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FROM THE LAND OF PAIN TO THE LAND OF PROMISE.ppt

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FROM THE LAND OF PAIN TO THE LAND OF PROMISE.ppt Powered By Docstoc
					Immigration to
 St. Clements
Why did they
come?
         The largest group of people
          that immigrated to St.
          Clements were from central
          and eastern Europe.
         This happened between the
          1880’s and 1920’s.
         Life was not good in Europe
          at this time.
         There were money, political,
          and ethnic problems.
In The West
 Austria-Hungary was the
  most powerful empire in
  Central Europe.
 They were in charge of the western Ukrainian
  provinces called Galicia and Bukovina.
 Austria-Hungary let the Polish landlords stay in
  charge of the Ukrainian people. They were not
  nice leaders.
 They would not let the Ukrainian people believe
  in their traditional church called the Orthodox
  Church.
In The East
 Russia was in charge of the
  eastern provinces of
  Ukraine and treated them
  worse than Austria-
  Hungary did.
 They wouldn’t even let them speak their
  own language.
 Russian Tsarist Minister of Education,
  Count Pyotr Valuyev, said, “The Ukrainian
  language never existed, does not exist, and
  never can exist.”
                                                Count Pyotr
                                                 Valuyev
Impossible Living
Conditions
   None of the peasants had enough land to live on.
   The peasants weren’t even given enough land to
    build a small farm to grow their own food.
   Out of 2,300,000 people living on the land, only
    50,000 lived comfortably. That is not even 2
    percent.
   The Hutterites from Germany and the
    Mennonites and Doukhobors from Russia were
    having the same problems.
        Looking for a Better Life
► Everyone  was looking for a better place to live.
► Canada, the United States, and Brazil opened their
  doors to immigrants.
► Hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian, Polish,
  German, and Russian immigrants left their homes
  and families, looking for a better life.
         Immigrating to Canada
► Canada   and the United States had the best land to
  settle on.
► Between 1890 and 1914, it is estimated that 100,000 -
  200,000 Ukrainians arrived in Canada from the
  Western Ukraine.
► The boats that brought the immigrants were stuffed
  with people.
► A lot of people died on the boats from diseases
  because there were too many people on board.
            Arriving in Canada
                   ► As  soon as the boats landed in
                     Canada, the immigrants took trains
                     to the wide-open West.
                   ► Many went to Winnipeg, but
                     immigrants coming to St. Clements
  East Selkirk       stopped at the East Selkirk
Immigration Shed     Immigration shed.
                   ► The first group of immigrants who
                     arrived at the shed included 1,700
                     Doukhobors. They were followed by
                     six hundred Galicians. Thousands
                     more Galicians and Russians over
                     the next few years.
         Building a Homestead
   After they arrived immigrants were given 160 acres of
    land free. In Europe they were only living on about 7
    acres.
   The Ukrainians liked to live on bush land with water
    and trees. They used wood for fuel and building
    materials.
   They built their homes in two ways. The first was a
    Galician-style house with two large rooms. The second
    was a Bukovinian style with three rooms.




                                         Bukovinian Style
      Settling Down
   Some of the men found work on logging, railway, and
    mining crews.
   Most of the settlers became vegetable farmers. One day
    these settlers would be known as the Market Gardeners.
   The Ukrainian immigrants settled in block communities.
   This meant they lived near each other so they could lend a
    helping hand.
   Racism happened a lot to these people because they were
    different.
                Naming their Towns
   The immigrants settled in rural East Selkirk,
    Libau, the Beaches, and in Narol-Gonor.
   The new settlers named some of the towns to
    remind them of their homeland. Libau, which
    was settled by German immigrants, was named
    from the Lettish city, Leipaja. The name Narol
    came from a district in the county of Lubaczow,
    Poland.
                    Education
   Manitoba was the first of the three prairie
    provinces to organize schools where the
    Ukrainians lived.
   The Ukrainian people were scared that they were
    trying to stop them from speaking Ukrainian.
   The English teachers only taught in English.




                    Balsam Bay School
                       Education
   Until 1916, in Manitoba school could not be taught
    in anything other than English.
   After this, the Ukrainian people were allowed to
    hire Ukrainian-speaking teachers for their schools.
   The provincial government even opened a school
    to train Ukrainian-speaking teachers.
   Happy Thought School is an example of the
    Ukrainian Bilingual teachers.


          Happy Thought School
          War/Persecution
 In 1914 World War I began.
 Austro-Hungary became Canada’s enemy.
 Austria still controlled parts of Ukraine and
  Ukrainians were considered to be enemy
  aliens.
 Ukrainian immigrants in St. Clements, as well
  as across Canada, were not treated nicely.
 In Manitoba, a delegation of English-speaking
  citizens petitioned their government to
  imprison and exile all Ukrainians in the
  province.
                 War/Persecution
 Thousands of Ukrainians were rounded up by police, and
    placed in guarded concentration camps.
   Here, they were imprisoned behind fences with barbed
    wire.
   They were also used as forced labour to help build Banff
    National Park, BC and Maritime mines, and Ontario steel
    mills.
   Most of them were able to return to their homes two years
    after the end of the war.
   With the creation of the United Soviet Republic of Ukraine
    in Russia, all of these people were finally referred to as
    Ukrainians in Canada.
        This presentation brought to you by the St. Clements Heritage
                             Advisory Committee!

         - “preserving our community’s heritage one story at a time” –

         Information Compiled/Presentation Created by Jared Laberge

                            The End
                              Bibliography
 St. Clements Historical Committee. East Side Of The Red. Winnipeg: Inter-Collegiate
    Press, 1984.
   InfoUkes Inc. Staff. Internment of Ukrainians in Canada.
    <http://www.infoukes.com/history/internment/>. April 10th 2005 .
   Piniuta, Harry. Land Of Pain Land Of Promise. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan: Prairie
    Books, 1981.

				
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