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The Cuban Missile Crisis The Cuban Missile Crisis Revising History  Thirteen Days—Oct

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The Cuban Missile Crisis The Cuban Missile Crisis Revising History  Thirteen Days—Oct Powered By Docstoc
					The Cuban Missile
           Crisis
          Revising History
   Thirteen Days—Oct. 16-28, 1962
   Culmination of the deterioration of US-
    Soviet Relations
   Declassified letters date through late Nov.
   Traditionally seen as the model of
    successful “crises management”
   “Misinformation, miscalculation and
    misjudgment”




The Basics
   1959—US deployment of Jupiter missiles
    in Turkey and Italy
   A “provocative step,” analogous to Soviet
    missiles in “Cuba or Mexico”
   April 1961—Bay of Pigs Invasion
   April 1962—Jupiter missiles become
    operational
   Khrushchev proposes to place medium
    range nuclear missiles in Cuba



Time Line
   Oct. 16, 1962—Pres. Kennedy informed of
    missile’s presence in Cuba
   Oct. 22—JFK writes to Khrushchev and
    informs the US public by television
    address
   Oct. 24—Naval Quarantine begins
   Oct. 26—Letter from Khrushchev pledges
    to remove missiles is pledge is made to
    not invade Cuba
   Oct. 27—A second letter demands the
    removal of missiles in Turkey; RFK meets
    w/ Soviet Ambassador
   Oct. 28—Khrushchev accepts Kennedy’s
    offer

Time Line cont.
 Missile Gap—US 500-USSR 50
 Placate Soviet Generals on the cheap
 Operation Mongoose—assassination
  attempts, sabotage and psychological
  warfare
 Bay of Pigs




Causes
 Diplomacy
 Military Action
 Quarantine-Diplomacy




Potential Courses of Action
   Letters between Khrushchev and Kennedy
   Back channel communications
   Newspaper leaks
   Two letters—Soft/Hard
   Miscommunications
   Meeting w/ RFK




Diplomatic Measures
 Trade for missiles in Turkey for those in
  Cuba
 Kennedy’s flexibility and Khrushchev’s
  willingness to risk embarrassment
 No final pledge to not invade




Resolution
 Flexibility, compromise and respect for an
  opponent’s understanding of its own
  vulnerability is essential
 Contrary to the traditional view
 Nuclear crisis only managed when unlikely
  conditions are present: empathy; good
  political skills; will to limit objectives; self
  confidence to reject advice
 With nuclear war there is no learning
  curve


Lessons—The US Perspective
   Believed the crisis ended because both
    side knew they were on the brink
   Did not think crises could be managed
   Prevention of crises: Hardliners argue for
    arms-build-up
   Strict centralized command
   Sought to improve communications—”hot
    line”




Lessons—Soviet Perspective
 Neither side could be trusted
 Saw withdrawal of troops as an invitation
  for invasion
 Cuba treated like a bargaining chip




Lessons—Cuban Perspective

				
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posted:5/6/2012
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