THE MONTHLY PLANCHET

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					                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Indianapolis Coin Club                                                                        March
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         2003
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                A.N.A. C-131170 - C.S.N.S L-600 - I.S.N.A. LM 243
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Mailing Address: P.O. Box 30103, Indianapolis, IN 46230 Fax: 257-2220


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     2002 Indiana Official First Day Coin Cover Available Now

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          The 2002 Indiana Official First        You can order directly from the US Mint on their website -
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Day Coin Cover (item Q28) is           www.usmint.gov, or you can call one of the numbers below:
                       presently own or may wish to collect. We hold eleven monthly meetings each year (presently at the Firemen’s Union Hall, 748 Massachusetts Ave.) during which various programs of an
                       educational nature are held for the benefit of our membership and the general public. All meetings are open to the public and there is no charge for attendance unless a person wishes to
                       The Indianapolis Coin Club is a non-profit, educational organization founded in 1939 for the purpose of educating people of all ages in the greater Indianapolis community about the coins they




                                                                                                                                                                                                                          the 19th in the series, and is
THE MONTHLY PLANCHET


                                                                                                                                                                                                                          now available through the US
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Call Type                               Phone Number
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Mint. This limited edition cover-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Within the 50 United States             1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          only 75,000 will be produced-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Fax                                     301-918-2039
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          features two Indiana Quarter
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 TTY                                     1-888-321-MINT (6468)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Dollars from the first day of
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          mintage, July 22, 2002. Each
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          cover includes quarters from
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          both the Philadelphia and Den-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          ver mint facilities on a hand-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          some display card with the 37-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          cent United States Flag postage
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          stamp. The postmark of August
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          2, 2002, Indianapolis, Indiana,
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          marks the day the Indiana
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Quarter Dollars were first re-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          leased to the Federal Reserve
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Bank and to the public.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Price: $ 19.95
                       become a member of the club. Adult annual dues are $12.00 per year, junior membership dues are $5.00 per year.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Alabama Statehood Quarter Released March 17

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Alabama became the 22nd state to be admitted into the Union on Decem-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           ber 14, 1819. The Alabama quarter design features an image of Helen
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Keller with her name in English, and in a reduced-size version of braille.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           The Alabama quarter is the first U.S. circulating coin to feature braille. An
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Continued on page 2
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Our next meetings are scheduled for Monday, March 24, and Monday, April 28, at 7:00 PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             at the Fireman’s Union Hall Building, 748 Massachusetts Ave. at College Ave.,
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Indianapolis. Parking is available in the lot west of the building and on the streets
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     north and south of the building.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Officers: President: Jim Luckey, Vice President: Jim Roehrdanz,           Inside      This      Issue:
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Secretary: Chris Clegg, Treasurer: Tom Ferverda, Sergeant-at-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Arms: Jim Warden. Past President: Vinton Dove                     President’s Report         2
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Editor/Webmaster: Gail Phillips                           Secretary’s Report         2
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Treasurer’s Report         2
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Puzzle Page                3
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Directors: Karl Kreck, Lawrence Wisthoff, Donald Black,                Kid’s Page                 6
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Coz Raimondi, Charles Alber, Allen Dove                         Other News             4,5,7



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Shop Amazon.com at: www.indianapoliscoinclub.org

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   1
                                                                  Treasurer’s Report
                 From Our                                            March 2003
                 President

The February meeting was a better at-          INCOME
tended meeting than expected, with             Dues                                 $ 87.00
weather being as bad as it was. Some           Coin Show Table Sales                 210.00
of the active members forgot we had            Miscellaneous (bank credit error)      10.00
a meeting. Vinton Dove presented a             Total Income                         $307.00
good talk on Franklin Halves. We had
a spirited auction with a new auction-
                                               EXPENDITURES
eer who is an old member, but has not
been attending as of late. More tickets        Meeting Hall Rental (Jan. & Feb.)     $ 75.00
were passed out for our March 16th             ANA Dues (2003)                         29.00
“Coin Show”. Please get out and sell           Newsletter Prep., Print, Mail           80.07
raffle tickets, as they are only means         Total Expenditures                    $184.07
of making a profit for the show. Please
forgive the shortness of this message          Net Income                            $123.93
as I have a broken left clavicle, mak-
ing typing quite difficult, especially         Balance in Checking as of 3/1/03 - $6,199.88
since I’m left-handed. See you at our
                                               Balance in CD Account - $15,017.19
Sunday show. Karl Kreck needs help
in setting up with moving in dealers at
7 am and cleaning up after the show
                                                      banner underlines the central image.
ends.
                                                      Helen Keller was born at “Ivy Green” in Tuscumbia, Ala-
                                  - Jim
                                                      bama, in 1880. When she was a small child, an illness
                                                      destroyed her sight and hearing and, consequently, de-
                                                      priving her of the senses by which we normally learn to
                Secretary’s                           speak. Despite her disabilities, Helen Keller learned to
                Report                                speak and read using the raised and manual alphabets,
                                                      as well as Braille. Miss Keller also graduated with hon-
                                                      ors, receiving her Bachelor of Arts degree from Radcliffe.
 The meeting was called to order by our presi-        She went on to publish numerous books, articles and
 dent, Jim Luckey. The secretary’s report was         essays. Helen Keller lived out her life addressing social
 read. We had attendance of 24 people, in-            issues for disabled persons and women. Every year at
 cluding dealers. A presentation on Franklin          “Ivy Green,” a weeklong celebration is held to commemo-
 Halves was given by Vinton Dove. The puzzle          rate her lifetime of accomplishments and her “Spirit of
 contest was won by Allen Dove, and the 50/           Courage.”
 50 drawing was won by Buddy Boyce. An
 announcement was made concerning loss of             In January 2001, Governor Don Siegelman announced
 membership status for non-payment of                 a statewide competition for Alabama schools to submit
 dues. We had an auction, with Rolland                concepts for the Alabama quarter. Of the thousands of
 Kontak serving as auctioneer.                        concepts submitted, Governor Siegelman forwarded
                                - Chris Clegg         three to the United States Mint: Helen Keller, Alabama’s
                                                      role in social movements, and Alabama’s social and eco-
Continued from page 1                                 nomic history. The United States Mint returned five can-
Alabama long leaf pine branch and magnolias grace     didate designs to the Governor’s office where the final
the sides of the design, and a “Spirit of Courage”    selection of Helen Keller, “Spirit of Courage,” was made.

                                                      2
                                        PFRP    CGESI          PRDQL,              O’DD        EGP

       This month’s puzzle is a
                                           ASEI,         O   FSRNA            OP      GEBS:
       cryptogram, where letters
       are substituted, one for an-             OP       LROA      “JGGAMIS”.
       other, until the puzzle is
       solved. If you think that one
       letter equals another, it will                                         ,
       equal that letter throughout
       the puzzle. Single letters,                                                                 :
       short words, and words us-                    ,
       ing an apostrophe give you
       clues to locating vowels.                                                               .
       Solution is by trial and er-
       ror.

       There will be a prize draw-
       ing from correct entries.

            In this puzzle,
              P equals T.
                                                            The moon didn’t
           Coin World Trivia:
                                                         appear on a US coin
1. A collector of “copperheads” collects                 until 1971, after the
what type of tokens?                                     first moon missions.
                                                           When did the sun
2. What inspired the bovine obverse of                   first appear on a US
the Old Spanish Trail commemorative?                             coin?
3. A coin bearing a ‘P’ mint mark was
struck at what U.S. Mint?

4. Two obols equal what denomination of
medieval European coin?

5. What do we call a coin, token, or
medal struck from unmatched dies?
                                                              Allen Dove was the winner of
                                                             last month’s puzzle contest. He
         February Puzzle Solution
                                                               won a yo-yo, customized by
                                                             Doc Gerth, and a deck of cards
                                                               from a casino in Las Vegas!
                                                                  Congratulations, Allen!
  There was a time when a fool and
  his money were soon parted, but
    now it happens to everyone.
         - Adlai Stevenson
                                            3
                                       the term "greenback," a nickname               went into a panic. When the dust
                                       still used today for our paper                 finally cleared, more than 400
NICKNAMES FOR PAPER MONEY
                                       money.                                         banks had failed, 8,000 businesses
             - by Gene Hessler
                                                                                      had gone bankrupt, and 156 rail-
                                          This article was written by Gene Hessler,   roads had fallen into receivership.
    Most of us have grown-up with      for “Money Talks”. "Money Talks" is pro-       President Cleveland persuaded
a nickname or two. Some of us          duced and underwritten by the American
                                                                                      Congress to repeal the Sherman
still carry them today. And our pa-    Numismatic Association, in Colorado
                                       Springs, America's coin club for over a cen-   Silver Purchase Act, passed only
per money is no different!
                                       tury.                                          three years earlier. Since the
                                                                                      nation's vaults were bulging with
   The $10 bill issued in 1901 had
                                                                                      silver dollars that no one wanted,
a battleship as its central design,
                                                                                      there was little demand for them
until an American buffalo replaced
                                                                                      in 1893. As a result, only a small
it. As you might guess, this ex-        THE 1893-S SILVER DOLLAR AND                  number of silver dollars were made
tremely popular note is often re-      THE SHERMAN ACT                                in the San Francisco Mint that year.
ferred to by collectors as the "buf-                        - by Mark Van Winkle
falo bill."
                                                                                           This article was written by Mark Van
                                          Over a hundred years ago, one               Winkle. "Money Talks" is produced and un-
    Five years earlier, another $10    of the rarest silver dollars ever              derwritten by the American Numismatic As-
bill was issued with the portrait of   minted was produced. It was rare               sociation, in Colorado Springs, America's
Thomas Hendricks. Hendricks had        not because of a lack of silver, but           coin club for over a century. To hear more
                                                                                      "Money Talks" scripts, or to obtain a tran-
been Grover Cleveland’s Vice Presi-    rather because of an overabun-                 script, log on to the ANA's website at
dent for nine months until he died     dance of it!                                   www.money.org.
in office. As a gesture to honor
Hendricks, his portrait appeared on        Today we'll read about how the
a $10 silver certificate. The por-     greed of the silver lobby in Con-              IS ALL THE GOLD IN FORT KNOX?
trait is set in a frame that re-       gress created this very rare coin.                                 - by Mark Van Winkle
sembles a tombstone. And this          The silver mining interests were
note is called the "tombstone          quite influential in Congress dur-               It's been said when someone is
note."                                 ing the late 19th century. In 1878,            asked to do something we want no
                                       this group used its influence to               part of: "Not for all the gold in
   The $10 bill first issued in 1869   pass the Bland-Allison Act, which              Fort Knox!" But, how do we even
features a small eagle at the lower    required the government to pur-                know there is any gold in Fort
center. When the note is turned        chase at least two million ounces              Knox?
upside down, the eagle resembles       of silver every month from the
a donkey's head. Collectors call       Western mines. But the govern-                     In the early days of the United
this the "jackass note."               ment already had plenty of silver,             States, the mint in Philadelphia
                                       and it didn't buy silver every                 was guarded by a vicious dog and
    The $100 and $1000 bills were      month. This caused the price of                a night watchman, who rang a bell
issued back in 1890. On the back       silver to drop for the next 10 years.          periodically to let citizens know the
of each, the denomination appears                                                     mint, and all its bullion, were still
in large numerals. The broad ze-          The powerful Western silver in-             secure. After gold was removed
roes are decorated with lines that     terests put pressure on their Con-             from U.S. coins in 1933, and citi-
resemble a melon, with a red inte-     gressmen to "do something." They               zens were required to turn in nearly
rior, and these are called "water-     did, but the cure ended up being               all their gold coins . . . the gold
melon notes."                          worse than the illness. The cure               was melted down and turned into
                                       was the Sherman Silver Purchase                small bars. In 1937, most of the
    And then there's the first paper   Act of 1890, which directed the                nation's gold reserves were moved
money ever issued by the federal       Treasury to now purchase even                  to the new Fort Knox facility near
government. It was in 1862 and         more silver each month. The sil-               Louisville, Kentucky.
it was issued to help pay for the      ver mine-owners were paid in gov-
Civil War. The backs of the bills      ernment notes that were redeem-                   Security is so tight at Fort Knox
were printed with green ink. The       able in gold. Three years later, the           that no one person is entrusted
green ink was a counterfeit deter-     nation's gold supply was severely              with the complete combination to
rent, since no one outside the gov-    depleted. There were doubts about              the twenty-ton vault door. Except
ernment has ever been able to per-     the United States meeting its in-              for authorized personnel, the only
fectly duplicate the ink's formula.    ternational obligations that were
It’s from this green ink that we get   payable only in gold. Wall Street                              Continued on page 5
                                                             4
Continued from page 4                          York Times reported, "It was a mild             LORD NELSON, THE HERO
person to ever enter the facility              day in Wall Street yesterday." And                       - by Arthur M. Fitts III
was President Roosevelt, who paid              Jay Cooke, head of the largest
a visit in 1943. Since no one, other           banking house in the western                      Few names in history are as well
than those who worked there, had               world, was telling reporters he felt,           known, and fewer still are as trea-
seen the gold for thirty years . . .           quote, "an unfailing confidence in              sured as Lord Nelson. According
rumors began spreading that the                God in whom we put our trust; I                 to his own account, he purposely
gold bullion was either partly, or             do not believe He will desert us."              set out to become a hero and brave
completely, missing. Illinois Con-                                                             every danger he would face. And
gressman Philip Crane discussed                     Cooke's optimism was as hol-               he did . . . becoming a legend in
that rumor with Treasury Secretary             low as the pockets of millions of               his own lifetime!
Simon in 1974. And, 26 years ago               investors were to become. The
today, a seven man congressional               Civil War . . . which ended eight                   Horatio Nelson, the son of a
inspection team, and nearly 100                years earlier . . . left the nation             county parson, was born in 1758.
reporters entered the vault. Later,            deep in debt. In an attempt to sta-             He went to sea at the age of 12,
the General Accounting Office and              bilize rampant financial speculation            and quickly learned how to lead
the Treasury Department con-                   and inflation, President Grant had              men. By the age of 20, he was a
ducted a special audit, and all the            reluctantly agreed six months ear-              post captain in the British navy;
gold was accounted for. Since                  lier to a gold standard which cur-              by 40, he was a rear admiral.
then, visits have become more fre-             tailed the paper money supply.
quent, along with regular govern-                                                                  He was a masterful tactician--
ment audits.                                       But it didn't work. To pay for              loved by his men, whom he in-
                                               the continued expansion of the rail-            spired, resented by his superiors,
    For those who wish to believe              road, the Stock Market was ma-                  whose orders and traditions he ig-
in conspiracy theories, probably               nipulated with speculators borrow-              nored, and feared by his enemies-
nothing short of a personal visit              ing from one source to pay off an-              -whom he destroyed in battle. He
would persuade them the nation's               other. This chain of borrowing                  lost an arm, later an eye and, even-
gold stocks are secure. But it does            broke in September of 1873.                     tually, his life--all in battle. Ironi-
appear that the granite, concrete              Eighty-nine American railroads                  cally, it was at his greatest victory-
and steel structure known as Fort              went bankrupt; 5,000 businesses                 -Trafalgar, off the coast of south-
Knox has held the nation's gold                failed, and unemployment topped                 ern Spain--that he died. While pac-
since 1937 . . . and it's still doing          one million.                                    ing the deck, shouting orders to
so today.                                                                                      his men, he was shot in the spine
                                                  On September 21st, Cooke was                 by one of Napoleon's sharpshoot-
      This article was written by Mark         forced to close his banks, and 22               ers.
VanWinkle. "Money Talks" is produced and       other institutions immediately did
underwritten by the American Numismatic        the same. The Stock Market closed                  For collectors, the Age of Nelson
Association, in Colorado Springs, America's    the next day, and didn't reopen for             is rich. The British Government
coin club for over a century. For informa-
tion about educational seminars on coin col-   nine days. Cash payments were                   couldn't afford to issue enough
lecting and grading, call 1-800-367- 9723      suspended and businesses every-                 coins to satisfy even the needs of
and request a brochure.                        where failed. New York banks lost               commerce. But private firms and
                                               35 million dollars in cash. To settle           individuals issued tokens and med-
                                               debts, paper scrip was issued.                  als, often designed by the leading
FINANCIAL PANIC OF 1873                                                                        sculptors of the day, commemorat-
                    - by Gene Hessler             October 2nd was the first day                ing everything from births to
                                               that the news of the financial panic            deaths--and battles, and the he-
   Many people have been closely               didn't dominate page one of the                 roes that emerged from them.
watching the recent activity on                Times. The next day, the panic was
Wall Street. No matter how bull-               over . . . and the headline in the                 Eight different medals honoring
ish or bearish the stock market                Times told readers it was a "Dull               "Nelson of the Nile" were issued
gets, at least we know it will al-             Day in the Street."                             for his victory over the French fleet
ways be open. But 130 years ago,                                                               in Egypt. Typically, Nelson's por-
the New York Stock Exchange shut                  This article was written by Gene Hessler.    trait graces one side, while the re-
down and didn't open again for nine            "Money Talks" is produced and underwrit-        verse might show the alignment of
days.                                          ten by the American Numismatic Associa-         the fleets, or give statistical ac-
                                               tion in Colorado Springs. America's coin club
                                               for over a century.
    On September 19th, The New                                                                               Continued on page 7
                                                                     5
                                                                                                Helen Keller
                                                          G     B       R       A       I        L       L       E   B       R   V   N   N   M

                                                          T    N        R       E       T        Y       B       X   A       L   H   E   T   R

                                                          T    C        I       C       L        T       L       D   N       T   E   E   C   R

                                                          M     M           C       L       Y        L   C       X   Y       J   A   R   L   H

                                                          J    F        F       T       L        L       E       X   R       R   R   G   F   K

                                                          N     S       X           J   I        E       J       K   E       B   I   Y   K   J

                                                          L    L        I       F       P        Y       P       T   N       T   N   V   Y   X

                                                          N     F       F       G       B        G       A       S   F       E   G   I   Y   X

                                                          W     E       D       J       H        W           T   N   R       B   L   D   R   R
Historic Highlights - A Mint Timeline
Moving Forward
                                                          V    M        M       W           W        T       F   W       P   E   N   E   F   Q
1865: After the Civil War ends, many mint of-
                                                          D    R        C       K       Q        W       W       B   M       N   G   C   H   K
fices open for a time in cities like Carson City,
St. Louis, Seattle, and New York.
                                                          A    I        B       M       U        C       S       U   T       H   G   N   G   R
1873: The Mint moves its Headquarters from
Philadelphia to Washington, D.C. and becomes
                                                          L    T        Y       H       L        R       L       H   L       Y   N   X   I   K
part of the Department of the Treasury, as it is
today.
                                                          N     A       V       I       L        L       U       S   E       N   N   A   B   F
1874: The new San Francisco Mint building
opens, known as the “Granite Lady” because it
looks like an ancient Greek temple.
1898: The United States wins the Spanish-                 ANNE SULLIVAN
American War and begins making coins for for-             BRAILLE
eign countries. Congress directs that all the rest        FINGERSPELLING
of our silver bullion be made into coins. 1 8 9 9 :       HEARING
George Washington appears for the first time              HELEN KELLER
on a coin: the commemorative Lafayette dollar.            IVY GREEN
                                                          RADCLIFFE
Building and Rebuilding                                   SIGHT
                                                          TUSCUMBIA
1900: The United States officially accepts the            WATER
gold standard—backing all its money by gold.
1904: The Denver Assay Office (where gold is
tested and weighed) becomes a mint (where coins
are made).                                               1913: The United States stops printing bills that can be exchanged for
1906: The San Francisco Mint building serves             gold coins.
as the city’s banking center because most of the         1918: Congress buys 40,000 acres of land at Camp Knox, Kentucky,
city is destroyed by a great earthquake and fire.        for a training center.
Also, the Denver Mint moves into its new build-          1921: The Peace Dollar is issued to commemorate peace between
ing.                                                     the United States, Germany, and Austria after World War I.
                                                         We begin to back our money with gold bullion instead of gold coins.
Presidents and Peace                                     1932: The new quarter dollar depicts George Washington, his sec-
                                                         ond coin appearance.
1909: The new one-cent design features                   Congress changes the name of Camp Knox to Fort Knox.
Abraham Lincoln on the 100th anniversary of              1933: As one way to fight the Great Depression, people are no longer
his birth. It is the first circulating coin that shows   allowed to own gold. The Mint stops making gold coins. Silver coins
a real person.                                           and certificates are used instead.
                                                                    6
Continued from page 5                               In this article, we'll look at some   "Silver Certificates" with silver bul-
                                                 of the most frequently-heard             lion or silver dollars. That's what
                                                 myths about our money:                   made them valuable. The govern-
                                                      Myth number one: If a coin is       ment hasn't done this since 1968
                                                 old, it's valuable. Actually, age has    . . . and today, most "Silver Cer-
                                                 little to do with a coin's value. It     tificates" are worth only their face
                                                 really depends on supply and de-         value.
                                                 mand. Many coins that are 2000
                                                 years old or older, can be pur-               Myth number four: The date
                                                 chased for less than $25, while          on paper money indicates the year
                                                 some 20th century coins may sell         it was printed. Actually, the "Se-
                                                 for hundreds or even thousands           ries" year on each bill identifies
                                                 of dollars. Why, there was even a        when that design was adopted. A
counts of prizes taken, or ships                 2000 golden dollar that recently         small letter under the "Series" year
sunk. More than 25 medals were                   sold for more than $40,000.              indicates that a minor change was
produced to honor Nelson after the                                                        made . . . usually a signature
battle of Trafalgar, which ended Na-                 Myth number two: If a coin,          change.
poleons' global ambitions.                       produced in error, escapes the U.S.
                                                 Mint, it's worth a lot of money. On           Myth number five: A serial
  This article was written by Arthur M. Fitts,   a percentage basis, few error coins      number is used only once on U.S.
III. "Money Talks" is produced and under-        ever leave the Mint--but even a          currency. Actually, serial numbers
written by the American Numismatic Asso-
ciation in Colorado Springs. America's coin
                                                 tiny percentage of billions of coins     are used again and again. The
club for over a century.                         means a large number of error            government merely advances the
                                                 coins do reach circulation. And          letter after the eight-digit number,
                                                 although they're interesting--           and recycles the numbers.
COMMON MYTHS ABOUT U.S. MONEY                    many of today's error coins are
                        - by Charles Surasky     worth less than $10.                      This article was written by Charles Surasky.
                                                                                          "Money Talks" is produced and underwrit-
   Like the story of the cat in the                                                       ten by the American Numismatic Associa-
                                       Myth number three: "Silver
                                                                                          tion, in Colorado Springs, America's coin club
microwave, myths about money Certificates" are valuable. Before                           for over a century.
often take on a life of their own.  1968, the government redeemed




                Collecting U.S. Coins Since 1952


                                                                                                          indexcoin@aol.com


              (literal translation for “head of a cow”) 3. Philadelphia Mint 4. Denar/denier 5. Mule
                         Coin World Trivia Answers: 1. Civil War Tokens 2. Cabeza de Vaca



        This month’s educational program will be presented by Wendell Wolka on “Dys-
                                                                 participation.
               functional Commerce, 1850’s Style”, with audience participation.
                                        Don’t miss it!



                                                                    7

				
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