Checklist of criteria for evaluating web sites by rajee7799

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Checklist of criteria for evaluating web sites

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									Checklist of criteria for evaluating web sites
Library resources and databases have already been pre-screened and evaluated by professionals.
Information on the Web is entirely unscreened - you must critically evaluate the content yourself.
As with print information, Web based information should be appraised for credibility, authority,
currency, accuracy and bias.
Author information (who wrote the page?)
Author’s name?
Title / position? Credentials?
Does it provide contact information?
Is the author quoted by other sources?
Site information (who owns/publishes the site?)
Does the site have authority for its claims?
Does it link to an organizational affiliation?
Does it provide contact information?
Look for a header or footer identifying the sponsor or affiliation of the site.
The URL can provide source information. Check the domain - .edu .com .ac .gov .org .net
Do other reputable sites link to this site?
Currency (when was the page written?)
Is the information up-to-date enough for your purpose?
Is the page dated? When was it last updated?
Are the links within it current or expired?
Accuracy (is the information reliable?)
Is the information factual, detailed, exact and comprehensive?
Is it credible, probable or possible?
Can the information be verified in other sources?
Are links provided to supporting evidence?
Is it well designed and without spelling or grammatical errors?
Bias / Purpose (why was this page written?)
Is the information balanced and objective?
Who is the intended audience? (academics, potential customers?)
Is there advertising on the page?
Is the language used designed to sway opinion?
Does the author have any connection to an organization or institution that may influence their
treatment of the topic?
If there is an overriding opinion it should be stated and not disguised.
Guidelines of requirements for examining web sites
Library options and data resource have already been pre-screened and analyzed by experts.
Information on the Web is entirely unscreened - you must really assess the articles yourself.
As with list details, Web centered details should be estimated for reliability, specialist, forex,
reliability and prejudice.
Author details (who composed the page?)
Author’s name?
Title / position? Credentials?
Does it offer get in touch with information?
Is the writer offered by other sources?
Site details (who owns/publishes the site?)
Does the website have specialist for its claims?
Does it website connect to an business affiliation?
Does it offer get in touch with information?
Look for a headlines or footer determining the attract or company of the website.
The URL can offer resource details. Examine the website - .edu .com .ac .gov .org .net
Do other trusted websites website connect to this site?
Currency (when was the website written?)
Is the details up-to-date enough for your purpose?
Is the website dated? When was it last updated?
Are the hyperlinks within it present or expired?
Accuracy (is the details reliable?)
Is the details actual, specific, actual and comprehensive?
Is it trusted, prospective or possible?
Can the details be confirmed in other sources?
Are hyperlinks offered to assisting evidence?
Is it well developed and without punctuational or lexical errors?
Bias / Purpose (why was this web page written?)
Is the details healthy and objective?
Who is the designed audience? (academics, prospective customers?)
Is there marketing on the page?
Is the terminology used developed to swing opinion?
Does the writer have any relationship to an company or company that may effect their therapy of
the topic?
If there is an overriding viewpoint it should be mentioned and not hidden.
“phrase searching”      use quotation marks around exact phrases eg “the grass is greener”

OR    returns results that include either of your search terms eg ‘ipod OR mp3’ (NB: ‘OR’ must
be UPPERCASE)

synonyms ~ find alternative keywords
eg ‘~deaf’ returns deaf, deafness, blindness, impairment etc.

define: find definitions from web pages and online glossaries etc eg ‘define:mp3’

exclude          use ‘-‘ immediately before a word you wish to exclude from
your search eg Iraq –war
intitle: returns pages with that keyword in the title and the other terms on the page somewhere
eg intitle:Otago museum virtually
allintitle:      only returns results that include all of your terms in the title eg allintitle:otago
museum virtually

domain search allows you to limit to particular sites ( eg academic only) eg deaf site:ac.nz

search one site search within one site only
eg classes site:www.library.otago.ac.nz

filetype        search for a particular filetype eg ipod OR mp3 filetype:pdf
“phrase searching”     use speech represents around actual words eg “the lawn is greener”

OR returns outcomes including either of your key terms eg ‘ipod OR mp3’ (NB: ‘OR’ must be
UPPERCASE)

synonyms ~ find substitute keywords
eg ‘~deaf’ comes back hard of hearing, hearing problems, loss of sight, incapacity etc.

define: find descriptions from websites and on the internet glossaries etc eg ‘define:mp3’

exclude use ‘-‘ instantly before a concept you wish to leave out from
your look for eg Irak –war
intitle: returns websites with that search term in the headline and the other conditions on the site
somewhere
eg intitle:Otago art gallery virtually
allintitle: only comes back outcomes including all of your conditions in the headline
eg allintitle: otago art gallery virtually

domain search allows you to restrict to particular websites ( eg educational only) eg hard of
hearing site:ac.nz

search one site search within one website only
eg sessions site:www.library.otago.ac.nz

filetype search for a particular filetype eg mp3 player device OR mp3 filetype:pdf

								
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