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Regular Board Meeting Packet

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Regular Board Meeting Packet Powered By Docstoc
					                                 BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                        McHENRY COUNTY COLLEGE DISTRICT #528


November 18, 2010                                                                       Board Room
Regular Board Meeting                                                          8900 U.S. Highway 14
7:00 P.M.                                                                     Crystal Lake, IL 60012

                                             AGENDA

1. CALL TO ORDER

2. ROLL CALL

3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

4. MISSION STATEMENT

5. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA

6. ACCEPTANCE OF MINUTES: Regular Board Meeting, October 28, 2010

7. OPEN FOR RECOGNITION OF VISITORS AND PRESENTATIONS
   Three (3) minutes per person or less.

8. APPOINTMENT OF TRUSTEE

9. BOARD COMMITTEE REPORTS
   Finance Committee

10. ICCTA REPORT

11. FRIENDS OF MCC FOUNDATION REPORT

12. PRESIDENT’S REPORT

13. PRESENTATION
    Innovation in Teaching and Learning Grant Award Winners: Dr. Tony Miksa, Vice President of
    Academic & Student Affairs; Mr. Tom Vician, Instructor of Art/Ceramics; Mr. Jack Brzezinski,
    Instructor of Computer and Digital Media; Mr. Thomas Kaltenecker; Culinary Management

14. COMMUNICATIONS
    A. Student Trustee Report
    B. Faculty Report
    C. Adjunct Faculty Report
    D. Staff Council Report
15. APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA
    For Approval
    A. Executive Summary, Board Report #10-227
    B. Financial Statements
       1. Treasurer’s Report, Board Report #10-228
       2. Ratification for Payment of Voucher #1026 - $1,636,309.57, Board Report #10-229
    C. Requests to Purchase/Renew
       1. 1098-T Processing Services, Board Report #10-230
       2. AACC Annual Membership, Board Report #10-231
       3. Neopost Postage Equipment, Board Report #10-232
       4. Annual Legato Backup/Recovery Maintenance, Board Report #10-233
       5. Server Lifecycle Replacements, Board Report #10-234
       6. VRanger Annual Support and Maintenance, Board Report #10-235
       7. SchoolDude Web-Based Products and Services, Board Report #10-236
       8. Rotary Lift – Automotive Department, Board Report #10-237
    D. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Culinary Management, Board Report #10-238
    E. Authorization of FY 2011 Non-Mandatory Transfers of Funds, Board Report #10-239
    F. Resolution for Estimated Tax Levy and Notice of Public Hearing, Board Report #10-240
    G. Personnel
       1. Personnel Adjustments for Fall 2010 Transfer and Occupational Courses, Board Report #10-174
           Addendum
       2. Continuing and Professional Education Personnel Considerations for Fall 2010, Board Report #10-175
           Addendum
       3. Appointment of New Occupational Therapy Assistant Instructor, Board Report #10-241
       4. Appointment of Replacement Instructor of Automotive Technology, Board Report #10-242
       5. Salary/Advanced Placement Adjustments, Board Report #10-243

16. ACTION ON ITEMS REMOVED FROM CONSENT AGENDA

17. APPOINTMENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTION FOR COLLEGE BANKING SERVICES, Board
    Report #10-244

18. INFORMATION REPORTS
    A. Resignation
    B. Resignation
    C. Distributed Press Releases

19. SUMMARY COMMENTS BY BOARD MEMBERS

20. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS

21. CLOSED SESSION

22. ACCEPTANCE OF CLOSED SESSION MINUTES: Regular Board Meeting, October 28, 2010

23. ADJOURNMENT




Mary Miller
Chair
                                            Foundation Update
                                         Board of Trustees Meeting
                                           November 18, 2010

The Promise
Mid-term reminder letters were sent to all current Promise students. Five Promise students volunteered to
assist with the Taste of McHenry County.

Annual Sponsorships
Our annual sponsorships continue to grow. We have secured sponsorships in the amount of $57,600.00
from 18 different business community sponsors. We are at 73% of annual goal and continue our efforts
working with potential sponsors.

Alumni
Awardees from the MCC Alumni Awards Program have been contacted and details are being worked out
for them to attend the graduation ceremony on Saturday, December 11.

Scholarships
We had another productive scholarship donor meeting, and re-established a working relationship with
another of our donors. As with other meetings, we re-established and updated the scholarship parameters,
adjusted the profile, and agreed on notification dates. In addition, we set guidelines for a new solicitation
campaign, which the foundation will assist the donor(s) in their fundraising efforts.

Events
The inaugural Taste of McHenry County event was held Sunday, November 7, with 21 area restaurants
participating. The event was highlighted by a competition between students in the MCC Culinary
Management program. After feasting on variety of food samples, many attendees stayed to watch the
chef’s competition. More than 200 of the attendees visited Hockey Hall of Fame legend Bobby Hull, who
was available to sign autographs and have photos taken with our guests. A team of 28 staff and student
volunteers, including President Smith who worked as a judge for the chef’s competition, worked together
to help make the event a success. A portion of the proceeds from the event will be used to fund a new
Culinary Management Scholarship.
McHenry County College                                                           Information Report
                                                                                 November 18, 2010


                                         Student Trustee Report

As part of my ongoing initiative to make myself more available to students, I have instituted weekly
office hours every Wednesday from 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. in the Student Life Office. On Monday,
November 1, I hosted the monthly “Ask Cody Anything” session with my fellow students to share
updates from the Board of Trustees meeting on October 28. Issues discussed included campus
sustainability, the approval of a campus police department, and the widening of Route 14.

On November 12-13, Student Senate attended the 31st annual Illinois Community College Student
Activities Association (ICCSAA) conference. The conference theme was “Sustainability Gone Wild.”
The conference is attended by student leaders from community colleges across the state. Students attend
sessions regarding professionalism, recruitment, retention, conflict resolution, sustainability and more.
The conference strives to build stronger student leaders by helping students across the state network and
learn of successful campus initiatives. On the same weekend, I attended the Student Advisory Committee
(SAC) meeting in Oak Brook, IL.




Cody Sheriff
Student Trustee
McHenry County College                                                         Board Report #10-227
                                                                               November 18, 2010


                                         Executive Summary

Information

Attached is the Executive Summary of financial information with year-to-date results for FY 2011
through the month of October. This Summary includes an explanation for significant changes as
compared with the same time last year, financial comparisons for the Operating Funds, and a summary for
all funds.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the Executive Summary as presented.




Vicky Smith
President
                                           Executive Summary

Fiscal Year 2011 is currently 33% complete with the year-to-date results for October 2010 being reported.
In the Operating Funds, total revenue is 59% of budget, as compared with 60% at the same time last year.
Total expenditures are 26% of budget, as compared with 27% at the same time last year. The Operating
Funds include both the Education Fund and the Operations and Maintenance Fund, and together comprise
most of the instruction and instructional support activities of the College.

The following items relate to the Operating Funds as a whole:

    •   Local revenue is currently 50% of budget as compared to 45% at the same time last year.
        $728,113 more revenue has been recorded through October 2010 than the previous year. This is
        primarily due to the fact that the FY2011 budget was prepared on a more conservative basis than
        in FY2010.
    •   State revenue is currently 16% of budget as compared to 26% at the same time last year.
        $356,906 less revenue has been recorded through October 2010 than the previous year. This is
        primarily due to the slowdown by the State of Illinois processing payments of the Base Operating
        Grant for FY2011.
    •   Student tuition and fee revenue is currently 86% of budget as compared to 103% at the same time
        last year. $401,289 less revenue has been recorded through October 2010 than the previous year.
        The primary reason for this decrease is due to the fact that at end of October 2010 registered
        credit hours for Spring 2011 are approximately 18% less than the end of October 2009 for the
        Spring 2010 semester. As of November 15, 2010 that gap has been narrowed to less than 4%.
        The FY2011 budget is 5% less than the FY2010 actual Spring semester credit hours for FY2010.
    •   Interest revenue is currently 33% of budget as compared to 9% at the same time last year. $54
        less revenue has been received through October 2010 than the prior year. This decrease is due to
        lower interest rates and a lower budget in FY2011.
    •   Salary expenditures are currently 30% of budget as compared to 31% at the same time last year.
        $168,610 more expenditures have been recorded through October 2010 than the prior year. This
        is due to salary increases in FY2011 as reflected in collective bargaining agreements and as
        approved by the Board of Trustees for non-bargaining unit employees.
    •   Employee benefit expenditures are currently 24% of budget as compared to 25% last year.
        $460,608 less in expenditures has been recorded through October 2010 than the prior year. This
        decreased cost is primarily the result of lower current year retirement incentive costs.
    •   Contractual services expenditures are currently 15% of budget as compared to 29% last year.
        $404,038 less in expenditures has been recorded through October 2010 than the prior year. This
        decrease is primarily due to professional services related to the ERP project incurred in fiscal year
        2010 and not reoccurring to date in fiscal year 2011.
    •   Utility expenditures are currently 31% of budget as compared to22% last year. $101,983 more in
        expenditures have been recorded through October 2010 than the prior year. This increase is due
        primarily to hotter summer weather and increased energy rates.
    •   Capital outlay expenditures are currently 6% of budget as compared to 2% last year. $32,092
        more in expenditures have been recorded through October 2010 than the prior year. This is
        primarily due to getting an earlier start on purchasing capital items after the budget was approved.
    •   Other expenditures are currently 31% of budget as compared to 27% last year. $28,577 more in
        expenditures have been recorded through October 2010 than the prior year. This increased cost is
        primarily due the timing of processing student tuition waivers in FY 2011 versus FY 2010.




                                                     1
                                                                             McHenry County College
                                                                     Operating Funds Financial Comparison
                                                         Four Months Actual Ended October 31, 2009 and October 31, 2010

                                                FY 2010 Actual to October 31, 2009                                              FY 2011 Actual to October 31, 2010
                                                     Operations &                                                           Operations &                                  Variance Over
                                      Education      Maintenance                         Percent to       Education         Maintenance                        Percent to   (Under) Prior
                                        Fund             Fund              Total          Budget            Fund               Fund               Total          Budget      Year Actual
Revenue
 Local                            $     10,643,951   $     1,392,467    $   12,036,418     45%        $    11,287,436   $       1,477,096   $     12,764,531      50%      $      728,113
 State                                     527,625           197,646           725,271     26%                274,867              93,498            368,365      16%            (356,906)
 Student Tuition & Fees                  9,486,378         2,440,497        11,926,875     103%             9,188,819           2,336,767         11,525,586      86%            (401,289)
 Sales & Service Fees                        9,699               -               9,699     41%                  9,945                 -                9,945      42%                 246
 Facilities                                  3,029             7,308            10,337     47%                  2,168              10,334             12,502      45%               2,165
 Interest                                   23,353               -              23,353      9%                 23,299                 -               23,299      33%                 (54)
 Non-Govt Gifts, Grants                     33,287               -              33,287         -                  -                   -                    0       0%             (33,287)
 Other                                       3,585             1,499             5,084     24%                  8,721               5,548             14,269       5%               9,185
Total Revenue                           20,730,907         4,039,417        24,770,324     60%             20,795,255           3,923,243         24,718,496      59%             (51,827)

Expenditures
 Salaries                                6,442,654          425,037          6,867,691     31%              6,618,397             417,904   $      7,036,301      30%             168,610
 Employee Benefits                       1,741,587          114,486          1,856,073     25%              1,261,285             134,180          1,395,465      24%            (460,608)
 Contractual Services                    1,053,448           51,490          1,104,938     29%                614,846              86,054            700,900      15%            (404,038)
 General Materials & Supplies              559,086           48,417            607,503     15%                510,607              60,567            571,174      16%             (36,329)
 Conference and Meeting                    105,236            6,431            111,667     19%                102,847               3,922            106,769      18%              (4,898)
 Fixed Charges                             556,137              -              556,137     52%                525,345                 280            525,625      49%             (30,512)
 Utilities                                   2,056          231,868            233,924     22%                  1,201             334,706            335,907      31%             101,983
 Capital Outlay                              6,513           15,244             21,757      2%                 53,849                 -               53,849       6%              32,092
 Other Expenditures                        128,032              -              128,032     27%                156,609                 -              156,609      31%              28,577
Total Expenditures                      10,594,749          892,973         11,487,722     27%              9,844,985           1,037,613         10,882,599      26%            (605,123)

Excess (deficiency) of revenues
 over expenditures                      10,136,158         3,146,444        13,282,602                     10,950,270           2,885,630         13,835,897                      553,296

Other financing sources (uses)
 Operating transfers out                       -          (2,000,000)              -                              -                    -                 -                             -

Excess (deficiency) of revenues
 and other financing sources
 over expenditures and other
 over financing uses              $     10,136,158   $     1,146,444    $   13,282,602                $    10,950,270   $       2,885,630   $     13,835,897               $      553,296
                                                                            McHenry County College
                                                                       Operating Funds Financial Summary
                                                                      Four Months ended October 31, 2010

                                                      FY 2011 Budget                                                             FY 2011 Actual
                                                  Operations &                                                   Operations &                                   Variance Over
                                   Education      Maintenance                       Percent to    Education      Maintenance                      Percent of   (Under) FY 2011
                                     Fund            Fund          Total              Total         Fund            Fund           Total           Budget          Budget
Revenue
 Local                            $ 22,466,886    $   2,941,325     $ 25,408,211       61%       $ 11,287,436    $ 1,477,096    $ 12,764,532         50%       $   (12,643,679)
 State                               1,734,260          613,060        2,347,320       6%             274,867         93,498         368,365         16%            (1,978,955)
 Student Tuition & Fees             10,781,281        2,642,807       13,424,088      32%           9,188,819      2,336,767      11,525,586         86%            (1,898,502)
 Sales & Service Fees                   23,850              -             23,850       0%               9,945            -             9,945         42%               (13,905)
 Facilities                             20,000            7,500           27,500        0%              2,168         10,334          12,502         45%               (14,998)
 Interest                               70,000              -             70,000        0%             23,299            -            23,299         33%               (46,701)
 Non-Govt Gifts, Grants                 63,971              -             63,971        0%                -              -               -            0%               (63,971)
 Other                                 255,750           16,500          272,250        1%              8,721          5,548          14,269          5%              (257,981)
Total Revenue                       35,415,998        6,221,192       41,637,190      100%         20,795,255      3,923,243      24,718,498         59%           (16,918,692)

Expenditures
 Salaries                           22,223,035        1,216,880       23,439,915      55%            6,618,397        417,904      7,036,301         30%           (16,403,614)
 Employee Benefits                   5,481,797          406,478        5,888,275      14%            1,261,285        134,180      1,395,465         24%            (4,492,810)
 Contractual Services                4,441,465          245,027        4,686,492      11%              614,846         86,054        700,900         15%            (3,985,593)
 General Materials & Supplies        3,357,100          199,052        3,556,152       8%              510,607         60,567        571,175         16%            (2,984,978)
 Conference and Meeting                553,023           34,693          587,716       1%              102,847          3,922        106,769         18%              (480,947)
 Fixed Charges                       1,079,755            3,800        1,083,555       3%              525,345            280        525,625         49%              (557,930)
 Utilities                               8,314        1,065,284        1,073,598       3%                1,201        334,706        335,906         31%              (737,692)
 Capital Outlay                        812,402           72,360          884,762       2%               53,849            -           53,849          6%              (830,914)
 Other Expenditures                    513,470              -            513,470       1%              156,609            -          156,609         31%              (356,861)
 Contingency                           701,550          125,000          826,550       2%                  -              -              -            0%              (826,550)
Total Expenditures                  39,171,912        3,368,574       42,540,486      100%           9,844,985      1,037,613     10,882,598         26%           (31,657,888)

Excess (deficiency) of revenues
 over expenditures                  (3,755,914)       2,852,618         (903,296)                  10,950,270       2,885,630     13,835,900                       14,739,196

Other financing sources (uses):
 Operating transfers (out)            (710,000)       (2,500,000)     (3,210,000)                          -              -                -                               -

Excess (deficiency) of revenues
 and other financing sources
 over expenditures and other
 financing uses                   $ (4,465,914) $       352,618     $ (4,113,296)                $ 10,950,270    $ 2,885,630    $ 13,835,900                   $   14,739,196
                                                                                  McHenry County College
                                                                               All Funds Financial Summary
                                                                            Four Months ended October 31, 2010

                                                                     Operations &                                                            Student                      Liability,
                                                      Operations &   Maintenance       Auxiliary           Restricted        Working         Grant &                     Protection &       Health
                                        Education     Maintenance    (Restricted)     Enterprises          Purposes           Cash            Loan            Audit      Settlement       Insurance           Total
                                          Fund           Fund           Fund             Fund                Fund             Fund            Fund            Fund          Fund            Fund            All Funds
Revenue
 Local                                 $ 11,287,436   $ 1,477,096    $        -       $         -      $          -      $        -      $         -      $       722    $       1,451    $         -     $ 12,766,706
 State                                      274,867        93,498             -                 -               4,491             -                -              -                -                -          372,856
 Federal                                        -             -               -                 -              88,272             -          1,684,636            -                -                -        1,772,908
 Tuition & Fees                           9,188,819     2,336,767             -             771,175               -               -                -              -                -                -       12,296,761
 Sales & Service Fees                         9,945           -               -           1,537,858               -               -                -              -                -                -        1,547,803
 Facilities                                   2,168        10,334             -                 -                 -               -                -              -                -                -           12,502
 Interest                                    23,299           -             5,445               -                 -               378              -              -                216              -           29,339
 Non-Govt Gifts, Grants                         -             -               -              46,472               -               -                -              -                -                -           46,472
 Other                                        8,721         5,548             -                 -                   50            -                -              -                -          1,691,282      1,705,601
Total Revenue                            20,795,255     3,923,243           5,445         2,355,505            92,813             378        1,684,636            722            1,667        1,691,282     30,550,946

Expenditures
 Instruction                              4,619,887           -               -                 -            154,111               -               -              -               -                          4,773,997
 Academic Support                           531,702           -               -                 -             17,820               -               -              -               -                            549,522
 Student Services                           930,955           -               -                 -             82,208               -               -              -               -                          1,013,163
 Public Service                             451,069           -               -             329,183           83,478               -               -              -               -                            863,730
 Auxiliary Services                       1,011,403           -               -           1,623,890              -                 -               -              -               -                          2,635,293
 Operations & Maintenance                       -       1,037,613             -               5,467           46,160               -               -           41,000         159,690                        1,289,930
 Institutional Support                    2,299,969           -            74,077                 48                               -         2,037,718            -           518,685         1,473,641      6,404,137
Total Expenditures                        9,844,985     1,037,613          74,077         1,958,588          383,776               -         2,037,718         41,000         678,375         1,473,641     17,529,773

Excess (deficiency) of revenues
 over expenditures                       10,950,270     2,885,630          (68,631)        396,917           (290,963)            378         (353,082)       (40,278)        (676,708)        217,640      13,021,173

Other financing sources (uses):
 Operating transfers in                         -              -               -                -                 -                -               -              -                -                -              -
 Operating transfers (out)                      -              -               -                -                 -                -               -              -                -                -              -
Total Other financing sources (uses)            -              -               -                -                 -                -               -              -                -                -              -

Excess (deficiency) of revenues
 and other financing sources
 over expenditures and other
 financing uses                          10,950,270     2,885,630          (68,631)        396,917           (290,963)            378         (353,082)       (40,278)        (676,708)        217,640      13,021,173

Beginning Fund Balance                   18,012,222     3,654,494        7,964,902         811,640             51,681        2,811,517         47,549         151,727        2,271,675          89,892      35,867,299

Ending Fund Balance                    $ 28,962,492   $ 6,540,124    $ 7,896,271      $ 1,208,557      $     (239,282) $ 2,811,895       $ (305,533) $        111,449    $ 1,594,967      $    307,532    $ 48,888,472
McHenry County College                                                           Board Report #10-228
                                                                                 November 18, 2010


                                           Treasurer’s Report

Information

Attached is the Treasurer’s Report for the month of October, including details regarding the College’s
investments.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the Treasurer’s Report as presented.




Vicky Smith
President
                         McHenry County College
                             Treasurer's Report
                       For the Month of October 2010

    Bank Name           Beginning       Deposits (+)   Disbursements (-)      Ending
 Location / Account      Balance       Other Additions Other Subtractions     Balance

Home State Bank
Crystal Lake
Main                   $1,961,941.25   $4,374,454.63     $3,865,735.18      $2,470,660.70


Harvard State Bank
Harvard
Credit Card            $168,154.59      $150,548.41        $2,153.71        $316,549.29


Home State Bank
Crystal Lake
Online                  $32,807.67         $2.79              $0             $32,810.46


Home State Bank
Crystal Lake
Flexible Spending           $0           $21,007.54       $21,007.54             $0


Home State Bank
Crystal Lake
Dental Claims               $0           $21,885.94       $21,885.94             $0


Home State Bank
Crystal Lake
Payroll                     $0              $0                $0                 $0


First Midwest Bank
McHenry
Student Grant & Loan     $513.60       $1,418,162.63     $1,415,083.88       $3,592.35




  11/16/2010
  REPORT-Treasurer
McHenry County College
November 18, 2010




Investments
                                                                                                         October 31,2010       September 30,2010
College Fund                                  Financial Institution                                       Investments             Investments              Interest       No. of Days              Maturity
Education                                     Illinois Funds                                                 21,811,740.43          29,041,439.36         see below           N/A       On Demand
Education                                     JPMorgan Chase                                                  8,110,674.25           3,000,656.93           0.40%             N/A       On Demand
Education                                     CDARS - Alpine Bank*                                              238,500.00             238,500.00          1.000%             180       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - Arizona Bank and Trust*                                   238,500.00             238,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - Business First Bank*                                      238,500.00             238,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - Herald National Bank*                                     238,500.00             238,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - MidFirst Bank*                                            238,500.00             238,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - Peoples Bank, National Association*                        16,495.52              16,495.52          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - SpiritBank*                                               238,500.00             238,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - The F&M Bank and Trust Company*                           174,500.00             174,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - The Huntington National Bank*                             141,500.00             141,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Education                                     CDARS - West Bank*                                                238,500.00             238,500.00          1.000%             360       11/12/2010
Operations & Maintenance (Restricted)         Illinois Funds                                                  8,170,721.90           8,169,619.79         see below           N/A       On Demand - Reserve Account
Operations & Maintenance (Restricted)         JPMorgan Chase                                                    921,569.59                    -             0.40%             N/A       On Demand
Working Cash                                  JPMorgan Chase                                                    617,481.03                    -             0.40%             N/A       On Demand
Liability, Protection and Settlement          JPMorgan Chase                                                    352,099.86                    -             0.40%             N/A       On Demand
Operations & Maintenance (Restricted)         Illinois Funds                                                           -               921,418.43         see below           N/A       On Demand
Working Cash                                  Illinois Funds                                                           -               617,379.75         see below           N/A       On Demand
Liability, Protection and Settlement          Illinois Funds                                                           -               352,042.11         see below           N/A       On Demand

                                              Total                                                           41,986,282.58           44,104,551.89



Interest Revenue                                                                                                                                                         Illinois Fund Rates - October 2010
                                                                                                                                                                                       Annualized rate - Money Mkt
College Fund                                                                                                          Oct-10             Fiscal YTD                      Low           0.137%
Education                                                                                                           5,019.80              23,196.48                      High          0.191%
Operations & Maintenance (Restricted)                                                                               1,253.27               5,445.43
Working Cash                                                                                                          101.28                 215.74                      Average        0.159%
Liability, Protection and Settlement                                                                                   57.75                 157.99

                                              Total                                                               $6,432.10              $29,015.64

* CDARS stands for Certificates of Deposit Account Registry Service. This program allows the College to purchase fully FDIC covered Certificates of Deposit from multiple
  institutions. All CD's are purchased in increments of less than the FDIC insurance maximum to ensure that both principal and interest are eligible for full FDIC insurance.
McHenry County College                                                          Board Report #10-229
                                                                                November 18, 2010


                               Ratification for Payment of Voucher #1026

Information

        100- Education Fund                                                            $738,772.82

        200- Operations & Maintenance Fund                                              142,311.10

        300- Operations & Maintenance (Restricted) Fund                                  11,673.54

        400- Bond & Interest Fund                                                              0.00

        500- Auxiliary Enterprises Fund                                                 190,617.59

        600- Restricted Purposes Fund                                                    69,852.80

        800- Student Grant & Loan Fund                                                         0.00

        1000- Trust & Agency Fund                                                        12,398.92

        1100- Audit Fund                                                                 41,000.00

        1200- Liability Protection & Settlement Fund                                      4,376.96

        1700-Employee Health Insurance                                                  425,305.84

                                                                Total:               $1,636,309.57


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees ratifies payment of Voucher #1026 dated November 18, 2010
totaling $1,636,309.57.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                           Board Report #10-230
                                                                                 November 18, 2010


                                          Request to Purchase
                                       1098-T Processing Services

Information

The College is required by the Internal Revenue Service to issue Form 1098-T to students for calendar
year 2010. Form 1098-T reports to the student the amount of tuition the student paid during the year. The
Form 1098-T is required to be issued by the College by January 31, 2011.

For the last four years, the College has used Affiliated Computer Services of Dallas, TX to provide this
service. The College has received good service from the vendor. The cost this year would be $0.62 per
1098-T issued to each student, which is the same as last year. Based upon current estimates of the
number of students for which 1098-T’s will be issued, the cost should not exceed $7,000.00.

This expense is budgeted in the Bursar’s Office Contractual Services Account in the Education Fund.

These services and supplies are exempt from bidding requirements as stated in the Illinois Public
Community College Act Chapter 110 ILCS 805/3-27.1, exemption (f) which reads, “purchase and
contracts for the use, purchase, delivery, movement or installation of data processing equipment,
software, or services and telecommunications and inter-connect equipment, software and services.”


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the purchase of calendar year 2010 processing
services of 1098-T’s for an amount not to exceed $7,000.00 from Affiliated Computer Services, Dallas,
TX.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                            Board Report #10-231
                                                                                  November 18, 2010


                                        Request to Renew
                                     AACC Annual Membership

Information

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is the primary advocacy organization for
community colleges at the national level. AACC collaborates with a wide range of entities within the
higher education community to monitor and influence federal policy and to collaborate on issues of
common interest. AACC currently represents more than 1,200 two-year, associate-degree granting
institutions, and MCC has been a member for more than a decade. The membership renewal rate for FY
2011 is $6,590.00.

This expense is budgeted in the Executive Office Account in the Education Fund.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the renewal of the College’s annual membership
for $6,590.00 to the American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, D.C.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                          Board Report #10-232
                                                                                November 18, 2010


                                         Request to Purchase
                                      Neopost Postage Equipment

Information

The College is currently in the fourth year of a five year lease of postage equipment from Neopost
through Brent’s Mailing Equipment Company. This equipment is used extensively on a daily basis to
send out U.S. Mail as well as UPS packages.

In order to assist their customers in upgrading to newly released digital mailing equipment, Neopost is
offering to cancel the remainder of the current lease term and upgrade the College to the new model on
another five year lease. Mailing equipment is very similar to computers in that technology changes
necessitate upgrading of equipment approximately every 4-6 years and the equipment is expensive.
Therefore, it is advantageous for the College to lease postage equipment. The total lease payment
includes the cost of the equipment, a maintenance service agreement on the equipment, meter rental, and
software updates.

The new equipment is faster and more technologically advanced. These factors will reduce equipment
down time and improve the speed and accuracy of mail processing. The current lease price is $691.05
monthly. The new lease price will be $549.41 monthly. This saves the college $141.64 per month
resulting in an annual savings of approximately $1,700.00.

Price quotations were solicited from two other vendors for comparable equipment. One vendor was
$25.15 per month higher and the other vendor did not respond.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the lease of a Neopost IS480DS Mail Machine at a
monthly cost of $549.41 for sixty (60) months starting April 1, 2011, from Brent’s Mailing Equipment
Company, Rockford, IL.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                           Board Report #10-233
                                                                                 November 18, 2010


                                          Request to Renew
                             Annual Legato Backup/Recovery Maintenance

Information

Every night Information Technology runs backup processes to insure the integrity and security of stored
data for administrative applications, operating systems, and staff, faculty and student data. This backup
data is then stored in an off campus facility, with a company named Iron Mountain, where it may be
retrieved if needed. The College depends on the product, Legato Networker (back-up and recovery)
system, to complete the backup processes. Legato Networker is owned by EMC Corporation. The
software license is covered by an annual maintenance and support agreement, which is due for renewal in
December for a period of 12 months. The Legato system is complex to operate, so vendor maintenance
and support is recommended. The College has had reason to call on the existing support agreements for a
number of upgrade and problem resolution issues.

This maintenance and support agreement will be purchased from EMC Corporation, the company that
manufactures and supports the product. Information Technology is recommending a one year renewal, to
allow IT to investigate alternative products for use in the future.

       Item                                                                 EMC

       One-year Legato Networker system support agreement                $14,049.00

These services and supplies are exempt from bidding requirements as stated in the Illinois Public
Community College Act Chapter 110 ILCS 805/3-27.1, exemption (f) which reads, “purchase and
contracts for the use, purchase, delivery, movement or installation of data processing equipment,
software, or services and telecommunications and inter-connect equipment, software and services.”

This expense is budgeted in the Information Systems account in the Education Fund.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the purchase of annual Legato Backup/Recovery
Maintenance and Support Agreement from EMC Corporation of Santa Clara, CA, for $14,049.00.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                              Board Report #10-234
                                                                                    November 18, 2010


                                            Request to Purchase
                                       Server Lifecycle Replacements
Information

In the Information Technology environment, a server that is over five years old is considered to be near
the end of its useful life. They run the risk of hardware failure, cost more to support, and are not
compatible with the planned upgrade to the Windows Server 2008 environment. It is critical to maintain
the College’s infrastructure environment with current and reliable technology. We have 32 physical
servers; stand alone and host servers, supporting 88 virtual servers. Five of these servers are at end of life
and are also not compatible with the planned upgrade to the Windows Server 2008 environment.
Over the past few years, the College has transitioned to become a predominantly Dell server environment
with Dell as the single source of new server acquisitions. In addition to lower cost, there are other factors
that support this single source environment. The College utilizes the Dell management console and all
firmware updates, bios updates; while health checks on the server pool are automatic. If the College were
to have a mixture of various hardware vendors, the College would be required to utilize additional
management tools that would not be compatible with one another, thus having to manage two or possibly
three management systems. For these reasons, Information Technology is recommending the purchase of
the new servers from Dell. The following table represents what is recommended for replacement:
End of Lifecycle Server being Replaced                           Replacement Server                    Cost

MCCESX1, MCCESX2, and MCCESX3 - Dell                    Dell R710 Server with VMware ESX           $17,284.99
2850 Servers - 5 years old                              licensing
IME Server – HP DL380 – 6 ½ years old                   Dell R710 Server                           $ 4,830.67
MCCInfotec HP DL380 Server – 6 ½ years old              Dell R710 Server                           $ 6,813.85
Gamedev HP DL380 Server – 5 ½ years old                 Dell R710 Server                           $ 5,345.29
DMC Server HP ML350 Server – 7 ½ years old              Dell R710 Server                           $ 7,658.13
                                                                                     Total:        $41,932.93
It should be noted that although all servers are the Dell R710 model, there are cost differences related to
the individual configuration for each server. These cost differences are due to different configurations of
memory and disk space required to support the operations each server will support. All new Dell servers
are Windows Server 2008 64-bit compliant and will position the College to move forward with the server
migration process that will allow for a smooth transition to the newest Windows operating systems in the
coming years.
These services and supplies are exempt from bidding requirements as stated in the Illinois Public
Community College Act Chapter 110 ILCS 805/3-27.1, exemption (f) which reads, “purchase and
contracts for the use, purchase, delivery, movement or installation of data processing equipment,
software, or services and telecommunications and inter-connect equipment, software and services.”
This expense is budgeted in the General Institution Account in the Education Fund.

Recommendation
It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the purchase of Server Lifecycle Replacements
from Dell, Round Rock, TX, for $41,932.93.


Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                             Board Report #10-235
                                                                                   November 18, 2010


                                         Request to Renew
                               VRanger Annual Support and Maintenance

Information

The College utilizes what is referred to as a Virtual Infrastructure environment, which represents 13
physical servers that host 88 virtual servers. This Virtual Infrastructure environment is considered an
industry standard and is used widely throughout the Information Technology industry. This infrastructure
is a critical part of the College’s infrastructure and needs to be backed up nightly. The College utilizes a
product called VRanger from a company named Vizioncore to produce the backups. This software allows
the College to back up the servers in a way that will allow the College to quickly recover from an
infrastructure disaster or hardware failure. The backup data is then stored in an off-campus facility, with
a company named Iron Mountain, where it may be retrieved if needed. The software licenses for
VRanger are due to expire in December 2010.

The College has successfully used the VRanger software for several years and is planning to do so for at
least three more years. The College received quotes from three companies for this service and is
leveraging a multi-year quote in order to reduce annual costs by approximately 20%. It should be noted
that the College was able to get a lower overall cost from CDW-G than from the manufacturer of the
software, Vizioncore. The license coverage will be for a period of three years ending in December 2013.

Description                                 Vizioncore            Netrix              CDWG

VRanger Software Support
and Maintenance                             $8,323.00           $7,239.10            $7,124.64


These services and supplies are exempt from bidding requirements as stated in the Illinois Public
Community College Act Chapter 110 ILCS 805/3-27.1, exemption (f) which reads, “purchase and
contracts for the use, purchase, delivery, movement or installation of data processing equipment,
software, or services and telecommunications and inter-connect equipment, software and services.”

This expense is budgeted in the Information Systems Account in the Education Fund.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the purchase of VRanger Annual Support and
Maintenance from CDWG, Vernon Hills, IL, for $7,124.64.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                            Board Report #10-236
                                                                                  November 18, 2010


                                         Request to Purchase
                              SchoolDude Web-based Products and Services

Information

The College currently does not have a system that creates and tracks maintenance work orders or a system
that assists in scheduling preventative maintenance tasks. The College currently uses a help desk system
that was developed many years ago by college staff. SchoolDude provides several web-based
applications that address these critical functions. Representatives from Maintenance, Operations and
Information Technology have researched the applications provided by SchoolDude, conducted reference
checks with several current Illinois clients, and inquired about like products from other vendors. The
products and services provided by SchoolDude proved to be as comprehensive as others, at a much lower
cost. As a result of this due diligence in researching systems that can provide tracking of work orders and
scheduling of preventative maintenance tasks, the College requested a quote from SchoolDude for four of
its products.

    •   MaintenanceDirect – MaintenanceDirect is a maintenance management tool used to supervise the
        entire work order process from request to completion.

    •   PMDirect – PMDirect is a preventive maintenance scheduling tool that helps create, assign, and
        manage recurring maintenance tasks efficiently. Work orders in PMDirect are automatically
        generated in MaintenanceDirect for completion and can include recommended materials and
        tools, startup procedures, and safety precautions. This module will be populated with the
        information created as a result of the Facility Condition Analysis and Equipment Inventory
        process.

    •   ITDirect – ITDirect is a powerful help desk management tool that streamlines the entire
        technology workflow process from incident request to resolution.

    •   ITAMDirect – ITAMDirect is a powerful asset management tool that streamlines all aspects of
        Information Technology asset administration from monitoring and reporting to planning life-
        cycle costs.

All four of these products are on-demand service delivered by the web browsers currently utilized by the
College. These systems are hosted by SchoolDude, so there are no additional costs for hardware as there
are with other vendor’s products. SchoolDude’s business model is to provide their products for an annual
fee. The annual cost for their service is extremely competitive. If, in the future the College decides to
adopt another vendor’s product, the data maintained by SchoolDude is the property of the College and we
will be able to migrate it from SchoolDude to the new vendor.

There are currently 21Higher Education institutions in Illinois that use products provided by SchoolDude.
This number includes 7 community colleges.

The quote provided by SchoolDude is for the period of January 1, 2011, through June 30, 2011, at a cost
of $15,182.10. These costs are broken down into two distinct areas. The items with “Quick Start
Training” are one-time costs for implementation and training. The other costs are for the right to use fees
of the individual modules for the initial 6-month period. The ongoing annual cost will be approximately
$20,738.00 which will be for a period of July through June for each subsequent year.
Following are the detail costs for the first six months.
        MaintenanceDirect                                 $   2,022.75
        MaintenanceDirect - Quick Start Training          $   1,200.00
        PMDirect                                          $     809.00
        PMDirect – Quick Start Training                   $     750.00
        ITDirect                                          $   2,022.75
        ITDirect – Quick Start Training                   $   1,200.00
        ITAMDirect                                        $   4,447.50
        ITAMDirect – Quick Start Training                 $   2,700.00

                                                   Total $15,182.10

These products and services are exempt from bidding requirements as stated in the Illinois Public
Community College Act Chapter 110 ILCS 805/3-27.1, exemption (f) which reads, “purchase and
contracts for the use, purchase, delivery, movement or installation of data processing equipment,
software, or services and telecommunications and inter-connect equipment, software and services.”

The training cost is budgeted in the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) budget in the Education Fund;
software use costs are budgeted in the End User Services account in the Educational Fund.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the purchase of the four identified products and
training services from SchoolDude, Cary, SC, for $15,182.10.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                                Board Report #10-237
                                                                                      November 18, 2010


                                           Request to Purchase
                                   Rotary Lift – Automotive Department

Information

As part of the Career and Technical Division, the Automotive Department served 153 students and
generated 1,560 credit hours in FY 10. The 10,000 pound hoist (lift) used in the automotive lab to raise
and lower vehicles for repairs requires replacement. It is no longer functioning and has been shut down
permanently. Because of the age of the lift, replacement parts are not available and it cannot be serviced.
This lift is located in the large automotive lab and is used continuously throughout the year in 90% of the
automotive classes for work that is performed underneath vehicles. The new style lift is EPA safe in that
hydraulic oil cannot seep into the ground if a leak develops. The rotary parts are encased in a fiberglass
cassette that is designed to utilize four gallons of oil, while the old style lifts hold about 55 gallons in a
steel storage tank underground that corrodes with age and begins to leak into the soil. We recommend
using the bid from Standard Industrial and Automotive Equipment, Inc. due to the fact that they can
deliver and install the lift over the holiday break and Automotive Lift Service and Equipment Company
cannot guarantee delivery on time.

                                          Automotive                Standard
                                          Lift Service              Industrial &
                                          and Equipment             Automotive               Rack’m Up
Quantity      Equipment                   Company                   Equipment, Inc.          Distributors

1             Rotary Lift Model
              SL210-RA, 2 post
              S.M.A.R.T. Cassette
              Style, 10,000 lb.
              Conventional
              Automotive Lift
              Includes Shipping/Install   $12,350.00                $12,975.00               $17,714.00

              Total                       $12,350.00                $12,975.00               $17,714.00

This expense is budgeted in the Capital Outlay account in the Education Fund.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the purchase of the rotary lift, as described above
for $12,975.00 from Standard Industrial Lift Service, Hanover Park, IL.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                           Board Report #10-238
                                                                                 November 18, 2010


                     Associate of Applied Science Degree in Culinary Management

Information

The College has completed the development of the curriculum for an Associate of Applied Science
Degree in Culinary Management. The purpose of the degree is to prepare entry level workers for
employment in the food service industry. Specifically, the program will increase the number of qualified
applicants in the food service field who have specialized training in food handling and preparation. This
degree is the next step in the further development of our Culinary Management program which will
eventually include coursework and certificates in baking and pastry and hospitality.

The new Culinary Management Degree continues to deepen the partnership between District 200 in
Woodstock, IL and the College. Since the inception of the program, District 200 has let the College
utilize their commercial grade kitchen to teach our Culinary Management Certificate programs. Once the
degree receives final approval more students will be taking advantage of the partnership.

The next step in the process is to receive approval for the degree from the Illinois Board of Higher
Education (IBHE) and the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB). However, before the College can
seek approval from either of these government entities the College’s Board of Trustees must approve the
degree.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the Associate of Applied Science Degree in
Culinary Management.




Vicky Smith
President
                             Associate of Applied Science Degree in Culinary Management
                            Course Prefix/#   Course Title                   Asterisk       Credit       Lecture     Lab
                                                                              New           Hours        Contact   Contact
                                                                             Courses                      Hours     Hours
General Education Courses (required coursework)
Note which courses are transferable.
Communications            ENG151 Composition I                                          3            3             0
       (6 credits)                 and
                          ENG152 Composition II                                         3            3             0
                                     or
                          SPE151 Intro to Speech

Humanities or Fine Arts    Select one course from AAS options approved by               3            3             0
      (3 credits)          Curriculum Approval Policy Council (CAPC)
                           Recommended: SPA151 Elementary Spanish I

                                                                                        3            3             0
Mathematics, Physical or   Select from following prefixes:
Life Sciences              MAT (minimum 100-level or above); BIO; CHM;
         (3 credits)       GEG 220; HRT 103, 105
(Note: All math courses
                           Recommended: MAT (minimum 100-level or above)
are transferable 1.1
courses with the
exception of MAT106,
107,140, 158, & 159,
which are 1.2)
                           Select from the following prefixes: ECO, PSY
Social & Behavioral                                                                     3            3             0
Sciences                   Recommended
        (3 credits)        PSY151 Intro to Psychology


Total                                                                                   15
Career and Technical Education Courses (required coursework)
Required Program           CLM100 Introduction to Professional Hospitality              3            3             0
Courses                    CLM105 Safety and Sanitation                                 2            2             0
                           CLM106 Culinary Nutrition                                    3            3             0
                           CLM107 Culinary and Hospitality Supervision                  3            3             0
                           CLM150 Inventory and Purchasing Resources                    3            3             0
                           CLM160 Menu Planning                                         3            3             0
                           CLM170 Hospitality Inventory Cost Control                    3            3             0
Total                                                                                   20
Work-Based Learning        CLM101 Culinary Skills I                                     7            4             8
Courses (required          CLM102 Culinary Skills II                                    7            4             8
internship, practicum,     CLM103 Culinary Skills III                                   7            4             8
apprenticeship, etc.)      CLM104 Culinary Skills IV                                    5            2             8
                           CLM108 Restaurant Operations                                 5            2             8
                           CLM140 Garde Manger & Int’l Cuisine                          5            2             8
Total                                                                                   36
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR COMPLETION
                                                                                        71
CLM 100 – Intro to Professional Hospitality                               3 credit hours
Introduction to Professional Hospitality is designed to provide students with an overview of the
hospitality industry. The students will learn about career opportunities in culinary arts, baking and
pastries, restaurant management, and lodging. The course includes defining the various segments,
organizational structure, operational characteristics and future trends in the hospitality industry.

CLM 101 Culinary Skills I                                                  7 credit hours
Culinary Skills I will provide the student with an introduction to a commercial kitchen. Upon completion
of this class, students will learn the proper and safe ways to handle a knife; identify, operate and
maintain kitchen equipment; evaluate recipes and successfully convert recipes; identify and apply the
use of spices and herbs in cooking; identify and demonstrate proper cooking methods.

CLM 102 Culinary Skills II                                                     7 credit hours
Culinary Skills II is a continuation of the Culinary Skills I class and upon completion of this course, the
students will be proficient in the preparation of stocks, soups, sauces, vegetable identification and
cookery, starch identification cookery, fruit identification, egg cookery, breakfast cookery, and hot and
cold sandwich preparation. Emphasis on positive employability traits will be reinforced. Prerequisite:
CLM 101 or written permission of the department chair.

CLM 103 Culinary Skills III                                                 7 credit hours
Culinary Skills III is a continuation of the Culinary II course and upon completion of this course, the
student will become proficient in the principles of identification and cookery of meat, poultry, game, fish
and shellfish. Students will learn the quality indicators when selecting and purchasing meat, poultry,
game, fish and shellfish using the Institutional Meat Purchasing Specification (IMPS), National
Association of Meat Purveyors (NAMP) meat buyers guide as well as the Seafood Handbook: The
Comprehensive Guide to Sourcing, Buying and Preparation. Prerequisite: CLM 102 or written permission
of the department chair.

CLM 104 Culinary Skills IV                                                   5 credit hours
Culinary Skills IV, the capstone class, will introduce students to a variety of dining experiences and the
opportunity to enhance their culinary and management skills in the day-to-day operation of a
restaurant. Students will be responsible for developing and executing menu items under the direction
of the chef instructor. The student’s recipes will reflect the pinnacle of their culinary management
education and individual creativity and will be showcased in the student-run restaurant. Students will
rotate through all stations found in a modern kitchen brigade and will perfect and strengthen their
communication, organization, teamwork and competency skills. Prerequisite: CLM 103 or written
permission of the department chair.

CLM 105 Sanitation and Safety                                            2 credit hours
Sanitation and Safety will give the students an understanding of the principles of sanitation and safety as
it relates to the commercial kitchen in the foodservice industry. Students will discuss the characteristics
and causes of food-borne illness and how to prevent unsanitary conditions. Students will learn the steps
necessary to implement a HACCP (hazard analysis critical control points) program. Successful
completion of this course will prepare the student to sit for the State of Illinois Sanitation Certificate
examination.

CLM 106 Culinary Nutrition                                                 3 credit hours
Culinary Nutrition introduces culinary students to the basic theories of nutrition and how to apply the
theories to food preparation. The class will include lectures on nutrition and nutrition’s relationship to
the body. The course emphasizes the preparation of healthful foods that are both pleasing to the eye
and the palate. Topics will include weight control, heart disease, cholesterol levels and cancer as they
relate to our diets.

CLM 107 Culinary and Hospitality Supervision                               3 credit hours
Culinary and Hospitality Supervision is designed to study the practices and management strategies
related to the hospitality and food service industries. Topics will include: building a professional work
environment; determining staff need; developing job descriptions; locating, recruiting and hiring new
employees; orienting, supervising and motivating employees; working in a diverse environment;
ensuring a lawful workplace; and discussing the various management styles used in hospitality
supervision.

CLM 108 Restaurant Operations                                            5 credit hours
Restaurant Operations will provide students with an in-depth, hands-on experience of typical dining
room and front-of-the-house food service operations. Topics covered include: psychology of service,
professional standards of performance for dining room personnel, foundational skills required for
serviceware handling, service sequence, order taking, guest relations, upselling techniques and simple
management procedures. This course will include the opportunity for students to receive a ManageFirst
Certificate, Cheese Sommelier Certificate and fundamental training to become a Wine Sommelier. MCC
will provide National Restaurant Association Education Foundation ServSafe Alcohol training and
certification upon the successful completion of the NRAEF ServSafe exam.

CLM 140 Garde Manger & Int’l Cuisine                                    5 credit hours
Garde Manger & International Cuisine will provide the student with the foundation, knowledge and skills
necessary for a garde manger cook/chef. Emphasis will include the operation of the garde manger/cold
kitchen, advanced sauces, salads and salad dressings, sandwiches, smoking, curing and preserving
meats, sausage preparation, contemporary charcuterie, plated appetizers, hors d'oeuvre, global garde
manger, plate and platter presentation, contemporary buffets, garnishing and centerpieces, and
modeled and sculpted centerpieces. Prerequisite: CLM 102 or written permission of the department
chair.

CLM 150 Inventory and Purchasing Resources                             3 credit hours
Inventory and Purchasing Resources is the study of procedures and practices in quantity purchasing and
inventory control. Topics include the scope of procurement, purchasing function, quality standards in
purchasing, supplier selection, make or buy analysis, managing the purchasing price, procurement
negotiations, and the principles of product receiving and storage. These topics will emphasize the
training of corporate social responsibility, the minimization of the carbon footprint of products as well as
the selection process for the use of community supported agriculture. Prerequisite: CLM 100 or written
permission of the department chair.

CLM 160 Menu Planning                                                   3 credit hours
Menu Planning is designed to cover all aspects of menu planning including marketing, nutritional needs,
menu layout and design, writing the menu, menu pricing, menu analysis, kitchen and staff capabilities,
and the menu as a management tool. Prerequisite: CLM 100 or written permission of the department
chair.

CLM 170 Hospitality Industry Cost Control                                 3 credit hours
Hospitality Industry Cost Control covers the cost control processes and procedures found in typical
hospitality operations. Topics covered will include: inventory control, food cost, beverage cost, labor
cost, staff scheduling, and operational costs. Application of general accounting principles and the
utilization of basic accounting-generated information in the analysis and decision-making process for a
hospitality business will also be covered. Prerequisite: written permission of the department chair.
Form 20

                                         Illinois Community College Board

                           APPLICATION FOR PERMANENT APPROVAL
                      OF A CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
                                 Submit THREE Complete Copies

COLLEGE NAME             McHenry County College          5-DIGIT COLLEGE NUMBER 52801

CONTACT PERSON                Thomas C. Kaltenecker

PHONE        815-455-7741                FAX      815-455-8991

EMAIL tkaltenecker@mchenry.edu
______________________________________________________________________________

CURRICULUM INFORMATION

AAS:
TITLE      Culinary Management                   CREDIT HOURS 71            CIP CODE       1.2 120504

CERTIFICATE:
TITLE  Chef Assistant I                          CREDIT HOURS 32            CIP CODE       12.0502

CERTIFICATE:
TITLE  Baking and Pastry Assistant I             CREDIT HOURS 32            CIP CODE       12.0501

PROPOSED CLASSIFICATION:                 X     District ______ Regional ______ Statewide

PROPOSED IMPLEMENTATION DATE:                   Spring 2011

 SUBMISSION INCLUDES:

   X      Part A: Feasibility Analysis

   X      Part B: Curriculum Quality and Cost Analysis. Also, complete the following when
           submitting Part B:

          This curriculum was approved by the college Board of Trustees on:                           .
                                                                                      Date
          State approval is hereby requested:
                                 Required- Chief Administrative Officer Signature         Date




  ICCB USE ONLY:

  ICCB APPROVAL DATE: AAS                        7-29 cr hrs Cert. __________ 30+ Cert. ___________

  IBHE APPROVAL DATE for AAS                                                                              1
                       Application for Permanent Approval of
                           an Occupational Curriculum
PART A: FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS
1. Curriculum Description:
a. The purpose of this program is to train students in culinary management. Students will develop a
    comprehensive understanding of culinary management concepts, advanced culinary skills, modern
    kitchen organization and sustainable “green” practices. Students will develop key skills in multiple
    areas of the culinary industry: cooking methods and skills represented in a modern kitchen; working
    with, managing and supervising a diverse workforce; setup and working in a sustainable “green”
    kitchen; recognizing and handling modern kitchen equipment; identifying, purchasing and producing
    with local and exotic foods; preparing local, national and international cuisine with profitability in
    mind. The curriculum is designed to meet industry standards set by the American Culinary Federation
    as well as the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, which prepares students for
    the NRAEF ManageFirst industry certification and the Illinois Food Server Sanitation Manager
    Certification.

b. The program will train individuals to be employable by any type of hospitality operation on land,
   water or in the air as Line Cook, Lead Cook, Kitchen Manager, Sous Chef, Chef de Cuisine,
   Executive Chef, Food & Beverage Manager, Purchaser, Food Service Manager, Private Chef, Caterer,
   Food Stylist, Restaurateur, Restaurant Manager, etc. This program will also provide skill enhancement
   to currently employed workers, helping them to maintain and update their skills as the field changes.
   This will help hospitality operations to stay competitive to lower their turnover and retraining costs as
   well as their profitability through better trained employees and the opportunity to convert to a
   sustainable “green” kitchen without the necessary employment of a consultant.

c. The target population is employed adults who need to update their skills or change fields and
   traditional students who want to enter the culinary and hospitality fields. Many current culinary
   professionals need to add sustainability “green” skills, management and supervisory skills in a diverse
   workplace or industry certifications to their current skill set. Employers are demanding increased food
   costing skills to prevent unnecessary waste, and the application of sustainable “green” culinary
   management skills to provide an overall profitable and socially responsible operation.

d. This program is unique in the way it combines sustainable “green” methods as an essential part of
   modern culinary management training. Consumers require higher awareness and participation of their
   hospitality operations and operators to provide a sustainable and socially responsible operation.
   Hospitality operators require staff skilled in techniques and methods to support sustainability and
   social responsibility while producing profit. This program will help our students be prepared to apply
   ample sustainable “green” culinary management knowledge to offer operators profitability and social
   responsibility, and to offer consumers value and trust.

e. This program will incorporate key business skills with sustainable “green” methods in culinary
   management. It is essential for our students to understand business and management theories to plan
   profitable socially responsible hospitality operations. Communication is also a key for our students.
   They will need to work effectively within their teams, manage and supervise their employees and
   report successfully to their operators, investors or employers at all levels to provide a well-organized
   operation.
                                                                                                              2
     2. LABOR MARKET NEED

a. Supply-Demand Data
   According to the IDES (Illinois Department of Employment Services), the average annual job
   openings in culinary arts for McHenry County due to growth and replacement is 805
   (http://lmi.ides.state.il.us/proiections/ccd proi.htm). The number of the annual culinary program
   completers for fiscal year 2007 is 35 for Elgin Community College, 11 for Harper College and 27 for
   College of Lake County. Of the 805 average annual openings in the culinary arts field for McHenry
   County, there are 73 regional culinary arts completers, indicating that the number of regional
   completers is less than 10% of the average annual openings in the culinary arts field for McHenry
   County. Detailed information is referenced in Appendix A.
b.    Alternate Documentation
     According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor, the food industry is expected to grow. Employment of chefs,
     cooks and food preparation workers is expected to increase by 11 percent over the decade from 2006-
     16. McHenry County restaurateurs have an inadequate supply of formally trained staff and the
     majority of restaurants contacted have indicated that there is a need for a culinary program in
     McHenry County.

     The National Restaurant Association publishes in its “Illinois Restaurant Industry at a Glance” a
     current employment of 507,500 people in the restaurant industry in Illinois. The NRA expects a job
     growth of 8.8% by 2020, creating 44,000 new jobs in Illinois. Restaurant jobs represent currently 9%
     of employment in Illinois. McHenry County employs 18,361 hospitality workers and has
     approximately 1,070 hospitality operations. (www.restaurant.org/pdfs/research/state/illinois.pdf)

c.    Projected Job Growth
     According to a report by McHenry County College's Office of Institutional Research and Planning
     (Page 9 of the feasibility study, as projected by the Illinois Restaurant Industry Overview), two main
     culinary occupations, foodservice managers and chefs and head cooks, are expected to grow to the
     year 2014. The growth expected over this period is projected at 18% statewide, with a much larger
     increase of 33% for McHenry County. The accompanying table illustrates projected job growth.

         Region     2004 Jobs   2014 Jobs Change       % Change        2006 Median Hourly Wage
         Regional    364        485        121         33%             $11.87
         Total
         State Total 22,792     26,464     3,972       18%             $15.17

         National   638,528     780,117    141,588     22%             $17.87
         Total
            Source: Economic Modeling, Inc.
            Prepared by Strategic Performance Group LLC

d. Labor Market Need
   As indicated from IDES, on average there are more than 800 openings in the culinary field in
   McHenry County annually and the number of students completing courses of study in the culinary
   field is less than 10% of the average annual openings. From 2005 to 2007, McHenry County College

                                                                                                              3
   sent 180 students to attend culinary programs at other community colleges, totaling 1256 credit hours.
   Ninety percent of students find jobs in culinary arts within one year of graduation.

e. Planning and Collaboration
   McHenry County College will deliver this curriculum in collaboration with Woodstock School
   District 200. Culinary Management classes will be offered during the day to Woodstock High School
   North students in the PCCS (Partnerships for Career and College Success) program, formerly known
   as Tech Prep. In addition, McHenry County College will offer this program to District 528 residents
   during the evening in the same location.

f. Regional Programs
   MCC is not seeking regional designation for this program at this time.




                                                                                                         4
CHART A: LABOR MARKET NEED. Summarize key findings from labor market data (including
alternate data if appropriate) to document need for the proposed program.

Employment Projections:
SOC Job Titles & Codes * (and other            Annual District       Annual Program
job titles if alternate data also submitted)   Openings*             Completers **
                                               (indicate from which surrounding districts)

35-0000 Food Prep & Serving Occupations 805                     Elgin – 35, reported FY 07
(See Appendix A for breakdown)________ _________                Harper – 11, reported FY 07
__________________________________ _________                    Lake County – 27, reported FY 07
__________________________________ _________                    Harper – 19, reported FY 08

Note: Data summarized in Chart A should directly correspond to data appended for 2a and 2b.

* SOC (Standard Occupational Classification) Job titles/codes & AAJO (Average Annual Job Openings)
by Community College district can be found through the IDES (Illinois Dept. Of Employment Security)
website at www.il.workinfo.com.

** Program completer data can be used from the most current ICCB Data and Characteristics Report or
completer data provided by the college.




                                                                                                      5
Occupational Employment Statistic (OES)
   Area: Northwest Illinois nonmetropolitan area
   Period: May 2009
                                                               Hourly        Hourly
                                             Employment                                  Annual median
           Occupation (SOC code)                               mean          median
                                                 (1)                                        wage(2)
                                                               wage           wage
   Food Preparation and Serving-Related
   Occupations (350000)                             12040          9.26           8.58            17,850
   First-Line Supervisors/Managers of
   Food Preparation and Serving Workers
   (351012)                                            750        13.81          12.11            25,180
   Cooks – Fast Food (352011)                         1510         8.58           8.39            17,450
   Cooks – Institution and Cafeteria
   (352012)                                            630        10.33           9.77            20,320
   Cooks – Restaurant (352014)                         700         9.45           9.05            18,820
   Cooks – Short Order (352015)                        (8)-       10.48           9.52            19,810
   Food Preparation Workers (352021)                   930         9.73           9.28            19,310
   Bartenders (353011)                                 680         8.58           8.55            17,780
   Combined Food Preparation and
   Serving Workers, Including Fast Food
   (353021)                                           2160         8.65           8.37            17,420
   Counter Attendants – Cafeteria, Food
   Concession and Coffee Shop (353022)                 330         9.19           8.51            17,700
   Waiters and Waitresses (353031)                    2750         8.41           8.17            17,000
   Food Servers – Nonrestaurant (353041)               (8)-        9.07           8.73            18,170
   Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants
   and Bartender Helpers (359011)                      300         8.65           8.39            17,440
   Dishwashers (359021)                                440         8.43           8.12            16,890
   Hosts and Hostesses – Restaurant
   Lounge and Coffee Shop (359031)                     150         7.97           7.88            16,390
   Footnotes:
   (1) Estimates for detailed occupations do not sum to the totals because the totals include occupations
   not shown separately. Estimates do not include self-employed workers.
   (2) Annual wages have been calculated by multiplying the hourly mean wage by 2080 hours; where an
   hourly mean wage is not published the annual wage has been directly calculated from the reported
   survey data.
   (8) Estimate not released.
   SOC code: Standard Occupational Classification code -- see http://www.bls.gov/soc/home.htm

   Data extracted on July 24, 2010



                                                                                                            6
CHART B: ENROLLMENT: Project enrollments and completions:



Culinary Management Degree
                              First Year         Second Year   Third Year
Full-Time Enrollments:        16                 16            16
Part-Time Enrollments:        32                 32            32
Completions:                  0                  16            32




                                                                            7
   CHART C: CURRICULUM.
   Culinary Management Degree:
                            Course Prefix/#   Course Title                    Asterisk       Credit       Lecture     Lab
                                                                               New           Hours        Contact   Contact
                                                                              Courses                      Hours     Hours
General Education Courses (required coursework)
Note which courses are transferable.
Communications            ENG151 Composition I                                           3            3             0
       (6 credits)                 and
                          ENG152 Composition II                                          3            3             0
                                     or
                          SPE151 Intro to Speech

Humanities or Fine Arts     Select one course from AAS options approved by               3            3             0
      (3 credits)           Curriculum Approval Policy Council (CAPC)
                            Recommended: SPA151 Elementary Spanish I

                                                                                         3            3             0
Mathematics, Physical or    Select from following prefixes:
Life Sciences               MAT (minimum 100-level or above); BIO; CHM; HRT
         (3 credits)        103, 105
(Note: All math courses
                            Recommended: MAT (minimum 100-level or above)
are transferable 1.1
courses with the
exception of MAT106,
107,140, 158, & 159,
which are 1.2)
                            Select from the following prefixes: ECO, PSY
Social & Behavioral                                                                      3            3             0
Sciences                    Recommended
        (3 credits)         PSY151 Intro to Psychology


Total                                                                                    15
Career and Technical Education Courses (required coursework)
Required Program           CLM100 Introduction to Professional Hospitality               3            3             0
Courses                    CLM105 Safety and Sanitation                                  2            2             0
                           CLM106 Culinary Nutrition                                     3            3             0
                           CLM107 Culinary and Hospitality Supervision                   3            3             0
                           CLM150 Inventory and Purchasing Resources                     3            3             0
                           CLM160 Menu Planning                                          3            3             0
                           CLM170 Hospitality Inventory Cost Control                     3            3             0
Total                                                                                    20
Work-Based Learning        CLM101 Culinary Skills I                                      7            4             8
Courses (required          CLM102 Culinary Skills II                                     7            4             8
internship, practicum,     CLM103 Culinary Skills III                                    7            4             8
apprenticeship, etc.)      CLM104 Culinary Skills IV                                     5            2             8
                           CLM108 Restaurant Operations                                  5            2             8
                           CLM140 Garde Manger & Int’l Cuisine                           5            2             8
Total                                                                                    36
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR COMPLETION
                                                                                         71
                                                                                                                              8
CHART Dl: FACULTY QUALIFICATIONS. Cite the minimum qualifications for new and existing
faculty.



Degree         Field                Years of Related          Years of Teaching
                                    Occupational Experience   Experience
Associate      Culinary Arts or
                                                5                      0
               Hospitality
Associate      Baking, Pastry or
                                                5                      0
               Culinary Arts




                                                                                         9
CHART D2: FACULTY NEEDS: Cite the number of faculty, including new and existing faculty, which
the program will need for each of the first 3 years, noting if they will serve as full time faculty or part
time.



                          First Year                  Second Year                    Third Year
                   Full-Time      Part-Time   Full-Time       Part-Time     Full-Time       Part-Time


# of New Faculty       0             2             0              2              0               1


# of Existing
Faculty                1             2             1              4              1               6




                                                                                                         10
                  OCCUPATIONAL CURRICULUM APPROVAL APPLICATION
                   PART B: CURRICULUM QUALITY AND COST ANALYSIS

1. OCCUPATIONAL CURRICULUM APPROVAL APPLICATION COVER SHEET.

Not needed, submitted as one proposal

a.   Cover Sheet. Not needed, submitted as one proposal.

b. Part A Revisions. Not needed, submitted as one proposal.

2. CURRICULUM INFORMATION. Provide the following information on the program:

a.   Curriculum. Chart C attached.

b. Articulation. This is an occupational curriculum intended to enhance the skills of currently employed
students, and prepare students new to the field for employment. High school students in District 200 can
receive dual credit by applying for PCCS classes. The certificate already in place and approved for Chef
Assistant I is the foundation for the Culinary Management degree.

c. Course Syllabi. No new courses.

d. Work-Based Learning. Students will work in the kitchens at Woodstock North High School and
McHenry County College to apply learning objectives directly and hands-on. We also collaborate with
local hospitality/restaurant businesses. Most classes will require students to attend field trips to various
kitchens, e.g., restaurants, hotels, country clubs, institutions and entertainment venues. Some classes will
require a practicum and/or hands-on experience with guests in a student-operated restaurant.


e. Equipment. The culinary kitchen labs are found at Woodstock North High School in District 200 and
at Mc Henry County College’s Foodservice Facility. We have most major equipment already in place and
small wares in both locations. For some classes we still need equipment as well as small wares.

3. EDUCATION AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS. Describe how the college ensures that the proposed
curriculum will provide needed education and skills for the occupation and will meet program objectives
by addressing the following:

a. Employer Input. (Appendix: Advisory Minutes)

b. Skill Level. All of the courses have been designed with the standards of the National Restaurant
Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) and American Culinary Federation (ACF), which are
based upon the industry standards. Students must meet or exceed these standards in order to successfully
complete this program.
c. Skills Standards/Credentialing/Licensure for Students. The standards are entry level. Students
who successfully complete the Safety and Sanitation course will be prepared to sit for the Illinois Food
Service Sanitation Manager Certification examination and the ManageFirst Certification from the
National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. In addition, students will be required to
                                                                                                           11
maintain a log book outlining their day-to-day activities which will be used as part of the formative
assessment. This documentation will provide proof of the students' cooking skill for those students
seeking certification by the American Culinary Federation.

d. Skills Standards/Accreditation for Programs. The college has designed this degree to meet the
NRAEF ManageFirst standards for 12 specific courses, which are measured against industry standards.
After successful completion students can apply for the NRAEF ManageFirst Diploma.

4. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING. Describe how the college plans to ensure students will
meet the objective for this program by providing the following:

a. Student Learning Objectives.

General education. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency with critical thinking,
communication, basic math, science, project management, and business writing skills.

Career and technical education component. Students will be expected to understand and demonstrate
intermediate culinary techniques and evaluate the necessity of applying sustainable “green” methods to a
modern kitchen. Students will be expected to comprehend, explain and demonstrate how to organize,
manage and supervise a profitable hospitality operation.

b. Assessment of Student Learning Objectives. The college will use both formative and summative
assessments such as log books, portfolios, kitchen performances, comprehensive quizzes and tests based
on each chapter and combine them for the end-of-program review evaluation process(es). Students will be
prepared to sit for the state of Illinois Food Service Sanitation Manager Certification Exam. Students will
be prepared to obtain the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation ManageFirst Diploma
and will be prepared for certification through the American Culinary Federation.

c. Program Improvement.
1) Yearly review will occur.
2) MCC will look at the rates at which our completers are passing the State of Illinois Food Service
Sanitation Manager Certification Examination.
3) MCC will look at the rates at which our completers are passing the National Restaurant Associations
ManageFirst Diploma.
4) MCC will determine how many students actually apply for an entry-level certificate from the American
Culinary Federation.

5. FACULTY

a.   Faculty Qualifications.          Completed Chart Dl is on Page 9.
b.   Faculty Needs.                   Completed Chart D2 is on Page 10.

6. ACADEMIC CONTROL.

a. Contractual/Cooperative Agreements. No other entity will be involved in the delivery of the
program.
                                                                                                         12
b. Academic Control. MCC believes that its classes and programs should be available to all members
of our community. With this goal in mind, the following individuals may enroll in credit classes as full-
time or part-time students:

•   A graduate of an accredited high school or home-school program
•   GED recipient
•   People at least 17 years old who withdrew from high school and did not earn a diploma
•   Students in high school who may benefit from taking courses through the High School Plus program.

This program will be offered and overseen by a culinary management faculty member. In this way the
faculty member shall maintain control over the program, including the quality of the curriculum.

7. COST DATA.

a. Source of Funds. This program will be supported by the course fees of the existing classes and the
Culinary Management budget.

b. Finance. No new direct costs.




                                                                                                        13
8. Advisory Minutes
                                               CULINARY MANAGEMENT
                                              ADVISORY BOARD MEETING
                                              6/29/09 – 8:45 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.


ATTENDEES:

Dawn Gerth, Le Petit Marché
Jameson Hadju, Bonefish Grill
Scott Lager, Biaggi’s
Haje Black, Salute! Farm & Vineyard
Zak Dolezal, Duke’s Alehouse
Mike Zema, Zema & Associates
James Falco, Executive Dean, Career and Technical Education
Tony Capalbo, Director of Perkins & High School Plus
Julie Freelove, Department Chair, Business Division
Thomas Kaltenecker, Culinary Management
Julie Nordholz, Division Secretary
Kathy Hoover, Division Secretary


After a breakfast buffet was served, introductions were made.

Thomas Kaltenecker opened the meeting by talking about the fresh approach to culinary management education. He provided
each attendee with an Advisory Board Meeting booklet, which outlined the Culinary Management program. He stressed that
following the core values in the booklet are very important to the success of the program. He then talked about the kitchen at
the Woodstock High School facility that will be used for the hands-on portion of the program. The kitchen environment is
small, and there is no walk-in cooler or freezer, but there are two double-door coolers. Since there is no room for overstock
items, we will teach students appropriate purchasing and food production. This facility will be utilized in the summer, as well
as the hours during the school year that are not used by the high school. Thomas will emphasize the “green” concept in the
Culinary Management program, and it will be utilized when it comes to such things as sustainable menu development or taking
care of refuse. Thomas mentioned he had learned the curriculum development side of culinary management at MCC in order
to combine his culinary skills with course requirements.

Jim Falco talked about the reason why we are at this meeting and how the culinary management program was initiated. It
started when Woodstock High School built a kitchen at their facility and asked MCC to partner with them. Federal and State
government say that a career program such as this requires that we meet with culinary professionals at least two times per year;
that is why we have the advisory meetings. At this time, we are starting with two certificate programs for Culinary
Management; this will eventually lead to degree programs. The number of students we anticipate to have makes this a
sustainable program. The lecture portion will be held at MCC. The hands-on portion will be held at Woodstock High School.
Jim added that he valued the input of those attending the meeting today.

Haje Black mentioned that inviting a student to the meeting would be a great idea. She had someone in mind who would have
a great deal of input.

Scott Lager said he had attended advisory meetings before, and noted they are important. He also mentioned that he has taught
at ECC.

Mike Zema serves on the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation and is the consultant for this program. He
stated that at our Culinary Management Advisory Board meetings we do not want to know how well we’re doing; instead, we
want to know how to improve our program. He commented that high school teachers would be a great addition to advisory
meetings. And, he hopes that the business people who attended our meeting today will be open to hiring our students. He
insists this program will not be a cookie-cutter image of ECC’s program. He advocates students learning strong core culinary
skills first. He believes in teaching students how to be prepared to enter this industry’s workforce. Our culinary management
students will start by learning basic culinary courses and will follow competency guidelines. The average age of a college
                                                                                                                            14
student at MCC is 32, and many do need credentialing. After taking courses at MCC, students may obtain a document from
NRAEF which will provide them with those credentials. Mike adds that we are looking for instructors who have a passion for
the culinary business. There has to be consistency with passion for the program—setting a high bar for teaching students. He
talked about the first production classes and that the culinary skills taught are designed to stimulate a student’s interest in the
program. He emphasized that we are to use Woodstock High School’s kitchen to teach skills—the kitchen is our lab. Also,
diversity needs to be part of our program, so we need to incorporate how different cultures can be reflected in our program.

Zak Dolezal wanted to know how our program could relate to areas other than the restaurant. Mike replied that the teaching of
culinary skills will be applicable to restaurant, hotel, and hospitality. Zak mentioned that while in culinary school, he missed
not being taught such skills as learning how to fix equipment.

Scott thinks students should not only learn about cooking, but also learn other things, such as how to work with a budget. Mike
agreed that it is important for students to learn the business and marketing end of culinary management, as well as the culinary
skills they expect to learn. So, students need to know multiple aspects of being a culinary employee when they are finally
ready to work. Scott mentioned that restaurant guests love to see a chef come to the table to talk to them or suggest items; this
is an example of a result from learning hospitality skills. What Haje would like to see reflected in our program is that our
students would learn not only the academic side of culinary management, but many aspects of culinary job skills. She thinks
we should add a unique characteristic or specific module to the program, perhaps teaching students how to adapt to the actual
working world.
Jameson Hadju mentioned that professionalism is an important part of a culinary employee’s skill. Scott suggested that resume
writing be included as part of the class.

Dawn Gerth explained how the internship is conducted at her bakery and emphasized the problem of cost and time restraints to
teach an internship student versus making them an extra laborer.

Tony Capalbo talked about how non-paid internships helped his son learn important restaurant skills. Scott believes a non-paid
internship would be an invaluable experience for a student, and it would also help the restaurant to save on labor costs. Jim
commented that most internships are not paid, but there is a source of funding available from the Illinois Cooperative Work
Study Grant that may provide payment. If MCC has a partnership with a restaurant, MCC could provide ½ the salary of an
employee in the internship with the grant. It was mentioned that certain teaching requirements need to be implemented in
order for student internships to be successful. It was also mentioned that an internship and classes can occur simultaneously.

Thomas stated that part-time instructors will have to teach a core requirement, but will also have the ability to include their
own instruction. The competency guide will be used as a reference book. Instructors will not be teaching out of any particular
book. One of Thomas’ ground-breaking ideas is to place the lecture portion of the class online, allowing more time for the
hands-on learning. Julie Freelove thinks this is a good idea, since today’s students easily take to studying online. Thomas
mentioned that there are many great upscale culinary books in our library. Thomas also mentioned that many of the classes use
the same book, which saves on students’ costs.

Jim discussed enrollment for Fall. The enrollment is capped at 32; the classes are held for a period of eight weeks; all 32
students can complete the program within the year. He added that students cannot take skills classes without committing to the
other classes. And, classes are given on a first come, first serve basis.

Thomas talked about guest lectures and field trips, which will be part of the program. (Example: a chef could come to class to
demonstrate a cooking technique.) The lectures/field trips will occur one time during the eight-week class. Thomas also
discussed participation in industry association meetings, and wants to be sure that we will be working with District 200. He
mentioned a high school program called ProStart, which may be coming to Woodstock High School. It is a program supported
by NRAEF, where students can receive college credit before entering MCC. If the program is implemented, it is something the
culinary management program could be part of.

Zak inquired about including kids in the culinary program. It was mentioned that Kids and College could be a way through
which this type of class could occur. Tony mentioned that we can only take 16 students in the culinary management program
at MCC under the Tech. Prep. Program (available to high school students), and that there are many more interested students.

Other items discussed:

                                                                                                                                 15
•   Thomas talked about the capstone class for the culinary program. He came up with the Scottish name, Slainte (meaning
    “to good health”) Terrace, for the live restaurant in which the students will work.
•   Mike talked about having strict attendance requirements for classes. Scott agreed that this is necessary.
•   Part of our future programming includes up-to-date teaching. NRAEF continues to update programming.
•   Zak wanted to know if more farmers could be involved in the program course “From Farm to Plate.” Thomas had talked
    to the Horticulture Dept. and found that this is not a viable option right now.
•   Haje talked about forging, and that farmers need to know in advance what product a restaurant needs.
•   Because of seasonal concerns, Thomas has figured out how to teach (and order supplies/product) accordingly.

The meeting was adjourned. Our next meeting will be held after our first semester of Culinary Management ends, which will
likely be in January 2010. It was suggested to have it on a Monday (but not on weekends).




                                                                                                                        16
                                   CTE – Culinary Advisory Committee Meeting minutes
                                             May 12, 2010, 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
                               At Woodstock North High School, Collaborative Kitchen, D147


Attendees: Tony Capalbo, Tina Drzal, Julie Freelove, Kathy Hoover, Thomas Kaltenecker, Liz Krol (Culinary student),
Julie Nordholz, Simon Pedersen

Welcome

Thomas gave us a tour of the Collaborative Kitchen utilized by the Culinary instructors and students. Thomas provided an
agenda/information sheet for each of us, and we went over the topics.

Academic Report and Enrollment Numbers

Thomas stated that we have our first graduates for the Baking and Pastry Assistant I and Chef’s Assistance I certificates. There
is pending approval for the AAS degree. And, there is a new certification called ManageFirst Program by the National
Restaurant Association Educational Foundation which we will be implementing as added industry certification for our students.
Thomas mentioned there will be more Culinary classes available next year. Thomas also discussed the enrollment numbers for
the year.

Tony talked about the two High School Plus Culinary Skills I classes that are available to students this fall, with there being a
limit of 16 students per class. At this time, there are 27 high school students enrolled in the culinary classes from Woodstock
High School and Woodstock North High School combined. District 200 wanted all of the students from one high school to be
in one class period, and all of the students from the other high school to be in the other class period. For this fall, all students
signed up for the morning (zero hour) class are from Woodstock High School (16 students—a filled class), and all students
signed up for the afternoon class are from Woodstock North High School (11 students – five openings left). Since there is
room for five more students in the afternoon class, Tony wanted to know the final number of students who are enrolled before
the school year is out, and then he needs to know how to advertise for the remaining five openings. When he knows the final
number of openings, he may implement a priority system in registration, where the oldest students, then the students with the
highest GPAs would have priority over the others. Thomas and Tina said they would need classes as filled as possible for
budgeting purposes. They mentioned high school seniors have an easier time getting to the p.m. class. If we can’t fill the five
spots with high school students, can we enroll college students? The high schools are concerned about security there, so it may
or may not work with enrolling the college students.

    •    Tony mentioned that Culinary seemed to be the focal point at many of the different fairs he has attended.
    •    In discussing MCC-sponsored programs for Culinary, most high school districts will pay for these for their students,
         since they are saving costs by having MCC run the culinary programs. Tina mentioned that Huntley High School only
         reimburses for A, B, and C grades.
    •    Julie F. said hopefully CAPC will approve of the Culinary degree program this fall (CAPC does not meet in the
         summer.) Julie N. mentioned the degree will be approved no earlier than spring 2011 because it would have to go
         through ICCB after CAPC approves.
    •    Culinary courses may be available by this fall.
    •    Thomas said we have enough management courses in the culinary program.
    •    Students have asked if they were able to transfer credits to another school, and they also asked about the right amount
         of credits to take, so they would be eligible for insurance. Tina mentioned the students try to apply now for classes
         under a payment plan, in case things change as we get closer to the new semester.

Professional Report

    •    The professional part of the kitchen has been certified by the McHenry Department of Health as a professional
         kitchen. Any outside catering has to be led by Thomas or Tina. Simon added that the kitchen needs to be maintained
         and held to a high standard. Thomas Kaltenecker said we can now host competitions in the WNHS kitchen.



                                                                                                                                 17
    •    Tony said when districts buy books, such as the ProStart books we’re interested in, someone needs to know about
         plans for ordering the books as soon as possible. We are trying to figure out how to work out book issues with dual
         credit classes.
    •    Soil Exchange is a company that works with Culinary. One thing the company does is pick up compost material from
         the kitchen.
    •    The two local farms we work with cannot grow anything now. Maybe by fall, there will be plenty of product. Salute!
         Farm grows exclusively for MCC now.
    •    Simon has some book ideas for canning, jarring and preserving. Tina said jams and jellies will be incorporated into
         the Pastry classes.
    •    Thomas mentioned changing some of the objectives in the culinary program to incorporate more recycling,
         sustainability and local farming focus in all classes.

Future Plans

Baking and Pastry AAS - Thomas would like student, graduation, and class numbers for Baking and Pastry classes from four
other colleges in the area to determine the need and feasibility of a Baking and Pastry AAS Program at MCC.

Restaurant Management Certificate – This will have no additional costs, so it will be easy to create. Only a couple of classes
need to be created in addition to the CLM program. Thomas wants to incorporate “beverages” and ServSafe Alcohol into the
program. It can take a year to create and finalize a certificate.

Equipment

Thomas mentioned that Culinary would like to have more items for the kitchen. He added that he is grateful for all that the
budgets, including Perkins, have given to the program. Thomas said District 200 wants to buy a cooler and freezer for the
kitchen. There is also a need for more stainless steel tables to work on. Right now, there’s a concern about having room for
those items. But, there will be a lockable storage area that may accommodate those and other items. Tony suggested that
District 200 be involved in helping to purchase kitchen items/equipment needed for the future. Thomas should talk to Brian
(WNHS principal) about any requests as soon as possible.

Curriculum

    •    Thomas listed in the agenda future classes for Culinary. MAT 140 is a pre-algebra class that is to be incorporated into
         the Culinary schedule. Julie F. suggested BUS 145 (Business Math) could benefit students the same, and the class is
         taught in the Business Department. Heather Zaccagnini would be the one to talk to about a math class as part of a
         requirement for a degree/certificate.
    •    The 72-credit degree program for Culinary is competitive with other schools. For the ManageFirst Industry
         Certificate, a student will need to complete seven certificates to earn the degree. .
    •    The Culinary and Pastry class cannot be taught at the same time, since both classes use the kitchen.
    •    Tina asked about Fine Arts in the General Education Core being a requirement of Pastry classes, rather than a choice.
    •    The Garde Manger & International Cuisine (CLM 140) class will be taught in the summer.
    •    There will be a class offered called Restaurant Operations. This is a class where students will receive hands-on
         experience in a restaurant-like atmosphere. The Employee Dining Room at MCC is likely to be the room formatted
         for this class. Slàinte Terrace is the name Thomas chose for this restaurant.

Internships

Frank Lanko is the one to contact at MCC about internships. Frank maintains the job board and has been really helpful in
assisting students who are looking for jobs. Tina mentioned there is a link about this in ANGEL for Culinary students.

Guest Lectures/Field Trips

There are some very informative lectures associated with Culinary. Thomas would like there to be one guest lecturer and one
field trip for each class per semester. Thomas took his class to Salute! Farm for a field trip, and Simon took his students to
Biaggi’s Restaurant for a tour on a Friday evening. Thomas wanted to thank the Hospitality Club and Perkins Grant for
                                                                                                                               18
providing funds for Culinary students to go to the National Restaurant Association show. Two students will be going to this
year’s NRA show, which will take place at the Hilton Towers. This will be a great opportunity for them, since there will be
students from other schools in attendance, and there will be some great events happening.

Events

    •    Many events have taken place throughout the year involving Culinary so far, including the Countryside Fall Fest,
         MCC Night, Take A Walk in Her Shoes Ball, and the most recent event, Dying to Dine. Thomas will be working with
         Jim Falco about the events scheduled for the coming years. Thomas mentioned that the events held are geared around
         students, so that is the most important consideration in holding them. Events probably should be limited, perhaps one
         per month. The core events should be done, and the Culinary program should be adhered to. Thomas said we have to
         be careful in planning events, however, because adjunct instructors are not paid any stipends.

Talking Points

There is one item that was added to the Core Values for Culinary: Sustainability – We educate in the use of locally grown
products and in respecting the natural resources and growth pattern.

Other

    •    Pictures taken for student portfolios are to highlight the students’ best work.
    •    There was discussion about a recipe book created by students. Marengo has a recipe book, so perhaps MCC Culinary
         students could create one, too. Simon thought it would be a great keepsake for the students. It could be great for
         Christmas gifts, too.
    •    Woodstock’s Farmers Market, which is number one in the state, approached MCC to help create a cookbook about
         Specialty Crops. Culinary’s part would involve what to do with the preserved product. This project will be worked
         on this summer. We will be receiving a $600 grant from Farmers Market for the books. Tony suggested that Thomas
         contact Christine Haggerty about the book binding process for this, if it is a large quantity of books.
    •    Liz Krol, one of our Culinary students, said she came to this meeting to learn more about our program.
    •    Thomas said we are trying to finish our program as soon as possible, so instructors can be matched with classes as
         early as possible. It can take a year for information to be placed in the course catalog, but information is available
         online much sooner.
    •    Culinary and Pastry students receive emails automatically when there is news to be shared.

The meeting was adjourned.




                                                                                                                              19
                                       Appendices Table of Contents

Appendix A.1.............Community College District Employment Projections, McHenry County

Appendix A.2.............Community College District Employment Projections, State

Appendix B................Local Restaurant Data

Appendix C................ICCB – Annual Duplicated Completers by Academic Program by College

Appendix D................McHenry County Job Projections

Appendix E................McHenry County Strategic Advantage – Occupation Report




                                                                                               20
Appendix A.1
Community College District Employment Projections, McHenry County
Information retrieved on April 19, 2010 from http://lmi.ides.state.il.us/projections/ccd_proj.htm

                                                            Projected
                                                                           Employment
                                              Base Year       Year           Change         Average Annual Job Openings   Annual
   Standard Occupational Classification       Employm       Employm                                                       Compou
                 (SOC)                           ent           ent          2006-2016                 due to                nd
                                                                                   Perce    Grow      Replaceme    Tota
 Code                   Title                   2006          2016        Number     nt      th          nts         l    Growth
 11-
 9051          Food Service Managers               185           208          23    12.28      2               4      6      1.18
 35-
 0000     Food Prep & Serving Occupations         7,811         9,056       1,245   15.94    124             275    399      1.49
 35-        Supervisors, Food Prep/Serving
 1000    Wkrs                                      569           651          82    14.47      8               5     13      1.36
 35-
 1011          Chefs and Head Cooks                103           114          11    10.94      1               1      2      1.02
 35-           1st-Line Svrs/Mgrs, Food
 1012    Prep/Serv                                 466           537          71    15.25      7               3     10      1.43
 35-         Cooks and Food Preparation
 2000    Workers                                  2,424         2,786        362    14.96     36              72    108      1.40
 35-
 2011          Cooks, Fast Food                    530           597          67    12.59      7              14     21      1.20
 35-           Cooks, Institution and
 2012    Cafeteria                                 255           287          32    12.60      3               7     10      1.19
 35-
 2014          Cooks, Restaurant                   670           775         105    15.61     10              18     28      1.47
 35-
 2015          Cooks, Short Order                  136           148          11     8.40      1               4      5      0.85
 35-
 2019          Cooks, All Other                        19            20        1     3.67      0               1      1      0.51
 35-
 2021         Food Preparation Workers             811           958         147    18.12     15              28     43      1.68
 35-        Food and Beverage Serving
 3000    Workers                                  3,742         4,386        644    17.22     64             147    211      1.60
 35-
 3011          Bartenders                          460           524          64    13.92      6              17     23      1.31
 35-           Comb Food Prep/Srv Wkrs,
 3021    Fast Food                                1,423         1,738        314    22.08     31              27     58      2.02
 35-           Counter Attendants,
 3022    Cafe/Cffee Shop                           379           431          53    13.87      5              26     31      1.29
 35-
 3031          Waiters and Waitresses             1,389         1,591        201    14.50     20              75     95      1.37
 35-
 3041           Food Servers, Nonrestaurant            91        103          12    13.18      1               1      2      1.25
 35-         Other Food Prep/Serving
 9000    Workers                                  1,077         1,233        156    14.49     16              52     68      1.36
 35-            Dining Rm/Cafe/Brtndr
 9011    Attndts/Hlprs                             325           376          50    15.45      5              14     19      1.47
 35-
 9021          Dishwashers                         397           451          54    13.60      5              16     21      1.28
 35-           Hosts,
 9031    Restaurnt/Lounge/Coffee Shop              237           274          36    15.19      4              16     20      1.46
 35-            Food Prep/Serving Related
 9099    Wrkrs, AO                                 117           132          16    13.39      2               6      8      1.21
 51-
 3000        Food Processing Workers               572           609          37     6.44      4              16     20      0.63
 51-
 3011          Bakers                              149           166          16    10.95      2               3      5      1.09
 51-
 3021          Butchers and Meat Cutters           130           133           2     1.66      0               4      4      0.23
 51-           Meat/Poultry/Fish Cutters &
 3022    Trimmrs                                       59            65        6    10.51      1               2      3      0.97
 51-           Slaughterers and Meat
 3023    Packers                                       69            77        8    11.45      1               2      3      1.10




                                                                                                                              21
Appendix A.2

Community College District Employment Projections, Statewide
Information retrieved on April 19, 2010 from http://lmi.ides.state.il.us/projections/statewideproj.htm


                                                       Project
                                                         ed
                                          Base                       Employment             Average Annual Job           Annua
                                          Year          Year           Change                    Openings                  l
        Standard Occupational            Employ        Employ                                                            Comp
         Classification (SOC)             ment          ment          2006-2016                    due to                ound
 Cod                                                                 Num    Perc          Gro       Replace       Tot    Growt
   e                 Title                2006          2016         ber     ent          wth        ments         al      h
  11-            Food Service
 9051    Managers                         10,137        11,146       1,009     9.95       101              239    340     0.95
  29-            Dietitians and
 1031    Nutritionists                     2,222         2,461        239     10.76         24              56      80    1.03
  35-      Food Prep & Serving                                       77,98                7,79                     23,
 0000    Occupations                     453,739       531,727           8    17.19          9           15,942   741     1.60
  35-        Supervisors, Food
 1000    Prep/Serving Wkrs                33,061        38,025       4,964    15.01       496              279    775     1.41
  35-            Chefs and Head
 1011    Cooks                             5,810         6,459         649    11.17         65              74    139     1.06
  35-            1st-Line Svrs/Mgrs,
 1012    Food Prep/Serv                   27,251        31,566       4,315    15.83        432             205    637     1.48
  35-        Cooks and Food                                          23,24                2,32                     6,5
 2000    Preparation Workers             141,201       164,441           0    16.46          5            4,187     12    1.54
  35-                                                                                                              1,2
 2011          Cooks, Fast Food           29,687        33,686       3,999    13.47       400              804      04    1.27
  35-          Cooks, Institution and
 2012    Cafeteria                        16,503        19,345       2,842    17.22       284              447    731     1.60
  35-          Cooks, Private
 2013    Household                           140           134           -6   -4.29          0               4      4     -0.44
  35-                                                                                                             1,6
 2014           Cooks, Restaurant         38,205        44,458       6,253    16.37       625             1,035    60     1.53
  35-
 2015           Cooks, Short Order         7,717         8,480         763     9.89         76             209    285     0.95
  35-
 2019          Cooks, All Other            1,257         1,359         102     8.11         10              34      44    0.78
  35-          Food Preparation                                                                                    2,5
 2021    Workers                          47,692        56,979       9,287    19.47        929            1,654     83    1.80
  35-        Food and Beverage                                       39,61                3,96                     12,
 3000    Serving Workers                 215,250       254,860           0    18.40          1            8,401   362     1.70
  35-                                                                                                              1,3
 3011           Bartenders                26,715        30,742       4,027    15.07        403             972      75    1.41
  35-           Comb Food Prep/Srv                                   18,59                1,86                     3,3
 3021    Wkrs, Fast Food                  79,792        98,390           8    23.31          0            1,513     73    2.12
  35-           Counter Attendants,                                                                                1,7
 3022    Cafe/Cffee Shop                  20,928        24,212       3,284    15.69        328            1,453     81    1.47
  35-           Waiters and                                          12,43                1,24                     5,5
 3031    Waitresses                       79,930        92,364           4    15.56          3            4,342     85    1.46
  35-           Food Servers,
 3041    Nonrestaurant                     7,885         9,152       1,267    16.07        127             121    248     1.50
  35-        Other Food                                              10,17                1,01                     4,0
 9000    Prep/Serving Workers             64,227        74,401           4    15.84          7            3,076     93    1.48
                Dining
  35-    Rm/Cafe/Brtndr                                                                                           1,1
 9011    Attndts/Hlprs                    19,790        23,171       3,381    17.08       338              829     67     1.59
  35-                                                                                                             1,3
 9021           Dishwashers               23,509        27,067       3,558    15.13       356              959     15     1.42
                                                                                                                            22
             Hosts,
 35-   Restaurnt/Lounge/Coffee                                                    1,1
9031   Shop                       13,634   15,765   2,131   15.63   213    932     45    1.46
 35-         Food Prep/Serving
9099   Related Wrkrs, AO           7,294    8,398   1,104   15.14   110    356    466    1.42
 51-       Food Processing                                                         1,3
3000   Workers                    35,282   37,962   2,680    7.60   296   1,016     12   0.73
 51-
3011          Bakers               8,622    9,578    956    11.09    96    182    278    1.06
 51-          Butchers and Meat
3021   Cutters                     6,632    6,755    123     1.85    12    210    222    0.18
 51-          Meat/Poultry/Fish
3022   Cutters & Trimmrs           3,858    4,287    429    11.12    43    122    165    1.06
 51-          Slaughterers and
3023   Meat Packers                4,956    5,582    626    12.63    63    157    220    1.20
 51-          Food Roast/Bake
3091   Mach Opers & Tendrs          841      935      94    11.18    9      31     40    1.07
 51-
3092         Food Batchmakers      6,713    7,445    732    10.90    73    171    244    1.04
 51-         Food Cooking Mach
3093   Opers & Tenders             3,660    3,380    -280   -7.65    0     142    142    -0.79




                                                                                           23
Appendix B




             24
Appendix C


                   Illinois Community College Board
                                Table III-9
   ANNUAL DUPLICATED COMPLETERS BY ACADEMIC PROGRAM BY COLLEGE
                          FOR FISCAL YEAR 2009




                                             120501



                                                                     120503

                                                                               Rest, Cul, & Cater Mgt
                                                                                           12 120504
                                                       Cul Arts/Chef Trng 12




                                                                                                        Ktchn Ast 12 120505
                                                                                                                               Fd Ser, Wait & Dine
                                Baker/Pastry Chef 12




                                                                                                           Fd Prep/ Prof Ck/



                                                                                                                               Rm Mgr 12 120507
Dist. No.    District/College

503          Black Hawk                      0                   0                           0                       0                   0
508          Chicago                       (2)                (53)                         (0)                     (0)                 (0)
               Daley                         0                   0                           0                       0                   0
               Kennedy-King                  2                  53                           0                       0                   0
               Malcolm X                     0                   0                           0                       0                   0
               Olive-Harvey                  0                   0                           0                       0                   0
               Truman                        0                   0                           0                       0                   0
               Washington                    0                   0                           0                       0                   0
               Wilbur Wright                 0                   0                           0                       0                   0
507          Danville                        0                  22                           0                       0                   0
502          DuPage                          1                  18                           4                       0                   0
509          Elgin                         65                   43                         11                      64                    0
512          Harper                          4                   5                           0                       0                   5
540          Heartland                       0                   0                           0                       0                   0
519          Highland                        0                   0                           0                       0                   0
514          Illinois Central                0                  13                           0                       0                   1
529          Illinois Eastern              (0)                 (0)                         (0)                     (0)                (26)
               Frontier                      0                   0                           0                       0                   0
               Lincoln Trail                 0                   0                           0                       0                  26
               Olney Central                 0                   0                           0                       0                   0
               Wabash Valley                 0                   0                           0                       0                   0
513          Illinois Valley                 0                   0                           0                       0                   5
525          Joliet                          4                  24                           0                       1                   0
520          Kankakee                        0                   0                           0                       0                   0
501          Kaskaskia                       0                  10                           0                       2                   2
523          Kishwaukee                      0                   0                           0                       0                   0
532          Lake County                     0                  18                           0                       0                  13
517          Lake Land                       0                   0                           0                       0                  49
536          Lewis & Clark                   0                   0                           0                       0                   0
526          Lincoln Land                    3                   0                           5                       0                   0
530          Logan                           0                   0                           0                       0                   0
528          McHenry                         0                   0                           0                       0                   0
                                                                                                                                                     25
524         Moraine Valley           7        0          14    0    0
527         Morton                   0        0           0    0    0
535         Oakton                   0        0           0    0    0
505         Parkland                 0        0           0    0    0
515         Prairie State            0        0           0    0    0
521         Rend Lake                0       16           0    0   20
537         Richland                 0        0           0    0   33
511         Rock Valley              0        0           0    0    0
518         Sandburg                 0        0           0    0    0
506         Sauk Valley              0        0           0    0    0
531         Shawnee                  0        0           0    0    0
510         South Suburban           0        0           0    0    0
533         Southeastern             0        0           0    0   11
522         Southwestern             0       21          13    5    0
534         Spoon River              0        0           0   24    0
504         Triton                   4       11           0    0    0
516         Waubonsee                0        0           0    0    0
539         Wood                     0        3           8    0    0

            TOTALS                 90       257          55   96   165

 SOURCE OF DATA:   Annual Enrollment & Completion Data
(A1)




                                                                         26
Appendix D

Region Info
Region: McHenry County
County Areas: McHenry, Illinois (17111)

                                                                                                                   Current
                                                                                                                   Median     Current Avg
 SOC                                           2010    2015               %                    %        Annual     Hourly       Hourly
 Code             Description                  Jobs    Jobs    Change   Change   Openings   Openings   Openings   Earnings     Earnings
35-
1011     Chefs and head cooks                   109     111         2      2%           8        7%           2      $11.06        $12.82
         First-line supervisors/
35-      managers of food preparation
1012     and serving workers                    534     553        19      4%          46        9%           9      $11.45        $12.68
35-      Cooks, institution and
2012     cafeteria                              187     198        11      6%          35       19%           7       $9.74        $10.23
35-
2014     Cooks, restaurant                      611     638        27      4%         107       18%          21       $8.00         $8.42
35-
2019     Cooks, all other                        29      33         4     14%           8       28%           2       $8.12         $8.73


                                  Total        1,469   1,533       64      4%         204       14%          41       $9.70        $10.53




                                          nd
Source: EMSI Complete Employment - 2 Quarter 2010


http://east.economicmodeling.com/internal/modules/home/index.php?#JobsbyOccupationReport


                                                                                                                                            27
Appendix E

             McHenry County College




                                  8900 US Hwy 14

                             Crystal Lake, Illinois 60012

                                    815.455.3700




                               Occupation Report




             Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc. www.economicmodeling.com




                                                                            28
Region Info

Region: McHenry County

County Areas: McHenry, Illinois (17111)

Selected Occupations

                        Occupation                                       Education Level
Chefs and head cooks (SOC 35-1011)                        Work experience in a related field
First-line supervisors/managers of food preparation and
                                                          Work experience in a related field
serving workers (SOC 35-1012)
Cooks, institution and cafeteria (SOC 35-2012)            Moderate-term on-the-job training
Cooks, restaurant (SOC 35-2014)                           Long-term on-the-job training
Cooks, all other (SOC 35-2019)                            Moderate-term on-the-job training



Executive Summary

                   Basic Information
2010 Occupational Jobs                                    1,469
2015 Occupational Jobs                                    1,533
Total Change                                              64
Total % Change                                            4.29%
Openings                                                  204
Median Hourly Earnings                                    $9.70



                 Economic Indicators
2010 Location Quotient                                    0.88
2015 Location Quotient                                    0.90
                                                          Source: EMSI Complete Employment - 2nd Quarter 2010




                                                                                                          29
Occupational Change Summary




                                                                               Median
                 Region       2010 Jobs 2015 Jobs Change % Change Openings     Hourly
                                                                              Earnings
Regional Total                    1,469     1,533       64      4%      204        $9.70
State Total                      88,283    93,659    5,376      6% 13,827         $12.16
National Total                2,360,927 2,507,744 146,817       6% 378,331        $12.32
                                           Source: EMSI Complete Employment - 2nd Quarter 2010




                                                                                           30
Top Industries for Selected Occupations




 NAICS
                              Name                   2010 Jobs 2015 Jobs    Change % Change
  Code
722110   Full-Service Restaurants                           793        822       29        4%
722211   Limited-Service Restaurants                        209        215         6       3%
930000   Local government                                    96         96         0       0%
722310   Food Service Contractors                            47         55         8      17%
722410   Drinking Places (Alcoholic Beverages)               43         45         2       5%
623110   Nursing Care Facilities                             28         29         1       4%
722213   Snack and Nonalcoholic Beverage Bars                27         26        -1      -4%
                                                 Source: EMSI Complete Employment - 2nd Quarter 2010




                                                                                                 31
Occupational Breakdown




  SOC                                                                             Median Hourly
                         Description              2010 Jobs 2015 Jobs Openings
  Code                                                                              Earnings
35-1011 Chefs and head cooks                            109      111         8               $11.06
        First-line supervisors/managers of food
35-1012                                                 534      553        46               $11.45
        preparation and serving workers
35-2012 Cooks, institution and cafeteria                187       198       35                $9.74
35-2014 Cooks, restaurant                               611       638      107                $8.00
35-2019 Cooks, all other                                 29        33        8                $8.12
        Total                                         1,469     1,533      204                $9.70
                                                      Source: EMSI Complete Employment - 2nd Quarter 2010




                                                                                                      32
Location Quotient Breakdown




  SOC
                                   Description                          2010 Jobs 2010 LQ 2015 LQ
  Code
35-2014 Cooks, restaurant                                                      611     0.96      0.98
        First-line supervisors/managers of food preparation and serving
35-1012                                                                        534     0.86      0.87
        workers
35-2012 Cooks, institution and cafeteria                                       187     0.64      0.65
35-1011 Chefs and head cooks                                                   109     1.29      1.29
35-2019 Cooks, all other                                                        29     1.18      1.24
        Total                                                                1,469     0.88      0.90
                                                        Source: EMSI Complete Employment - 2nd Quarter 2010




                                                                                                        33
Data Sources and Calculations



Industry Data

In order to capture a complete picture of industry employment, EMSI basically combines covered employment data
from Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) produced by the Department of Labor with total
employment data in Regional Economic Information System (REIS) published by the Bureau of Economic Analysis
(BEA), augmented with County Business Patterns (CBP) and Nonemployer Statistics (NES) published by the U.S.
Census Bureau. Projections are based on the latest available EMSI industry data, 15-year past local trends in each
industry, growth rates in statewide and (where available) sub-state area industry projections published by individual
state agencies, and (in part) growth rates in national projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Occupation Data

Organizing regional employment information by occupation provides a workforce-oriented view of the regional
economy. EMSI's occupation data are based on EMSI's industry data and regional staffing patterns taken from the
Occupational Employment Statistics program (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics). Wage information is partially
derived from the American Community Survey. The occupation-to-program (SOC-to-CIP) crosswalk is based on
one from the U.S. Department of Education, with customizations by EMSI.

Location Quotient

Location quotient (LQ) is a way of quantifying how concentrated a particular industry, cluster, occupation, or
demographic group is in a region as compared to the nation. It can reveal what makes a particular region unique in
comparison to the national average.

State Data Sources

This report uses state data from the following agencies: Illinois Department of Employment Security, Employment
Projections.




                                                                                                                   34
McHenry County College                                                             Board Report #10-239
                                                                                   November 18, 2010


                                 Authorization of FY 2011 Non-Mandatory
                                             Transfer of Funds

Information

There are three non-mandatory transfers of funds in the approved FY 2011 budget approved by the Board
of Trustees. It is now necessary for the Board of Trustees to approve the actual transfer of these funds.
The three budgeted transfers are as follows:

           Transfer Out                           Transfer In                          Amount
Operations and Maintenance            Operations and Maintenance
Fund                                  Fund, Restricted                             $2,500,000.00

Education Fund                        Auxiliary Enterprises Fund                    $325,000.00
                                      Liability, Protection and
Education Fund                        Settlement Fund                               $385,000.00

The purpose of the $2,500,000.00 transfer from the Operations and Maintenance Fund to the Operations
and Maintenance Fund, Restricted is to accumulate funds for the purposes of (1) providing 25% local
matching funds for state funded capital construction projects and (2) providing resources to do locally
funded capital projects including repairs and renovation and deferred maintenance.

The purpose of the $325,000.00 transfer from the Education Fund to the Auxiliary Enterprises Fund is to
provide resources used in the support of those activities accounted for in the Auxiliary Enterprises Fund
such as student activities, student government, intercollegiate athletics, childcare services, food service
operations and bookstore operations.

The purpose of the $385,000.00 transfer from the Education Fund to the Liability, Protection, and
Settlement Fund is to provide resources for payment of the employer’s portion of Social Security and
Medicare taxes. The College has chosen to levy property taxes in the Education Fund and reduce its levy
in the Liability, Protection, and Settlement Fund to maintain maximum financial flexibility with its local
property tax revenues.

These transfers are consistent with past practice in prior fiscal years.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the following non-mandatory transfers of funds as
follows: (1) from the Operations and Maintenance Fund to the Operations and Maintenance Fund,
Restricted in the amount of $2,500,000.00 (2) from the Education Fund to the Auxiliary Enterprises Fund
in the amount of $325,000.00 and (3) from the Education Fund to the Liability, Protection, and Settlement
Fund in the amount of $385,000.00.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                            Board Report #10-240
                                                                                  November 18, 2010


                    Resolution for Estimated Tax Levy and Notice of Public Hearing

Information

The attached resolution is necessary in order to estimate the 2010 tax levy and provide notice of the
public hearing.

The tax levy hearing will be held on December 16, 2010, at 7 p.m. in Room A217 on the campus of
McHenry County College, 8900 U.S. Highway 14, Crystal Lake, Illinois.

The College will advertise the date of the hearing on the proposed tax levy on December 6, 2010, in the
Northwest Herald.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees adopts the attached resolution estimating the 2010 tax levy
and setting the public hearing on the tax levy for December 16, 2010.




Vicky Smith
President
                Resolution Determining the Estimated Tax Levy for the 2010 Tax Year and
                                 Scheduling a Public Hearing Thereon



WHEREAS, pursuant to 35 ILCS 200/18-55 through 35 ILCS 200/18-100 the Board of Trustees of

McHenry County College, Community College District Number 528, counties of McHenry, Boone, Kane,

and Lake, State of Illinois, is required to determine the estimated amounts of taxes necessary to be levied

for the year not less than 20 days prior to official adoption of the aggregate tax levy of the district; and



WHEREAS, said statute further requires a taxing district to give public notice and to hold a public

hearing on the district’s intent to adopt an aggregate tax levy.



NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of McHenry County College,

Community College District Number 528, Counties of McHenry, Boone, Kane, and Lake, State of

Illinois, as follows:



Section 1: Public notice shall be given in the Northwest Herald, a newspaper of general circulation in said

district, and a public hearing shall be held, all in the manner and time prescribed in said notice, which

notice shall be published not more than 14 days nor less than 7 days prior to said hearing, and shall be not

less than 1/8 page in size, with no smaller than twelve (12) point type, enclosed in a black border not less

than ¼ inch wide and in substantially the following form:
                        NOTICE OF PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX INCREASE
                                McHENRY COUNTY COLLEGE

I.      A public hearing on the Proposed 2010 Tax Levy for McHenry County College District #528,
        McHenry, Lake, Kane and Boone Counties, Illinois, will be held at 7 p.m. on the 16th day of
        December, 2010 in Room A217 on the campus of McHenry County College, 8900 U.S. Highway
        14, Crystal Lake, Illinois.

        Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and present testimony to the taxing district
        may contact Donald L. Wilske, Interim Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer, 8900 U.S. Highway
        14, Crystal Lake, Illinois, 815-455-8568.

II.     The operating and special purpose property taxes extended for 2009 were $25,691,380.

        The proposed operating and special purpose property taxes to be levied for 2010 are $28,234,827.
        This represents a 9.9% increase over the previous year.

III.    The debt service property tax extended for 2009 was $0.

        The proposed debt service property tax to be levied for 2010 is $0. This represents a 0% increase
        over the previous year.

IV.     The total property taxes extended for 2009 were $25,691,380.

        The proposed total property taxes to be levied for 2010 are $28,234,827. This represents a 9.9%
        increase over the previous year.

                                                  Donald L. Wilske
                                                  Treasurer
                                                  McHenry County College District #528

Section 2: This resolution shall be in full force and effect forthwith upon its passage.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES
COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT #528
COUNTIES OF MCHENRY, BOONE, KANE,
AND LAKE, STATE OF ILLINOIS

Adopted this 16th day of December, 2010.

BY:__________________________________
  Chair


ATTEST:__________________________
      Secretary
McHenry County College                                                        Board Report #10-174
                                                                              August 26, 2010
                                                                              Addendum
                                                                              November 18, 2010


                                 Personnel Adjustments for Fall 2010
                                  Transfer and Occupational Courses

Information

Listed below are adjustments for Fall 2010 Transfer and Occupational courses and program development:
                                                  Contact               Previously
 Name                       Assignment            Hours                 Approved $        $ Amount
 Ambrose-Gerak, Mary        BUS241301               3                             0        1,664.25
 Berry, Robin L             BUS240301               3                             0        1,616.70
 Catenazzo, Anthony R       PHI151007               3                             0        1,616.70
 Catenazzo, Anthony R       PHI251011               3                             0        1,616.70
 Coleman-Cruz, Erin D       ART166201               2                             0        1,067.23
 Cottrell, Julie A          ACC151350               3                             0        1,854.45
 Cottrell, Julie A          ACC220350               4                             0        2,472.60
 Davis, Donna S             MAT099004               4                             0        1,225.73
 Gruba, Henry V             FRS122002               3                             0        1,838.60
 Howard, Dean J             CIS110207               2                             0        1,225.73
 Howard, Dean J             CIS110209               2                             0        1,225.73
 Jackson, Beverly S         CIS110204               2                             0        1,225.73
 Jackson, Beverly S         CIS110206               2                             0        1,225.73
 Kamarajan, Shanthi         MAT099005               4                             0        1,236.30
 Kieca, John J              AMT160202               6                             0        3,170.00
 Krahn, Thomas E            CIS118201               2                             0        1,236.30
 Perry, Louise J            SPE151201               3                             0        1,870.30
 Petty, Arthur E            IBS270601               3                             0        1,350.00
 Rasmussen, G Robert        CIS110606               2                             0        1,088.37
 Scott, Gina M              CIS110609               2                             0        1,088.37
 Valverde, Osiris           CIS110208               2                             0        1,088.37
 White, Russell IV          MAT099004               4                     2,427.60         1,236.30
 White, Russell IV          MAT099005               4                     2,472.60         1,236.30
 Wood, Marianne A           CIS110202               2                             0        1,151.77
                               Independent/Individualized/Internships
                                                 Contact    Number of     Previously
 Name                       Assignment            Hours      Students    Approved $       $ Amount
 Arctander, Mark C          ART299001               1           2                  0         150.00
 Arctander, Mark C          ART299005               3           1                  0         225.00
 Barnard, Allison A         SPA102001               3           3                  0         675.00
 Davis, Donna S             MAT071002               2           2                  0         305.00
 Hand, Arthur James         ART299002               3           1                  0         225.00
 Hand, Arthur James         ART299003               3           1                  0         225.00
 Keller, Loreen M           ENG095001               3           6                  0       1,350.00
 Lear, Bryan J              ART242001               6           3                  0         675.00
 Lush, Paige                MUS211001               1           1                  0         278.96
 Lush, Paige                MUS211002               2           1                  0         557.92
 Levernier, William R       IMT104303               3           2                  0         450.00
 Mack, Stephen H            FRE252002               4           2                  0         600.00
                                                    Contact    Number of       Previously
 Name                         Assignment             Hours      Students      Approved $        $ Amount
 Ollerenshaw, Joanne          DGM150001                4           8                    0        1,800.00
 Vician, Tom J                ART299006                1           1                    0           75.00
 Vician, Tom J                ART299007                3           1                    0          225.00
 Vorel, Kim F                 IND160008                1           1                    0           75.00
                                       Faculty Non-Teaching Roles
                                                                               Previously
 Name                             Assignment                                  Approved $        $ Amount
 Alexander, Nneka N               Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Alheit, Deborah C                Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Crizer, Lisa D                   Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Fallon, Kelly A                  Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Garrison, Marla                  Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 George, Rebecca H                Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Haegerich, Heidi M               Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Humphrey, Anne                   Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Kleisch, Elke A                  Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Kramer, Katie L                  Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Krich, Amanda E                  Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Lear, Bryan J                    Differential Pay                                      0          480.00
 Linder, Lisha S                  Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Linder, Lisha S                  Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Lozier, Christopher              Counseling                                       559.84        1,049.70
 Malone, Marc P                   Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 McCord, Robert                   Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Midday, Katherine A              Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Midday, Katherine A              Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Obradovich, Nicholas             Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Pishotta, Mark A                 Counseling                                     5,466.20        5,677.60
 Poe, Katrine L                   Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Ponzio, Peter J                  Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Powell, Brenda C                 Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Power, Laura A                   Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
 Robinson, Jennifer L             Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Robison, Marie E                 Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Singer, Tara J                   Music Adjunct Stipend                                 0           55.80
 Steffen, Penny D                 Mentee Stipend                                        0           90.00
 Thomas, Tammy M                  Mentor Stipend                                        0          210.00
 Zaccagnini, Heather              Mentor Stipend                                        0          105.00
                                                 Overload
                                                            Percent of         Previously
 Name                              Assignment               Overload          Approved $         $ Amount
 Albright, Meredith L              CIS110611                  13.33                     0         1,351.46
 Freelove, Julie A                 AOM22202                   13.33                     0         1,351.46
Recommendation
It is recommended that the Board of Trustees ratifies the personnel adjustments for Fall 2010, as listed
above.


Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                            Board Report #10-175
                                                                                  August 26, 2010
                                                                                  Addendum
                                                                                  November 18, 2010


              Continuing and Professional Education Personnel Considerations for Fall 2010

Information

Listed below are instructors to be hired for the Fall 2010 Semester:

Full-time Personnel      Classes & Seminars         These are paid on a per-course basis:         $ Amount
Diaz, L                  NTC S44 003                Microsoft Excel 2003                             400.00
Meinke, B                NMD C01 012                CNA Retest                                       300.00
Meinke, B                NMD S90 012                BNATP CERT 1                                      30.00
Meinke, B                NMD S91 012                BNATP CERT 2                                      30.00
Meinke, B                NMD S93 001                BNATP CERT 3                                      30.00
Meinke, B                NMD S94 001                BNATP CERT 4                                      30.00

Part-time Personnel      Classes & Seminars         These are paid on a per-course basis:         $ Amount
Small, J                  11/20/2010                Defensive Driving Course- 8 Hour                 300.00
Small, J                  12/04/2010                Defensive Driving Course- 8 Hour                 300.00
Small, J                  12/20/2010                Defensive Driving Course- 8 Hour                 300.00


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees ratifies the employment additions as listed above.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                               Board Report #10-241
                                                                                     November 18, 2010


                                        Appointment of New
                               Occupational Therapy Assistant Instructor

Information

At the December 2009 Board Meeting, the Board of Trustees approved the new full-time faculty position
of Occupational Therapy Assistant Instructor. Joyce Lane has been recommended to fill this position. Dr.
Lane has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy from University of Illinois, Chicago, IL,
a Master of Education in Counseling and Guidance from Howard University, Washington, D.C. and a
Doctor of Philosophy in Social Policy from Brandeis University, Waltham, MA. Her experience is as
follows:

        2002 – 2010             Senior Public Service Administrator (2004 – 2010)
                                Chief, Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services, Clinical Services (2002 – 2004)
                                Division of Mental Health, State of Illinois, Chicago, IL

        1999 – 2002             Associate Professor in Occupational Therapy
                                Chicago State University, Chicago, IL

        1992 – 1999             Research Coordinator and Assistant Professor, Department of
                                Occupational Therapy
                                Rush Presbyterian – St. Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, IL

Seven applications were received, and the search committee interviewed three candidates.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the appointment of Joyce Lane to the faculty
position of Occupational Therapy Assistant Instructor, effective January 12, 2011, at a
nine-month salary of $67,575.00.




Vicky Smith
President



 Contract        Placement                         Contractual                          Contract Salary of
 Placement       Multiplier     Base Salary        9-month Salary   Current Salary      Previous Employee

       VI             1.50      $45,050.00           67,575.00      Not Applicable      Not Applicable
POSITION:                   OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR

CLASSIFICATION:            Faculty / Full-time tenure track position


RESPONSIBILITIES:

Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

• Management of the Occupational Therapy Assistant program, including planning, evaluation,
  budgeting, selection of faculty and staff, maintenance of accreditation and commitment to strategies
  for professional development
• Oversee the coordination of field work and collaborating sites
• Uphold program accreditation standards to achieve and maintain accreditation
• Teach approximately 15 contact hours per week
• Available to teach daytime, evening, and weekend classes, as needed
• Assist with curriculum development through preparation of additional courses or seminars to enhance
  current programming
• General involvement as a faculty member in participatory College governance, advisement of
  students, and College committees
• Assessment of student learning
• Work cooperatively within the department, the division, and throughout the College in striving for
  educational excellence
• Keep appraised of external agency regulations and changes to regulations that directly impact a
  particular curriculum
• Work with colleagues in high schools and four-year institutions to facilitate articulation of appropriate
  courses within those institutions
• Continue professional development in area of expertise and in teaching/learning strategies


MINIMUM POSITION QUALIFICATIONS:

• Licensed as an Occupational Therapist or certified as an Occupational Therapy Assistant
• Minimum of five years experience in the field of Occupational Therapy, including practice as an
  Occupational Therapist or Occupational Therapy Assistant
• Administrative or supervisory experience
• Prefer Master’s Degree in Occupational Therapy or related field
• At least one year full-time teaching experience
• Demonstrated commitment to professional growth
• Willingness to use educational technology
• Commitment to the mission of the community college, and to teaching and motivating community
  college students in ways appropriate to their diverse backgrounds and learning styles


ISSUED: April 2010
McHenry County College                                         Board Report #10-242
                                                               November 18, 2010


                             Appointment of Replacement
                         Instructor of Automotive Technology

                                  To be Developed
McHenry County College                                                         Board Report #10-243
                                                                               November 18, 2010


                               Salary/Advanced Placement Adjustments

Information

The agreement between the Board of Trustees, McHenry County College, Community College District
#528 and the McHenry County College Faculty Association includes an advanced placement adjustment
each time a full-time faculty member obtains 15 additional hours of pre-approved course work. Robert
Mihelich, Amy Taylor and David White qualify for such an adjustment at this time. The salary
adjustments will take effect for the 2010-2011 academic year.

                                              2010-2011                     Adjusted 2010-2011
                                         Placement and Salary               Placement and Salary

  Robert Mihelich                           Lane 3, Step 4                      Lane 4, Step 4
                                             $58,565.00                          $61,268.00

  Amy Taylor                                Lane 1, Step 2                      Lane 2, Step 2
                                             $47,753.00                          $50,456.00

  David White                               Lane 6, Step 13                    Lane 7, Step 13
                                              $91,902.00                         $95,055.50

The agreement between the Board of Trustees, McHenry County College, Community College District
#528 and the McHenry County College Staff Council includes a salary adjustment of $1,200.00 for full-
time members upon completion of 15 credit hours of pre-approved course work. In accordance with this
agreement, Grant Havens qualifies for his second adjustment at this time.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the above salary adjustments for Robert Mihelich,
Amy Taylor, David White and Grant Havens.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                            Board Report #10-244
                                                                                  November 18, 2010


                                   Appointment of Financial Institution
                                     for College Banking Services

Information

Based upon discussion by the Board of Trustees in early 2010, the administration committed to
conducting a Request for Proposals (RFP) process in the fall to determine whether or not it would be in
the best interest of the College to either maintain its current banking relationships or to make a change.
The College has been with its current primary financial institution since the late 1990’s. A statement was
made that the best time to make a change would be at or after the start of calendar 2011.

On September 8, 2010, a RFP for banking services was issued and published. In addition, a copy of the
RFP was sent to seventeen banks with a physical presence within the McHenry County College District.
On September 16, 2010, a mandatory pre-proposal meeting was held at the College. Representatives
from eight banking institutions attended and asked question relative to the RFP.

On October 1, 2010, formal responses were received from six banks:

Bank of America
Castle Bank
Crystal Lake Bank and Trust
First Midwest Bank
Home State Bank
JPMorgan Chase Bank

A determination was made that all six responses met the criteria contained in the RFP document.

On October 12 and 13, 2010, interviews were conducted with each individual bank in order for the banks’
representatives to make an oral presentation of their proposal and for the College to ask questions of
clarification of the banks. Interviews were conducted by Don Wilske, Interim Chief Financial
Officer/Treasurer, Steve Piorkowski, Accountant, and Laura Lagerhausen, Accounting Specialist. In
addition, copies of the RFP responses were furnished to Vern Manke, Interim Vice President of
Administrative Services, for his input.

All six proposals received were very competitive. Each bank’s proposal was unique unto itself. The
criteria used in evaluating the proposals were which bank provided the best overall combination of (1)
service, (2) security, and (3) costs. Each bank’s proposal was reviewed and analyzed to determine
specifically how the bank responded to the College’s requirements.

Each member of the evaluation team was asked to independently rank their top three proposals based
upon the written responses to the RFP and the presentations made by the bank representative(s). All three
members of the evaluation team had the same three banks in their respective top three rankings.
The combined rankings indicated that Crystal Lake Bank and Trust provided the College with the best
overall proposal. In addition, the customer references of Crystal Lake Bank and Trust were checked and
found to be excellent.


Factors that led to the selection of Crystal Lake State Bank and Trust included (1) strong customer service
references provided by existing bank customers, (2) state of the art banking security features, and (3) a
competitively priced banking service fee structure coupled with a competitive interest earnings rate on
collected balances.
The combined rankings were reviewed and discussed by the evaluation team and the team is
recommending Crystal Lake Bank and Trust for selection as the College’s financial institution for
banking services.


Recommendation

It is recommended that the Board of Trustees approves the appointment of Crystal Lake Bank and Trust
as the College’s financial institution of record for the period February 1, 2011 to January 31, 2014, with
the option for the College to renew for two, one-year extensions and authorizes the Treasurer to execute
all necessary documents subject to review by the College’s attorney.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                         Information Report
                                                                               November 18, 2010


                                             Resignation

Information

Thomas Bentley, Research and Planning Associate has submitted his resignation effective
December 2, 2010.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                         Information Report
                                                                               November 18, 2010


                                             Resignation

Information

Lesley Frederick, Dean of Students has submitted her resignation effective November 30, 2010.




Vicky Smith
President
McHenry County College                                                          Information Report
                                                                                November 18, 2010


                                      Distributed Press Releases
                                     October 15-November 9, 2010

Information

The following releases have been distributed to all local media outlets from October 15-November 9,
2010.

•   MCC Accepting Registration for Staff Council Scholarship
•   MCC to Present Music Faculty Recital, Jazz Concert in November
•   Shah Center Offers Hands-On Computer Classes in November
•   Shah Center Offers OSHA 10-Hour For Construction Industry
•   Supervisory Leadership Series Offered at Shah Center
•   Hiring Essentials Series Available at MCC's Shah Center
•   ISBDC Announces Small Business Offerings for November
•   Shah Center Introduces New Program: Statistics and Statistical Process Control
•   MCC Offers Trip to Washington D.C. in Spring
•   MCC to Offer Private Detective Licensing Exam Preparation
•   MCC to Offer Intro and Advanced Welding Classes
•   Child Abuse Symposium to Feature Nationally Recognized Leader/Educator Oct. 28
•   MCC to Host MCC Night 2010 for High School Students, Parents
•   MCC to Host Green Living Expo Nov. 6
•   MCC Employee Receives Jaycees Distinguished Service Award
•   MCC to Host Information Sessions For Allied Health Careers, Vet Assistant
•   MCC to Transition Campus Public Safety to Law Enforcement Agency
•   MCC to Offer Continuing Education Dance, Wine Classes
•   Independent Audit Recognizes MCC's Stellar Financials for FY 2010
•   Empower Yourself with Unique Continuing Education Classes at MCC
•   MCC Offers Construction Zone Flagger Training Course
•   MCC to Host Veterans Day Recognition Ceremony Nov. 11
•   Bioneers Conference and Green Living Expo
•   MCC Wishes Trustee Well in New Venture with County Board
•   Child's World Conference Nov. 13
•   Workforce Core Skill Development Offered at MCC's Shah Center
•   MCC's Shah Center Offers Computer Skills Courses in December
•   ISBDC Announces Small Business Offerings for December
•   Shah Center Breakfast Series to Feature Author Mike Micklewright
•   MCC Shah Center Offers Quickbooks Year End Readiness




Vicky Smith
President

				
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