The Rhetorical Situation

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The Rhetorical Situation Powered By Docstoc
					  Subject
Audience
 Purpose
 Context
   Goals
Subject
 Every document has a subject: what is
  the document about?
 That subject is usually either a situation
  or a person.
 People as the subjects of documents
  are actually rare in the workplace. Why?
Audience
 Every document is written for someone
  to read. Who will read this document?
 What is that person’s education level,
  expectations for the document, needs,
  wants, and preferences?
 See Audience Profile Sheet, under
  “Course Documents.”
                                      AUDIENCE
                 Kind of Reader: Primary    Secondary

Reader’s Name:
Reader’s Job Title:
Education:
Professional Experience:
Job Responsibilities:
Personal Characteristics:
Personal Preferences:
Cultural Characteristics:
Attitude Toward the Writer:
Attitude Toward the Subject:
Expectations about the Subject:
Expectations about the Document:

Reasons for Reading the Document:
Reading Skill:
Reader’s Physical Environment:
Most Common Errors on
Audience
 Misunderstanding who the audience is
  for the document. They often confuse
  themselves with the reader.
 Assuming that because we are “role
  playing,” the details are either not
  required or not necessary.
 Leaving whole sections of the profile
  blank because they can’t or don’t know
  what kind of person would likely be in
  the reader’s position.
Purpose
 INFORM (about what?)
 PERSUADE (of what?)
Most Common Errors on Purpose
 Not using the two verbs “inform” and
  “persuade.”
 Unable to determine what they are
  persuading the audience of with the
  document.
Context
 What is the situation, or “back story”?
 What happened before the document
  that caused the document to be written
  in the first place?
Most Common Errors on Context
 Not understanding what Context even is.
 Not telling the whole story—either jumping
  into the middle of it, leaving out the ending,
  or being too vague with the details.
 Unable to place themselves into the
  position of the writer at a certain workplace,
  dealing with a certain situation.
 Unable to distinguish between “ConTEXT”
  and “ConTENT”
Goals
 Short-term (immediate)
 Long-term (in the future)
 What do you want, expect or need to
  have happen (either right away or some
  time in the future) as a result of writing
  this document?
Most Common Errors on Goals
 Very rarely are any mistakes made on
  the Short-Term (Immediate) goal.
 For Long-Term, not thinking far enough
  into the future.
 Also for long-term, not anticipating bad
  outcomes, such as lawsuits, bad
  customer reactions to bad news, or not
  anticipating backlash that lands on
  themselves.
Any questions?

				
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posted:5/3/2012
language:English
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