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					                                    Week Twenty-Three

The following periods will be held throughout the week, according to the accompanying
schedule for week 23.

MORNING MEETING

   Activities
    Morning Message
    Calendar
    Schedule
    Surprise Box
    Sharing: Bring in a fact about Mount Rushmore.

   Materials
    Calendar materials

   MA Frameworks
   History and Geography
   1. Identify sequential actions, such as first, next, last, in stories and use them to describe
   personal experiences. (H)
   2. Use correctly words and phrases related to chronology and time (now, long ago, before,
        after; morning, afternoon, night; today, tomorrow, yesterday; last or next week, month,
        year; and present, past, and future tenses of verbs). (H)

   English Language Arts: Language Strand:
   Standard 1: Discussion: Students will use agreed-upon rules for informal and formal
      discussions in small and large groups.
   Standard 2: Questioning, Listening, and Contributing: Students will pose questions,
      listen to the ideas of others, and contribute their own information or ideas in
      groups.

LANGUAGE ARTS
On Monday, we will do a word sort to continue our work on differentiating medial vowel
sounds. The word sort will focus on the word families –ig, -ag, and –og.

On Wednesday, we will start personal word banks, in which the children will accumulate
words that they are familiar with, in order to continue to practice and master these words.
Today I will introduce how we will be using the personal word banks, and then have the
children add as many words that they know as they can. They may copy words from the
word wall and from other sources around the room.

On Thursday, we will begin working on collecting individual dictations in order to create
predictable text for the children to use in their reading practice. First, we will come up
with a topic, and then each child will tell me something to write down. We will say each
word as I write it and discuss spelling, capital letters, and punctuation. The process will
be very similar to the interactive writing we have done before. At the end of the writing
session, I will reread the entire dictation, then reread it again as the children read with me
using choral reading. I will make a copy of the dictation to use tomorrow.

On Friday, we will choral read the dictation again as the children follow along on their
own copies, pointing to words as they read. Next, the children will begin collecting
known words for their word bank. They will underline the words they know, and then
make word cards to place in their personal word banks.

    Materials
     Word sort pictures
     Glue
     Scissors
     Paper
     Note cards
     Metal binding rings
     Chart paper

    MA Frameworks
      English Language Arts: Reading and Literature Strand:
      Standard 7: Beginning Reading: Students will understand the nature of written
      English and the relationship of letters and spelling patterns to the sounds of
      speech.
      Standard 8: Understanding a Text: Students will identify the basic facts and main
      ideas in a text and use them as the basis for interpretation.
      English Language Arts: Composition Strand:
      Standard 19: Writing: Students will write with a clear focus, coherent
      organization, and sufficient detail.

MUSIC

For the next four weeks, we will work on the Core Knowledge Unit First Grade Music
with a Core Knowledge Twist. This week we will do Lesson One.

This unit introduces the first grade student to basic music theory concepts that have contrasting
qualities. Aspects of duration (long/short), tempo (fast/slow), pitch (high/low), and melody
(same/different) are explored. Kinesthetic movement is also made to enhance learning
connections. The students will be exposed to Core Knowledge Sequence vocabulary (historical,
geographical, or scientific) that will be woven within the fabric of their music lesson experiences.
II. OVERVIEW
A. Concept Objectives
1. Students will appreciate the aesthetic differences in music: short vs. long, fast vs.
slow, high vs. low, same phrases vs. different phrases.
2. Students will understand that music can be sung or instruments can be played in
contrasting ways.
3. Students will understand that various body parts can be moved in response to music.
4. Students will understand that music relates to various mathematical, historical,
scientific, and language arts vocabulary.
B. Content from the Core Knowledge Sequence
1. Recognize short or long sounds, p. 33
2. Sing accompanied, in unison, p. 33
3. Discriminate between fast and slow music, p. 33
4. Move responsively to music, p. 33
5. Discriminate between obvious differences in pitch: high and low, p. 33
6. Discriminate between same and different melodic phrases, p. 33
7. Associate temperature in degrees Fahrenheit with weather, p. 36
8. Recognize Lewis and Clark were early explorers of the American West p.30
9. Become familiar with three classifications of animals, p. 37
10. Recite four sayings common to the English language, p. 26
C. Skill Objectives
1. Perform a simple rhythm pattern containing long and short sounds using body
percussion
2. Use an acceptable singing voice
3. Perform a simple melody either quickly or slowly
4. Move with the beat of a song
5. Aurally recognize a high or low pitch
6. Aurally discriminate between two musical phrases that sound the same or
different
7. Visually associate various types of weather with temperatures in Fahrenheit
8. Recognize historical figures, animal classifications, and popular American sayings
BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE
A. For Teachers
1. Moore, Karen. Note: Suggested Activities to Motivate the Teaching of
Elementary Music. USA: Educational Service, Inc. 1973.
2. MusicPlay. Canada: Themes & Variations. 2003. ISBN# 1-894096-71-1.
Book and CD set.
3. Warren, Jean and Shroyer, Susan. Holiday Piggyback Songs. Everett,
Washington: Warren Publishing House, Inc. 1988. ISBN# 0-911019-18-9.
4. Westphal, Frederick (ed.). Heritage Songster. USA: Wm. C. Brown Company.
1966. ISBN# 0-697-03452-6.
B. For Students
1. Echo short rhythmic or melodic phrases
2. Realize that weather changes and can be measured
3. Understand that an explorer discovers new places
4. Know various body parts
5. Recognize various animals and how they live
6. Understand the concept of “opposite”
LESSONS
Lesson One: Long and Short Sounds/ Math Measurement: temperature
A. Daily Objectives
1. Concept Objective(s)
a. Students will appreciate the aesthetic differences in music: long vs.
short.
b. Students will understand that music can be sung or instruments can be
played in contrasting ways.
c. Students will understand that various body parts can be moved in response
to music.
d. Students will understand that music relates to various mathematical
vocabulary.
2. Lesson Content
a. Recognize short or long sounds, p.33.
b. Sing accompanied, in unison, p.33.
c. Sing “Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be”, p.34.
d. Associate weather with temperature in degrees Fahrenheit, p. 36.
3. Skill Objective(s)
a. Perform a simple rhythm pattern containing long and short sounds using
body percussion.
b. Use an acceptable singing voice.
c. Visually identify pictures of weather with temperatures of either 32
degrees, 50 degrees, or 80 degrees Fahrenheit.
B. Materials
1. Song: “Oh Dear, What Can the Matter Be” (see Appendix A)
2. A picture of children playing in snow (Appendix B)
3. A picture of children in the autumn leaves wearing a sweater (Appendix B)
4. A picture of a child swimming in the summer (Appendix B)
5. Eight large cards: two cards are individually labeled with the word “long” and six
cards are labeled with the word “short”. On the back of each card is a portion of a
picture that, collectively , looks like a caterpillar.
6. Song: “Oh Dear, What Can the Matter Be”
7. Tambourine
8. Temperature/Weather words to the tune of “Oh Dear, What Can the Matter Be” (see
Appendix A)
C. Key Vocabulary
1. Short sound: a musical sound with a brief duration
2. Long sound: a musical sound that has extended duration
3. Fahrenheit: a method of measuring temperature
D. Procedures/Activities
1. Shake a tambourine for several seconds. Encourage students to respond to your
exclamation of “Wow! I can shake this instrument for a long time!” Then quickly tap the
tambourine. Identify this quick playing as “short”.
2. Display the large card with the word “long” on it. Ask a student to identify the word
shown on the card and allow them to shake the tambourine for several seconds.
3. Display the large card with the word “short” on it. Ask a student to identify the word
shown on the card and allow them to briefly shake the tambourine.
4. Select six additional students to come to front of class to read either the “long” or “short”.
Have students stand in this formation: long, long, short, short, short, short, short, short.
5. Teacher sings song “Oh Dear, What Can the Matter Be”. At the beginning of each verse,
the song is paused and the next “long” or “short” word is turned over. Teacher reminds
students that when the card’s word is turned over, they should substitute the word “long” or
“short” instead of the word in the lyrics. For example, if three cards or “short” are turned
over, then everyone sings “Oh Dear, What can the short, short, short!”
6. Sing song until all “long” or “short” words are turned over and picture of caterpillar is
shown.
7. Eight alternate students come forward. Each child is given a tambourine. Have the
students with the tambourines practice shaking out a long sound and then a short sound on
their tambourine.
8. Sing song again, using tambourines to shake on two long sounds at the beginning of each
phrase or tap quickly on the six short sounds that follow. Other students without tambourines
may use various body percussion patterns such as shaking hands upward on “long” sound
and clapping on the “short” sound.
9. New idea: Students with tambourines and cards sit down. Teacher displays picture of
winter scene with ice skaters. Discuss winter and cold temperatures. Notice that the label
also in the picture at the side shows 32 degrees.
10. Teacher sings song again using verse 2 (see Appendix A ). Children are encouraged to
sing and add body percussion to the repeated musical phrase about weather and its
associated temperature.
11. Repeat lesson step ten with pictures and verses of other weather situations and their
associated temperatures.
a. “Summer swimming scene/ 80 degrees F”
b. “Autumn scene with children in sweaters/ 50 degrees F”
E. Assessment/Evaluation
1. Rubric for performance of “Oh Dear, What Can the Matter Be” and visual identification
of three weather scenes and their associated weather temperatures. See Appendix C.

A COLLAGE OF AMERICAN ICONS: PRESIDENTS AND SYMBOLS
Lessons Five Through Eight

Lesson Five: Theodore Roosevelt
A. Daily Objectives
1. Concept Objective(s)
a. Student identifies U.S. historical figures and understands their
contribution to our country as well as the important values they embody,
i.e., honesty, curiosity, hard work and conservation of natural resources
2. Lesson Content
a. Presidents, Past and Present: Theodore Roosevelt
3. Skill Objective(s)
a. The student will listen to and understand a variety of texts both fiction
and nonfiction.
b. The student will follow written text top to bottom and left to right.
c. The student will develop new vocabulary based on the unit.
d. The student will respond to material presented in a variety of ways, i.e.,
participating in discussion, answering questions, journal writing using
inventive spelling, making connections and completing projects.
e. The student will recite and learn key facts.
B. Materials
1. Book: The Legend of the Teddy Bear by Frank Murphy
2. A stuffed teddy bear
3. Computer with Internet access connected to LCD projector
4. Projection screen
5. Website: www.lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/collections/troosevelt_film/trffilm.html
6. Globe
7. Pointer
8. Large chart paper on easel or blackboard with the key facts from Appendix A
printed on it in sentence form.
9. Key vocabulary written on 3 x 5 cards and added to the Word Wall
10. A picture of Theodore Roosevelt to color for each student (Appendix B)
11. One basket of colored pencils for each table
12. Student zip-lock bags
C. Key Vocabulary
1. Conservation means making the effort to save or protect something, especially
something in nature
2. Natural resources are usable supplies found in nature, like oil, animals, trees.
3. A safari is a special kind of hunting trip
D. Procedures/Activities
1. PRIOR TO LESSON: Turn on computer and LCD projector, access website and
adjust image to screen. Preview the website for clips related to Theodore
Roosevelt, especially those of the President on safari in Africa. Prepare a guide
for discussion. (See Appendix C for an example.)
2. Show students the stuffed teddy bear. Ask the children to tell you what the
stuffed animal is called and allow them to tell the class about their favorite teddy
bear. Ask the students if they’ve ever wondered how the “teddy bear” got its
name.
3. Remind them about how President Jefferson is honored with his image on the
nickel and Abraham Lincoln is honored with his on the penny. Tell them another
President, Theodore Roosevelt, was honored by having a stuffed toy named after
him. Say: Let’s learn about this President and why he was so special
4. Ask the students to point out the continent of Africa on the globe. Tell them that
in President Roosevelt’s time, people would travel to Africa to hunt wild animals.
This hunting trip is called a safari.
5. Show selected video clips of Teddy Roosevelt from the website. Pause where
needed for discussion.
6. Tell the students that many of the very animals that President Roosevelt captured
on his trips were stuffed and donated to the Museum of Natural History in
Washington, D.C. where they can be seen on display. President Roosevelt
strongly encouraged conservation of the nation’s natural resources.
7. Present the book, The Legend of the Teddy Bear, and tell the students that the
events from one of President Roosevelt’s hunting trips led to people naming a
stuffed animal after him. Review the meaning of “legend” and read the book
aloud to the students asking them to listen carefully for the part about how the
stuffed toy was named for this President. (Assessment 1)
8. Engage students in reciting the key facts after you read them using the pointer for
directed reading. Repeat three times. (Assessment 2)
9. Hand out the picture of Theodore Roosevelt, the colored pencils and the student
zip-lock bag. . Suggest that students color the teddy bear in the picture as their
favorite teddy bear looks. When completed, pictures should be put into the ziplock
bags. Collect the zip-lock bags for the next lesson.
E. Assessment/Evaluation
1. During the project, ask questions and observe for participation and response:
a. What was one of President Roosevelt’s favorite hobbies? (hunting)
b. Where did President Roosevelt travel to hunt? (Africa)
c. What was the special name given to this kind of hunt? (safari)
d. Why was President Roosevelt considered a conservationist? (He was
interested in protecting nature.)
e. Where can we see some of the animals President Roosevelt captured?
(Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.)
f. Why did people name a stuffed toy after President Roosevelt? (On one
of his trips, President Roosevelt prevented a baby bear from being
killed.)
2. Did students follow the text and recite the key facts?

Lesson Six: Mount Rushmore (Part I)
A. Daily Objectives
1. Concept Objective(s)
a. Student recognizes national symbols and understands their significance
2. Lesson Content
a. Symbols and Figures: Mount Rushmore
3. Skill Objective(s)
a. The student will listen to and understand a variety of texts both fiction
and nonfiction
b. The student will develop a new vocabulary based on the unit.
B. Materials
1. Key vocabulary written on 3 x 5 cards and added to the World Wall
2. Book: Mount Rushmore Presidents by E.E. Hirsch, Jr.
3. Four cards with images of common symbols downloaded from Internet source –
Suggestions: heart, McDonald’s golden arches, handicap, cross, etc.
4. Piece of granite
5. Hammer
6. Newspaper
C. Key Vocabulary
1. A symbol is a picture, emblem or object that is universally recognized to
represent something else. It is something visible representing something
invisible.
2. A memorial or monument is something created as a reminder of a person or
event.
3. South Dakota is a state in north central United States and the location of Mount
Rushmore.
4. Granite is a very hard rock used a lot in construction because of its durability.
D. Procedures/Activities
1. Review the concept of “symbol” by holding up the four cards, one at a time.
Have the students identify what each “represents;” that is, what do they think of
when they see the symbol? Inform the students that there are certain symbols that
represent our country and that they will be learning about them over the next
weeks.
2. Show the students the piece of granite. Pass it around so that they can feel it as
you explain that granite is a very hard stone that is often used to build buildings
because it lasts a long, long time.
3. With newspaper underneath, hit the stone with the hammer. Pass it again and ask
the students if they see any cracks in the stone. Reinforce that granite is so hard
and tough that anything built with granite will last a long time. Tell the students
that today you will be talking about a symbol of America that was made to last a
long time.
4. Display the cover of Mount Rushmore Presidents by E.D. Hirsch and ask the
students if they recognize the faces on the cover.
5. Have students identify each face and give one key fact (from previous lessons)
they remember about the particular president.
6. Tell the students that this is a memorial or monument to these four presidents and
ask if anyone knows the name of the memorial. If not, tell the students that it is
called Mount Rushmore.
7. Write the word “mountain” on the blackboard. Point to the word and have
students read the word repeating it after you. Ask if they can hear part of the
monument’s name in the word “mountain”. Give time for responses, and then
underline the root “mount.” Refer back to the cover of the book where the
students can see the word “Mount” in Mount Rushmore. Explain that Mount
Rushmore was actually carved out of a mountain of granite!
8. Read Mount Rushmore Presidents asking the students to pay particular attention
to how long it took to create the monument. (Assessment 1)
E. Assessment/Evaluation
1. Ask questions and observe for participation and responses:
a. Name the presidents of Mount Rushmore. (George Washington,
Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt)
b. Why are their faces on Mount Rushmore? (as a memorial to these four
beloved presidents)
c. From what was Mount Rushmore carved? ( a mountain of granite)
d. Where is Mount Rushmore located? (in the state of South Dakota)
e. How long did it take to complete the project? (14 years)

Lesson Seven: Mount Rushmore (Part II)
A. Daily Objectives
1. Concept Objective(s)
a. Student recognizes national symbols and understands their significance
2. Lesson Content
a. Symbols and Figures: Mount Rushmore
3. Skill Objective(s)
a. The student will follow written text top to bottom and left to right.
b. The student will develop a new vocabulary based on the unit.
c. The student will respond to material presented in a variety of ways, i.e.,
participating in discussion, answering questions, journal writing using
inventive spelling, making connections and completing projects.
d. The student will recite and learn key facts.
e. The student will understand and follow directions.
B. Materials
1. Computer with Internet access connected to an LCD projector
2. Projection screen
3. Website: www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/rushmore/sfeature/sf_footage.html
4. Large chart paper on easel or blackboard with the key facts from Appendix A
printed on it in sentence form.
5. Key vocabulary written on 3 x 5 cards and added to the Word Wall
6. One for each student and two extra of the 3-D pop-up of Mount Rushmore from
www.papertoys.com/rushmore.htm on tag board and already cut out
7. A small container with some tacky glue for each table (Tacky glue adheres and
dries quicker.)
8. A craft stick or small flat paint brush for each student
9. Directions for the project (Procedure 7) written on chart paper and displayed
10. Student zip-lock bags
C. Key Vocabulary
1. Words from Lesson Six
2. Dynamite is a blasting explosive used to blow up and demolish large structures.
3. A jackhammer is a drilling tool used for breaking up hard substances such as
rock or pavement by a repeated pounding action
D. Procedures/Activities
1. PRIOR TO LESSON: Turn on computer and LCD projector, access website and
adjust image to screen. Preview clip of Mount Rushmore being constructed.
Make a sample of the 3-D pop-up Mount Rushmore.
2. Review the assessment questions/responses from the previous lesson. Remind
students that in the last lesson they listened to a book about the construction of
Mount Rushmore. Today they will be viewing a video.
3. Show students the video, instructing them to watch for the kind of equipment
used and the number of people who worked on the project. (Assessment 1)
4. Using the pointer for guided reading, engage the students in reciting the key facts
after you read them. Repeat three times.(Assessment 2)
5. Hold up a completed sample of the 3-D pop-up of Mount Rushmore from and tell
the students they will be constructing their own Mount Rushmore. Hand out
student materials and student zip-lock bags.
6. Demonstrate and have the students construct the 3-D tag board Mount Rushmore
by following the directions. Using the pointer for directed reading, read and
complete each step: (Assessment 3)
a. Fold each flap along the dotted lines.
b. Match the numbers/letters on each flap to the corresponding space on the
tag board base.
c. Apply a small amount of glue to the flaps with craft stick (or brush).
d. Attach to the matching spaces on the base and pinch to set the glue.
7. Once dry, put the project in the student zip-lock bag and collect.
E. Assessment/Evaluation
1. Immediately following the video, ask students to answer the focal questions and
note their responses:
a. Name the equipment used to construct the monument. (a pointing
machine, jackhammers and dynamite)
b. How many people worked on this project? (360)
2. Did students follow the text and recite the facts.
3. Observe that students are able to follow the directions and construct the 3-D tag
board Mount Rushmore correctly.

Lesson Eight: George W. Bush, Our Current President
A. Daily Objectives
1. Concept Objective(s)
a. Student identifies U.S. historical figures and understands their
contributions to our country as well as the important values they embody,
i.e., honesty, curiosity, hard work and conservation of natural resources.
2. Lesson Content
a. Presidents, Past and Present: Current United States President
3. Skill Objective(s)
a. The student will listen to and understand a variety of texts both fiction
and non fiction.
b. The student will follow written text top to bottom and left to right.
c. The student will develop new vocabulary based on the unit.
d. The student will respond to material presented in a variety of ways, i.e.,
participating in discussion, answering questions, journal writing using
inventive spelling, making connections and completing projects.
e. The student will recite and learn key facts.
f. The student will listen for and identify responses to specific target
questions.
B. Materials
1. A baseball cap, a toy horse and a toy fighter plane
2. Book: Let’s Read About . . . George W. Bush by Sonali Fry with the title
concealed by a piece of tag board taped over it.
3. Large chart paper on easel or blackboard with the key facts from Appendix A
printed on it in sentence form.
4. Pointer
5. Key vocabulary written on 3 x 5 cards and added to the World Wall.
2007 Core Knowledge® National Conference, A Collage of American Icons, Kindergarten 15
6. Several recent newspaper or news magazine articles, with pictures, about
President Bush
7. Computer with Internet access connected to an LCD projector
8. Projection screen
9. Website: www.whitehouse.gov/history/life/# (A short video on which the
President talks about his work and the oval office.)
10. One 8.5”x 5.5” journal page with the starting phrase, “If I were the President I
would . . .” and a pencil for each student along with student zip-lock bags.
C. Key Vocabulary
1. A politician is a person who takes an active part in government business.
2. An election is the process of voting to choose a person for office.
3. Current means occurring in the present time.
D. Procedures/Activities
1. PRIOR TO LESSON: Turn on the computer and LCD projector, access the
website and adjust the image to the screen. Preview the video clip for Step 9.
Develop target questions and discussion guide. Write the target questions on
large chart paper. (See Appendix C for an example.)
2. Ask the students to name the four presidents of Mount Rushmore. Tell them that
these men led our country a long time ago. Ask what we call “long time ago”.
(past) Today they will be learning about the man who is currently leading our
country. Ask what we call “current or today.” (present)
3. Show students the book. Ask if they can identify the man on the cover. When
they do, remove the paper concealing the title and read it with them. Tell the
children this book will tell us about the life of President Bush. Ask: “What do we
call a book that tells about the life of a person?” (a biography)
4. Display the baseball cap, the horse and the plane. Tell the students they will hear
about these items in the book and that you want them to remember what these
items tell us about President Bush.
5. Read aloud Let’s Read About . . . George W. Bush by Sonali Fry.
6. Hold up each of the items in #4 and call on different students to tell how they
remind us of President Bush.
7. Engage students in reciting the key facts by reading it first and using the pointer
for directed reading. Repeat three times. (Assessment 1)
8. Hold up newspaper/magazine clippings. Tell the children that President Bush has
a very important job and what he does is in the news almost every day. Inform
them that they will see a short video in which President Bush talks about his job
and that they should listen for the answers to the questions on the chart. Read the
target questions together and assign each to a different group of students. Remind
students to raise their hands when they hear the answer to their question in the
video just as they did with those in the lesson about Abraham Lincoln.
9. Play the video clip. Pause to discuss and record answers to target questions. Also
pause to draw attention to the Presidential Seal informing students that they will
hear more about that in the next lesson. At the conclusion of the video, review
the target questions and responses using pointer for directed reading.
(Assessment 2)
10. Have a short discussion allowing the students to tell about the President’s job.
(Assessment 3)
11. Hand out the journal page a pencil and student zip-lock bags. Instruct students to
complete the sentence with their thoughts on what they would do for the country
if they were President. When completed, put journal page in the zip-lock bag.
(Assessment 3) Collect the student zip-lock bags for use in the next lesson.
E. Assessment/Evaluation
1. Did students follow text and recite facts?
2. Observe which student teams were able to identify answers to the video focal
questions.
3. Did students demonstrate understanding of the President’s job as indicated in the
follow-up discussion and journal activity?

WRITING

On Wednesday, using Unit 3, Session 13, we will work on peer editing to correct spelling
errors. The children will go through their partner’s writing and circle words that appear to
be spelled incorrectly. The children will then work together to try and find the correct
spellings of the words. They can use the word wall, friends, or myself to search for
correct spellings.

On Friday, using Unit 3, Session 14, we will work on peer editing to correct punctuation
errors. I will review the conventions of punctuation that we have worked on so far,
especially periods. I will reinforce how important it is to put periods in longer stories to
make them easier to read. A period tells the reader to stop and think for a second before
they begin the next thought. Children will work with their peers to read previous writings
and think about when one thought ended and the next began.

MATH
This week, we will work on Unit 4, Investigation 2, Sessions 2.3 – 2.5. We will play two
games called Build-On and Quick-Images: Ten Frames, which reinforce the concept of
fractions of ten. Then we will continue to work on counting strategies and play a
variation on Roll-And-Record.

				
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