which the MSS. or scarce printed Books are
kept.
   Parts of Periodicals, work in progress, Pamphlets, &c, until
such time as is proper for binding them shall be kept under such
a system of management that they may be produced if required,
after a few minutes' notice on application being made to the
Librarian by means of an ordinary Library note, so that persons
in whose literary researches such works are necessary may
consult them in the Library with the consent of the Librarian.
                      For Admission to the Library.
   Except on the day when the Library is re-opened for any
Quarter, those Undergraduates who have obtained a Professor's
orders for Books shall be admitted to the Library for the purpose
of selecting their Books, or otherwise consulting the Library,
during the hour from one to two.
                     THE UNIVEESITY LIBRARY.                         99

    Admission of Persons not Members of the University, for
                  the purpose of Study and research.
   The Chancellor or Vice-Chañcellor may grant an order of
admission to the. Library for the purpose of study and research to
any person who shall produce to him a recommendation from any
Fellow of the Senate or Professor, or any Member of the Uni-
versity who shall have been admitted to the Degree of M.A., or
any higher degree, stating " that the person recommended is
well known to him," and " that he is a fit and proper person to
obtain such order." The name of the Member of the Senate or
the Professor upon whose recommendation any such order of
admission shall be granted, shall be placed after the name of the
person receiving the permission in a List to be suspended at the
entrance of the Library.
   Such persons shall be permitted to use the Library whilst open,
except (on any day on which the Library is first opened for the
Quarter, or on any day on which the Library is closed for the
Quarter). This admission order shall not entitle the holder to
have access to lock up cases, which admission order shall have
effect only until the expiration of the quarter in which it shall
have been granted.
                For Opening and Closing the IÁbrary.
   Por the purpose of allowing the Librarian sufficient time to
inspect the Books, the Library shall be closed for the first fort-
night in the month of January, and also for the two days (ex-
cepting Sunday) next after each of the three other quarter days.
   The Library shall be closed on Sundays and Public Holidays.
   The Library shall be open on Saturdays from ten till one, and
other days from ten till three.
100

                UNIVERSITY OFFICERS, &c.
                                               VISITOR.
    The Governor of the Colony for the time being is ex-officio
Visitor of the University.
    * 1850.—His Excellency SIB CHARLES AUGUSTOS FITZ Ror, K.C.B., K.H.
      1855.—His Excellency SIR THOMAS WILLIAM DENISON, K.C.B.
   1861.—His Excellency The Right Hon. SIE JOHN YOUNG,
K.C.B., G.C.M.G.
                                          CHANCELLOR.
    The Chancellor is elected by the Fellows of the Senate out of
their own body, for such period as the Senate may from time to
time appoint. The period is at present limited by a By-Law
to Three years ; but the retiring Chancellor is declared to be
eligible for re-election.
       1851.—EDWARD HAMILTON", M.A.
       1β54.—SIR CHARLES NICHOLSON, Bart, D.C.L., LL.D.

      1862.—The Hon. FRANCIS LEWIS SHAW MEREWETHER, B.A.
                                   VICE-CHANCELLOR.
   The Vice-Chancellor is annually elected by the Fellows of the
Senate out of their own body.
       1851.—SIB CHARLES NICHOLSON, Bart, D.C.L., LL.D.
       1854.—The Hon. F. L. S. MRBKWETHER, B.A.

      1862.—The Hon. EDWARD DEAS-THOHSON, CB.
                           THE SENATE.
   The original Senate was appointed on the 24th December,
1850, by the following Proclamation :—
W HEREASthe anUniversityyearSydney,"Majesty's Keign,Council ofAn ActSouth Wales, purpose
  passed in
            by Act of the Governor and Legislative
              fourteenth
  and endow the           of
                             of Her                  entitled "
                                                                New
                                                                      to incorporate
                                     it is amongst other things enacted, that for the
of asceitainiDg by means of examination, the persons who shall acquire proficiency in litera-
ture, science, and art, and of rewarding them by Academical Degrees, as evidence of their
respective attainments, and by marks of honor proportioned thereto, a Senate, consisting of
the number of persons in the said Act mentioned, shall within three months after the passing
thereof, be nominated and appointed by the said Governor, with the advice of the Executive
Council of the said Colony, by a Proclamation to be duly published in the New South Wales
Government Gazette, which Senate shall be, and by the said Act is constituted from the date
of such nomination and appointment, a Body Politic and Corporate, by the name of " TAe
University of Sydney ;" and it is thereby further enacted, that the said Body Politic and
Corporate shall consist of sixteen Fellows, twelve of whom, at the least, shall be laymen :

     * The dates prefixed to the names of Office Holders refer to the first appointment or
entrance upon ottice.
                           UNIVERSITY OFFICERS.                                        101
Now, therefore, I, Sm CHAULES AUGUSTUS FITZ ROT as such Governor aforesaid, by this
my Proclamation, published in the New South Wales Government Gazette, do notify and
proclaim that, with the advice of the said Executive Council, I have nominated and ap-
pointed the following persons to be such Senate as aforesaid : that is to say :—
The Rev. William Binnington Boyce.                  Francis Lewis Shaw Merewether, Esq.
Edward Broadhurst, Esq.                              Charles Nicholson, Esq.
John Bayley Darvall, Esq.                           Bartholomew O'Brien, Esq.
Stuart Alexander Donaldson, Esq.                     The Hon. John Hubert Plunkett, Esq.
The Right Rev. Charles Henry Davis.                 The Rev. William Purves.
Alfred Denison, Esq.                                 His Honor Roger Therry, Esq.
Edward Hamilton, Esq.                                The Hon. Edward Deas-Thomson, Esq. ■
James Macarthur, Esq.                                William Charles Wentworth, Eeq.
                Given under my Hand and Seal at Government House, Sydney, this twenty-
                    fourth day of December, in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight
                    hundred and fifty, and in the fourteenth year of Her Majesty's Reign.
                    (L.s.)                                     CHAS. A. FITZ ROY.
                                 By Sis Excellency's Command,
                                             E. DEAS THOMSON.
                               GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.


   Under the original Incorporation Act the election to vacant
Fellowships was vested in the Senate until there should be one
hundred graduates holding the Degree of M.A., LL.D., or M.D.
By an Act passed in 1861 the election to vacancies was vested in
Fellows of the. Senate, Professors, and other Public Teachers of
the University, Examiners, Principals of .Incorporated Colleges
within the University, Superior officers declared to be such by
By-Law and graduates keeping their names on the Register of
the University who may have taken any or either of the Degrees
of M.A., LL.D., or M.D.—In addition to the sixteen Fellows it
was provided by the same Act that there should not be fewer
than three nor more than six ex~officio Members of the Senate,
being Professors of the University in such branches of Learning
as the Senate might select.


                         EX-MEMBEES        OP     THE     SENATE.
     * 1854.—Hamilton, Edward T., M.A.                I860.—Macarthur, James./·
       1855.—Davis, The Right Rev. C. H., D.D.        I860.—Denison, Alfred, B.A.
       1856.—Broadhurst, Edward.                      1861.—Donaldson, Sir Stuart A.
       1859.—Boyce, the Rev. W. B.                    1861.—Cooper, Sir Daniel.
       1859.—Therry, Roger.
                                 * Dates of vacating office.
102                    UNIVERSITY OFFICERS.

                        PRESENT SENATE.
         Allen, The Hon. George.
         Allwoód, The Rev. Robert, B.A.
         Darvall, John Bayley, M.A.
         Douglass, H. Grattan, M.D.
         Faucett, Peter, B.A.
         Macarthur, Sir William.
         Manning, The Hon. Sir William M., LL.D.
         Martin, James.
         Merewether, The Hon. F.L.S., B.A., Chancellor.
         Nicholson, Sir Charles, Bart., D.C.L., LL.D.
         O'Brien, Bartholomew, M.D.
         Pell, Morris Birkbeck, B.A.
         Plnnkett, The Hon. J. Hubert, B.A.
         Polding, The Most Rev. Archbishop, D.D.
         Purves, The Rev. William, M.A.
         Smith, John, M.D.
         Thomson, The Hon. E. Deas, C.B., Vice-Chancellor.
         Wentworth, The Hon. William Charles.
         WooUey, John, D.C.L.


                     PROFESSORS.
         CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE.
        1852.—(a) John WooUey, Principal, D.C.L., (Oxford.)

         MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.
      1852.—(b) Morris Birbbeck Pell, B.A., (Cambridge.)

         CHEMISTRY AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS.
          1852.—(c) John Smith, M.D., (Aberdeen.)
         α Late Fellow of University College, Oxford.
         b Late Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge.
         c Late Assistant Professor of Chemistry, in Marischal College, Aberdeen,
                    UNIVEESITY OFFICERS.                         103

                           LOGIC.
            1855.—John Woolley, D.C.L., (Oxford.)
                   ASSISTANT CLASSICS.
            1855.—Hugh Kennedy, B.A., (Oxford.)
          EEADEE LN GENEEAL JTJEISPETJDENCE.
        1859.—John F.Hargrave, M. A., (Cambridge.)
                    READER IN FEENCH.
                      Mons. P. A. Dutruc.
   FACULTY OF AETS.—EXAMINERS APPOINTED BY THE
                  SENATE FOE 1862.
     c            )   Woolley, John, D.C.L., (Oxford.)
                  )   Cary, Henry, M.A., (Oxford.)
   MATHEMATICS        )     Pell, Morris Birkbeck, B.A., (Cam-
        AND            >         bridge.)
NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. ) a Scott, Rev. W., M.A., (Cambridge.)
      CHEMISTRY           Ï   Smith; John> MiD-i   (Aberdeen.)
         AND
EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. J       Greenup, R., M.D., (Cambridge.)


                      J
FACULTY OF MEDICINE.—BOAED OF EXAMINERS APPOINTED
     BY THE SENATE UNDEE THE BY-LAWS OF 1856.
           John Smith, M.D., (Dean of the Faculty.)
           Arthur Martin áBeckett.
           George Bennett.
           Richard Greenup, M.D., (Cambridge.)
        b John Macfarlane, M.D., (Glasgow.)
      Charles Nathan.
      ' c James Robertson, M.D., (Edinburgh.)
      George West.
                  a Late Fellow of Sidney Sussex College.
                  b M. D., University of Melbourne.
                  c M.B., University of London.
104        UNIVERSITY OFFICERS.

                 REGISTRARS.
       1S51.—RICHARD GREENUP, M.D.
       1852.—WILLIAM LOUIS HCTTON.
       1853.—HUGH KENNEDY, B.A.

            ESQUIRE BEDELL.
       1855.—"W. C. WINDEYER, M.A.

      UNIVERSITY         SOLICITOR.
            GEORGE WIGRAM ALLEN.

                    AUDITOR.
           1861.—GEOFFREY EAGAR.

         CURATOR OF MUSEUM.
             I860.—EDWARD REEVE.
            1861.—CHARLES WATT.

               ACCOUNTANT.
                 WILLIAM CLARK.
                                                                   105

                      COLLEGES.

   By the Act 18 Victoria No. 37, provision is made for the
Foundation of COLLEGES within the University, in connexion with
the various religious Denominations ; in which Students of the
University may enjoy the advantages of residence, instruction in
the doctrine and discipline of their respective Churches, and
tuition supplementary to the Lectures of the public Professors.
   No Student can be admitted at any such College unless he
immediately matriculates in the University ; submits to its dis-
cipline ; and attends the Statutable Lectures ; nor can he con-
tinue a member of the College longer than his name remains
upon the University Books.
                 SAINT PAUL'S COLLEGE.
Incorporated by the Act 18 Victoria in connexion with the
Church of England. In the terms of the Act the Visitor is the
Bishop of Sydney. The Corporation consists of a Warden, who
must be in Priest's Orders, and eighteen Fellows, six of whom
must be in Priest's Orders. The Eellows with the Warden form
the Council in which the government of the College is vested.
                               VISITOR.
                      THE    BISHOP OF       STDNEi.
          1855.—The Right Reverend Frederick Barker, D.D.
                  THE PRESENT SOCIETY.
                            WARDEN.
       a The Reverend William Henry Savigny, M.A., (Sydney.)
                            VICE-WABDEN.

                               BURSAR.
                            J. D. Cox, B.A.
                             o 8.A., (Oxford.)
                                     K
106                          COLLEGES.
                              FELLOWS.
Allwood, Rev. Robert, B.A.              Mitchell, Hon. James.
Clarke, Rev. W.B., M.A.                 b Mort, Thomas Sutcliffe.
a Cowper, Hon. Charles.                 Nathan, Charles.
Holroyd, Arthur Todd, M.B.              Smart, T. W.
Johnson, Richard.                       Stack, Rev. W., M.A.
Johnson, Robert.                        Stephen, Hon. Sir Alfred.
Kemp, Hon. Charles.                     Stephen, Rev. A. H., B.A.
King, Rev. George, B.A.                 Tooth, Robert.
Metcalfe, Michael.                      Walsh, Rev. W. H., M.A.

                                  M.A.
                 Johnson, James W.
                 Lee, Edward.
                 Want, R. C.
                                  B.A.
                 Bowman, Alexander.
                 Hargraves, Edward John.
                 Hunt, Edward.
                 M'Carthy, H.' T. S.
                 Cowper, Sedgwick S.
                 Innes, Gustavus.
                 Stephen, Cecil Bedford.

                     UNDERGRADUATES.
                                RESIDENT.

                 Long, George Edward.
                 Manning, William Alexander.


                    a Succeeded Sir D. Cooper,
                    o Succeeded H. H. Brown.
                               COLLEGES.                               107

                     ST. JOHN'S          COLLEGE.
   Incorporated by the Act 21 Victoria, in connexion with the
Roman Catholic Church. In the terms of the Act the Visitor is
the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney. The Corporation
consists of a Rector (who must be a duly approved Priest) and
eighteen Fellows, of whom six must be duly approved Priests,
and twelve laymen. These eighteen Fellows with the Rector
form the Council in which the government of the College is
vested.

                                VISITOR.
            THE EOMiN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF STDNEY.

      1857.—The Most Reverend John Bede Polding, D.Ü.

               THE     PRESENT         SOCIETY.
                                RECTOR.
    The Very Reverend John Forrest, D.D., (Gregorian Uni-
versity, Rome.)

                               FELLOWS.
a Brennan, The Rev. M.                 Hart, James.
  Butler, Edward.                      Keating, The Rev. Jerome.
  Corish, The Rev. Michael A.          Lenehan, Andrew.
  Curtis, William C, M.A.              MacEncroe, The Ven. Archd".
δ Donovan, John, M.A.                  Makinson, Thomas C, B.A.
  Duncan, W. A,,                       O'Connor, Richard.
c Ellis, G. E.                         Plunkett, John H., B.A.
  Faucett, Peter, B.A.                 Sheridan, The Rev. J. F.
  Gorman, John V.                      Therry, The Very Rev. John J.

                  α Succeeded The Very Reverend Dean Lynch.
                  b Succeeded William Davis.
                  c Succeeded J. K. Heydon.
108                           COLLEGES.

                        UNDERGRADUATES.
                                RESIDENT.
                   Healey, Patrick Joseph.
                   Lynch, William.
                   Browne, William C.
                   Cummings, John S.

                              SON-RESIDENT.
                   Callachor, Hugh B.
                   McNamara, Patrick B.
                   Meillon, Joseph.
                   Quirk, Daniel P.

                        WESLEY       COLLEGE.
   Incorporated by an Act of the Legislature which received the
Governor's assent, on the first of June, 1860, in connexion with
the Wesleyan Methodist Church. In the terms of the Act the
Visitor is the President for the time being of the Conference, or
in his absence from the Colony, the Chairman for the time being
of the New South Wales District. The Corporation consists of
a Principal (who must be a Wesleyan Methodist Minister in full
connection with the Conference), and twelve Fellows, of whom
four must be Wesleyan Methodist Ministers in full connection
with the Conference, and eight Laymen who must be communi-
cants with the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and of whom five at
least must be Members of the Wesleyan Methodist Society.
The four Senior Ministers resident for the time being in the
County of Cumberland, not being Supernumeraries, are ex-officio
the Clerical Members of the Council. These twelve Fellows
with the Principal form the Council in which the government
of the College is vested.
                                                                             109




                         SCHOLARSHIPS.



      1.-UNIVERSITY             SCHOLARSHIPS             FOR
                  GENERAL           PROFICIENCY.


   Seven Scholarships for general Proficiency of thé annual value
of £50 each, have been established by the Senate out of the
Endowment Fund of the University. Under the present By-
Laws three (one of which is the Levey) are allotted to the under-
graduates of the first year, three to the second year, and one to
the third year, but these are not awarded unless the Candidates
exhibit a degree of proficiency satisfactory to the Examiners.
They can be held for one year only, and are given for general
proficiency in the subjects to be studied for a degree in the
Faculty of Arts. Under the provisions of the By-Laws in force
previous to the year 1855, these Scholarships were tenable
during the whole of the undergraduate course.

   1852.—CURTIS, W. C.       SHALT, K.                 WlNDEYEB, W. C.
          .UlTCHBLL, D. S.   WENTWORTH, FlTZWILLIAM.   WILLIS, R. S.
          OLITEK, A.
   1SÖ3,—BiETON, G.          PATBBSON, J.              JOHNSOJf, J.   W.
          DONOVAN, J.        REN^ICK, A.               KlNLOCK, J-
          HABNKTT, J.        CoULSON, T. H.
   1S54.—SALTING, G.         STACK, J.                 HAWTKOK.V, .STLWKT.
   1855.—INNES, GDSTAVDS.    JONES, RlIES K.
   1857.-RuSSBLL, H.         CoWLISHAW, W".            OAKLAND, J.
110                              SCHOLARSHIPS.

   1858.—STEPHEN, CECIL.            LANE, GEOHGE.
   1859.—STEPHEN, CECIL.            BOWMAN, E.                PBHBY, J.
   1860.—STEPHEN, CECIL.            MEIN, C. S.               GRIFFITH, S.
   1861.—BOWMAN, E.                 MURRAY, C. E. B.          WEIGHT, K.
         GRIFFITH, S.               MEIN, C. S.               ALLEN, A.
   1862.—GRIFFITH, S W.             ALLEN, A. M.              MATE, F.
         MURRAY, C. E. R.           SMITH, R.'                CAFE, A.
         MEIN, C. S.




              2.—CLASSICAL SCHOLARSHIP.

   A Special Scholarship of the annual value of £50 was awarded
by the Senate in the years 1854-5 for the encouragement of
Classical Literature, to be open to all Undergraduates without
limitation who might have completed their sixth term in the
University.
                            1854.—WILLIAM CHARLES WINDEYER.
                            1855.—GEORGE SALTING.


  This Scholarship ceased to be awarded *on the foundation in
1857 of the

                     COOPER SCHOLARSHIP.
   A sum of £1000 was given by the Honorable Sir Daniel Cooper
in 1857, for the foundation of a Scholarship for the encourage-
ment of Classical Literature. The Principal is invested in
Government Debentures, bearing 5 per cent, interest, and
yielding at the present time £50 per annum. This Scholarship
is open to all Undergraduates who have completed their sixth
term, and is tenable for one year only, but it can be held with a
General University or Special Scholarship.
                                 1857.—HAWTHORN, STUART.
                                   1S62.—GRIFFITH, S. W.
                         SCHOLARSHIPS.                        m

             3.-BARKER SCHOLARSHIP.
   A principal sum of £1000 was given by Thomas Barker, Esq.,
in 1853, for the foundation of a Scholarship for the encourage-
ment of Mathematical Science. This Scholarship was originally
open to all Undergraduates, but it can now be competed for by
those of the third year only, like the Cooper Scholarship above
described, and is held on the same terms. The annual value
is £50.
                   1853.—MITCHELL, DAVID SCOTT.
                   1854.—MITCHELL, DAVID SCOTT.
                   1855.—PATERSON, JAMES.
                   1857.—JONES, REES R.
                   1858.-21¾* Awarded.
                   1859.—COWLISHAW, W.
                   I860.—STEPHEN, CECIL.
                   1861.—BOWMAN, EDWARD.
                   1862.—GRIFFITH, S. W.




       4—DEAS-THOMSON SCHOLARSHIP.
   In the year 1854, .the Honorable E. Deas-Thomson, Esquire,
then Colonial Secretary of New South Wales, left the colony on
a visit to England, and on that occasion a Testimonial Fund was
raised^ and presented to him on account of his public services.
Out of this fund, Mr. Deas-Thomson appropriated £1000 to the
foundation of a Scholarship in the University for the encourage-
ment of Physical Science. Like the Cooper and the Barker
Scholarships, it is open to Undergraduates in their sixth term
only, and is held on the same terms as those Scholarships. This
Scholarship is of the annual value of £50.
                   1854.—WILLIS, ROBERT SPIER.
                   1855.—SALTING, WILLIAM SEVERIN.
                   1857.—Not Awarded.
                   1858.—RUSSELL, HENRY.
                   1859.-ODAiFE, F. H.
                   1860.—STEPHEN, CECIL.
                   1861.—BOWMAN, ANDREW.
                   18G2.—MURRAY, C. E. R.
112                           SCHOLARSHIPS.

                5.-LEVEY           SCHOLARSHIP.
   The sum of £500 was bequeathed by Solomon Levey, Esquire,
to the Sydney College, which had been established by a certain
number of Subscribers forming a Joint Stock Company for the
purpose of imparting the rudiments of a liberal education to the
youth of the Colony. The direction of Mr. Levey in respect to
this bequest was that the amount should be invested in the pur-
chase of shares in the College, and that the annual income
arising therefrom should be applied towards the education of
Orphan Boys at the discretion of the Trustees of the College.
    The Sydney College having failed in its object, the Shareholders
were empowered by an Act of the Legislature passed in 1853, to
sell to the University of Sydney the Land in Hyde Park, which
had been granted by the Government as a site for the College
with the buildings and all other property belonging to the College,
including Mr. Levey's bequest. This sale having been effected
accordingly in the same year, it was resolved by the Senate of
the University, that Mr. Levey's bequest which they had acquired
should be devoted to the foundation of a Scholarship to be called
the Levey Scholarship, but that the principal, which then, with
accrued interest, amounted to £565, should be allowed to accu-
mulate further before its actual application to the intended object.
The principal is now represented by seven Government Deben-
tures of £100 each, beai'ing interest at the rate of 5 per cent.
              1857.—TOM, W.                  I860.—MURHAY, C. E. R.
              1858.—Not Awarded.             IS6\ .—Not Awarded.
              1839.—Not Awarded.             1863.-0'15RIEN, L.

                6—SALTING EXHIBITION.
    A sum of £500 was given by Severin Kanute Salting, Esquire,
to the University, to be applied for the promotion of sound
learning. This Exhibition is appropriated for a student in the
Faculty of Arts, proceeding to the University from the Sydney
Grammar School. The principal is invested in Government
Debentures bearing interest at 5 per cent.
                                   I860.—MEIS, C. S.




                      N
                                                                   113

                              PRIZES.

                                ENGLISH ESSAY.

In 1853, a Prize of £11 was given by Professor Woolley for the
     best English Essay. The sum of £200 (Government Deben-
     tures) was given in 1854, by W. C. Wentworth, Esq., the
     interest to be applied in an Annual Prize for the same
     object.
                          1853.-WlNDETEH, W. C.
                          1854.-WlNDETER, W. C.
                          1855.—WlNDETER, W. C.

                            1862.—DOCKER, ERNEST B.

                                ENGLISH VERSE.

In 1854, the Provost, Edward T. Hamilton, Esq., gave £25 for
     the best Composition hi English Verse. Since the year 1857,
     an annual sum of £20 has been appropriated by the Senate
     for a Medal for the same object.
                   ISBi /WILLIS, R. SPIER.               1 Pn „■
                   1864
                       - \SALTINO, WILLIAM S.    J Equa1·
                            1857.—SALTING, WILLIAM S.
                            1860.-YARRlNeTON, W, H.

                       <, 1861.—DOCKER, ERNEST B.

                            LATIN HEXAMETERS.

The late Chancellor, Sir Charles Nicholson, gave a Medal of the
     annual value of £20 for the best Composition in Latin
     Hexameters.
                           1855.—SALTING, GEORGE.
                           1857.—SALTING, GEORGE.
                           1862.-GRIFFITH, S. W.

                                 GREEK IAMBICS.

In 1853, Sir Charles Nicholson gave £20 for the best Com-
     position in Greek Iambic, Verse. In 1861 and 1862, an
     annual Medal of the value of £10 was offered by Professor
     Woolley for the same object. This Medal is now given
     annually by the Honorable George Allen.
                           1853.—FORSBALL, W. F.
                           1861.—HOUISON, JAMES.
                           1862,—GRIFFITH, S. W.
                                          L
114                             PRIZES.

                             LATIN    ELEUlACS.

£10 is annually given by the Chancellor, the Hon. Francis
     L. S. Merewether, for the best Composition (generally a
     translation) in Latin Elegiacs.
                         1856.-SAI.TING, GEORGE.
                         1857.—SALTING, GEORGE.
                         185S.—SALTING, GEORGE.
                         1861.-GBIPEITH, S. W.


                               LATDi ESSAY.

A Prize of £10 for the best Latin Essay was offered by Professor
     Woolley.
                          1854.—SALTING, GEORGE.
                          1856.—SALTING, GEORGE.


An Annual Medal of the value of £10 is given by Professor
    Woolley for an English Essay by a Bachelor of Arts, not
    exceeding fifteen terms from his matriculation.

An Annual Prize for Proficiency in Mathematics among com-
         mencing Bachelors is given by Professor Pell.
                           1861.—STEPHEN, CECIL.


  An Annual Prize is given by Professor Smith, to the Student
who distinguishes himself most at the Class Examinations, (virna
voce,) in Chemistry and Experimental Physics throughout each
year.    These Prizes have been awarded as follows :—
                         1854. (   PATERSON.
                               \  WILLIS.
                         1855. —RENWICK.
                         1856. —HAWTHORNE.
                         -
                         -
                         1857. (   GARLAND.
                               \  HALLET.          }   aeq.

                         1858. f  GA RL AK D.
                               \  STEPHEN.         }   aeq.

                         I860. —STEPHEN.
                         -
                         1861.    f   BOWMAN, E.\
                                X     GRIFFITH. J
                                           ANNUAL PRIZ ES.
          Books stamped with the University Arms are given under a By-Law of the Senate
                   to each Member of the First Class at the Yearly Examinations.
         CLASSICS.       MATHEMATICS.       CHEMISTRY AND        LOGIC.            MORAL         FRENCH.         GENERAL
                                            ExPEaiSIENTiL
                                            PHXSICS.                            PHILOSOPHY.                      JURIS i'RunENCE.

1853.    Oliver, 1       Kinlcck, 1         Curtis, I
         Windeyer, 1     Mitchell, 1        Fitzgerald, 1
                                            Kinlock, 1
                                            Mitchell, 1
                                            Riley, 1

1854.    Windeyer, 2 Q                      Fitzgerald, 2       Windeyer, 2     Windeyer, 2
         Barton, 1      Paterson, 1         Burdekin, S., 1
         Paterson, 1                        Dacre, 1
         Salting, G., 1                     Harnett, 1
         Salting, W. 1                      Paterson, I

1855.    Paterson, 2     Paterson, 2        Burdekin, S., 2     Paterson, 2     Salting, G., 2    Salting, G.2
         Salting, G. 2   Re η wick, 2       Renwick, 2          Salting, G. 2   Salting, W., 2   SaTting,W.2
         Salting, W.2    Salting, G., 2-
         Stack, 2        Hawthorne, 1
         Hawthorne, 1    Jones, 1

1856.    Hawthorne, 2    Jones, 2           Hawthorne, 2                                         ~ McLerie, 1
         lnnes, 1        Hawthorne, 2       lnnes, 1                                             Jones, 2.
         Norton, 1       lnnes, 1           Russell, 1
         Hunt, I         McLerie, I
                         Russell, 1

1857.    lnnes, 2        lnnes, 2           lnnes, 2                                             McLerie, 2,
         Hunt, 2         Russell, 2         Russell, 2                                           Rogers, 1
         Cowlishaw, 1    McLerie, 2         Quaife, 1                                            Wilshire, 2
         Garland, 1      Cowlishaw, 1       Garland, 1
         Tom, 2          Garland, 1         Halley, 1
         Gibbes, 1       Gibbes, 1          Cowlishaw, 1
         Cowper, Γ       Tom, I

1858.    Garland, 2      Cowlishaw,. 2      ■ Quaife, 2                                          Rogers, 2
         Cowlishaw, 2    Garland, 2         Garland, 2\ σ                                        McCarthy, 2
         Gibbes, 2       Gibbes, 2          Tom, 2        ίK
         Tom, 2          Tom, 2             Bowden, 2 \ ¿·
         Sowper, 2       Quaife, 2          Cowlishaw2j K
         Lane, 1         Terry,. 2.         Stephen, 1
         Stephen, 1      Rogers, 2          Lane, 1
         Dixson, 1       Stephen, I
                         Lane, 1
                         Dixson, 1

1859.    Stephen, 2  Stephen, 2             Stephen, 2                                                           Paterson, J., M.A.
         Bowman E. 1 Bowman, E., 1          Bowman, E., 1                                                        Curtis,W. C.,M.A.
         Bowman A.l Colyer, 1                                                                                    Donovan, J., M.A.
                                                                                                                 Tom, Wesley

18(10.   Bowman-E.2      Bowman, E., 2      Bowman, E., 21                                       Hurst; 1        Broughton, 1
         Sriffith, 1     Colyer, 2          Griffith, 1;
         Murray, 1       Griffith, 1        Murray, I
         Healy, 1        Murray, 1          Hurst, 1
         Mein, 1         Mein, 1            Meillon, I
         Docker, 1       Docker, 1          Mein, 1
                         Meillon, 1

186!.    Griflith, 2     Griffith, 2        Meillon, 2                                           Docker, 2       McCormack, 1
         Murray, 2       Murray, 2          Griffith, 2
         Healy, 2        Meillon, 2         Murray, 2
         Quirk, 5., 2    Wright, I          Healy, 2\ ¿.
         Docker, 2                          Mein, 2 J 8
         Wright, 1                          Docker, 2
                                            Houison, 2
                                            McNamara21 &
                                            Quirk, D., 2 ; fc


                     N.B.—The figures 1, 2, denote, respectively, Students of the first and second years,
116



                                   DEGREES.


                                               M.A.
1859.—BURDEKIN, M.                     MITCHELL, D. S.      JOHNSON, J. W.
      CORTIS, W. C.                    WlNDEYEB, W. C.      KITT LOCK, J.
      FITZGERALD, R.M.                 DONOVAN, J.          PATERSON, J.
      LEE, EDWARD.

I860.—STACK, JOHN.

18Gl.—STANLEY, GEORGE H.              WANT, RANDOLPH C.

1882.—SAVIGNY, W. H.                  ALLEN, W.       P.   GABLAND, J. R.
WrLLis, R. S.                         COWLISHAW, W.        QUAIFE, F. H.
                                      B.A.

1857.—RENWICK, A.                     SiLTlNG, G.          SALTINQ W.

1859.-BuBDEKIN,       S.   JEgrotat   HABGRAVES, E.   H.   HUNT, E.
HAWTHOENB1S.,                         JONES, R.            RUSSELL, H.
BOWMAN, A.                            PlLCHEB1 G.

1860.-GiBBES, F. J.        T. S.      TOM, W.              INNES, GUSTAVOS.
MACCABTHY, H.                         COWPEB, S.
                                      S.
1861.—BOWDEN, J. E.                   ROGERS, F. E.

1862.—STEPHEN, CECIL                  BOWMAN, E.           BOWMAN, A.



   The following gentleman passed the Examination for the
                           degree of B.A.
                                        186S.—THORNE, G.
                        REPORT
      UNIVERSITY                  OP          SYDNEY,
              FOR THE YEAR ENDED 3IsT DECEMBER, 186!.




   1. The Senate "of the University, in accordance with the pro-
visions of the 22nd clause of the Act of Incorporation, 14 Vic,
NO. 31, have the honor to submit, for the information of the
Governor and Executive Council, the following Report of their
Proceedings during the year 1861.
   2. Twelve Students were admitted to Matriculation, after
having passed the statutory examination.
   3. The following Degrees were conferred :—
                             MASTEES    0Γ AETS.
     The Reverend George H. Stanley, B.A., London (admitted
       to examination under the By-Law relating to Bachelors of
       Arts of British Universities).
     Mr. Randolph Want, B.A., Sydney.
                            BACHELOES    OP   AETS.
     Mr. James Ebenezer Bowden.
   , Mr. Frederick Rogers.
  4. The following were the successful Candidates for Scholar-
ships during the year, viz. :—
    BARREE SCHOLAESHIP (for proficiency in Mathematical Science) :—
                         Edward Bowman.
    DEAS-THOMSON SCHOLARSHIP (for proficiency            in Physical
    Science):—
                              Andrew Bowman.
 118                            REPORT.

       GENERAL UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS :—
          Third year :—      Edward Bowman.
                          I Samuel W. Griffith.
          Second year :— < Charles E. R. Murray.
                          ' Charles S. Mein.
          -r,. .           ( Kelson Wright.
                J
                          \ Arthur Mansfield Allen.
   5. The University Prizes were awarded as follows :—
    UNIVERSITY MEDAL (English Heroic Verse) :—
                             Ernest B. Docker.
    VICE-CHANCELLOR'S MEDAL (Latin Elegiacs) :—
    Samuel W. Griffith.
    PROFESSOR WOOLLEY'S MEDAL (Greek Iambics) ;—
    James Houison.
   6. Fellowships of the Senate were vacated by Mr. William
Charles Wentworth, Sir Daniel Cooper, and Sir Stuart Alex-
ander Donaldson. These Vacancies were filled by the elections
of Sir William Manning, LL.D., Q.C, and Mr. John Bayley
Darvall, M.A., Q.C., and by the re-election of Mr. Wentworth on
his.return to the Colony.
   7. Mr. Charles Watt was appointed Curator of the Museum in
the room of Mi'. Edward Reeve, resigned.
   8. It being deemed advisable that, the supervising of the Uni-
versity Books of Account should be entrusted to an experienced
Accountant, not otherwise concerned in the business of the Uni-
versity ; Mr. Geoffrey Eagar was appointed Auditor.
   9. A change in the constitution of the University was effected
by an Act passed by the Legislature at the instance of' the
Senate to amend the Incorporation Act of 1851. Under this
Act, all full graduates now possess the right of voting at elec-
tions of Fellows of the Senate, which right, under the original
Act of Incorporation, was not to be enjoyed by them until their
number had reached 100.       This right is also now extended to
                                REPORT.                                119
the Heads of Colleges within the University, to all University
Teachers, and all Superior officers of the University, declared to
be such by By-Law. By the same Act, the titles of jbhe Provost
and Vice-Provost were altered to those of Chancellor and Vice-
Chancellor, and the Senate was enlarged by a provision that in
addition to the originally prescribed number of Fellows there
must be not fewer than three nor more than six ex-officio Mem-
bers, who must be " Professors of the University in such
" branches of learning as the Senate shall.from time to time by
" any By-Law in such behalf select." The Senate have accord-
ingly passed a By-Law (annexed) selecting for the present, three
Professors, namely, the Senior Professor of Classics, the Senior
Professor of Mathematics, and the Senior Professor of Chemistry
and Experimental Physics·.
   10. The funds granted by the Legislature having been ex-
hausted, no progress was made in the building during the year.
A Clock and Bell have been presented by Sir Stuart Alexander
Donaldson, which will be placed in the Tower when completed.
   11. Appended is an account of the Receipts and Expenditure
of the University during the year.

The foregoing Report was adopted at a meeting of the Senate
held on the 9th June, 1862, and ordered to be transmitted to the
Honorable the Colonial Secretary, for presentation to the Governor
and Executive Council and the Parliament, in pursuance of the
22nd section of the Act of Incorporation, 14 Vict., No. 31.
(Signed)                              HUGH KENNEDY,
                                 _____                    REGISTEAR.
                           APPENDIX.
                                 BY-LAW.
   The Senior Professor of Classics, the Senior Professor of Mathematics, "
and the Senior Professor of Chemistry and Experimental Physics, shall be
ex-officio Members of the Senate, under the provisions of the Sydney Uni-
versity Incorporation Act Amendment Act of 1861.
  ACCOUNT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY.
                                                              Froni 1st JTaiiunry to tlic 31st !December, ISOl.

                           RECEIPTS,                                                                                            EXPENDITURE

                              ENDOWMENT           FUND.                                                                              ENDOWMENT 1'UND.
Received amount of Endowment from Government, under                                                 Paid for Salaries, Charges for Printing, Stationery, Sundry
      Act of Incorporation                                                  6,000       0                     Expenses ...                                                                         4,552 17
      ,,        Lecture Fees from Students, after paying Professors         0                                 Furniture                                                                              104 0
                 their share                                                                                  Petty Cash     ...                                                                     20 0
      ,,        Bachelor of Arts, M.A., and Matriculation Fees ...             32 9         0                 University Scholarships                                                                262 10
      „         For Pasturage ...                                               5
                                                                               74 0         0                                                                                                        700 0
                                                                                                              Dehentures for " Barker Scholarship"
,,       Interest on Investments in Government Debentures                      85 0         0                 One Debenture, Salting Exhibition                                                      100 0
on account of Scholarships, under " Private Foun-                                                             Scholarships under "Private Foundations "       ...                                    243 4
dations"                                                                                                      Fencing, Levelling, Laying out Grounds, &rc ...                                        600
„        Rent of Newtown Property. (Deas Thomson Scho-.                        133 17           8                                                                                                    0
larship), less for Painting, Repairs, &c.                                                                         TOTAL EXPENDITURE, Endowment Fund
Balance in Commercial Bank, 31st December, 1860...                             110      7 10                      .................................................................................. £6,682 12       2
                                                                             1,219      4 Il        Balance on hand in Commercial Bank, 31st Dec, 1861 ...                                       365 7 3

                        TOTAL RECEIPTS, Endowment Fund .................... £6,947 19       5                                                                                                    £6,947 19           6


                             BUILDING FDND.                                                                      BUILDING FUND.
Balance in Commercial Bank, 31st December, 1860 .                               13      3       0   Paid for Building purposes during the year
                                                                                                    Balance in Commercial Bank, on this account, 31st Dec,
                                                                                                    1861                     ................................................................

                                                                              £13       3       0                                                                                                    £13         3       0


          Audited, ith March, 1862,                                                                         Sydney, '31st December, 1861,
                       G-. EAGAE, AUDITOR.                                                                              WILLIAM CLARK, ACCOUNTANT.
                    ALPHABETICAL                            LIST
                                           OF


      MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

   Adnum, Henry                                    Corish, Rev. M. A.
t Allen, Arthur                                    Cowlishaw, W., M.A.
* Allen, George                                    Cowper, Charles
Î Allen, G. W.                                     Cowper, S. S., B.A.
   Allen, Walter, M.A.                             Cox, J. D.
* Allwood, Rev. R., B.A.                           Cummings, John S.
¡I àBeckett, Arthur                                Curtis, W. C, M.A.
   Bennett, Edward                              * Darvall, J. B., M.A.
Il Bennett, George                                 Docker, E. B.
   Bowden, J. E., B.A.                             Donovan, John, M.A.
   Bowman, Andrew, B.A.                         * Douglass, H. Grattan, M.D.
   Bowman, Alexander, B.A.                         Duncan, W. A.
   Bowman, Edward, B.A.                         X Dutruc, P.
   Brennan, Rev. M.                             % Eagar, Geoffrey
   Broughton, A.                                Ellis, E. G.
   Browne, W. C.                                * Faucett, P., B.A.
   Burdekin, Marshall, M.A.                        Fitzgerald, R. M., M.A.
   Burdekin, Sydney, B.A.                          Forrest, Very Rev. J., D.D.
   Butler, E.                                      Garland, J. R., M.A.
   Callachor, H.                                   Gibbes, F. J., B.A.
t Cape, Alfred                                     Gorman, J. V.
Il Cary, H., M.A.                               Il Greenup, Richard, M.D.
+ Clark, William                                t Griffith, S. W.
   Clarke, Rev. W. B., M.A.                     X Hargrave, J. F., M.A.
   Colyer, H. C.                                Hargraves, E. John, B.A.
   * Fellows of the Senate.   I Professors and Officers.   Il Examiners,   t
                                            M              Scholars.
122                   ALPHABETICAL LIST.

   Harris, M.                   Mate, W. H.
   Hart, J.                     McCormick, J. C.
   Hawthorne, Stuart, B.A.      McGibbon, John
   Healey, P. J.                Meillon, J.
   Holroyd, A. T., M.B.         t Mein, C. S.
   Houison, J.                  Metcalfe, Michael
   Hunt, Edward, B.A.           * Merewether, P. L. S., B.A.
   Hurst, B.                          (Chancellor.)
   Innes, Gustavus C, B.A.         Mitchell, James
* Johnson, J. W., M.A.             Mitchell, David S., M.A.
   Johnson, Richard                Mort, T. S.
   Johnson, Robert              t Murray, C. E. R.
   Johnston, A.                 Il Nathan, Charles
   Jones, Rees R., B.A.         * Nicholson, Sir Charles, Bart.,
   Keating, Rev. J.                   D.C.L.
   Kemp, Charles                * O'Brien, Bartholomew, M.D.
J Kennedy, Hugh, B.A.              O'Brien, P.
   King, Rev. George, B.A.      t O'Brien, L.
   Kinlock, John, M.A.             O'Connor, R.
   Lee, Edward, M.A.               Paterson, James, M.A.
   Lenehan, A.                  * PeU, Morris B., B.A.
   Long, G. E.                     Pilcher, C. E.
   Lynch, W.                       Pilcher, George D., B.A.
* Macarthur, Sir William        * Plunkett, J. H., B.A.
   McCarthy, H. T. S., B.A.     * Polding, The Most Rev.
   MacEncroe, Ven. Archdeacon         Archbishop, D.D.
Il Macfarlane, John, M.D.       * Purves, Rev. W., M.A.
   Macnamara, P. B.                Quaife, P. H., M.A.
   Makinson, T. 0., B.A.           Quirk, D. P.
   Manning, G. A.               Quirk, J. N.
   Manning, Sir W., LL.D.       Renwick, Arthur, B.A.
* Martin, James                 Il Robertson, James, M.D.
t Mate, F.                      Rogers, P. E., B.A.
                       ALPHABETICAL LIST.                     123
   Russell, Henry, B.A.          * Thomson, B. Deas, CB.
   Salting, G., B.A.                  (Vice-Chancellor)
   Salting, W., B.A.                Tom, Wesley, B.A.
   Savigny, Rev. W. H., M.A.        Tooth, Robert
Il Scott, Rev. W., M.A.             Walsh, Rev. W. H., M.A.
   Sheridan, Rev. J. F.          Í Want, Randolph 0., M.A.
   Smart, T. W.                  Î Watt, Charles
* Smith, John, M.D.              Il West, George
t Smith, Robert                     WiIHs, R. S., M.A.
   Stack, John, M.A.                Wilshire, A. T.
   Stack, Rev. William, Μ.Δ.     * Wentworth, W. C.
   Stephen, Sir Alfred           X Windeyer, W. 0., M.A.
   Stephen, Cecil B., B.A.       * Woolley, John, D.C.L.
   Stephen, Rev. A. H., B.A.        Wright, W. K.
   Therry, Very Rev. J.
APPENDIX.
            SCHOLARSHIP. EXAMINATION,
                           DECEMBER,       1861.




                              B.A. DEGREE.

                   SECOND      AND     FIRST YEARS..


Translate into Latin Prose—
     Tully was the first who observed that friendship improves
happiness and abates misery by the ■ doubling of our joy and
dividing of our grief; a thought in which he hath been followed
by all the essayers upon friendship that have written since his
time. Sir Francis Bacon has finely described other advantages,
or, as he calls them, fruits of friendship : and indeed there is no
subject of morality which has been better handled and more
exhausted than this. Among the several fine things which have
been spoken of it, I shall beg leave to quote some out of a very
ancient author, whose book would be regarded by our modern
wits as one of the most shining tracts of morality extant, if it
appeared under the name of a Confucius, or of any celebrated
Grecian philosopher ; I mean, The Wisdom of the Son of Sirach.
How finely has he described the art of making friends by an
obliging and affectionate behaviour, and laid down that precept
which a late excellent author has delivered as his own,—That we
should have many well-wishers, but few friends !—" Sweet
language will multiply friends, and a fair-speaking tongue will
increase kind greetings. Be in peace with many, nevertheless
have but one counsellor of a thousand." ·
4.                    EXAMINATION PAPEES.

                           B.A. DEGREE.

                  LUCRETIUS.—BOOKS I., Π., III.

Translate into English—
 1. Postremo pereunt imbres, ubi eos pater .¿Ether
     In gremium matris Terrai prœcipitavit :
     At nítidas surgunt fruges, rameique virescunt
     Arboribus ; crescunfc ipsse, fetuque gravantur.
     Hinc alitur porro nostrum genus, atque ferarum :
     Hinc tetas urbeis puerûm florere videmus,
     Frundiferasque novis avibus canere undique sylvas :
     Hinc fessas pecudes, pingues per pabula teta,
     Corpora deponunt ; et candens lacteus humor
     Uberibus manat distentís : hinc nova proles
     Artubus infirmis teñeras lasciva per herbas
     Ludit, lacte mero mentéis perculsa novellas.
     Haud igitur penitus .pereunt qusequomque videntur ;
     Quando alid ex alio reficit Natura, nec ullam
     Rem gigni patitur, nisi morte adjutam aliena.
 2. Jamne vides igitur, quamquam vis extera multos
     Pellat, et invitos cogat procederé sajpe,
     Prascipitesque rapi ; tarnen esse in pectore nostro
     Quiddam, quod contra pugnare obstareque possit :
     Quoius ad arbitrium quoque copia material
     Cogitur interdum flecti per membra, per artus ; .
     Et projecta refrenatur, retroqué residit ?
     Quare in seminibus quoque idem fateare, necesse est ;
     Esse aliam, prœter plagas et pondera, caussam
     Motibus, unde hase est oUis innata potestas :
     De nihilo quoniam fieri nihil posse videmus.
     Pondus enim prohibet, ne plágis omnia fiant,
                      EXAMINATION -PAPEES.                             5

  Externa quasi vi. : sed ne mens ipsa necessum
  Intestinum habeat cunctis in rebus agundis,       ·
  Et devicta quasi, cogatur, ferré patique ;
  Id facit exiguum clin amen principiorum,. .
  Nee regione loci certa nee tempore certo.
  3. Hoc etiam faciunt ubi discubuere tenentque
  Pocula seepe homines, et inumbrant ora coronis ;
  Ex animo ut dicant, ' Brevis hic est fructus homullis :
  Jam fuerit ; neque post umquam revocare licebit !' ■".
  Tamquam in morte mali cum primis hoc sit eorum,
  Quod sitis exurat miseros atque aridà torreat,
  Aut alise qúoius desiderium insideat rei.
  Nec sibi enim quisquam tum se vitamque requirit,
  Quom pariter mens et. corpus sopita quiescunt;
  Nam.licet œternum per nos sic esse.soporem ; "
  Nec' desiderium nostn nos adtigit ullum :
  . Et tarnen haudquaquam nostros tune.illa, per artus
  Longe ab sensiferis priinordia motibus errant..
     1. What was the inducement to Lucretius to adopt the
doctrine of Democritus ?
     2. Explain briefly the Atomic theory of Lucretius, and
distinguish it from that of Dalton. Does Lucretius make any
approach to the latter ?
     3. Criticize Lucretius' explanation of " free will."
     4. How would you, from the conclusion of the 3rd Book,
argue in favor of the Immortality of the Soul?
     5. What was the homceomeria of Anaxagoras ?
     6. How does Lucretius prove that whilst atomic forms are
limited, the number of atoms under each form is unlimited ?
     7. How does Lucretius prove that the Universe is infinite ?
How might he be answered ? What conclusion does modern
philosophy draw from this and similar contradictions of the
formal reason ?                                     ■              '
6                    EXAMINATION PAPERS.



                             B.A. DEGREE.



                    ARISTOPHANES—ACHARNES.




1. Translate into English—
                         Ευριπίδη, Εύριπίδιον,
       υπάκουσαν, εϊπερ πωποτ ανθρώπων τινί·
       Δικαιόπολις καλεί σε Χολλίδης, εγώ.
ET.                          αλλ' ον σχολή.
ΔΙ.     ¿λλ' εκκυκλήθητ.      ET. αλλ' αδύνατον. ΔΙ. ¿λλ' όμως.
ET.    ¿λλ' εκκυκλησομαι· καταβαίνειν δ' ου σχολή.
ΔΙ.     Ευριπίδη,     ET. τι λελακας ;    ΔΙ. άναβάδην ποιείς,
       εξόν καταβάδην · ουκ έτος χωλούς ποιείς.
       άταρ τι τα ράκι εκ τραγωδίας έχεις,
       εσθήτ ελεινήν ; ουκ έτος πτωχούς ποιείς.
       ¿λλ άντιβολώ προς των γονάτων σ, ΕύριπίΒη,
       δός μοι ρακών τι τοΰ παλαιού δράματος.
       δει γάρ με λεξαι τω χορω ρησιν μακράν ·
       αυτή δε θάνατον, ην κακώς λέξω, φέρει.
ET.    τα ποία τρύχη ; μων εν οις Οίνεύς ¿δι
       6 δύσποτμος γεραιος ήγωνίζετο ;
ΔΙ.   ουκ Οίνέως ην, αλλ' ετ άθλιωτερου.
ET.   τα τοΰ τυφλού Φοίνικος ;      ΔΙ. ού Φοίνικος, ου,
       ¿λλ' έτερος ην Φοίνικος άθλιώτερος.
ET.   ποίας ποθ' άνηρ λακίδας αιτείται πέπλων ;
       ¿λλ ι; Φίλοκτήτου τα τοΰ πτωχοΰ λέγεις ;
ΔΙ.   ουκ, ¿λλά τούτου ττολυ πολύ πτωχιστερου.
                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

                     7

ET.    αλλ' η τα Βυσπινή θέΧεις πεπΧωματα
       α ΒεΧΧεροφοντης είχ ο γωλο? ουτοσί;
ΔΙ.    ου ΒεΧΧερόφόντης· άλλα κάκεΐνος μεν ην
       χωλό?, προσαιτων, στωμνΧος, δεινός Χετγειν.
ET.     οίδ' ανΒρα, Μυσον ΤήΧεφον.    ΔΙ. val, ΤήΧεφον
       τούτου Βος άντιβοΧω σε μοι τα σπάργανα.
ET.     ω irai, Βος σύτψ ΤηΧεφου ρακώματα.
       κείται δ άνωθεν των Θυεστείων ρακών,
       μεταξύ των Ίνοΰς·     ΘΕ. ΙΒού ταυτϊ λα/Sé.

2. Translate into English—
Εξ ου <γε γοροίσιν εφεστηκεν τρυγικοις ο ΒιΒάσκαΧος ήμων,
οΰπω παρέβη προς το θεατρον Χεξων ως Βεξιός εστίν
ΒιαβαΧΧόμενος δ' ΰπο των εγθρων εν Άθηναίοις ταγυβουΧοις,
ως κωμωΒεΐ την πόΧιν ημών καϊ τον Βημον καθυβρίζει,
άποκρίνεσθαι Βείται νυνι προς 'Αθηναίους μεταβούΧους.
φησίν δ' είναι ποΧΧων à/γαθων άξιος υμιν ο ποιητής,
παύσας υμάς ξενικοίσι Χοηοις μη Χίαν εξαπατασθαι,
μήθ" ήΒεσθαι θωπευομενους μήτ είναι γαυνοποΧίτας.
πρότερον δ' υμάς άπο των πόλεων ο'ι πρέσβεις εξαπατωντες
πρώτον μεν ίοστεφάνους εκάΧουν κάπειΒη τούτο Ttç ε'ίποι,
ευθύς Βια τους στεφάνους επ άκρων των πυηι&ίων εκάθησθε.
ει Βε τις υμάς υποθωπεύσας Χιπαρας καΧεσειεν 'Αθήνας,
εΰρετο παν αν Βια τάς Χιπαρας, άφύων τιμήν περιάψας.
ταύτα ποιήσας ποΧΧ&ν αγαθών αϊτιος ύμίν <γεήένηται,
καϊ τους Βημους èv ταΐς πόΧεσιν Βείξας ως Βημοκρατοΰνται.
τουγαρτοι νυν εκ των πόΧεων τον φορον ύμΐνάπάηοντες
ήξουσιν, ΙΒειν επιθυμούντες τον ποίητην τον άριστον,
όστις πάρεκινΒύνέυσ ειπείν εν Άθηναίοις τα Βίκαια.
ούτω δ° αύτοΰ περί της τόΧμης ηΒη πόρρω κΧεοςηκει,
Ότε και βασιΧευς, ΛακεΒαιμονίων την πρεσβείαν βασανιζων,
8                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

ήρώτησεν ir ρώτα μεν αυτού'; πότεροι ταΐς ναυσϊ κρ ατοναιν
είτα Se τούτον τον ποι/ητην ποτέρους εϊποι κακά ποΧΧά·
τούτους yàp εφη τους ανθρώπους ποΧν βεΧτίους yeyevr¡a0at,
και τω ποΧέμφποΧυ νικήσειν, τούτον ζυμβουΧον e-χοντας.

    1. Give some account of the parabasis in Attic Comedy.
    2. Quote any passages in this play illustrative of the first
three books of Thucydides.
    3. Explain the dislike of Aristophanes to Euripides.




                             BA.     DEGREE.


                                 LOGIC.


      1. Distinguish applied from modified Logic. ,Under which.head
do Aristotle's Dialectic, Apodictic, and Rhetoric come ?
    '2. Every experimental science. is partly a priori :—every
abstract science is partly derived from experience.
     3. What is the difference between'Aristotle's view of Logic
and Hamilton's ? '
     4. Shew that the distinction between differentia and property,
is real and indispensable in material, as well as in abstract
sciences. Criticize the following AS DEFINITIONS.—Honesty is the
best Policy—Virtue is the truest pleasure—Political Economy is the
science of Social well-being. An Equilateral triangle is one with
equal angles—A parallelogram is a four sided-figure withits oppo-
site angles equal., The truest benevolence is a wise self interest.
     ,5. What general fact led to the maxim, "No affirmatives
                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.                                9
distribute the predicate ?" in what cases is this false ? . In what
sense might it be said that no unusual statement is scientifically
true, unless the predicate and subject are convertible ?
     6. Make a table of Aristotelian opposition of propositions—
explain why it differs from the modern. What is his diametrical
opposition ?
     7. All analytic.sentences were, when first made, synthetic;
and are, when first stated to each person, synthetic to him.
     Justify the rule—" All negatives distribute the predicate."—
express in ANI ' Regulars are not the only Soldiers'- There are poi-
sons besides Snake bites. The Mysteries of Révélation are not the only
truths which transcend our reason.—Political Economy, 'is. only a
branch of Social science.—Mathematics is. not the science of what-
ever can be measured or numbered. How would Aristotle express
these propositions ?
     9. Figure in syllogism does not result from the merely formal
position of the middle' term in the premises, as subject or pre-
dicate, but from its scientific relation to the other terms as
whole or part.        From what mistake did the fourth figure arise P
     10. Make syllogisms formally violating the general rules, of the
first figure. Shew that these syllogisms are not really in the first
figure at all.
     11. Sometimes syllogisms expressed in the first figure ought
to be reduced to the second or third. Syllogisms, of the second
or third figure ought not always to be reduced to the first.
     12. Explicate the following syllogisms, and apply to them
(when you can,) the principles of questions 9, 10, and .11..
           Selfishness is never really honest, and therefore can never
be moral.
           Since Justice is always prudent, it is sometimes good
 policy to sacrifice, great prospects of personal advantage.
           He that is of Grod heare.th my words : ye therefore- hear
 them not, because ye are not of God.
                                        b
 10                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

            Weak indulgence to children is really cruel, for no action
  can be benevolent which is not for the good of its object.
            The Chemical " Law of definite proportions " is not pro-
  perly a theory at all : it simply states a fact derived from
  experience.
            None but whites are civilized: the Hindoos are not
 white, and, therefore, not civilized, (use " white " as middle
 term.)
          No man can possess of himself the power to perform
superhuman actions ; miracles are superhuman, and, therefore, no
. unassisted man can work miracles.
           The principles of Justice are variable ; and are therefore
 no appointment of nature.
           Some poisons are vegetable ; no poisons are wholesome ;
 therefore some vegetables are not wholesome.
     13. Shew (1.) that induction is the exact converse of deduc-
tion ; (2.) that the formal conditions of induction are really
impossible ; (3.) how the difficulty is reconciled.
     14. Shew (1.) that the force of an induction does not depend
upon the number of the cases from which it is inferred ; (2.) that
the process of experiment involves a deductive and an inductive
process at each step ; (3.) that this induction assumes as a funda-
mental principle the universality of every real fact ; (4.) that the
difference between the educated and uneducated consists not in
the logical process of inference in induction, but in the analy-
tic verification of the fact from which we infer.
     15. Analyse, exhibiting the use of immediate inference, the
following syllogisms.—
          Virtue is happiness : and as all desire happiness, all
desire virtue.
           Punishment iß an evil : if, therefore, we may not do evil
that good may come of it, we have no right to hang a man as an
example.
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                                11
         Wine is a stimulant : in cases where stimulants are hurt-
ful, you must not give wine.
     16. Why would Che enumeration of every individual who had
ever possessed a certain attribute, never justify an induction.
     17. Shew that the following involves both an induction and a
deduction.—"Ofcourse I shall die, as my father did before
me."
    18. Explain Aristotle's four formulas for predication.

                     A. υπάρχει τω B.
                     A. κατηγορείται του Β.
                     A. èv δλω έστϊ τώ B.
                                ι         t
                     B. eV 6\φ εστί τω A.

     19. Explain the following fallacies :—
           Physicians poison their patients, for they give them opium.
           The fishes in the net were of all kinds ; these were fishes
in the net; therefore they contain all kinds.
           Those who think the man innocent, must disapprove of
punishing him ; as you do disapprove of this, you must believe
him innocent.
          May, June, July, and August, the coldest months in the
year, have no E in their names, therefore, all the coldest months
are without an R in their names.
          Loaves of bread grow in the fields ; for what we eat grows
in the fields.
          The greatest eater is the least eater ; for the man that eats
least is the hungriest, and the hungriest eats most.
          Cold is expelled by heat ; therefore, the influenza must be
cured by heat.
          John, Henry,, and Thomas, are all men ; and the judgment
of all men is final ; since therefore they are at variance on this
point, contradictory judgments may be equally final.
12                    EXAMINATION PAPERS.

     20. Exhibit the following in logical form :—
          A lawyer pleading before Baron Alderson, argued that it
would be unjust to punish his client, who, although in other
respects, a moral man, was afflicted with an incurable ' klepto-
mania.' " No injustice in the world," answered the Judge, " for
the law of England, though in other respects sound enough, is
afflicted with an inveterate ' punitomania.' "




                           B.A.    DEGREE.



                      CICERO      DE   REPÚBLICA.



Translate into English—
    1. Est autem maritimis urbibus etiam quaedam corruptela ac
mutatio morum : admiscentur enim nouis sermonibus ac disci-
plinis, et importantur non merces solum aduenticiae sed etiam
mores, ut nihil possit in patriis institutis manere integrum. lam
qui incolunt eas urbes, non haerent in suis sedibus, sed uolucri
semper spe et cogitatione rapiuntur a domo longius : atque etiam
cum manent corpore, animo tarnen excurrunt et uagantur. Nee
uero uUa res magis labefaetatam diu et Carthaginem et Corin-
thum peruertit aliquando, quam hie error ac dissipatio ciuium,
quod mercandi cupiditate et nauigandi et agrorum et ärmorum
eultum reliquerant. Multa etiam ad luxuriam inuitamenta per-
niciosa ciuitatibus subpeditantur mari, quae uel capiuntur uel
importantur : atque habet etiam amoenitas ipsa uel sumptuosas
uel desidiosas inlecebras multas cupiditatum.
                        EXAMINATION PAPERS.                                 13
      2. Sed id quod fieri natura rerum ipsa cogebat, ut plusculum
sibi iuris populus adscisceret liberatus a regibus ; non longo
interuallo, sexto décimo fere anno, Postumo Cominio Sp. Cassio
consulibus, eonsecutus est : in quo defuit fortasse ratio, sed tarnen
uincit ipsa rerum publicarum natura saepe rationem. Id enim
tenetote, quod initio dixi, nisi aequabilis hàec in chútate conpen-
satio sit et iuris et officii et muneris, ut et potestatis satis in
magistratibus, et auctoritatis in principum consilio, et libertatis
in populo sit, non posse hune incommutabilem rei publicae con-
seruari statum. Nam cum esset ex aere alieno commota ciuitas,
plebs montem sacrum prius, deinde Auentinum oceupauit. Ac
ne Lycurgi quidem disciplina tenuit illos in hominibus graecis
frenos : nam etiam Spartae, régnante Theopompo, sunt item
' quinqué quos illi ephoros appellant, in Creta autem decern qui
cosmoe uocantur, ut contra consulare Imperium tribuid pi., sic
illi contra uim regiam constituti.
       1. Compare with the first passage Aristotle's account of the
 advantages and disadvantages of a maritime site. Exemplify it
 from Thucydides in the case of Athens. How would Aristotle
 counteract the revolutionary tendency of the ναυτικός όχλος ?
       2. Give a full account of the change which was effected by
 the event alluded to in the second passage.
       3. How came the quarrel between the early plebs and patres to
 assume so much of the character of a contest between rich and poor ?
       4. Illustrate by the early history of Rome and Athens the maxim
 that all revolutions arise from social rather than political causes.
       5. Criticize carefully the comparison of the Tribunes of the
 Gommons with the Hphors and Cosmi.
       6. Sp. Cassium, de occupando regno moliëntem, summa apud
 populum gratia florentem, quœstor accusavit.
       Translate and fully explain : correct the word in Italics : before
  whom-and of what did the quœstor accuse him ? Was this the
  quaestor of later .times ?
14                     EXAMINATION PAPEES.


                            B.A. DEGREE.



                 THUCYDIDES.—BOOKS I., H., ΠΙ.


Translate into English—
   1. " XaXeirbv yap το μετρίως ειπείν εν ω μόΧις καϊ η Βόκησις
της άΧηθείας βεβαιούταν 6 τε yàp ξυνει&ως και εύνονς
ακροατής τάχ' αν τι ενΒεεστερως προς à βούΧεταί τε και
επίσταται νομίσειε ΒηΧοΰσθαι, ο τε άπειρος εστίν α καϊ
πΧεονάζεσθαι, Βια φθόνον, εϊ τι υπέρ την εαυτόν φύσιν άκούοι.
με·χρι yàp τούδε ανεκτοί οι έπαινοι είσι περί έτερων Χεηόμενοι,
ες όσον αν καϊ αυτός έκαστος οϊηται ικανός εΐναι Βρασαί Tt αν
ηκουσε· τω Βε ΰπερβάΧΧοντι αυτών φθονοΰντες ηΒη καϊ άπισ-
τονσιν. επειδή Bk τοις πάλαι ούτως εΒοκιμάσθη ταύτα καΧως
εχειν, j(pr) καϊ εμε επόμενον τω νόμω πειράσθαι υμών της εκάσ-
του βονΧησεώς τε καϊ Βόξης τνχεΐν άς.επϊ πΧείστονΓ
   2. Και μην καϊ το fi/77ei,èç τ°ν εταιρικού άΧΧοτριώτερον èyε-
νετό Βια το ετοιμότερον είναι άπροφασίστως τοΧμάν ου yàp
μετά των κείμενων νόμων ώφεΧίας ai τοιαΰται ξυνοΒοι, άλλα
παρά τους καθεστωτας πΧεονεζία. καϊ τας ες σφάς αυτούς
πίστεις ου τω θείω. νόμω μάΧΧον εκρατΰνοντο η τω KOivjj Tt
παρανομήσαι. τά τε άπο τών εναντίων καΧώς Χ^ομενα ενεΒε-
■χοντο ερ^/ων φυΧακΐ/ ει προυχοιεν, καϊ ου yεwaιóτητι. άντιτι-
μωρησασθαί τε τίνα περϊ πΧείονος ην η αύτον μη προπαθεΐν.
καϊ όρκοι ει που âpa yêvoivro ξυναΧΧατ/ης, εν τω αντίκα προς
το α,πορον εκατερω Βώόμενοι ϊσγυον ουκ εγόντων αΧΧοθεν
Βύναμιν εν Βε τω παρατυγόντι ο φθάσας θαρσησαι, ει '¿Soi
αφρακτον, ηΒιον Βια την πίστιν ετιμωρείτο η άπο τοΰ προφα-
                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.                             15
vow, και τό Te άσφαΧες εΚο^/ίζετο και on άπατρ περιτ/ενόμενος
ξυνεσεως ¿νγώνισμα προσελάμβανε. ραον δ Ot 7τολλοι κακούρ-
γοι οντες δεξιοί κεκΧηνται η αμαθείς ¿νγαθοι, και τω μεν αίσγύ-
νονται, επϊ δε τω â/γάΧΧονται. πάντων δ' αυτών αϊτιον αρχή
ή δια πΧεονεξίαν καί φιΧοτιμίαν, έκ δ' αυτών και ες το φιΧο-
νεικειν καθιστάμενων τό πρόθυμον. οι γαρ εν ταΐς πόΧεσι
προστάντες μετ ονόματος εκάτεροι ευπρεπούς, πλήθους τε
Ισονομίας πολιτικής καϊ αριστοκρατίας σώφρονος προτιμήσει,
τα μεν κοινά λόγω θεραπεύοντες αθΧα εποιουντο, παντϊ δε
τρόπω αγωνιζόμενοι άΧΚ,ήλων περι/γύγνεσθαι ετοΧμησάν τε τα
δεινότατα επέδεσαν τε, τάς τιμωρίας en μείξους ου μέχρι του
δικαίου και τί) πόΧει ξυμφόρου προτιθεντες, ες δε το εκατέροις
που άεϊ ήδονήν έχον ορίζοντες, καϊ ή μετά ^τηφου αδίκου κατά/γ-
νώσεως η χειρϊ κτώμενοι το κρατείν έτοιμοι ήσαν την αυτικα
φιΧονεικίαν εκπιμπΧάναι. ώστε ευσέβεια μεν ουδέτεροι ενόμι-
ζον, ευπρέπεια δε λόγου οΐς ξυμβαίη επιφθονως τι διαπράξασ-
θαι, άμεινον ήκουον. τα δε μέσα των πολιτών υπ αμφοτέρων,
r¡ οτι oil ξυνηγωνίζοντο ή φθάνω του περιείναι, διεφθείροντο.

   α. Τω δε ύπερβάΧΧοντι αύτων.         What is the construction of
           αυτών ?
   l·. Write out in the order of construction ώστε ευσέβεια—
           ήκουον, supplying the words understood.
   c. οίς ξυμβαίη—what mood, and why used ?
    1. At the time of Pericles' funeral oration what was the ex-
tent of the Athenian Empire ?
    2. What was its duration ?     How and by what events is that
duration usually estimated ?
   3. Describe the state of parties when the war broke out :—-
            (a) among the other Grecian States ;
            Cb) among the Athenian leaders.
16                    EXAMINATION PAPERS.


                             B.A.   DEGREE.


         ARISTOTLE'S POLITICS.—BOOKS II., III., VII.



1. Translate into English—
    \E7rei. 8ε πολιτεία μεν /cal πολίτευμα σημαίνει ταύτον,
πολίτευμα δ' εστί το κυριον των πόλεων, άνώγκη Β' είναι, κυριον
η ενα ή ¿λύγους η τους πολλούς· όταν μεν ό εις η οι ολίγοι ή οι
πολλοί προς το κοινον συμφέρον αρχωσι, ταύτας μεν ορθάς
άναγκαΐον είναι τας πολιτείας, τας Βε προς το '¿Βιον η του ενός
η των ολίγων η του πλήθους, παρεκβάσεις· η jap ου πόλίτας
φατέον είναι τους μετέχοντας, η Set κοινωνείν του συμφέροντος.
Κάλείν δ είώθαμ'εν των μεν μοναρχιών την προς το κοινον
αποβλεπουσαν συμφέρον βασιλείαν, την δε των ¿λύγων μεν
πλειόνων Βε ένος αριστοκρατίαν, η Βια το τους αρίστους άρχειν
η Βια το προς το άριστον τ§ πολει καϊ τοις κοινωνοΰσιν αύτης.
"Οταν Be το πλήθος προς το κοινον πολιτεύ/ηται συμφέρον,
καλείται το κοινον όνομα πασών των πολιτειών, πολιτεία.
Συμβαίνει δ' εύλό'γως· ενα μεν ¡γαρ Βιαφέρειν κατ άρετην ή
ολίγους ενΒέχεται, πλείους δ' ηΒη χαλεπον ήκριβώσθαι προς
πασαν άρετην, άλλα μάλιστα την πολεμικήν αυτή <γάρ εν
πλήθει Γγίγνεται. Λιόπερ κατά. ταύτην την πολιτείαν κυριώ-
τατον το προπολεμουν, και μετεχουσιν αυτής οι κεκτημένοι τα
όπλα. Παρεκβάσεις Βε των ε'ιρημενων, τυραννις μεν βασιλείας,
ολυγαρχία Βε αριστοκρατίας, δημοκρατία Βε πολιτείας. Ή μεν
<γάρ τυραννίς εστί μοναρχία προς το συμφέρον το του μοναρ-
χοΰντος, η δ' ολυγαρχία προς το των εύπορων, η Βε δημοκρατία
προς το συμφέρον το των απόρων· προς Βε το τω- κοινω λυσυ-
τελοΰν ούΒεμία αυτών.
                       EXAMINATION PAPBES.                           17
    1. Explain the principle of Aristotle's division of constitu-
tions. What does he consider the ^essential distinction of
oligarchy and democracy ? What does he mean by dynasty ?
What corruptions of monarchy and republic correspond to it ?
    2. How does Aristotle explain ostracism ?

2. Translate into English—
    "Εστί S' αρχή, κατάπερ èv τοις πρώτοις είρηται Xóyoic, ή
μεν του άρχοντος χάριν, ή Se του αρχομένου· τούτων Se την μεν
Βεσποτικην élvaí φαμεν, την Se των ελευθέρων. Διαφέρει S'
ενια των επιταττομένων ού τοις εργοις, άλλα τω τίνος ένεκα'
Sib ποΧΧά των είναι Ζοκούντων διακονικών ερηων και των νέων
τοις εΧευθέροις καλόν Βιακονείν προς yàp τό καΧον και το μη
καΧον ούχ οντω Βιαφέρουσιν αϊ πράξεις κα& αΰτας, ώς εν τω
τέΧει και τω τίνος ένεκεν. ,Επεϊ Se ποΧίτου καϊ άρχοντος την
αυτήν άρετην είναι φαμεν και του αρίστου άν&ρος, τον S' αύτον
άρχόμενόν τε Βείν γίνεσθαι πρότερον καϊ άρχοντα ύστερον,
τοϋτ αν είη τω νομοθέτη πρατ/ματεΰτέον, 'όπως άνδρες αγαθοί
ιγίνωνται, καϊ δια τίνων επιτηδευμάτων, και τι το τεΧος της
αρίστης ζωής.
     1. Give Aristotle's answer to the question ; " are the good
man and good citizen the same ? " Shew that a really perfect man
would not need to be ostracized.
     2. Why would Aristotle exclude the mechanics and agri-
cultural labourers from the franchise ?
     3. What was the Grecian fundamental notion of landed pro-
perty ? Explain the difficulty of Grecian politicians in reference
to the number of the landed estates and of the citizens.
     4. Why and for what is the State bound to educate her
citizens ? Does the principle apply to modern governments ?


                                    c
18                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.


                              B.A. DEGREE.


                            MATHEMATICS.


                 ARITHMETIC       AND      ALGEBRA.



     1. Find the value of 8 cwt. 3 qrs. 17 lbs. at £13 10s. per ton.
                      3   5       4                   1                    7
    2. Add together — — and —-of 13 —.             and divide     n
                6
                      5   8       7                   3'                   9
of the result by 15.
    3. Extract the square root of '001 to 4 places of decimals.
    4. Find the present value of a Bill for £370 due 8 months
hence at 10 per cent.
    5. If a man working ten hours a day can do a certain piece
of work in 17 days, how long will it take another man to do the
same, supposing him to work only nine hours a day, but to do
one-fourth more work in a given time ?
    6. Find the value of

(Λ/-ΞΪ-+ V^) χ (3^ + ^Ξϊ\
\       χ+1               χ—1/               \      v'j                y   J
where χ = 3 ; y =■ 2.
     7. Find the greatest common factor of
                     3¾3 — 7ÍB2 y + 5xy2 — y3 ,
           » and       χ2 y + Sxy2 — 3»3 — y3 .
    8. Find the least common multiple of any two numbers, and
shew, that every other common multiple must be a multiple of it.
    9. If a, b, c, d be proportionals, prove ma ■ nb :: mo : nd;
also that a — b : a + b ■= : c — d : c + d.
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                            19

    10. Solve the equations-
(1) a·        h       ; a? Z
              ax      +    >
     hx                        2
(2) 3œ2 +     YIx -- = 266
(3) ( 4a =  Iy + 5
    \2xy =  :
    11. Two 39. start for the same place, one an hour after the
            trains
other ; the first goes 18 miles an hour and stops 10 minutes at
an intermediate station ; the other goes 24 miles an hour without
stopping, and both arrive at their destination together ; deter-
mine the distance.
    12. Prove the rules for multiplying and dividing numbers by
means of tables of. logarithms. What is the characteristic of the
logarithm of 1000 </3 ?
    13. Given log.- 2 = 030103; log. 3 = 0-47712; find
log. -008, log. 1-5 ; log. 5400.




                               B.A. DEGREE.


                               GEOMETRY.


     1. Define the terms square, circle, rectangle, axiom.
     2. Shew that the three angles of every triangle are together
equal to two right angles ; also that the angles of any rectilineal
figure, together with four right angles, are equal to twice as
many right angles as the figure has sides.
     3. The straight lines drawn· from the angular points of any
triangle, to the middle points of the opposite sides meet in one
point.
20                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

     4. If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the square
of the whole line is equal to the squares of the two parts, together
with twice the rectangle contained by the parts. What does this
proposition become when the two parts are equal ?
     5. Shew that the diameter is the greatest straight line in a
circle, and that of any others that which is nearer to the centre
is greater than one more remote.
     6. If two chords, AB, AC, be drawn from any point A of a
circle, and produced to D and E, so that the rectangle AB, AD
is equal to the rectangle AC, AB, then, if O be the centre of the
circle, AO is perpendicular to DE.
     7. Having given the segment of a circle, describe the circle
of which it is the segment.
     8. Inscribe an equilateral and equiangular octagon in a given
circle.
     9. If the first of four magnitudes be the same multiple or
part of the second that the third is of the fourth, then the first is
to the second as the third is to the fourth.
     10. Magnitudes have the same ratio to one another which
their equimultiples have.
     11. Equiangular triangles are similar to one another.
     12. Divide a given straight line into two parts, so that the
similar figures described upon them may be to one another in the
ratio of 2 to 1.




                              B.A. DEGREE.


                                 STATICS.


     1. Define the terms force, solid body, rigid body, flexible
string.
                      EXAMINATION PAPEES.                                  21

     2. Explain the physical principle of the transmission of force.
     3. Assuming the parallelogram of forces as far as the direc-
tion of the resultant is concerned, prove it as regards the magni-
tude of the resultant.
     4. Find the magnitude and line of action of the resultant of
two parallel forces acting in opposite directions. Explain the
result when the forces are equal.
     5. Find the condition of equilibrium of a rigid body, one point
of which is fixed, acted upon by any number of forces in one plane.
     6. A B is a horizontal rod without weight. A is fixed, and to
B is attached a weight W. The rod is supported by a string,
one end of which is fastened to the rod at C, and the other to a
fixed point D : A D is vertical : also AB = a, AC = c, AD — d,
find the tension of the string, and explain the result when d = o.
     7. Explain the action of the wedge as a mechanical power.
     8. Explain what is meant by the coefficient of friction, and
how its value may be determined in any particular case.
     9. A heavy rod is placed with one end against a smooth inclined
plane, and the other upon a rough horizontal plane. Find the limit-
ing position of equilibrium.      Is equilibrium in all cases possible ?
    10. A tree is to be pulled down by means of a rope whose
length is equal to the height of the tree. At what point of the
tree should the rope be attached, so that the force applied to it
may act with the greatest advantage ?




                             B.A.    DEGREE.


                      EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS.


    1. Describe an apparatus by which electricity          can be de-
veloped by magnetic induction.
22                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.'

     2. Explain the construction of three galvanic arrangements,
stating by whom they were devised.
     3. Give the rate of expansion of air for each degree of Fahren-
heit's scale : also, the rule for correcting the bulk of a gas for
temperature.
     4. State the different kinds of attraction which are described
as belonging to matter.
     5. Give the number used to express the latent heat of water ;
also the number used for steam.                                     "'
     6. If chloride of potassium be decomposed by voltaic electricity,
at which pole or electrode do each of its constituents appear ?
State what is the primary, and what the secondary effect, in this
case.
     7. What is meant by the term specific gravity ? Describe the ■
method of taking the specific gravity of a piece of matter heavier
than water, and insoluble in that fluid : give one or two examples.
     8. Describe the construction of the ordinary barometer, and
its uses.



                            SECOND      TEAR.


                               CLASSICS.

                                JUVENAL.

Translate into English :—
 1. Pone domi lauros, duc in Capitolia magnum
     Cretatumque bovem : Seianus ducitur unco
     Spectandus : gaudent omnes. quae labra ? quis Uli
     "Vultus erat? numquam, si quid mihi credis, amavi
     Hunc hominem. sed quo· cecidit sub crimine ? quisnam
                    EXAMINATION PAPERS.                       23
Delator ? quibus indicias ? quo teste probavit ?
Nil horum : verbosa et grandis epístola·, venit
A Capreis.      Bene habet ; nil plus interrogo.   Sed quid
Turba Rémi ?        Sequitur Fortunam ut semper et odit
Damnatos.       idem populus, si Nursia Tusco
Favisset, si obpressa foret secure senectus
Principis, hac ipsa Seianum diceret hora
Augustum.        iam pridem ex quo suffragia nulli
Vendimus, effiidit curas,       nam qui dabat olim
Imperium, fasces, legiones, omnia, nunc se
Continet, atque duas tantum res anxius optat,
Panem et Circenses.        Perituros audio multos.
Nil dubium : magna est fornacula : pallidulus mi
Brutidius meus ad Martis fuit obvius aram.
Quam timeo, victùs ne poenas exigat Aiax '
TJt male defensus ! curramus praecipites, et
Dum iacet in ripa, calcemus Caesaris hostem.
2. Gratum est quod patriae civem populoque dedisti,
Si facis ut patriae sit idoneus, utilis agris,
Utilis et bellorum et pacis rebus ágendis.
Plurimum enim intererit quibus artibus et quibus hune tu
Moribus instituas.       Serpente ciconia pullos
Nutrit, et inventa per dévia rura lacerta :
lili eadem sumtis quaerunt animalia pinnis.
Vultur iumento, et canibus, crucibusque relictis,
Ad fetus properat, partemque cadaveris adfert.
Hic est ergo cibus magni quoque vulturis, et se
Pascentis, propria quum iam facit arbore nidos.
Sed leporem, aut capream, famulae Jovis, et generosae
In saltu venantur aves : bine praeda cubili
Ponitur : inde autem, quum se matura levarit
Progenies, stimulante fame, festinat ad illam
Quam primum praedam rupto gustaverat ovo.
24                   EXAMINATION PAPERS.

 3. Vivite confcenti casulis et collibiis istis,
     O pueri, Marsus dicebat et Hernicus olim,
     Vestinusque senex ; panem quaeramus aratro,
     Qui satis est mensis : laudant hoc numina ruris,
     Quorum ope et auxilio, gratae post munus aristae,
     Contingunt homini veteris fastidia querous.
     Nil vetitum fecisse volet quem non pudet alto
     Per glaciem peroné tegi ; qui submovet Euros
     Pellibus inversis.     Peregrina ignotaque nobis
     Ad scelus atque nefas, quaecumque est, purpura ducit.
        Haec illi veteres praecepta minoribùs : at nunc
     Post finem auctumni media de nocte supinum
     Clamosus iuvenem pater excitât. Adcipe ceras,
     Scribe, puer, vigila, causas age, perlege rubras
     Maiorum leges, aut vitem posee libello.
     Sed caput intactum buxo, naresque pilosas
     Adnotet, et grandes miretur Laelius alas.
     Dirue Maurorum attegias, castella Brigantum,
     Vt locupletem aquilam tibi sexagesimus annus
     Adferat : aut longos castrorum ferre labores
     Si piget, et trepidum solvunt tibi cornua ventrem
     Cum lituis audita, pares quod venderé possis
     Pluris dimidio, nec te fastidia mercis
     Ullius subeant ablegandae Tiberium ultra,
     Neu credas ponendum aliquid discriminis inter
     Ungüenta et corium.        Lucri bonus est odor ex re
     Qualibefc.      Illa tuo sententia semper in ore
     Versetiir, Dis atque ipso love digna, poetae :
     TJnde habeas, quaeret nemo ; sèd oportet habere.
     Hoc discunt omnes ante alpha et beta puellae.
                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.                         25

                FIRST AND SECOND TEARS.



                     ARISTOPHANES—NUBES.



1. Translate into English—
          Αέναοι ΝεφεΧαι,
          άρθώμεν φανεροί Βροσεράν-φύσιν ενάηητον,
          πατρός άπ' 'ίΐκεανον βαρναγεος
          νψ-ηΧών ορέων κορνφας επι
          ΒενΒροκόμονς, "να
          τηΧεφανείς σκοπιάς άφορώμεθα,
          καρπούς τ άρΒομεναν ίεράν γθόνα,
          καϊ ποταμών ζαθεων κεΧαΒηματα,
          καϊ πόντον κεΧάΒοντα βαρυβρομον
          όμμα yàp αιθέρος άκάματον σεΧατ/είται
          μαρμαρεαις εν ανγαΐς.
          αλλ' άποσεισάμεναι νέφος ομβριον
          άθανάτας ίΒέας, επιΒώμεθα
          τηΧεσκόπω ομματι γάίαν·

2. Translate into English—
'-4λλ' οι/ν Χιπαρός <γε καϊ ευανθης εν <γνμνασίοις Βιατρίψεις,
ον στωμνΧΧων κατά την cvyopav τριβοΧεκτραπεΧ, οϊαπερ οι νΐιν,
οΰδ' εΧκόμενος περί πρατγματίον ^Χισ-χραντιΚο^εξεπιτρίπτον
άΧΧ εις ΆκαΒήμειαν κατιών, νπο ταΐς μορίαις άποθρέξει, .
στεφανωσάμενος κα,Χάμω Χευκω μετά σώφρονος ήΧικιωτον,
μιΚακος οζών καϊ άπραημοσνιτης καϊ Χεύκης φνΧΧοβοΧονσης,
ηρος εν ωρα γαιρων, οπόταν πΧάτανος πτεΧεα ψιθνρίζτ].
                                    d
26                    EXAMINATION PAPERS.

           ην ταΰτα ποιής aya φράζω,
           και προς τούτοις προσέγτ]ς τον νουν,
           έξεις αει στήθος Χιτταρον,
           γβοώ,ν Χευκην, ώμους μεγάλου?,
              γΧώτταν βαιάν.
           •ην S απερ οι νυν επιτηΒεύτ/ς,
           πρώτα μεν έξεις -χροια,ν ¿υγραν,
           ωμούς μικρούς, στήθος Χεπτον,
           γΧωτταν μργαΧην, ψήφισμα μακρόν,
              και σ άναπεισει
           το μεν αίσχρον άπαν. καΧον ή<γεΐσθαι,
              το καΧον δ αισχρον
           και προς τούτοις της 'Αντιμάχου
              καταπυγοσύνης άναπΧήσει.

     1. What was the distance of time between the acting of the
Nubes, and the condemnation of Socrates ? Does Plato make any
reference to this play in connexion with that condemnation ?
     2. How far would Socrates himself have agreed with the
strictures of Aristophanes on the New Philosophy, and its paid
Teachers ?
     3. How did Socrates' method naturally appear to destroy the
modesty of the young men ?
     4. Why did Socrates abandon the study of physical science ?
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                            27


                             SECOND TEAR.


                       TACITUS ANNALIUM.—I.


1. Translate into English—
     At Romae ruere in servitium cónsules, patres, eques. Quanto
quis illustrior, tanto magis falsi ac festinantes, vultuque compo-
sito, ne laeti excessu principis neu tristiores primordio, lacrimas
gaudiuin questus adulationes miscebant. Sextus Pompeius et
Sextus Appuleius cónsules prima in verba Tiberii Caesaris iura-
vere, apudque eos Seius Strabo et Gaius Turranius, ille praetori-
arum cohortium praefectus, bic annonae ; mox senatus milesque
et populus. Nam Tiberius cuneta per cónsules incipiebat, tan-
quam vetere re publica et ambiguus imperandi. Ne edictum qui-
dem quo patres in curiam vocabat, nisi tribuniciae potestatis
praescriptione posuit sub Augusto acceptae. Verba edicti fuere
pauca et sensu permodesto : de honoribus parentis consulturum,
ñeque abscedere a corpore, idque unum ex publicis muneribus
usurpare. Sed defuncto Augusto signum praetoriis cohortibus
ut imperator dederat ; exeubiae, arma, cetera aulae ; miles in
forum, miles in curiam comitabatur. Litteras ad exercitus tan-
quam adepto prineipatu misit, nusquam eunetabundus nisi cum
in senatu loqueretur. Causa praeeipua ex formidine, ne Grer-
manicus, in cuius manu tot legiones, immensa sociorum auxilia,
mirus apud populum favor, habere im'perium quam exspeetare
mallet. Dabat et famae, ut vocatus electusque potius a re pub-
lica videretur quam per uxorium ambitum et senili adoptione
irrepsisse. Postea.cognitum est ad introspiciendas etiam proce-
rum voluntates induetam dubitafcionem : nam verba, vultus in
crimen detorquens recondebat.
28                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

 2. Translate into English—
     Igifcur cupido Caesarem invadit solvendi suprema milifcibus
duoique, permoto ad miserationem omni qui aderat exercifcu ob
propinquos, amicos, denique ob casus bellorum et sortera homi-
rmm. Praemisso Caecina, ut occulta salfcuum scrutaretur pontes-
que et aggeres húmido paludum et fallacibus campis imponeret,
incedunfc maestos locos visuque ac memoria deformis. Prima
Vari castra lato ambitu et dimensis principiis trium legionum
manus ostentabant ; dein semiruto vallo, humili fossa accisae iam
reliquiae consedisse intelligebantur : medio campi albentia ossa,
ut fugerant, ut restiterant, disiecta vel aggerata. Adiacebant
fragmina telorum equorumque artus, simul truncis arborum ante-
fixa ora. Lucis propinquis barbarae arae, apud quas tribunos ac
primorum ordinum centuriones mactaverant. Et cladis eius su-
perstites, pugnam aut vincula elapsi, referebant hic cecidisse
legatos, iUic raptas aquilas ; primum ubi vulnus Varo adactum,
ubi infelici dextra et suo ictu mortem invenerit ; quo tribunali
concionatus Anninius, quot patibula captivis, quae scrobes ; ut-
que signis et aquilis per superbiam illuserit. Igitur Romanus
qui aderat exercitus, sextum post cladis annum, trium legionum
ossa, nullo noscente alienas reliquias ajD suorum humo tegerefc,
omnes ut coniunctos, ut consanguíneos, aucta in hostem ira, ma-
esti simul et infensi condebant. Primum exstruendo túmulo
caespitem. Caesar posuit, gratissimo muñere in defunctos, et
praesentibus doloris socius.
     1. Explain the extension " tribunitiœ potestatis prœscriptione,"
and shew how the autocracy of the Emperors grew out of the
republican forms.
     2. Make a stem of the Caesars, from JuHuS the Dictator to
Caligula
     3. Illustrate " Vetera, atque.msita Glaudiœ familiœ swperbia."
     4. Give an account ■ of the mutiny of the German legions,
marking the localities.
                      EXAMINATION PAPEES.                             29
    5. " Non aliud discordantis patriae remediwn, fuisse quam ut ab
uno regeretur." To what causes principally was the Civil war
owing ? When may it be said to have really begun ? Why was
the restoration of the Constitution hopeless ?
    6. How many years are included in the first book of the
Annals ?
    7. Grive some account of Asinius Gallus, Ccecma, Arminius,
Cn. Lentulus. .
    8. Where were Ara TTborium, Treviri, Nauportum, " quam-
twmque Amisiam et Tjwppiam ammes inter, hand promd Teuto
bergiensi saltu, in quo reliquiae Vari legionumque insepultae
dicebantur ; " explain, and give the modern names of the
localities.




                          SECOND YEAR.


                      HERODOTUS.—BOOK II.


1. Translate into English—
     Μαρτυρεει Sé μοι τη γνώμτ/, 'ότι τοσαύτη εστί Αίγυπτος
Όσην τίνα εγω άποδείκνυμι τω λόγω, καϊ το Άμμωνος νρηστή-
ριον γενομενόν το . εγώ της εμεωυτου γνώμης ύστερον περί
Αϊηυπτον επυθόμην. οί jàp Βη εκ Μαρέης τε πολιός και
Άπιος, οίκεοντες Αίηΰπτου τα πρόσουρα Λιβύη, αυτοί τε
δοκέοντες είναι Λίβυες, και ουκ Αίτ/ύπτιοι, και άγθόμενοι τη
περί τα ιρα θρησκίη, βουΤωμενοι θηΧεων βοών μη εργεσθαι,
έπεμψαν ες Άμμωνα, φάμενοι " ούΒεν σψίσι τε και Ανγυπ-
" τίοισι κοινον είναι· οίκεειν τε <γάρ εξω του Δ ελτα, καϊ ουκ
30                    EXAMINATION PAPERS.

" όμόλογεειν αύτοισι. βούλεσθαί τε πάντων σφίσι εξείναι
" γενέσθαι." è Βε θεός σφεας ουκ εα ποιεειν ταϋτα, φας " Αϊ-
" yvTTTOv είναι ταύτην την ο Νεΐλος επιών άρΒει· και Αίτ/υπ-
" τίους είναι τούτους, ο'ί ενερθε Έλεφαντίνης πολιός οίκεοντες,
" απο του ποταμού τούτου πίνουσι." οΰτω σφι ταϋτα εχρυσθη.

2. Translate into English—
     ,
      Εχράτο Be καταστάσει πρηιγμάτων τοφΒε. το μεν ορθριον,
μέχρι ότου πΧηθώρης άγορης, προθύμως επρησσε τα προσφερό-
μενα πρηγματα· το Be απο τούτου έπινε τε καϊ κατεσκωπτε
τους συμπότας, και ην μάταιος τε και παιγνιήμων. άχθεσθεν-
τες Be τουτοίσι οι φίλοι αυτοΰ, ενουθετεον αυτόν, τοιάΒε λέγον-
τες· "V2 βασιλεύ, ουκ ορθώς σεωυτού προέστηκας, ες το άγαν
" φανλον προάγων σεωυτόν. σε γαρ χρην εν θρόνω σεμνω
" σεμνον θωκέοντα, Bi ήμερης πρησσειν τα πρηγματα· καϊ
" οΰτω Ανγύπτιοί τ αν επιστεατο ώς ΰπ άνΒρος μεγάλου
" άρχονται, και αμεινον συ αν ήκουες. νυν Be ποιέεις ούΒαμως
" βασιλικά." Ό δ° άμείβετο τοισίΒε αυτούς· " Ta τόξα οι
" κεκτημένοι, επεαν μεν Βεωνται χράσθαι, ενταννυουσι· έπεαν
" Be χρησωνται, εκλνουσι. ει γαρ Br¡ τον πάντα χρονον εντετα-
" μένα εϊη, εκρατ/είη αν ώστε ες το Béov ουκ αν εχοιεν αύτοισι
" χρησθαι. οΰτω Βή καϊ άνθρωπου κατάστασις· ει εθελοι κα-
" τεσπουΒάσθαι αιεϊ, μηΒε ες παυγνίην το μέρος εωυτον άνιεναι,
" λάθοι αν ήτοι μανεϊς, η ογε άπόπληκτος γενόμενος, τα εγω
" επισταμένος, μέρος έκατέρψ νέμω." Ταύτα μεν τους φίλους
άμείψατο.
     1. The various accounts related by Herodotus of the sources
of the Nile.    What was his own opinion ?
     2. Explain Herodotus' mistake about the apprehended
decrease in the rise of the Nile, and its consequences.
     3. What are the principal sources of Egyptian History ?
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                             31
 What makes the chief difficulty in determining the early Chro-
 nology ?
     4. Give an account of the Egyptian Sothic year.
     5. Up to what period are the 30 dynasties counted ? What
are the great divisions which used to be called the old, middle,
and new Empire ?
     6. What are the principal opinions as to the Exodus King ?
Which would at first sight appear most consistent with the cal-
culation in 1 Kings, vi. 1 ?
     7. What is the proof of contemporary dynasties ?
     8. Give the Kings of Egypt mentioned in the Bible, after
the Exodus. Where you can, identify them,—giving the monu-
mental or other proof,—in the dynasties of Manetho, and in
Herodotus.
     9. Who was the original Sesôstris ? Whom did Herodotus
confound with him ? How does Tacitus illustrate this ? To
whom does the Stele near Beyroot belong ?
     10. How is the ethnology and language of the Egyptians
ascertained ? Mention some points in which their civilization was
greatly in advance of the Assyrian.
     11. What is Sir G-. Wilkinson's opinion as to the list of kings
which Herodotus gives ; and how does he maintain it ? Give
the date of the true Mœris ; and the Mœris of Herodotus. How
is the latter identified ?   Where would BJiampsinitus come ?
     12. What was the real character of ,the Labyrinth ?
     13. With what crisis of Egyptian History may the immigra-
tion into Greece of Cadmus and Danaus be connected ?
     14. Give an account of the Hieroglyphics. How far did the
Egyptians reach true Alphabetic writing ?
     15. The date of the SyJc-sos, and their probable country. To
what, probably, were the numerous changes of dynasty in Egypt
owing?
     16. How far was the Egyptian a caste-system ?
32                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

     17.. What was the nature of the revolution, social and poli-
tical, introduced by Psammetichus ?
     18. With what crisis in Eastern History is the invasion of
Egypt by the Persians connected ?




                             SECOND TEAR.


                 ARISTOTLE—RHETORIC.—BOOK II.



1. Translate into English—
     Του μεν οΰν αυτούς είναι πιστούς Χέζοντας, τρία εστί τα
αϊτια· τοσαΰτα yáp εστί, Bi α πιστεύομεν εξω των αποδείξεων.
"Εστί Bk ταύτα, φρόνησις, και αρετή, καΐ εύνοια, διαψεύδον-
ται <γάρ, περί ων Χεμουσιν ή σνμβουΧευουσιν, ή δια πάντα
ταύτα, η Βια τούτων τι. *ίΓ yàp δι άψροσύνην ουκ ορθώς
δοξάζουσιν ή Βοξάζοντες ορθώς, Βια μσχθηρίαν ου τα δοκοΰντα
Xêr/ουσιν η φρόνιμοι μεν και επιεκείς εισιν, àXX ουκ ευνοι· Βιό-
περ èvBé-χεται, μη τα βεΧτιστα συμβουΧεύειν <γινώσκοντας.
KaI παρά ταύτα ούδεν. 'Ανάηκη άρα τον άπαντα δοκοΰντα
ταύτα εγειν, είναι τοις άκροωμενοις πιστον.

2. Translate into English—
     ,
     Επε\ Βε τα ενθυμήματα Χέζεται εκ τεττάρων τα Be τετ-
ταρα ταύτα ¿CTTW, είκος, παράδειγμα, τεκμήριον, σημεΐον εστί
Be, τα μεν εκ των ως επι το ποΧυ η όντων, ή δοκούντων συνημ-
μένα ενθυμήματα εκ των εικότων τα Βε Bi επα/γωγης Βια τοΰ
ομοίου η ενός η πΧειονων, όταν Χαβων το καθόΧου είτα συΧ-
ΧοΎίσηται τα κατά μέρος, δια παραδείγματος· τα δε δι àvay-
                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.·                              33

καίου και οντος, Βια τεκμηρίου· τα Be, Βια του καθοΧου η τον
εν μέρει οντος εάν τε ον εάν τε μη, BiA σημείων το 8ε είκος, ου
το αιει, άλλα το ως έπι το ποΧυ· φανερον ότι τα τοιαύτα μεν
των ενθυμημάτων αίεί εστί Χνειν φέροντα ενστασιν. H 8ε
Χύσις φαινόμενη ¿λλ' ουκ αληθής αίεί· ου γαρ 'ότι ουκ είκος
Χυει ο ενιστάμενος ¿λλ Οτι ουκ άνα/γκαΐον.
    1. Explain the relation of the ήθος του Χεγοντος and πάθος
τον άκουόντος to rhetorical proof: and point out the analogy of
education in other sciences.
    2. Distinguish άντισυΧΧογισμος and ένστασις ; and exhibit
the general and particular ενστασις logically in the example
given by Aristotle (σπουΒαίος 6 'έρως).
    3. Distinguish the true and false use of appeals to the passions.
    4. Distinguish εϊΒη—κοινά εϊΒη—τόποι.
    5-   H επαγωγή αργή.
    6. Develop the two signs, and τεκμηρίου. What is the differ-
ence between the latter and scientific demonstration ?
   7. Explain fully the second passage as far as it relates to
example : particularly shewing the logical distinction between
όμοιον and ταυτόν.
    8. Explain fully Aristotle's account of γνώμη; and his com-
parison of γνώμη and example as practical arguments.
   9. Analyse a πάθος according to Aristotle, exemplifying by
οργή and νεμεσις ?
  10. Shew that ouly the perfect ΒιαΧεκτικος can be a ρητωρ.
34                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.


                            SECOND YEAR.



Translate into Latin Hexameters :
     As when the pilgrim, who with weary pace,
     Through lonely wastes untrod by human race,
     For many a day disconsolate has stray'd,
     The turf his bed, the wild-wood boughs his shade,
     O'er-joyed beholds the cheerful seats of men
     In grateful prospect rising on his ken—
     So Gama joyed, who many a weary day
     Had traced the vast, the lonesome watery way ;—
     So joyed his bounding heart, when proudly rear'd
     The splendid city o'er the wave appear'd.
Translate into Latin Elegiacs :
     ' Live whilst you live,' the Epicure would say,
     ' And seize the pleasures of the passing day.'
     ' Live whilst you live,' the Moralist replies,
     ' And give to God each moment as it flies.'
     Lord, in my view let both united be ;
     I live to pleasure, whilst I live to Thee.
Translate into Greek Iambics :
   Thyestes. Return with me, my son,
And old friend Peneus, to the honest beasts,
And faithful desert, and well-seated caves ;
Trees shelter man, by whom they often die,
And never seek revenge ; no villany
Lies in the prospect of a humble cave.
   Pen. Talk you of villany, of foes, and fraud ?
   Thy. I talk of Atreus.
                          EXAMINATION PAPEES.                    35

   Pen. What are these to him ?
   Thy. Nearer than I am, for they are himself.
   Pen. Grods drive these impious thoughts out of your mind.
   Thy. The gods for all our safety put them there.
Return, return with me.
   Pe«. Against our oaths ?
I cannot stem the vengeance of the gods.
   Thy. Here are no gods ; they've left this dire abode.
   Pen. True race of Tantalus ! who parent like
Are doom'd in midst of plenty to be starved.




                             SECOND YEAR.


                   MATHEMATIC S.

                              FIRST Division.

                                  ALGEBRA.

    1. Solve the equations—
                   3¾2 + 17¾ = 36 §
                             a
                   ΛA+            =   ! _ Λ A- a
                      y                         v
                          χ—a                       χ -f a
                   y- _ 1 _            y
                              x         -y χ — 2
     2. When does one quantity vary as another ? Shew that
this relation between two variable quantities can (with proper
limitations) be expressed by a constant ratio.
36                     EXAMES7ATION PAPERS.

     3. One of two clocks keeps accurate time and the other gains
very nearly 4 minutes a day ; their beats coincide at 3h 27™ 15s,
and at 3h 45m 20s by the gaining clock; determine its exact
gaining rate.
     4. Insert any number of terms between two given terms, so
that the whole may be in Arithmetical Progression ; and shew
that the sum of the series thus formed varies as the whole num-
ber of terms.
     5. Eight, persons sit round a table ; find the number of ways
in which they can be arranged so that two particular persons
may not sit next to each other.
     6. Find the number of combinations of η things taken r
together ; what must be the value of r in order the number
may be the greatest possible.
     7. There are three numbers, the difference of whose differ-
ences is 6, their sum is 33, and their product 1071 ; find the
numbers.
     8. Expand (x + a)n, η being any whole number.
     9. Find the cube root of 217 by the Binomial Theorem correct
to 4 places of decimals.
     10. Prove that any number is divisible by 3 or 9 if the sum
of its digits is divisible by the same numbers.
     11. Find the present value of an annuity of £100 to com-
mence 5 years hence and continue ten years, money being worth
10 per cent, per annum.
     12. If
   ___________ 1 __________           _       A           B         C
 (x — a) (x — V) (x — c)                 χ—α            χ—b        χ—c
for all values of», determine the values of AB and C.
                         EXAMINATION PAPEKS.                                       37

                              SECOND         YBAE.


                               SECOND DIVISION.


                                   ALGhEBRA.


   1. State and prove the rule for determining the               greatest
common measure of two numbers.
                                                          a
    2. Explain the meaning of the expression -, and thence
              a      0          ac                   _
prove that - of - equals —; ; a, h, c, and d beingwhole numbers.
              b       d        bel
     3.- Find the square root of 7 + 3 v. 5 in the form of the
sum of two surds ; what property of quadratic surds is assumed
in the process ?
    4. Solve the equations—
               (1)    3.τ2 + 17a; = 36 f,

               (2) /sJÏU =                    1 - ,\/αΙΞ« .
                           χ—a                         ro + a

     5. When does one quantity vary as another ? Shew that
this relation between two variable quantities can (with proper
limitations) be expressed by a constant ratio.
     6. Find the value öf the Decimal '37 491 ................. ; the last three
figures recurring.
     7. One of two clocks keeps accurate time, and the other gains
very nearly 4 minutes a day ; their beats coincide at 3h 27m 15s,
and at' 3d 45m 20s by the gaining clock ; determine its exact
gaining rate.
     8. Insert any number of- terms between two given terms, so
that the whole may be in Arithmetical Progression ; and shew
38                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

that the sum of the series thus formed varies as the whole num-
ber of terms.
     9. Eight persons sit round a table ; find the number of ways
in which they can be arranged so that two particular persons
may not sit next to each other.
     10. Find the number of combinations of η things taken r
together ; what must be the value of r in order that the number
may be as great as possible ?
     11. There are three numbers, the difference of whose differ-
ences is 6, their sum 33, and their product 1071 ; find the
numbers.

     12. Solve the equation    νχ    -   - ■=   yœ _ ¡¿ '




                              SECOND TEAR.


                        TRIGONOMETRY.


     1. Prove the formulas
                    Sin (180° - A) = Sin A,
                    Tan (180° + A) = Tan A,
                    Cos ( - A)       = Cos A.
    2. Trace the variations in sign and magnitude of the cotan-
gent of an angle through the four quadrants.
    3. Investigate a formula for all angles which have a given
tangent, supposing a to be the least of them.
    4. Find tan A in terms of tan 2 A, and account for the double
value.
                      EXAMINATION PAPEBS.                                                        39

    5. Prove the formulae
             Sin A + Sin B = 2 Sin i (A + B) Cos ¿ (A - B),
                        Cos A, Cos B, Cos C =
        I ¡Cos (A + B + C) + Cos (1 + B - C) + Cos (A - B + C)
                          + Cos (A- B - C)}.
    6. Explain the ambiguous case in the solution of triangles.
    7. Find the areas of regular polyons of η sides circumscribed
about a circle, and· inscribed in it ; and deduce the area of a
circle in terms of ·π and the radius.
    8. Explain the use of a table of logarithms, and the parti-
cular advantages of the base 10.
    9. Find the values of logi 4^            I0^3 (27)5.
    10. Assuming the series
                                                χ2           "œ3
                         a           x
            log, "(1 + 0 = ~ Y + J                                       ...........
     prove that
          log« (as + 1) = 2 loge «¡ — log«. (» — 1) —
           (11               1                                                               )
           (2¾2 -1                   3          (2»2-l)3          +    &o .............. j
   11. Prove Demoivre's Theorem.
   12. Shew that
           on    α               θ   N/~I                L        - θ -J*=!
           2 Cos θ = e                               +       e
   o   /    1 β-  α θ V^n                               - θ s/~\
   2/-1 Sin θ = e                                    — e
   13. Sum the series
Cos a + Cos 3 a + Cos Ba +               ......................       + Cos (2 η — 1) a.
   14. Having given that Sin 2 A = f, find the values of A.
40                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.


                         FIRST           TEAR.

                              CLASSICS.

                         TERENCE.—PHOEMIO.


Translate into English—
DE. Itane tandem uxorem duxit Anfcipho injussn meo ?
Nee meum imperium : ac, mitto Imperium : non simultatem
      meam
Revereri saltern ? non pudere ? O facinus audax ! O Geta
Monitor.       GE. Vix tandem.       DE. Quid mihi dicent ? aut quam
      causam reperient ?
Demiror.       GE. Atqui reperi jam : aliud cura.    DE. An hoc dicet
      mihi ?
Invitus feci ; lex coegit : audio : fateor.    GE. Places.
DE. Verum scientem, taciturn, causam rädere advorsariis.
Btiam idne lex coegit ?       GE. Illud durum.    PH. Ego expediam ;
      sine.
DE. Incertum'st quid agam ; quia prseter spem, atque incredibile
      hoc mi obtigit :
Ita sum irritatus, animum ut nequeam ad cogitandum instituere.
Quamobrem omnes, cum secundce res sunt maxume, tum maxume
Meditari secum oportet, quo pacto advorsam œrumnam ferant.
Pericia, damna, exilia peregre rediens semper cogitefc,
Aut fili peccatum, aut uxoris mortem, aut morbum filite :
Communia esse hœc: ne quid horum unquam aeeidat animo
      no vom.
Quicquid praeter spem eveniat, omne id deputare esse in lucro.
GE. O Phsedria, incredibile quantum herum anteeo sapientia !
Meditata mihi sunt omnia mea incommoda, herus si redierit :
                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.                                 41
. Molendum'sfc in pistrino : vapulandum : habendum compedes :
  Opus ruri faciundum : horum nil              quicquam accidet animo
       no vom.
 Quicquid praeter spem eveniet, omne id deputabo esse in lucro.
 Sed quid cessas homiuem adiré, et blande in principio alloqui ?
 DE. Phsedriam, mei fratris video filium mi ire obviam.
 PH. Mi patrue, salve.      DE. Salve : sed ubi est Antipho ?
 PH. Salvom advenire—          DE. Credo : hoc responde mihi.
 PH. Valet : hic est : sed satin' omnia es sententia ?
 DE. Vellem quidem.         PH. Quid istuc est ?
    What are the metres in this passage ?         Scan the following
 lines : —
 Nee meum Imperium ac mitto imperium non simultatem meam—
 Quamobrem omnes cum secundas res sunt maxime tum maxime—·
 Dari mi in conspectum nunc sua culpa ut sciât.



Translate into English—
GE. TJbi in gyneeceum ire occipio, puer ad me accurrit Mida :
Pone apprehendit pallio, resupinat : respicio : rogo,"
Quamobrem retineat me : ait, esse vetitum intro ad heram
     accederé.
Sophrona modo fratrem hue, inquit, senis introduxit Chremem :
Bumque nunc esse intus cum illis : hoc ubi ego audivi, ad fores
Suspenso gradu placide ire perrexi : accessi : astiti :
Animam compressi : aurem admovi : ita animum cœpi attendere,
Hoc modo sermonem captans.          AN. EU ! Geta.       GE. Hie pul-
     cherrumum
Pacinus audivi : itaque pasne hercle exclamavi gaudio.
AN. Quod?      GE. Quodnam arbitrare ?       AN. Nescio.      GE. Atqui
     mirificissumum :
Patruus tuus est pater inventus Phanio, uxori tuas.     AN,. Hem !
                                    f
42                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

Quid ais ?        GE. Gum ejus consuevit olim matre in Lemno
      clanculum.
PH. Somnium ! utin' hagc ignoraret suum patrem ?          GE. Aliquid
      crédito,
Phormio, esse causse : sed me censen' potuisse omnia
Intelligere extra ostium, intus quas inter sese ipsi egerint ?
AN. Atque hercle ego quoque illam inaudivi fabulam.          GE. Immo
      etiam dabo,
Quo magis credas : patruus interea inde hue egreditur foras :
Haud multo post cum patre idem recipit se intro denuo :
Ait uterque tibi potestatem ejus habendi se dare :
Denique ego sum missus te ut requirerem atque adducerem.
AN. Hem !
Quin ergo rape me : quid cessas ?                GE. Fecero.      AN. O mi
       Phormio,
Vale.     PH. Vale, Antipho.      Bene, ita me Di ament, factum !

     1. How does the use of si with present-conditional by the
Comic writers differ from Cicero's usage ? How would this be
expressed in Greek ?
     2. Give the Greek and Latin ways of expressing the three
forms of the universal, (1.) the proper universal, (2.) the in-
dividualized class, (3.) the indirect example. Shew that the. last
is the formula of the subjunctive mood.
     3. How would you shew that the future perfect belongs to the
indicative mood ?
     4. Give the Greek expression answering to sane (I grant
but,) and imrrw (nay—but,) and shew why it is the same
expression for both.
     5. How is the Comedy of Terence connected with the social
and political condition of Rome in the second Century B.C. ?
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                            43


                              FIRST TEAE,


                           LIVY.- BOOK       II.


Translate into English—
      Hoc tantum licentiae Etruscis non meta magis quam consilio
concessum. namque Valerius consul intentus in occasionem
multos simul et eífusos improviso adoriundi, in parvis rebus
negligens ultor, gravem se ad maiora vindicem servabat. itaque
ut eliceret praedatores, edicit suis, postero die fréquentes porta
Esquilma, quae aversissima ab hoste erat, expellerent pecus,
scituros id hostes ratus, quod in obsidione et fame servitia infida
transfugerent. et sciere perfugae indicio ; multoque plures, ut
in spem universae praedae, tumea traiiciunt. P. Valerius inde
T. Herminium cum modicis copiis ad secundum lapidem Gabina
via occultum considere iubet, Sp. Lartium cum expedita iuventute
ad portam Collinam stare, donee hostis praetereat ; deinde se
obiieere, ne sit ad numen reditus. consulum alter T. Lucretius
porta Naevia cum ahquot manipulis militum egressus ; ipse
Valerius Coelio monte cohortes delectas educit. iique primi
apparuere hosti. Herminius ubi tumultum sensit, coneurrit ex
insidiis, versisque in Valerium Etruscis terga caedit. dextra
laevaque, hinc a porta Collina ilünc ab Naevia, redditus clamor,
ita caesi in medio praedatores, ñeque ad pugnam viribus pares, et
ad fugara septis omnibus viis. finisque ille tarn effuse evagandi
Etruscis fuit."
Translate into English—
     Tum primum lex agraria promulgata est, nunquam deinde
usque ad hanc memoriam sine maximis motibus rerum agitata,
consul alter largitioni resistebat, auetoribus patribus, nee omni
44                      EXAMINATION PAPEES.

plebe adversante, quae primo coeperat fastidire munus vulgatum
a civibus isse in socios, saepe deinde et Virginium consulem in
concionibus velut vaticinantem audiebat, pestilens collegae munus
esse ; agros illos servitutem iis qui acceperint laturos ; regno
viam fieri, quid ita enim assumi socios et nomen Latinum ? quid
attinuisse Hernicis, paullo ante hostibus, capti agri partem tertiam
reddi, nisi ut hae gentes pro Coriolano duce Cassium liabeant ?
popularis iam esse dissuasor et intercessor legis agrariae coeperat.
uterque deinde consul certatim plebi indulgere. Verginius dicere
passurum se assignari agros, dum ne cui nisi civi Romano
assignentur. Cassius quia in agraria largitione ambitiosus in
socios eoque civibus vilior erat, ut alio muñere sibi reconcüiaret
civium ánimos, iubere pro Siculo frumento pecuniam acceptam
retribuí populo, id vero hand secus quam praesentem mercedem
regni aspernata plebes : adeo propter suspicionem insitam regni,
velut abundarent omnia, muñera eius in animis hominum
respuebantur.
     1. To what period does the second book of Livy relate ?
     2. Give an account of the war of which the first passage
describes a part. On what authority are we able to correct
Livy's account of its issue ? Explain the custom at auctions
" bona regis Porsenœ vendendi." What effect had this war on the
number of the Roman local tribes ?
     3. How many gates had Rome at this time ? Describe the
position of the most important.
     4. How and on what grounds does Niebuhr explain the TWO
annual Chief Magistrates established at the Revolution ? What
was their title ?    When was the name " Consul " first used ?
     5. Give clearly the grounds for Niebuhr's opinion of the
usurpation of the election, first of both consuls, afterwards of
the senior consul, by the Curies. How is the massacre of the
Fabii at the Cremera connected with this ?
     6. Explain, with dates, the treaties of Rome, with the Latins
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                           45
 and Hernicans, made by Sp. Cassius. How do they shew the
 decline of Rome's power since the first year of the Republic ?
 What probable influence had the league with the Latins on the
 settlement at the first secession?
     7. The legend of Coriolanus.- What is Niebuhr's reason for
postponing the date ? How were the successes of the Volsci and
.¿Equi against the Latins and Hernicans ultimately useful to
Rome ?       What was Coriolanus' real merit ?
     8. Give an account of the "Lex Agraria." How do we
know the exact character of that of Cassius ? how was it carried ?
and how evaded ? Explain the origin of Livy's misapprehension
in the second of the passages for translation. Explain and correct
" cum Hernicis fsedus ictum ; agri partes duœ ademptae : inde
dimidium Latinis, dimidium Plebi divisurus consul Cassius
erat."
     9. The history of the Tribunate of the Plebs until the pass-
ing of the law of Volero Publilius.




                         FIRST           YEAR.


                          PLATO      ÎKMDO.


1. Translate into English—
     Ei μεν εστίν α θρυΧοΰμεν αεί, καλόν τε καϊ àr/αθον και πάσα
η τοιαύτη ουσία, και εττι ταυτην τα εκ των αισθήσεων ττάντα
αναφερομεν, υτταρ·χουσαν ττροτερον άνευρίσκοντες ήμετέραν
ούσαν, και ταύτα εκείνη ¿ιττεικαζομεν, ¿ιναηκαΐον, ούτω'; ωςττερ
και ταΰτα εστίν οντω<; και την ημετεραν ψυγην eivai καϊ ττριν
46                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

γεγονεναι ημάς' el δε μη εστί ταύτα, αΧλως αν 6 λόγο? ούτος
ειρημενος εϊη ; αρ ούτως έχει, και 'ίση ανάγκη ταΰτά τε εινα-
και τας ημετέρας ^υχας, ττριν και ημάς γεγονεναι, και ει μη
ταΰτα, ούΒε τάδε ; ' Τπερφυώς, εφη, ω Σώκρατες, ό Σιμμίας,
8οκεΐ μοι ή αύτη ανάγκη είναι, καΐ εις.καλόν γε καταφεύγει ο
λόγος ει? το ομοίως είναι την τε ψυχην ημών, πρϊν γενέσθαι
ημάς, και την ούσίαν, ην συ νυν λέγει?, ού yàp έχω εγωγε ούΒεν
ούτω μοι εναργές 6ν, ως τούτο, το πάντα τά τοιαύτα ε'ίναι ως
οΐόν τε μάλιστα, καλόν τε και άγαθον και ταΧλα πάντα, α συ
νύν 8η έλεγες' και εμοιγε ίκανώς άποΒεΒεικται.

2. Translate into English—
     ....... ΕπειΒάν τις πιστευση λόγω TtW άληθεΐ είναι άνευ της
περϊ τους λόγοι»? τέχνης, καπειτα oXíryov ύστερον αύτω 8όξη
-ψ-ευΒης είναι, ενίοτε μεν ων, ενίοτε δ' ούκ ων, κα\ αύθις έτερος και
έτερος, και μάλιστα 8η οι περί τους άντιλογικους λόγοι»?
Βιατρίψαντες οΐσθ' 'ότι τελευτώντες οϊονται σοψώτατοι γεγονεναι
τε καϊ κατανενοηκεναι μόνοι, ότι ούτε των πραγμάτων ούΒενος
ούΒεν νγιες ούΒε βέβαιον ούτε των \όγων, άλλα πάντα τα οντά,
άτεγνώς ώςπερ εν Εύρίπω, ανω και κάτω στρέφεται και γρονον
ούΒενα εν ούΒενϊ μένει. Πάνυ μεν ουν, εφην εγω, αληθή λέγεις.
Ούκοϋν, ώ ΦαίΒων, εφη, οίκτραν αν εϊη το πάθος, ει οντος 8η
τίνος αληθούς και βέβαιου λόγου καϊ Βυνατού κατανοήσαι,
έπειτα Βια το παραγίηνεσθαι τοιοντοις τισϊ Χόγοις τοις αύτοις
τότε μεν Βοκούσιν άληθεσιν είναι, τότε 8ε μή, μη εαυτόν τις
αίτιωτο, μηΒε την εαυτού άτεχνίαν, άλλα τελευτών Βια το
άλγείν άσμένος επι τους λόγου? αφ εαυτού την αιτιαν αττωσαιτοt
κα\ ηΒη τον λοιπόν βίον μισών τε και ΧοιΒορών τους λογούς
Βιατελοΐ, τών 8ε όντων της αληθείας τε και επιστήμης στερηθείη ;
Νη τον Λία, ην δ' εγώ, οίκτρον Βήτα.
     Πρώτον μεν τοίνυν, εφη, τούτο εΰλαβηθώμεν,                  κάί μη
                       EXAMINATION PAPEES.                              47

παρίωμεν etc την ψυχήν, &>ç των λόγων KivSi/veúet ovSèv t»ytèç
eîvcu, άλλα πολύ μάΧΧον, οτι ήμεΐ<{ ονττω ύγιώ? 'έγομεν, άλλ'
άνδριστέον καϊ ττροθυμητέον ύγίω? ë%eiv.
     1. Give some account of Phsedo, Simmias and Gebes.
     2. Why was pre-existence necessary to the proof of immortality
to the Greeks ?
     3. Explain Plato's άνάμνησις. In what form would modern
philosophy express the superiority of the ideal to the real ? In
what way may this be an argument for immortality ?
     4. Was Plato's ¿δέα of Good, as far as developed by him,
a conscious moral being, or merely a perfect type ?
     5. What is the relation of the doctrine of the Harmony to the
general argument ? How is it refuted ?
     6. On what kind of argument would a modern psychologist
chiefly rely to infer Immortality ? Does Plato employ it ?
     7. Positive Philosophy is inconsistent in excluding the question
of the existence and immortality of the soul from the range of
inductive science.
     8. What is the meaning of the μΰθος in. the Phœdo ?
     9. What is the scientific value of the Dialogue form in Plato's
works ?



                              FIRST YEAR.


                    MATHEMATICS.


                                EUCLID.

   ' 1. If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to two
sides of the other each to each ; but the angle contained by the
48                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

two sides of the one, greater than the aagle contained by the two
sides of the other, the base of the one which has the greater
angle shall be greater than the base of the other.
     2. The opposite sides and angles of parallelograms are equal
to one another.
     3. If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the squares
of the whole line and one of the parts, are equal to twice the
rectangle contained by the whole and that part, together with the
square of the other part.
     4. If a straight line from the centre of a circle bisect another
straight line which does not pass through the centre, it shall cut it
at right angles ; and if it cut it at right angles it shall bisect it.
     5. The angle at the centre of a circle is double the angle at
the circumference on the same base.
     6. Describe a circle about a given square.
     7. If any number of magnitudes be proportionals, as one
antecedent is to its consequent, so shall the sum of the ante-
cedents be to the sum of the consequents.
     8. Equiangular parallelograms have to one another the ratio
compounded of the ratios of their sides.
     9. Planes to which the same straight line is perpendicular
are parallel to one another.
     10. If A B C P be a parallelogram, and from any point E in
its diagonal A C, E B and E D be drawn, the triangles EBC
and EDC shall be equal.
     11. Prove that the perimeter of a square is less than that of
any parallelogram equal to it.
     12. The points from which equal tangents can be drawn to
two unequal circles, all lie in a straight line perpendicular to the
line joining their centres.
     13. Divide a given triangle into two parts having a given
ratio to one another, by a line parallel to one of the sides.
                       EXAMINATION. PAPERS.                           49

                               FIRST YEAR.


                    AEITHMETIC AND ALGEBRA.


                                                         a
    1. Explain what is meant by the symbol — ; and shew that


                                   b       mb
where m is a whole number.
    Deduce the rules—
          (1) For dividing a fraction by any number ;
          (2) For adding two fractions together.
    2. Add together the fractions
                      1        3     7       11
                          T        ~ÏÔ     TF       "7o~'
and reduce the result to a decimal.
    3. Find the value of "9 ; and deduce a rule for expressing a
recurring decimal as a vulgar fraction ;
                             Ex.         -01729.
    4. Find the values in shillings and pence of the followino·—
                  £•87264,     £-819,      -7 2 of 2s. 6d.
     5. A piece of hoop iron 8| inches long, weights 2| ozs. ; find
the length of 1 cwt. of the same material.
     6. Find the square roots of the following, each to 4 place
of decimals—
                            1
                      7,     —,     417-21,    -0437.

    7. Explain the origin and meanings of the expressions
50                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

     8. Find the value of the expression
              2® + Vx2 — a2         ■            2x — ν/«2 — a2
              2x - Vx2 - a?                    2χ + Λ/»2 - α2
                          ,               7/1 + 2
                         when       κ=   -----------
                                         10 - 3m
    9. If α be prime to δ, but be divisible by a, shew that c is divi-
                                    a
sible by a.   Hence shew that — is in its lowest terms.
     10. Find the conditions in order that the equations
           ax + by = c
           a'x + b'y = c'
           may be      (1)    Identical ;
                   (2)    Contradictory.
Find what the vulues of χ and y become under these con-
ditions.
     11. Solve the equations
             ((B + a)4 - 6 a2 x2 - 3 ax (a2 + x2 ) = o
                     ai2 + y2 + xy2 + χ2 y = 4 |
                              »3    +     y»     =        8.   J
     12. If a and β be the roots of the equation
                           ax2 + bx + c = o,
     Shew, without solving the equation, that
                                                     6
                             a + β = --------------
                                                 a
                                                 c
                                   aß =                   —
                                                     C'

and that the equation whose roots are
                           α               β
                           —         and      —>               is
                           β               a
                               ac — b2
                     x2 + 2 -------------- χ + I — o.
                        EXAMINATION PAPEES.                            51

    13. Find the sum of a series in Arithmetical Progression.
Using the common notation, shew that
                                      η
                            s=     — (a + I)
and find η in terms of a, b, s.
    14. Sum the series
            ------- ,      ------ ,       1 ......... to η terms.
            a+b           a+b




                                  CHEMISTRY.



     1. Give a brief statement of the laws of combination.
     2. State how much oxygen, by weight and bulk, at standard
temperature and pressure, is obtainable from an equivalent in grs.
of the chlorate of Potassa, subjected to sufficient heat to entirely
decompose it ;—give the formula for the residual compound, and
its weight.
     3. If the salt left, in the case mentioned, be dissolved in
water, and a sufficient quantity of nitrate of silver added, what
what will be the weight of the insoluble compound formed, its
formula, and what quantity of dry salt will be contained in the
solution ?
     4. Give the names and formulas of the various compounds of
nitrogen and oxygen.
     5. Represent by a diagram, the action of nitric acid upon
metallic copper : also, the action of cold dilute niric acid upon
metallic tin.
52                     EXAMINATION PAPEES.

     6. Give a table of the equivalents and symbols of twenty of
the most important elements.
     7. Enumerate the various compounds of phosphoric acid
and water, state the mode of preparation of these hydrates, and
the number of equivalents of base with which they severally
combine.
     8. Give diagrams to illustrate the decomposition effected by a
solution of nitrate of silver in solutions of the subphosphate of
soda, the phosphate of soda, the pyrophosphate of soda, and
the metaphosphate of soda,
     9. State the specific gravity of copper, tin, lead, silver
and gold.
     10. Write the fórmala for prussic acid ; state the different
strengths at which it is sold for the purpose of medicine ; and
also the tests for determining its presence.
   11. If the formula for a binary compound is written, the
formula for which element is placed first ?
   12. State the characteristic tests of the following elements :—
chlorine, bromine, iodine, and fluorine.
   13. How may a salt of potassa be distinguished from a salt of
soda ? State how, in the employment of one of the tests, the
precipitate formed by a potassa salt may be distinguished from
the precipitate that would be obtained by a salt of ammonia.
   14. Give the names and symbols of the alkaline earths ;
state their general characters, and how they may be distinguished
from each other.
   15. How may cast-iron be converted to wrought-iron ? give
the tests for Iron in solution, distinguishing between a proto-salt
and a per-salt.
   16. Write the formulas for the following compounds, accord-
ing to the salt radical theory :—hydrated sulphuric acid, hydrated
nitric acid, nitrate of potassa, and nitrate of soda; give the names
proposed for these compounds, in accordance with that theory.
                        EXAMINATION PAPEES.                          53
   17. Show by a diagram the reaction between the terchloride
of Phosphorus and Water, with the formulas of the products,
also the same particulars in the case of the Pentachloride of
Phosphorus.
   18. Describe how Metallic Lead may be obtained from the ore
which is most abundant ; give the formula from the ore.
   19. Give the formulas for Litharge and Red Lead ; state how
they are prepared.




                                  1862.



                               CLASSICS.



             MATRICULATION AND SCHOLARSHIPS.


              I.—CANDIDATES FOR SCHOLARSHIPS.
Translate into Latin—
     1. Oh ! my friend, I think sometimes, could I recall the days
that are past, which among them should I choose ? not those
" merrier days," not the " pleasant days of hope," not " those
wanderings with a fair hair'd maid," which I have so often and
so feelingly regretted, but the days, my friend, of a mother's
fondness for her school-boy. What would I give to call her
back to earth for one day, on my knees to ask her pardon for all
those little asperities of temper which, from time to time, gave
54                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

her gentle spirit pain ; and the day, I trust, will come ; there
will be time enough for kind offices of love, if " Heaven's eternal
year" be ours.     Hereafter her meek spirit shall not reproach me.


                          II.— MATRICULATION.

     1. Then the dictator, having enforced silence, says:—It is well,
O Romans. Military discipline has prevailed : the dignity of
superior command has conquered : both of which were exposed
to the risk, whether they were henceforth to exist at all. Q.
Fabius, who fought in disobedience to his commander, is not
acquitted of guilt ; but being condemned of guilt, is granted to
the wishes of the Roman people ;—is granted to the authority of
the tribunes, which brought to him an aid not constitutional, but
resting on entreaty. Live, Quintus Fabius ! happier in the una-
nimity of the State to defend you, than in the victory in which
you a little while ago exulted. Live, though you have dared a
deed, which not even your parent would have forgiven, if he had
been in the same position as Lucius Papirius.




              MATRICULATION AND SCHOLARSHIPS.



            (One passage only required for Matriculation.)
 Translate into English—
     I. Hoc anno (quoscunque cónsules habuit) rei ad populum
Furius ct Manlius circumeunt sordidati ; non plebem magis quam
juniores patrum suadent, mouent : Honoribns et administratione
rei publicae abstmeant ; consulares vero fasces, praetextam cum-
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                               55
lemque sellam nihil aliud quam pompam funeris putent. Claris
insignibus velut infulis velatos ad mortem destinari. Quod si
consulatus tanta dulcedo sit, jam nunc ita in animum inducant
consulatum captum et oppressum ab tribunicia potestate esse ;
consuli velut apparitori tribunicio omnia ad nutum imperiumque
tribuni agenda esse. Si se commoverit, si respexerit patres, si
aliud quam plebem esse in re publica crediderit, exsilium C.
Marcii, Menenii damnationem et mortem proponat ante oculos.
     II. Otho interim, contra spem omnium, non deliciis ñeque desi-
dia torpescere. Dilatae voluptates, dissimulata luxuria et cuneta
ad decorem imperii composita : eoque plus formidinis adferebant
falsae virtutes et vitia reditura. Marium Celsum consulem desig-
natum per speoiem vinculoram saevitiae militum subtractum
acciri in Capitolium jubet : clementiae titulus e viro claro et
partibus inviso petebatur. Celsus, constanter servatae erga
Galbam fidei crimen confessus, exemplum ultro imputavit. Nee
Otho quasi ignosceret ; sed ne hostem se metueret conciliationes
adhibens statim inter Íntimos amieos habuit et mox bello inter
duces delegit : mansitque Celso velut fataliter etiam pro Othone
fides integra et infelix.
    III. An mérito reprehendat in quadam epístola Epicurus eos, qui
dicunt sapientem seipso esse contentum, et propter hoc amico non
indigere, desideras scire. Hoc obiicitur Stilponi ab Epicuro, et
his quibus summum bonum visum est animus impatiens. In am-
biguitatem incidendum est si exprimere άπάθειαν uno verbo cito
voluerimus et impatientiam dicere. Poterit enim contrarium ei
quod significare volumus intelligi. Nos enim eum volumus
dicere, qui respuat omnis malí sensum : accipietur is qui nullum
possit ferre malum. Vide ergo nnm satius sit, aut iuvulnera-
bilem animum dicere aut animum extra omnem patientiam
positum. Hoc inter nos et illos interest. Noster sapiens vincit
quidem       incommodum       omne        sed    sentit :     illorum,   ne
sentit
56                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

quidem. Illud nobis cum illis commune est, sapientem seipso
esse contentum : sed tamen et amicum habere vnlt, et vicinum,
et contubernalem, quamvis sibi ipse sufficiat.
     IV. Si ciuis Romanus Latinam aut peregrinam uxorem duxerit
per ignorantiam, cum earn ciuem Romanam esse crederet, et
filium procreauerit, hic non est in potestate, quia ne quidem ciuis
Romanus est, sed aut Latinus, aut peregrinus, id est eius
condicionis cuius et mater fuerit, quia non aliter quisquam ad
patris condicionem accedit quam si inter patrem et matrem eius
connubium sit : sed ex senatusconsulto permittitur causam erroris
probare, et ita uxor quoque et filius ad ciuitatem Romanam
perueniunt, et ex eo tempore incipit filius in potestate patris esse.
Idem iuris est si earn per ignorantiam uxorem duxerit quae
dediticiorum numero est ; nisi quod uxor non fit ciuis Romana.
Item si ciuis Romana per errorem nupta sit peregrino tamquam
ciui Romano, permittitur ei causam erroris probare, et ita filius
quoque et maritus ad ciuitatem Romanam perueniunt, et aeque
simul incipit filius in potestate patris esse.




              MATEICULATION AND SCHOLARSHIPS.



            (One passage only reqtiired for Matriculation.)
Translate into English—
    I. Δόξαν ημίν ταύτα, ¿ττορευόμεθα. 'Εττει&ή δε èv τω
•προθύρφ άηενομεθα, έπισταντες περί τίνος λόγοι/ Βιέλ&γόμεθα,
êç ημίν κατά την 6Βον ¿νέττεσεν· Xv ουν μη άτέλης yévotTO,
άλλα διαπερανάμενοί οΰτως είσίοιμεν, στώ/τε? eV τω προθύρφ
ΒίβΚΐηόμεθα, eo>ç συνωμοΧο'γησαμεν αλληλοις.         Bo/ceî ουν μοι,
                      .EXAMINATION PAPKRS.                        57

ó θυρωροί, ευνούχος τκ, κατήκουεν ημών, κινδυνεύει Βε Βια το
πλήθος των σοφιστών άχθεσθαι τοις φοιτώσιν εις την οΐκίαν.
επειΒη γούν εκρούσαμεν την θυραν, άνοίξας καϊ ίΒών ημάς,
"Ea, εφη, σοφισταί τίνες' ού σχολή αυτω. Και άμα άμφοΐν
τοίν χεροΐν την θυραν -πάνυ προθύμως ώς οΐός τ ην επηραξε.
καϊ ημείς πάλιν εκρούομεν. καϊ ος εγκεκλειμενης της θύρας
άποκρινόμενος είπεν, '/2 άνθρωποι, εφη, ουκ ακηκοατε, οτι ού
σχόλη αυτω ; ΆΧλ.' ω 'γαθε, εφην εγώ, οΰτε παρά Καλλίαν
ηκομεν οΰτε σοφισταί εσμεν, àWà θαρρεί' Πρωταγόραν γάρ
TOI Βεόμενοι IBeîv ηλθομεν. είσάγγείλον οΰν. Μόγις ονν ποτέ.
ημιν άνθρωπος άνέωξε την θυραν.
     II. Δειπνούντων Βε αυτών, ο Φίλιππος γελοιόν Tt ευθύς
επεχείρει λέγειν, "να Βη επιτελοίη ώνπερ ένεκα εκαλεΐτο εκάσ-
τοτε επϊ τα Βεϊπνα. Ώς B' ουκ εκίνησε γέλωτα, τότε μεν
άχθεσθεϊς φανερός εγενετο. Αύθις δ' ολίγον ύστερον άλλο τι
γέλοΐον εβούλετο λέγειν. Ής Βε ούΒε τότε εγελασαν επ αυτω,
εν τω μεταξύ παυσάμενος του Βείπνου, συγκαΧυψάμενος κατε-
κειτο. KaI è Καλλίας τι τούτ, εφη, ω Φίλιππε ; αλλ' η
¿Βύνη σε εϊληφε ; Και ος αναστενάξας ^ειπε, ναι μα Δι, εφη,
ώ Κάλλια, μεγάλη γε. Έπει γαρ γελως εξ ανθρώπων άπολω-
λεν, ερρει τα εμα, πράγματα. ΤΙρόσθεν μεν .γαρ τούτου ένεκα
εκαλούμην επϊ τα Βεϊπνα, 'ίνα εύφραίνοιντο οι συνόντες, Bi εμε
γελώντες· νυν Βε τίνος ένεκα καϊ καλεί με τις ; οΰτε γαρ ετ/ωγε
σπουΒάσαι αν Βυναίμην μάλλον, ηπερ αθάνατος γενέσθαι, οΰτε
μην ώς άντικληθησόμένος καλεί μέ τις, επει πάντες ϊσασιν, οτι
αρχήν ούΒε νομίζεται είς την εμην οίκίαν Βείπνον είςφερεσθαι.
Καϊ άμα λέγων ταύτα άπεμύττετό τε, και ττ) φωνί) σαφώς
κλαίειν εφαίνετο.
    III. Νομίζω Βε και τον θεντα τον νόμον ταύτην την Βιά-
νοιαν εχειν αποβλέψαντα των πολιτών προς τους κρείττους
τών αρχόντων καϊ των νόμων, επειΒη παρά τών τοιούτων ούκ
                                 h
58                    EXAMINATION PAPERS.

εστίν iSiq, 5ίκην λαβείν, 8ημοσίαν τιμωρίαν ύπερ των αδικού-
μενων κατασκευάσαι. ε'γώ τοίνυν ev τε τω κοινω κεκριμαί
τετράκις, ¿Sía τε ovSéva SιεκώXυσa 8ικάζεσθαι βούλόμενον
Αλκιβιάδης Se τοιαύτα εργασάμενος ού8εμίαν πώποτε 8ίκην
ύποσχείν ετόλμησεν. οΰτω γαρ χαλεπός εστίν, ώστε ου περί
των παρεληΧυθότων àSik-ημάτων αύτον τιμωρούνται ¿λλ' ΰττερ
των μελλόντων φοβούνται, και τοις μεν πεπονθόσι κακώς
άνεχεσθαι Χνσιτέλει, τούτω δέ ουκ εξαρκεΐ, εΐ μη κα\ το Χοιπον
ο Tt αν βούΧηται διαττράξηται.
     IV. Μετά Se την τών Ηρακλείδων κάθοΰον και τον της
χώρας μερισμον ΰττ αυτών και τών σιτγκατεΧθόντων αύτοις
Δωριέων εκπεσείν της οικείας συνέβη πολλούς εΙς την Άττι-
κην, ων ην και 6 της Μεσσήνης βασιλεύς ΜεΧανθος· ούτος Se
και τών 'Αθηναίων εβασίλευσεν εκόντων, νικησας εκ μονομα-
χίας τον τών Βοιωτών βασιλέα Έάνθον. εύανδρουσης Sε της
Αττικής Sià του? φυγάδα?, φοβηθέντες οι ΉρακΧείδαι, παρό-
ζυνάντων αυτούς μάΧιστα τών êv Κορίνθω και τών εν Μεσ-
σήνη, τών μεν Sià την ηειτνίασιν, τών Se, 'ότι Κόδρο? της
'Αττικής εβασίλευε τότε ό του ΜεΧάνθον παις, ¿στράτευσαν
επι την Άττικην ηττηθεντες Sk μάχη της μεν αΧΧης επέστη-
σαν γης, την Μεηαρικην Se κατέσχον και την τε ποΧιν έκτισαν
τα Méyapa και τους ανθρώπους Δωριεας αντί 'Ιώνων εποίη-
σαν ηφάνισαν Se καΐ την στηλην την ορίζουσαν τους τε Ίω-
νας και τους ΠεΧοποννησίονς.
                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.                          59

             MATRICULATION AND SCHOLARSHIPS.



           (One passage only required for Matriculation.)

Translate into English—
I.     Summa deûm Pietas, cujus gratissima cœlo
     Rara profanatas inspectant numina terras,
     Hue vittata comam, niveoque insignis amictû,
     Qualis adhuc praesens, nullaque expulsa nocéntum
     Fraude, rudes populos atque aurea regna colebas,
     Mitibus exsequiis ades, et lugentis Etrusci
     Cerne pios fletus, laudataque luinina terge.
     Nam quis inexplëto rumpeütem pectora questu,
     Complexumque rogos, incumbëntemque favillis
     Adspiciens, non äut primœvse fanera plangi
     Conjugis, aut nati modo pubescentia crëdat
     Ora rapi flammis ? pater est, qui fletur : âdestê
     Dique hominesque sacris : procul hinc, procul ite nocentes.
      .................................... Tenet ecce seniles
     Leniter applicitus vultus, sanctamque parentis
     Canitiem spargit lacrymis, animœque supremum
     Frigus amat : céleres genitoris filius annos,
     (Mira fides,) nigrasque putat properasse sórores.
Π.        Vicinus meus est, manuque tangi
          De nostris Novius potest fenestris.
          Quis non invideat mihi, putetque
          Horis omnibus esse me beatum,
          Juncto cui liceat frui sodale ?
          Tarn longe est mihi, quam Terentianus,
          Qui nunc Niliacam regit Syenen.
          Non convivere, nee videre saltern,
60                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.

          Non audire licet : nee urbe tota
          Quisquam est tam prope, tam proculque nobis.
          Migrandum est mihi longius, vel illi.
          Vicinus Novio, vel inquilinus
          Sit, si quis Novium videre non vult.

 III.   Quid trahor ulterius, Stilicho ? quid vincere differs,
        Dum certare pudet ? nescis, quod turpior hostis
        Laetitia majore cadit ? pirática Magnum
        Erigit, illustrât servilis laurea Crassum.
        Annuis : agnosco fremitum, quo palluit Eurus,
        Quo Mauri Gildoque ruit.          Quid Martia signa
        Sollicitas ? non est jaculis hastisve petendus :
        Conscia succumbent ándito verbere terga.
        Ut Scytha post multos rediens exercitus annos,
        Cum sibi servilis pro finibus obvia pubes
        Iret, et arceret dominos tellure reversos,
        Armatam ostensis aciem fudere flagellis.
        Notus ab ineeptis ignobile repulit horror
        Vulgus, et adductus sub verbera torpuit ensis.
 IV.    Thebarum regina fui, Sipyleia cautes
          Quae modo sum : lassi numina Latoidûm.
        Bis Septem natis genitrix lœta atque superba,
          Tot duxi mater fuñera, qnot genui.
        Nec satis hoc divis : duro circumdata saxo
           A mi si humani corporis eflîgiem.
        Sed dolor, obstructis quanquam vital ibus, haeret.
          Perpetuasque rigat fonte pio lacrymas.
        Pro facinus ! tantsene animis cœlestibus irse ?
          Durât adhuc luctus matris, imago pérît.
                     EXAMINATION PAPERS.                   61


            MATRICULATION AND SCHOLARSHIPS.



Translate into English—

    1. "Sol δ' εγώ εσθΧά νοεων ερεω, μεηα νητηε Πέρση,
       την μεν τοι κακότητα καϊ ΐλαδον εστίν εΧεσθαι
       ρηϊδίως· Χείη μεν οδός, μάλα δ' εγγυθι ratet.
       της δ' αρετή1; ίδρωτα θεοί προπάροιθεν εθηκαν
       αθάνατοι,· μάκρος δε καϊ όρθιος οΐμος ες αυτήν
       και τρηγυς το πρώτον εττην δ' etc άκρον ικηται,
       ρηϊδίη δη εττειτα πεΚει, χαλεπή ττερ εοΰσα.
       Ούτος μεν ττανάριστος, ος αύτω πάντα νόηση,
       φρασσάμενος τά κ έπειτα καϊ ες τέλος ησιν άμείνω·
       εσθλος δ' αυ κάκεΐνος, ος ευ είποντι πίθηται·
       ος δε /ce μητ αυτός νοεη μήτ άλλου άκουων·
       εν θνμω βάλΧηται, ο δ' αΰτ à-χρήϊος άνήρ. ■

    2. Τις yàp παΧαίσας ευ, τις ώκύπονς άνηρ,
       η δίσκον αράς, ή γνάθον παίσας καλώς,
       πάλει πατρώα στεφανον ηρκεσεν ~λαβών ;
       πότερα μαγουνται πολεμίοισιν εν χεροΐν
       δίσκους έχοντες, ή δι ασπίδων ποσϊ
       θείνοντες εκβάλοΰσι πολεμίους πάτρας ;
       ούδεϊς σίδηρου ταΰτα μωραίνει πελας
       στάς. άνδρας ουν ε-χρήν σοφούς τε κό/γαθούς
       φύλλοις στεφεσθαι, -χωστις η·γεΐται πάλει
       κάλλιστα, σώφρων καϊ δίκαιος ων άνηρ,
       όστις <γε μύθοις φγ' απαλλάσσει κακά,
       μαγας τ άφαιρων και στάσεις· τοιαύτα yàp
       πολει τε πάστ) πάσ'ι θ 'Ελλησιν καλά.
62                     EXAMINATION PAPEES.

     3.    íl μωρέ μωρέ, ταΰτα ττάντ εν Tr)S1 ενι,
          οίκείν μεν εν àr/ρω τοΐττον εν τω <γηΒίω
          άπαΧΧαγέντα των κατ àr/opàv πραγμάτων,
          κεκτημένου ζευγαριού οικείου βοοίν,
          εττειτ άκούειν ττροβατίων βληγωμενων,
          τρυγάς τε φωνήν etc Χεκάνην ωθούμενης,
          οψω 8ε χρήσθαι σπινιδίοκ τε και κνχΧαις,
          καΐ μη ιτεριμενειν εξ cvyopâ<; ΙχθύοΊα
          τριταία ττοΧντίμητα βεβασανισμενα
          εττ ΙχθυοττώΧου χειρι παρανομωτάτρ.




              MATRICULATION AND SCHOLARSHIPS.


1. Translate into Latin Hexameters—
           O mother Ida, many-fountain'd Ida,
           Dear mother Ida, hearken ere I die.
           For now the noon-day quiet holds the hill :
           The grass-hopper is silent in the grass :
           The lizard with his shadow on the stone
           Rests like a shadow, and the cicala sleeps
           The purple flowers droop : the golden bee
           Is lily-cradled : I alone awake.
           My heart is breaking, and my eyes are dim,
           And I am all a-weary of my life.
2. Translate into Latin Elegiacs—
          We watch'd her breathing through the night,
              Her breathing soft and low,
          As in her breast the wave of life
              Kept heaving to and fro.
                        EXAMINATION PAPBES.                      63
           But when the morn came dim and sad
             And chill with early showers,
           Her quiet eye-lids closed—she had
             Another morn than ours.
3. Translate into Greek Iamb. Trim. Acat —
                          Whom can we accuse
          But ourselves, for what we suffer ? Thou art just
          Thou all-creating Power ! and misery
          Instructs me now that yesterday acknowledged
          . No deity beyond my lust and pride,
          There is a heaven above us that looks down
          With the eyes of Justice upon such as number
          Those blessings freely given, in the accompt
          Of their poor merits : else it could not be
          Now miserable I, to please whose palate
          The elements were ransack'd, yet complained
          Of nature as not liberal enough
          To sooth my lusts, and pamper my proud flesh-
          Should wish in vain for bread.




                 MATEICTJLATION EXAMINATION.


    1. Multiply £24 18s. 7£d. by 47, and divide the product by
the same number.
                             4      3
    2. Find the value of — of — of 17s. 6d., and express the
result as a decimal of a pound.
    3. Find the amount of £280 at compound interest for two
years and a-half at 8 per cent.
64                     . EXAMINATION PAPERS.

    4. Extract the square root of 241081 ; also of -003 to four
places of decimals.
    5. Prove (a — b) (c — d) = ac — ad — be + bd; a, b, c,
and d being whole numbers.
                                                          3
    „ Ώ Ί           .    ,             ,                 ® - 39 a¡ + 70
    6. Reduce to its lowest terms the expression —; ------------------------
                                              r           2
                                                         x — 3 χ — 70
    7. Simplify the expressions
                       1                          1
               a — να2 — χ2              a + Va? — x2
               and     {ab2. JaW.     VaW. VTW]*-
                                       3        3x ~ 5
     8. Solve the equations Ix + — = ---------------- —
                                       5            3
               and    7x + 9y = 24¡/ - Sx = 6|.
    9. Define a plane superficies ; a right angle ; a circle ; parallel
straight lines ; and state the axiom relative to the latter.
     10. Draw a right line perpendicular to a given right line
from a given point without it.
     11. Parallelograms on the same base and between the same
parallels are equal to one another.
     12. If the square on one side of a triangle be equal to the
sum of the squares on the other two sides, the angle contained
by those two sides shall be a right angle.
                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.                           65

               FIRST TEAR.—SCHOLARSHIPS.


                            MATHEMATICS.

    1. Solve the equation—
                         ax? + bx + c = o.
    Find what the values of χ become
                     (1) when c = o
                     (2) when b = o and c = o.
    2. Simplify the expressions
                                                  I ^S - ^2
              ^a3 - Qa? x'+ 9cw2 ,

    3. Solve the equation—
                     2»3 +'2œ& - V- = (2a + V) x.
                   th
    4. Find the n term, and the sum (i) of η terms of an
arithmetical progression in terms of the first term (a), the com-
mon difference (δ) and η ;
     Also find η in terms of a, s and the last term I,
            Ex.     a = 1, I = 6¾, s = 45 ; find TO.
    5. Find the number of permutations of η things taken r
together.     What does the formula become when η = r ?
    6. "Write down four terms of the expansion of (a + V)n. In
what cases is the number of terms in this expansion infinite ?
    7. Find the (r + l)lh term in the expansion of (1 + x)n.
Ex. Find the 7th term in the expansion of (1 — x) —3.
    8. If a straight line be divided into two equal, and also into
two unequal parts, the rectangle contained by the unequal parts,
together with the square of the line between the points of sec-
tion, shall be equal to the square of half the line.
     Divide a given straight line so that the rectangle contained
by the two parts may be the greatest possible.
66                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

    9. Find the centre of a given circle.
    10. Shew that angles in the same segment of a circle are
equal to one another.
    11. Shew that the chords joining the extremities of pai'allel
chords in a circle, towards the same parts, are equal.
    12. Inscribe a square in a given circle.



               SECOND TEAR.—SCHOLARSHIPS.


                    AEITHMETIC AND ALGEBRA.


     1. Find the value of the series
                   1       1      1
                   Y + JJ + ΊΓτΤ + ............
correct to five places of decimals ; and divide 3 by the result.
    2. Find the values of the following expressions each to 5
places of decimals—
                   ,     vTs - -/J                ι
                       ^15 +      </3 '    ^45
     3. Prove that a" — bn is divisible by a + b when η is even.
     What is the value of the fraction
     a« - &e
when       h=—a?
Solve the equations—                                -4
8a; - 17          20» - 13        16» - 30
                                                    ■1
10» -
      2» — 4              4» — 3 a ~~      4» — 7
         x2 (œ _ 4)2 + 25 = 10 (» - 4a;)
                                              2a; -
         a;2 - y* = 21 ")
         xv = 10 ) ·
                         EXAMINATION PAPERS.                                 67

    5. Find the value of the fraction
               a — χ + </2αχ — χ2
                 a—χ
                 a
                 when       χ=a—                                .
                                         Λ + (δ - I)2
    6. If a and β be the roots of the equation
                           ax2 + hx + c = o,
shew, without solving the equation, that
                                                  δ
            #      -        a+β=-—
                                                  a
                                                  c
                                    aß = — .     a
    Form an equation whose roots shall be a2 and /32-.
    7. Shew how to sum the series
      a + (a + V) r + (a + 2δ) r2 + ........................... to »terms.
    Sum the series
            1 + 2» + 3 a:2 + ex9'+ ..................... + nxn~K
    8. Find the number of words of three letters, each beginning
with a consonant, which can be formed with 4 consonants and
5 vowels.
    9. Prove the Binomial Theorem for a positive integral index.
    10. Expand       (1 — x) ~n,     (1 — 2œ) -3, each to 5 terms.
   11. Shew that χ + — is not less than 2, when χ is a real
quantity.


               SECOND TEAR.—SCHOLARSHIPS.

                                  EUCLID.

     1. If one side of a triangle be produced, the exterior angle
is greater than either of the interior opposite angles.
68                     EXAMINATION PAPEES.

     2. Describe a parallelogram that shall be equal to a given
triangle, and have one of its angles equal to a given rectilineal
angle.
     3. Describe a square that shall be equal to a given rectilineal
figure.
     4. The straight line at right angles to the diameter of a circle
from its extremity falls without the circle ; and no straight Une
can be drawn from the same point between that line and the
circle, so as not to cut the circle.
     5. In equal circles, equal straight lines cut off equal circum-
ferences.
     6. Describe a circle about a given square.
     7. If four magnitudes of the same kind be proportionals, they
shall also be proportionals when taken alternately.
     8. If four straight lines be proportionals, the rectangle con-
tained by the extremes is equal to the rectangle contained by
the means.
     9. From two points, one on each side of a given line, draw
two straight lines to a point within it, such that the angle between
the two lines so drawn shall be bisected by the given line.
     10. Prove that the sides of any four sided rectilineal figure
are together greater than the two diagonals.
     11. Describe two circles of given radii, such that the straight
line joining their points of section shall be equal to a given line.
     12. Prove that the area of the square inscribed in a circle is
to the area of a square inscribed in a seini-circle, with the same
radius, as 5 : 2.
     13. The straight lines drawn from the angles of a triangle to
bisect the opposite sides, all meet in one point.
                         EXAMINATION PAPERS.                                 69

                THIRD TEAR.—SCHOLARSHIPS.


              TRIGONOMETRY AND CONIC SECTIONS.


    1. Shew that the ratio arc : radius is a proper measure of an
angle, and express an angle of 36° 30' 45" in circular measure.
    2. Determine an expression for the sine of the sum of two
angles in terms of the sines and cosines. Draw a figure for the
case in which one angle is obtuse.
    3. Determine the sine and cosine of half an angle of a tri-
angle in terms of the sides.
                          cos u — e                  ν                      u
    4. Given cos ν = : --------------- > find tan ~ in terms of tan~.
                          1 — e cos u                ¿                      ¿
                 x
     5. Expand a in ascending powers of x, and find the value
of a which reduces the expression to its simplest form.
     6. Shew how the logarithm of the sine of an angle, not
exactly given in the tables, may be determined approximately ;
and prove that the accuracy of the approximation fails for par-
ticular values of the angle.
                              sin θ + sin 3 θ + sin 5 θ.........................
    7. Prove tan η θ =                            —
                           -------- ~—; -------- — ----------- — --------------
                              cos θ + cos 3 θ + cos 5 θ ......................
to η terms.
     8. Shew that the equation As + By = C represents a
straight line, and determine the length of the perpendicular upon
it from the origin of co-ordinates.
     9. Find the equation to the straight line touching a given
circle at a given point.
     10. Define a Parabola, and find its equations referred to
Rectangular and Polar co-ordinates, the focus being the pole.
     11. Assuming the equation to an ellipse, shew that the sum
of the lines drawn from the foci to a given point is equal to the
diameter.
70                      EXAMINATION PAPERS.

     12. If two tangents be drawn to an ellipse from a given
point without it, find the equation to the line' joining the points
of contact.




                THIRD TEAR.—SCHOLARSHIPS.


                              MATHEMATICS.


     1. Shew that the square root of a number which is not a
perfect square, cannot be expressed as a recurring decimal.
     2. How, and under what conditions, may the expression
                              ax2 + bx + c
be resolved into two real simple factors ?
     3. Prove the rule for finding the Gr.C.M. of three quantities.
     4. Find the five roots of the equation «5 — 1 = o.
     5. Find the condition under which the equations
OiB2 + bx + c = o
a'x2 + b'x + c' = o
have one root in common.
    6. Sum the series
                 1 + 3» + δ»2 + 7œ3 + ...................
                 I2 + 22 + 3a + 42 + ..................
each to η terms.
     7. The sum of η terms of an arithmetical progression is

                            ¿ (3» + 1) ,
η being any whole number. Apply the method of indeterminate
co-efficients to the determination of the first term and the com-
mon difference.
                        EXAMINATION PAPERS.                           71
     8. How many words consisting of 2 consonants and 2 vowels,
and each commencing with a consonant, may be formed of 5 con-
sonants and 3 vowels ?
     9. Describe a square which shall be equal to a given recti-
lineal figure.
     10. Equiangular triangles are to one another in the duplicate
ratio of their homologous sides.
     11. If the area of a square be double that of an equilateral
triangle, shew that the side of the square is a mean proportional
between the altitude of the triangle and its side.




              DEAS THOMSON SCHOLARSHIP.


          CHEMISTRY AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS.

     1. State the quantity of nitrogen, by weight and bulk, con-
tained in 100 cubic inches of pure dry atmospheric air, at
standard temperature and pressure.
     2. -How much carbonic acid, by weight and bulk, would.be
formed by the action of 100 cubic inches of oxygen upon pure
carbon ?
     3. State the nature of the products, and their weights, formed
by the'combustion of 200 grains of light carburetted hydrogen.
     4. Describe a process used for the preparation of calomel ;
write the formulas for calomel and corrosive sublimate, and
their systematic designations.
     5. Give a process for the preparation of chlorine gas ; state
its specific gravity, its color, and the circumstances under which
it has been liquified.
     6. Write the formula for ammoniacal gas ; state the tern-
72                       EXAMINATION PAPERS.

perature and pressure under which it has been liquified, and the
source from which the commercial supply is chiefly derived.
     7. "Write the formulas for cyanogen and hydrocyanic acid ;
state how these compounds are usually prepared.
     8. Describe the manufacture of sulphuric acid from sulphur
or iron pyrites. Write the formulas for oil of vitriol and the
Nordhausen sulphuric acid.
     9. Give a brief description of the process now employed for
the manufacture of soda from common salt. Shew the re-
actions by diagrams.
     10. Write the formulas for the following compounds :—
Fused caustic soda, crystals of soda of commerce, nitrate of
soda, hyposulphite of soda, and iodide of sodium.
     11. State the leading characters, chemical and physical, of
phosphorus.
     12. Describe the preparation of phosphorus from bone earth.
     13. From what sources is the supply of carbonic acid to the
atmosphere chiefly derived ? State what natural process causes
the removal of this gas from the air, and the requisite conditions.
     14. Describe Davy's Miners' Safety Lamp, and explain the
cause of its efficiency.
     15. Explain the formation of dew.
     16. Describe Daniell's dew-point hygrometer, and how it is
to be used to determine the hygrométrie state of the air.
     17. Explain the construction of the common and Astatic
galvanometers.
     18. Given 100 cubic inches of air, temperature 80° F., dew-
point 60°, pressure 29-6 inches,—required the bulk of dry air at
standard temperature and pressure.
     19. State the weight of steam at 212° F., required to melt
one pound of ice at 32° F., leaving the resulting water at 60° F.


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