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					                                                高级口译预测试卷(四)
                                  SECTION 1: LISTENING TEST (30 minutes)
                                                Part A: Spot Dictation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear a passage and read the same passage with blanks in it. Fill in
each of the blanks with the word or words you have heard on the tape. Write your answer in the corresponding
space in your ANSWER BOOKLET. Remember you will hear the passage ONLY ONCE.
      Malaria is a very serious disease that kills more children under the age of five than any other disease. People
get malaria when they are bitten by (1) called mosquitoes. The mosquitoes (2) which enter a person's blood
and cause malaria.
     Carter Dibbs is an American doctor who works on the (3) for the United States Agency for International
Development. Doctor Dibbs says the parasite that causes malaria is much (4) , such as the virus that causes
polio. He says the malaria parasite (5) so that it is more difficult to make a vaccine that is safe and will
(6) .
      Malaria vaccines are now (7) in Burkina Faso and Mall. Vaccines are being tested on children in
Mozambique and Mall. Many organizations are (8) . They include U, S. A. I. D, the American military,
American health organizations, (9) .
     To make sure that a vaccine will (10) , it must be tested on many people in many different places. Doctor
Dibbs says the people who join the vaccine tests are as important to (11) as the scientists.
     People are told about the tests during public meetings (12) . Doctor Dibbs says people should (13)
that could happen to their bodies if they take the medicine that is being tested. Adults or parents of children must
agree to the vaccine test.
     Adults receive (14) the vaccine medicine. The children receive either the malaria vaccine or a different
medicine that (15) a different disease.
     Then health care workers (16) to see if they show any signs of malaria. The results of the tests must be
compared to people who have not (17) .
     The vaccine is successful if (18) who receive it do not show any signs of malaria for one year.
     Then the United States government will be asked to (19) . However, it could still take another five years
before (20) to give to all the children in Africa and around the world.
                                         Part B: Listening Comprehension
Directions: In this part of the test there will be some short talks and conversations. After each one, you will be
asked some questions. The talks, conversations and questions will be spoken ONLY ONCE. Now listen carefully
and choose the right answer to each question you have heard and write the letter of the answer you have chosen
in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
Questions 1 to 5 are based on the following conversation.
1. (A) They are a group of astronauts.
    (B) They are several scientists who are interested in the moon.
    (C) They are a group of scientists and engineers who study Mars.
    (D) They are NASA staff.
2. (A) They are trying to find another planet for human beings to live on.
    (B) They are looking for fossils on Mars.
    (C) They are sending robots to Mars.
    (D) They are digging underground the Mars.
3. (A) Because robots will not be able to communicate with life on Mars.
    (B) Because robots are not as good as human beings are at digging underground for life on Mars.
    (C) Because human beings are as intelligent as robots.
    (D) Because robots cannot set up colonies on Mars.
4. (A) Scientists from "Mars Underground" want to stay on Mars for a lifetime.
    (B) Scientists from "Mars Underground" have been paying attention to the manned missions that we have
been sending to Mars.
    (C) Even if there is any life on Mars, it is not an intelligent one.
    (D) We will send astronauts to Mars within ten years.
5. (A) Dry lake beds.                                 (B) Dry river channels.
    (C) Places which thermal systems.                (D) Parks and gardens.
Questions 6 to 10 are based on the following news.
6. (A) Blizzard.                                        (B) Airplane crash.
    (C) Heavy rain.                                      (D) Tsunami.
7. (A) Nike has the ambition to become the number one brand in soccer.
    (B) Soccer-related business has become the focus of Nike.
    (C) Nike is bigger than Adidas in soccer-related business.
    (D) Competition between Nike and Adidas is getting more and more intense.
8. (A) minimally 15                                    (B) over 1,000
    (C) more than 5,000                                (D) not specified
9. (A) To prove to donors that the Global Fund to Fight AIDS is working efficiently.
    (B) To spend enough money to fight AIDS.
    (C) To hold a special session of the UN General Assembly.
    (D) To create a global fund to fight AIDS.
10. (A) To buy a British company that operates terminals at several US ports,
     (B) To refuse to get involved in a fire storm on Capitol Hill.
     (C) To take over some operations at six US ports.
     (D) To alleviate the suspicion and challenge from the US Congress.
Questions 11 to 15 are based on the following interview.
11. (A) The unusual habits of the centenarians.
     (B) How to live to be 100?
     (C) The incredible groups of senior citizens.
     (D) How to be young forever?
12. (A) Because more people are living beyond their expectations.
     (B) Because scientist are very much interested in it.
     (C) Because more people are not living as long as they expected.
     (D) Because researchers found centenarians always have unconventional hobbies.
13. (A) Optimism.                                    (B) Mobility.
     (C) Genetics.                                    (D) Strength to adapt to loss.
14. (A) All the residents studied have unusual hobbies.
     (B) All the centenarians studied ate a highly nutritious diet.
     (C) Some of the centenarians suggest that people drink alcohol and eat pork in order to live a long life.
     (D) Most of the studied centenarians' friends are still alive.
15. (A) Try not to lose any of your family members.
     (B) Learn to relax yourself now and then.
     (C) Do some sort of regular physical activity everyday.
     (D) Always find something to laugh about.
Questions 16 to 20 are based on the following talk.
16. (A) It is produced by famous people.
     (B) It gives advice about life.
      (C) It's expressed in myths, fairy tales, legends and songs.
      (D) It is extremely humorous.
17. (A) They have different opinions about life.
      (B) They have different opinions about humor.
      (C) They have different moral principles.
      (D) They have different ways of expressing folk wisdom.
18. (A) They are elegant and wise short sayings.
      (B) Franklin is best at "horse sense" humor.
      (C) It was started by Abraham Lincoln.
      (D) It's in the form of simple commonsense humor.
19. (A) To prove that many popular ideas were actually harmful.
      (B) To influence people in power.
      (C) To show everyone else's mistakes.
      (D) To irritate and make fun of people.
20. (A) Because most people didn't know he was going to die.
      (B) Because he thought it would be fun to tell people that he was dying while he was not.
      (C) Because he wanted to show that he was stronger than people in power.
      (D) Because he wanted to prove that the reports were misleading again.
                                    SECTION 2: READING TEST (30 minutes)
Directions: In this section you will read several passages. Each one is followed by several questions about it. You
are m choose ONE best answer, (A), (B), (C) or (D), to each question. Answer all the questions following each
passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage and write the letter of the answer you have
chosen in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
      Midway through the first decade of the 21st century, economic growth is pulling millions out of poverty.
Growth, so devoutly desired yet often so elusive for developing countries, is occurring in China and India on a
heroic scale. Yet once affluence is achieved, its value is often questioned. In the l960s and 1970s, economists
started worrying about environmental and social limits to growth. Now Avner Offer, professor of economic history
at Oxford University, has added a weighty new critique to this tradition.
      "The Challenge of Affluence" accepts that the populations of poor countries gain from growth, but says that
the main benefits of prosperity are achieved at quite modest levels. Its central thesis is that rising living standards
in Britain and America have engendered impatience, which undermines well-being. The fruits of affluence are
bitter ones, and include addiction, obesity, family breakdown and mental disorders.
      The claim is as ambitious as it is pessimistic. Professor Offer, who has an unorthodox academic background
(before embarking on his academic career he worked as a soldier, farmer and conservation worker in his native
Israel), is unafraid to challenge economic orthodoxy. He gives short shrift to the rational decision-makers of
economic models, arguing that consumers are myopic creatures easily tempted by the lures of immediate
satisfaction. As societies become wealthier, traditions and institutions that bolster commitment and far-sighted
behavior are eroded. Individuals increasingly live for today rather than tomorrow. Prudence may have built up
affluence, but affluence is no friend of prudence.
      Professor Offer buttresses his theoretical challenge with a large casebook from America and Britain. Drug
addiction, which "shows how choice is fallible" is widespread. Obesity rates have risen alarmingly, in large
measure because of the availability of fast food. The swift adoption of television in American homes after the
Second World War is contrasted with the slower spread of appliances like dishwashers. This, he says, shows
consumers' preference for time-using devices of "sensual arousal" over time-saving investments around the home.
Falling saving rates, rising divorce figures and much else besides are yoked to the argument.
      The book fails to convince, however, both in its challenge to mainstream economics and in its interpretation
of the historical evidence. Choices may multiply with the growth of affluence, but there is nothing new in the
tension between impatience and prudence. Behavioral economics is now helping to explain the common tendency
to procrastinate over decisions such as joining retirement saving plans that would be in individuals' long-term
interest. However, this body of work is best understood as a set of exceptions that modifies but leaves intact the
canonical model of rational choice, not least since it is irrational to suppose that people in general behave
irrationally.
      Furthermore, there is little reason to believe—and scant evidence to support—the notion that behavior
becomes more myopic as societies get richer. Rather, individuals face new and difficult challenges that they
succeed, by and large, in meeting. One example is rising enrolment in higher education. By choosing to study
rather than to work, students are sacrificing short-term income and greater consumption in order to secure higher
living standards in the future.
      Another example of far-sighted behaviour and self-control is the investment that people make in their own
health by adopting new lifestyles. Despite the addictiveness of nicotine, the prevalence of smoking has plunged as
consumers have become better informed about its risks. Individuals are also investing in their health through more
exercise and better diet. Fast-food chains have stumbled as more and more consumers reject unhealthy meals.
Obesity rates among American women have stabilised, an early sign of a turning-point in the great fattening of
society.
      Professor Offer's broader message of gloom and foreboding is unwarranted. Measures indicating that
well-being stalls beyond a certain modest level of affluence take no account of rising expectations, which are a
virtue in themselves. Not only is prosperity welcome in itself but it contributes to rising life expectancy, another
extraordinary boon, not least because prosperity brings with it improved health care, Equally important, it extends
horizons and widens opportunities for more and more people. Affluence may present new challenges but they are
a lot better than the alternative.
1. What is the best rifle of the passage?
      (A) The perils of prosperity                      (B) Fruits of affluence
      (C) Growth and its social effects                (D) Prosperity and environment
2. In the sentence "He gives short shrift to the rational decision-makers of economic models" (Para. 3), the
expression "give a short shrift to" can be paraphrased as ______.
      (A) he gives detailed illustration of the point.
      (B) he pays little attention to the point.
      (C) he writes a short paragraph about the point.
      (D) he ends with a brief but warm discussion about the point.
3. The expression "The claim is as ambitious as it is pessimistic." can be best paraphrased as which of the
following?
      (A) the claim is both ambitious and pessimistic.
      (B) the claim is more ambitious than pessimistic.
      (C) the claim is either ambitious and pessimistic
      (D) the claim is more pessimistic than ambitious.
4. Which of the following is not the consequence of prosperity?
      (A) obesity rates have risen greatly.
      (B) more and more people are addicted to drugs.
      (C) divorce rates are rising.
      (D) consumers' preference for time-saving devices
5. What is the function of the last paragraph?
      (A) a summary of the whole passage
      (B) a repetition of the views expressed
      (C) a challenge to the views expressed
      (D) an intensification of the theme of the essay
      Martin Hughes is not your typical hybrid-driving, clean-energy fanatic. Hughes and his wife, both longtime
oil-industry veterans, zoom around Houston in no-compromise vehicles. His, a Nissan Xterra SUV. Hers, a zippy
Volkswagen Passat.
      Yet when Hughes heard last year about an environmental startup called TerraPass Inc. , he was intrigued. The
Menlo Park (Calif.) company sells "green tags," which cost up to $80 a year and which are designed to offset the
emissions a car spews into the air during that period. After taking a small cut of each sale, TerraPass pools its
members' fees and invests them in clean energy production, including wind power. Hughes checked out the
service online last August and then forked over $129 for two TerraPass windshield decals. "I was impressed," he
says. "It's a for-profit product that allows you to exercise your conscience."
      TerraPass is channeling the good intentions of individual consumers concerned about carbon emissions,
which are linked with global warming. U. S. companies are also adopting the certificates, in part because they
wish to cater to this growing, green constituency. But the tags, which are now America's fastest-growing
alternative-energy product, aren't simply a marketing vehicle. U. S. businesses have watched Europe and Japan
adopt tough regulations on carbon emissions and say the tags could help them prepare for similar developments in
the U. S.
      Starbucks Corp. has been a leader in the green-tag movement, mainly because renewable power is still hard
to come by. Last year, Starbucks made a pledge to buy 20% of the annual electric power for its North American
stores—about 150 million kilowatt hours—from renewable sources. But no single wind farm can service all 8,400
of its U. S. coffee shops. In fact, many Starbucks have no means of hooking up to any renewable power producer.
      So Starbucks stores continue to consume power as usual, but the company passes an extra payment of less
than half a cent per kwh to a middleman called 3 Phases Energy Services in San Francisco. 3 Phases redistributes
funds to 40 wind farms across the country, then issues a certificate. With this subsidy, the farms cut the price of
their power and boost sales to local customers. The net effect: Nationwide, an amount of power equal to
Starbucks' purchase is shifted to wind and away from conventional "dirty" sources.
      A host of companies is now using this clever type of transaction to meet renewable energy targets, slash
emissions, and make their brands stand out. Whole Foods Market Inc. , based in Austin, Tex. , turned to
certificates in January, when it decided to offset 100% of its energy consumption with renewables. Whole Foods
quickly became the biggest corporate buyer of such tags in the U. S. Safeway, Liz Claiborne, and HSBC have also
made major pledges in the past year. "We'll see more and more reliance on (tags)" in coming months, says Blair
Swezey, a policy adviser at the U. S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo.
      Green tags come with a cost. For big purchases, the certificates can tack an extra 0.5% to 8% onto an energy
bill. "It's not a financial hardship, but it is an incremental amount of money that's not required," says Steve
McDougal, senior manager of business development at 3 Phases, which also supplies green tags to Johnson &
Johnson and IBM. Still, the premium that most companies pay for green tags works out to far less than they would
pay to buy renewable power directly from a patchwork of suppliers, McDougal says.
      Now utilities are snapping up green tags as they scramble to meet new renewable energy regulations. To date,
23 states have adopted requirements that power companies replace a portion of the energy they sell with
renewable power. California is committed to a goal of 20% by 2017, and New York has to hit 25% by 2013. In
many cases, green tags offer the easiest path to meet the new minimums.
      For retail operations such as Starbucks and Whole Foods, the tags help attract a green clientele. For industrial
companies such as DuPont, Staples, and J&J, green tags are also a way to meet, or anticipate, regulations. With
the carbon-restricting rules of the Kyoto Accord in effect in Europe, Canada, and Japan, many such companies are
trying to align their U. S. operations with global practices. "We need to understand how to do business as a
company in a carbon-constrained environment," says Mark Buckley, vice-president for environmental affairs at
Staples Inc. which aims to reduce its emissions by 7% by 2010. Meanwhile, a clutch of state-backed and nonprofit
auditors, such as Green-e in San Francisco, is trying to standardize how tags are measured and tracked.
      While many companies are just beginning to experiment with green certificates, individuals are using them to
offset the power consumed in everything from cross-country flights to wedding receptions and ski trips. At Mt.
Hood Meadows Ski Resort, an hour east of Portland, Ore. , 18,000 skiers purchased green tags this year. One was
Allen Engle, an electrical engineer in Bend, Ore. He buys a $2 green tag along with his $ 48 lift ticket, to
compensate for the power consumed on his day trip to the slopes. "To get any new technology started, you need
incentives, like tax incentives," says Engle. For many companies and consumers, tags are an acceptable short-term
cost.
6. The author introduces Martin Hughes at the beginning of the passage ______.
      (A) to show he and his wife are both environmentally conscious
      (B) m serve as the background of his life story
      (C) to introduce the topic of "green tag"
      (D) to encourage the readers m follow suit
7. When Steve McDougal says "It's not a financial hardship, but it is an incremental amount of money that's not
required," she means that ______.
      (A) Green tag costs a lot of money.
      (B) Green tag costs an extra amount of money.
      (C) Green tag's is cost-effective.
      (D) The cost on green tags is far less than the companies pay to purchase renewable power from suppliers.
8. Which of the following can NOT be concluded from Hughes' comment "It's a for-profit product that allows you
to exercise your conscience." (Para. 2) ______.
      (A) The product of "green tag" is designed for the purpose of raising fund.
      (B) The product of "green tag" is profitable.
      (C) It is not compulsory and consumers purchase it of their own will.
      (D) It comes from the consumers' good intention of reducing carbon intention.
9. What is the best title of the passage?
      (A) Big corporations: pioneer of environmentalism
      (B) Consumer demand and development of green tag
      (C) Green tag and its extra cost.
      (D) Transformation from car devotee to environmentalist
10. Which of the following about the "green tag" is NOT true?
      (A) It was designed to compensate for the emissions a car exits into theair.
      (B) TerraPass gathers its members' fees and invests them in clean energy production.
      (C) Many companies purchased green tags for various purposes
      (D) Consumers can benefit high return from green tag.
      Laura Holshouser's favorite video games include Halo, Tetris, and an online training game developed by her
employer. A training game? That's right. The 24-year-old graduate student, who manages a Cold Stone Creamery
ice-cream store in Riverside, Calif. , stumbled across the game on the corporate Web site in October.
      It teaches portion control and customer service in a cartoon-like simulation of a Cold Stone store. Players
scoop cones against the clock and try to avoid serving too much ice cream. The company says more than 8,000
employees, or about 30% of the total, voluntarily downloaded the game in the first week. "It's so much fun," says
Holshouser. "I e-mailed it to everyone at work."
      The military has used video games as a training tool since the 1980s. Now the practice is catching on with
companies, too, ranging from Cold Stone to Cisco Systems Inc. to Canon Inc. Corporate trainers are betting that
games' interactivity and fun will hook young, media-savvy employees like Holshouser and help them grasp and
retain sales, technical, and management skills. "Video games teach resource management, collaboration, critical
thinking, and tolerance for failure," says Ben Sawyer, who runs Digitalmill Inc. , a game consultancy in Portland,
Me.
      The market for corporate training games is small but it's growing fast. Sawyer estimates that such games
make up 15% of the "serious," or nonentertainment market, which also includes educational and medical training
products. Over the next five years, Sawyer sees the serious-games market more than doubling, to $100 million,
with trainers accounting for nearly a third of that. It's numbers like those that prompted Cyberlore Studios Inc. ,
maker of Playboy: The Mansion, to refocus on training games—albeit based on its Playboy title. And training
games will be top of mind at the Game Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif. , this month.
      Companies like video games because they are cost-effective. Why pay for someone to fly to a central training
campus when you can just plunk them down in front of a computer? Even better, employees often play the games
at home on their own time. Besides, by industry standards, training games are cheap to make. A typical military
game costs up to $10 million, while sophisticated entertainment games can cost twice that. Since the corporate
variety don't require dramatic, warlike explosions or complex 3D graphics, they cost a lot less. BreakAway Games
Ltd., which designs simulation games for the military, is finishing its first corporate product, V-bank, to train bank
auditors. Its budget? Just $500,000.
      Games are especially well-suited to training technicians. In one used by Canon, repairmen must drag and
drop parts into the right spot on a copier. As in the board game Operation, a light flashes and a buzzer sounds if
the repairman gets it wrong. Workers who played the game showed a 5% to 8% improvement in their training
scores compared with older training techniques such as manuals, says Chuck Reinders, who trains technical
support staff at Canon. This spring, the company will unveil 11 new training games.
      Games are also being developed to help teach customer service workers to be more empathetic. Cyberlore,
now rechristened Minerva Software Inc. , is developing a training tool for a retailer by rejiggering its Playboy
Mansion game. In the original, guests had to persuade models to pose topless. The new game requires players to
use the art of persuasion to sell products, and simulates a store, down to the carpet and point-of-purchase display
details.
      Don Field, director of certifications at Cisco, says games won't entirely replace traditional training methods
such as videos and classes. But he says they should be part of the toolbox. Last year, Cisco rolled out six new
training games—some of them designed to teach technicians how to build a computer network. It's hard to
imagine a drier subject. Not so in the virtual world. In one Cisco game, players must put the network together on
Mars. In a sandstorm. "Our employees learn without realizing they are learning," says Field. Sounds suspiciously
like fun.
11. Which of the following best summarises the main idea of the passage?
      (A) The advantages of online training game have been exploited by many companies to save money.
      (B) Video games have been used as training tool for the military.
      (C) Companies tend to use online game as the marketing tool.
      (D) Online training game will become a major industry in the following years.
12. The word "dry" in the sentence "It's hard to imagine a drier subject." (last paragraph) can be replaced by
______.
      (A) not wet and moist                        (B) difficult
      (C) obscure                                     (D) dull
13. It can be concluded from the essay that the author's attitude toward the training game is that of ______.
      (A) supportative                                (B) oppositive
      (C) skeptical                                   (D) critical
14. Which of the following about the video game is true?
      (A) Video games mainly teaches portion control and customer service.
      (B) Companies like video games because they can help their employees relax.
      (C) The market for corporate training games is enormous and it's growing fast.
      (D) The games will entirely replace traditional training methods.
15. It can be concluded that the tone of the passage is ______.
      (A) complimentary                                 (B) encouraging
      (C) critical                                    (D) pessimistic
      LARRY SUMMERS, a Treasury secretary under Bill Clinton, once said that "the world economy is flying on
one engine" to describe its excessive reliance on American demand. Now growth seems to be becoming more
even at last: Europe and Japan are revving up, as are most emerging economies. As a result, if the American
engine stalls, the global aeroplane will not necessarily crash.
      American consumers have been the main engine not just of their own economy but of the whole world's. If
that engine fails, will the global economy nose-dive? A few years ago, the answer would probably have been yes.
But the global economy may now be less vulnerable. At the World Economic Forum in Davos last week, Jim
O'Neill, the chief economist at Goldman Sachs, argued convincingly that a slowdown in America need not lead to
a significant global loss of power.
      Start with Japan, where industrial output jumped by an annual rate of 11% in the fourth quarter. Goldman
Sachs has raised its GDP growth forecast for that quarter (the official number is due on February 17th) to an
annualised 4.2%. That would push year-on-year growth to 3.9%, well ahead of America's 3.1%. The bank predicts
average GDP growth in Japan this year of 2.7%. It thinks strong demand within Asia will partly offset an
American slowdown.
      Japan's labour market is also strengthening. In December the ratio of vacancies to job applicants rose to its
highest since 1992. It is easier to find a job now than at any time since the bubble burst in the early 1990s.
Stronger hiring by firms is also pushing up wages after years of decline. Workers are enjoying the biggest rise in
bonuses for over a decade.
      Higher incomes mean more spending: households spent 3.2% more in December than a year earlier. And
according to Richard Jerram, of Macquarie Bank, retail sales rose in 2005 for the first full year since 1996. In
other words, Japan's growth is becoming much less dependent on exports. The disappearance of deflation has also
reduced real interest rates, giving further support to domestic demand.
      Even the euro area is emerging from the doldrums. In Germany in particular, vigorous corporate restructuring
has boosted productivity and profits. So far, however, this has been at the expense of jobs and wages, and hence of
consumer spending—although with capital expenditure picking up, new hiring is likely to follow. Mr O'Neill
suggests that Germany is where Japan was 18 months ago.
      The Ifo survey of German business confidence also indicates that the recovery is spreading to consumers.
Retailers' confidence in January rose to its highest for five years. The expectations component of the overall
survey rose to its highest since November 1994. If the traditional relationship between Ifo's business-confidence
index and GDP growth holds, then Germany's economy could grow this year by much more than most economists
are forecasting.
      For the first time in many years, Germany's domestic demand looks set to contribute more to growth in 2006
than its net exports will. Elsewhere in the euro area, domestic demand has been the main source of growth in any
case. According to Morgan Stanley, since 1999 it has supplied 95% of the zone's GDP growth. These economies
are therefore more resistant to external shocks than is generally thought.
      Although Germany is leading the pack, businesses throughout the euro area are feeling perkier. The European
Commission's survey of business sentiment rose healthily in January, to a level that could signal GDP growth of
well above the consensus forecast of 2% for this year.
      Alongside stronger domestic demand in Europe and Japan, emerging economies are also tipped to remain
robust. These economies are popularly perceived as excessively export-dependent, flooding the world with cheap
goods, but doing little to boost demand. Yet calculations by Goldman Sachs show that Brazil, Russia, India and
China combined have in recent years contributed more to the world's domestic demand than to its GDP growth.
They have chipped in almost as much to global domestic demand as America has.
      If this picture endures, a moderate slowdown in America need not halt the expansion in the rest of the world.
Europe and Japan together account for a bigger slice of global GDP than the United States, so faster growth there
will help to keep the global economy flying. A rebalancing of demand away from America to the rest of the world
would also help to shrink its huge current-account deficit.
      This all assumes that America's economy slows, rather than sinks into recession. The world is undoubtedly
better placed to cope with a slowdown in the United States than it was a few years ago. That said, in those same
few years America's imbalances have become larger, with the risk that the eventual correction will be more painful.
A deep downturn in America would be felt all around the globe.
16. What is the main idea of the passage?
      (A) Global growth is less lopsided than for many years
      (B) a comparison of economies of the three engines of the global airplane.
      (C) America's impact on the world's economy
      (D) The three economy's contribution to the world economy
17. In the sentence "As a result, if the American engine stalls, the global aeroplane will not necessarily crash.", the
word "stall" can be best paraphrased as ______.
      (A) decline                                       (B) halt
      (C) accelerate                                   (D) aggravate
18. The article can be classified as one of
      (A) objective commentary                          (B) detailed narration
      (C) chronological description                  (D) heated argumentation
19. The word "doldrums" in the sentence "Even the euro area is emerging from the doldrums".
      (A) boom                                            (B) gloom
      (C) prosperity                                   (D) decline
20. Which of the following is not true?
      (A) It is easier to find a job now than at any time in Japan.
      (B) Higher income will bring about more expenditure.
      (C) In the euro area, domestic demands are strong.
      (D) Europe and Japan together account for a bigger proportion of global GDP than the United States.
                                   SECTION 3: TRANSLATION TEST (30 minutes)
Directions: Translate the following passage into Chinese and write your version in the corresponding space in
your ANSWER BOOKLET.
      Dell says the problem is that it dropped prices too much. But deeper, more threatening forces are also now at
play.
      The first is the resurgence of rivals, which have caught up with Dell's low price model. By driving prices
down, Dell has unintentionally cut costs for its rivals too. "The supply chain has become as standardized as the
components—the money has been wrung out," explains an expert. Dell, by not working through retail outlets, is
still more efficient, but the cost benefits that this once brought have been whittled away.
      The second factor hurting Dell is that growth in the computer business is coming from the consumer market
and emerging countries rather than the corporate market, in which Dell sells around 85% of its machines.
Increasing sales to consumers is difficult for Dell because individuals tend to want to see and touch computers
before buying them. They also like to be able to return the machine easily if it breaks. Dell's tack of retail presence,
once ballyhooed as a benefit, has turned into grave disadvantage.
      A third problem facing Dell is its exclusive use of Intel chips rather than lower-priced ones made by Intel's
sworn rivals, AMD. This arrangement lets Dell buy chips inexpensively and benefit from Intel's generous
co-marketing programmes. But it has started to harm Dell's sales for higher margin computer servers.
                                  SECTION 4: LISTENING TEST (30 minutes)
                                        Part A: Note-taking And Gap-filling
Directions: In this part of the test you will hear a short talk. You will hear the talk ONLY ONCE. While listening
to the talk, you may take notes on the important points so that you can have enough information to complete a
gap-filling task on a separate ANSWER BOOKLET. You will not get your ANSWER BOOKLET until after you
have listened to the talk
      Alcoholism and (1) addiction has already spread at alarming rate in the 21st Century. One of the biggest
(2) about it is that only (3) people and ethnic minorities are more likely to get addicted. But the truth is that
addiction is (4) to (5) , color and socio-economic background.
      People take drugs and alcohol because of the (6) or relaxing effects they have on the body. But as the
person develops a habit, the (7) of the brain starts to change and adapt, (8) more and more of the drug as it
resists the discomfort of (9) .
      The brain controls behavior by (10) actions that will ensure survival of the species. But the problem lies
in the fact that some chemicals, like caffeine, alcohol and (11) can (12) brain reward systems directly,
(13) the sensory receptors mediating natural rewards. But other more (14) drugs, such as heroine and
cocaine, can produce a far more (15) effect, so the addiction would be more (16) .
      Addictions are lifelong (17) that are very hard to get rid of. Even some of the most skilled and (18)
people might become addicts even though they are fully (19) of their harmful nature. The biggest killer is the
person's (20) of his or her condition of getting slowly addicted.
                                         Part B: Listening and Translation
Ⅰ. Sentence Translation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 5 English sentences. You will hear the sentences ONLY ONCE.
After you have heard each sentence, translate it into Chinese and write your version in the corresponding space in
your ANSWER BOOKLET.
(1) ______
(2) ______
(3) ______
(4) ______
(5) ______
Ⅱ. Passage Translation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 2 English passages. You will hear the passages ONLY ONCE.
After you have heard each passage, translate it into Chinese and write your version in the corresponding space in
your ANSWER BOOKLET. You may take notes while you are listening.
(1) ______
(2) ______
                                   SECTION 5: READING TEST (30 minutes)
Directions: Read the following passages and then answer IN COMPLETE SENTENCES the questions which
follow each passage. Use only information from the passage you have just read and write your answer in the
corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
      These days, getting answers to most questions seems like a no-brainer. For everything from who won an
Olympic speed skating race to when to plant tomatoes, most people turn to Google or one of its rivals.
      Not John W. Rogers Jr. The CEO of Ariel Capital Management LLC doesn't use the Internet at work or at
home. The 47-year-old Princeton University grad thinks the Net is largely a waste of time. Assistants print out
e-mails for him and researchers give him paper copies of Wall Street analysts reports from the Web. He prefers to
spend his time reading, talking directly with his staff, working out at the gym, or spending time with his teenage
daughter. "I listen and read; e-mail is a huge distraction." says Rogers.
      It's a sentiment that many Americans find hard to imagine. Plowing through e-mail has become part of the
daily routine, like brushing your teeth or walking the dog. But Rogers isn't as much of an oddity as it might seem.
Despite its popularity among teens and techies, and its use in most offices, the Internet is far from ubiquitous. In
fact, 39 million American households still do not have Internet access. That means only 64% of households are
connected, according to a recent survey of 1,000 people by Dallas researcher Parks Associates. An even bigger
surprise is that the growth of the Internet in the U. S. has stalled.
      Many people are non-Netizens for obvious reasons. They can't afford service or live in remote areas without
hope of affordable connections. And some are past the age when they want to adopt new technology. But the
spectrum of naysayers also includes millions of well-off, educated, and younger professionals. Of the survey
respondents who say they don't use the Web, 24% make more than $ 50,000. Some 39% of the Netphobes
attended or graduated college or have at least some associate degree training. And 29% are 44 years old or
younger. "It's not just everyone's grandmother who is avoiding the Internet," says John C. Barrett, director of
research at Parks Associates.
      Why are people saying no? Some worry, after hearing about online seams and digital viruses, that the Net
isn't safe. Others swear that, for all the brouhaha about the Net's ability to enhance communication, e-mail and
instant-message chats break down social interaction. But the broader issue is that—despite innovations that make
it possible for people to call up their bank accounts with a few clicks of the mouse, watch the latest episode of The
Daily Show with Jon Stewart on a PC, and play online games against competitors in Korea, France, and South
Africa—the Internet remains too complicated and costly for a huge swath of American society.
      Other consumer electronics gear is much more widely adopted: Nearly 100% of U. S. households have a TV,
83% have a DVD player, and 78% have a cell phone. Despite their particular drawbacks, all these technologies are
easier to use than an Internet-connected computer. Yet, while the tech industry has vowed to make its products
simpler, companies keep stuffing online services, PCs, and other devices with. complicated new features. That's
why predictions of a few years ago that 75% of American households would be online by now have fallen short.
      It's little wonder that millions of people don't like or trust the Internet. Take Sylvia Goodwin, a 57-year-old
assistant attorney general in Tucson. She has a PC at home but no Net service. That puts her among the 31% of
households that say they will not subscribe to an Internet service because access at work is sufficient. To Goodwin,
the Web is a 21st century manifestation of the world depicted in George Orwell's 1984. As a prosecutor, Goodwin
knows how easy it is for Big Brother to gain access to personal information. To her, giving out addresses,
telephone numbers, and credit-card information online seems like a surefire way to lose control of your privacy.
"If you do everything on the Internet, someone can go in and pick it up," she says.
      For others, the Internet is an example of what author Nell Postman called "the surrender of culture to
technology." From Silicon Valley engineers to teenage geeks, tech enthusiasts see only what the Net can do, not
what it might undo. But James J. Mitchell, a retired banking executive from suburban Chicago, believes the Web
dismantles face-to-face communication. He's part of the 18% of households that, according to the Parks survey,
have a computer but aren't interested in "anything" on the Internet.
1. Who is John W. Rogers Jr. ? What does the author want to tell us from his example?
2. What does the author mean by "non-Netizens"? Who are those people?
3. Why do millions of people say "no" to the Internet?
      Things must be going well in the parcels business. At $ 2.5m for a 30-second TV commercial during last
weekend's Super Bowl, an ad from FedEx was the one many Americans found the most entertaining. It showed a
caveman trying to use a pterodactyl for an express delivery, only to watch it be gobbled up on take-off by a
tyrannosaur. What did the world do before FedEx, the ad inquired? It might have asked what on earth FedEx did
before the arrival of online retailers, which would themselves be sunk without today's fast and efficient delivery
firms.
      Consumers and companies continue to flock in droves to the internet to buy and sell things, FedEx reported
its busiest period ever last December, when it handled almost 9m packages in a single day. Online retailers also set
new records in America. Excluding travel, some $ 82 billion was spent last year buying things over the internet,
24% more than in 2004, according to comScore Networks, which tracks consumer behaviour. Online sales of
clothing, computer software, toys, and home and garden products were all up by more than 30%. And most of this
stuff was either posted or delivered by parcel companies.
      The boom is global, especially now that more companies are outsourcing production. It is becoming
increasingly common for products to be delivered direct from factory to consumer. In one evening just before
Christmas, a record 225,000 international express packages were handled by UPS at a giant new air-cargo hub,
opened by the American logistics firm at Cologne airport in Germany. "The internet has had a profound effect on
our business," says David Abney, UPS's international president. UPS now handles more than 14m packages
worldwide every day.
      It is striking that postal firms—once seen as obsolete because of the emergence of the internet—are now
finding salvation from it. People are paying more bills online and sending more e-mails instead of letters, but most
post offices are making up for the thanks to e-commerce. After four years of profits, the United States Postal
Service has cleared its loss $11 billion of debt.
      Firms such as Amazon and eBay have even helped make Britain's Royal Mail profitable. It needs to be: on
January 1st, the Royal Mail lost its 350-year-old monopoly on carrying letters. It will face growing competition
from rivals, such as Germany's Deutsche Post, which has expanded vigorously after partial privatization and now
owns DHL, another big international delivery company.
      Both post offices and express-delivery firms have developed a range of services to help e commerce and
eBay's traders—who listed a colossal 1.9 billion items for sale last year. Among the most popular services are
tracking numbers, which allow people to follow the progress of their deliveries on the internet.
      How long will the boom continue? The parcel companies clearly see plenty of growth ahead—they are
making big investments in new cargo hubs and aircraft. But in some areas the limits are already being tested. On
February and Amazon, the best-known online retailer, announced a 17% increase in sales to almost $3 billion in
its busy fourth quarter. But profits fell because of higher shipping costs.
      Amazon has been subsidizing shipping to help boost its sales. Last year it introduced "Amazon Prime",
which provides free shipping in return for a one-off payment. The tactic is "very expensive", Amazon's chief
executive, Jeff Bezos, told analysts. But, he added, the early signs are that it does at least encourage people to buy
more.
      Yet internet-only e-tailers such as Amazon are also facing stiffer competition from bricks-and mortar stores
improving their own online offers, including supermarket giants such as Wal-Mart. Some of these also offer
"pick-up in-store" options for people buying online but wanting to avoid shipping costs or having to stay at home
to take deliveries. Some of the parcels firms have been experimenting with delivering goods to petrol stations,
where people can collect packages on their way home. They are also trying to come up with more low-cost
services. Convenient, cheaper deliveries will encourage more people to shop online.
4. According to the author, what factors have been contributing to the boom of delivery business?
5. Why are postal firms—once threatened by the emergence of the internet—now finding salvation from it? Give
some examples.
6. What challenges are the online retailers now faced with?
      A good education may be priceless, but in America it is far from cheap—and it is not getting any cheaper. On
February 1 st Congress narrowly passed the Deficit Reduction Act, which aims to slim America's bulging budget
deficit by, among other things, lopping $12.7 billion off the federal student-loan programme. Interest rates on
student loans will rise while subsidies fall.
      Family incomes, grant aid and federal loans have all failed to keep pace with the growth in the cost of tuition.
"The funding gap between what students can afford and what higher education costs has got wider and wider,"
says Claire Mezzanotte of Fitch, a ratings agency. Lenders are rushing to bridge the gap with "private" student
loans-loans that are free of government subsidies and guarantees.
      Virtually non-existent ten years ago, private student loans in the 2004-2005 school year amounted to $13. g
billion—a compound annual growth rate of almost 30%—and they are expected to double in the next three years.
According to the College Board, an association of schools and colleges, private student loans now make up nearly
22% of the volume of federal student loans, up from a mere 5% in 1994-1995.
      The growth shows little sign of slowing. Education costs continue to climb while pressure on Congress to
pare down the budget deficit means federal aid will, at best, stay at current levels. Meanwhile, the number of
students attending colleges and trade schools is expected to soar as the children of post-war baby-boomers
continue matriculating.
      Private student loans are popular with lenders because they are profitable. Lenders charge market rates for
the loans (the rates on federal student loans are capped) before adding up-front fees, which can themselves the
around 6%-7% of the loan. Sallie Mae, a student-loan company and by far the biggest dispenser of private student
loans, disclosed in its most recent report that the average spread on its private student lending was 4.75% , more
than three times the 1.31% it made on its federally backed loans.
      All of this is good news when lenders are hungry for new areas of growth in the face of a cooling mortgage
market. Private student loans, says Matthew Matthew of Friedman, Billings, Ramsey, an investment bank, are
probably "the fastest-growing segment of consumer finance—and by far the most profitable one—at a time when
finding asset growth is challenging." Last December J.P. Morgan, which already had a sizeable education-finance
unit, snapped up Collegiate Funding services, a Virginia-based provider of federal and private student loans.
Companies from Bank of America m GMAC, the financing arm of General Motors, have jumped in. Other
consumer-finance companies, such as Capital one, are whispered to be eyeing the market.
      The road ahead will not be free of bumps. Jack Kopnisky, the chief executive of First Marblehead, a provider
of services for companies offering private student loans, likens the business to credit cards. They too saw an influx
of competition when margins were fat, only for them to be consolidated into a handful of dominant lenders during
the 1990s. "Private student loans, too," says Mr Kopnisky, "are a scale business. Smaller lenders will have a tough
time." That may be why Washington Mutual decided to get out of the student—loan business earlier this year.
      The market is, after all, relatively new and untested. Students are high-risk borrowers. They have short credit
histories and big piles of debt. The College Board estimates that at four-year public colleges, students graduate
with (on average) $15,500 of debt; those at private colleges leave school $19,400 in tile red. Who knows how they
will fare when interest rates rise, or if the economy slows?
      The question is all the more urgent because the growth in private student loans has come through a shift from
lending to the top tier of students, often graduate students at elite schools, to a wider and riskier group at
community colleges, trade schools and the like. Moving to the mass market is how the credit-card business
exploded in volume. Private lenders to students need to work out how to avoid imploding in harder times.
7. Why has the funding gap between what students can afford and what higher education costs got wider and
wider?
8. Why do the more and more student have to turn to private student loans?
9. Why are private lenders so interested in student loans?
10. Explain the statement "the road ahead will not be free of bumps". (Para.7)
                                  SECTION 6: TRANSLATION TEST (30 minutes)
Directions: Translate the following passage into English and write your version in the corresponding space in
your ANSWER BOOKLET.
      在数亿球迷的翘首企盼中,一场盛大的体育狂欢正在如火如荼地进行。32 支顶尖球队明星云集德国,
为争夺大力神杯而杀得昏天黑地。
  世界杯会如何影响世界经济?各国球迷们享用四年一度的足球大餐时,可能无暇考虑这等严肃的问题,
但冷静的经济学家们却已经研究出了新成果。像奥运会一样,世界杯作为一种商业赛事,对东道主而言,
意味着财源滚滚的“金鸡”      。有专家预测,今年世界杯,德国将至少获得 200 亿美元的直接经济效益。所
以,荷兰 Hypercube 咨询公司干脆提议,国际足联将目前四年一度的世界杯赛的频率加快一倍,变成两年
一度的赛事。




                                                高级口译预测试卷(四)
                                                        听力原文
                                          SECTION 1: LISTENING TEST
                                                Part A: Spot Dictation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear a passage and read the same passage with blanks in it. Fill in
each of the blanks with the word or words you have heard on the tape. Write your answer in the corresponding
space in your ANSWER BOOKLET. Remember you will hear the passage ONLY ONCE.
Now let us begin Part A with Spot Dictation.
      Malaria is a very serious disease that kills more children under the age of five than any other disease. People
get malaria when they are bitten by tiny insects called mosquitoes. The mosquitoes carry parasites which enter a
person's blood and cause malaria.
      Carter Dibbs is an American doctor who works on the Malaria Vaccine Development Program for the United
States Agency for International Development. Doctor Dibbs says the parasite that causes malaria is much more
complex than other organisms, such as the virus that causes polio. He says the malaria parasite uses many tricks so
that it is more difficult to make a vaccine that is safe and will prevent the disease.
      Malaria vaccines are now being tested on adults in Burkina Faso and Mali. Vaccines are being tested on
children in Mozambique and Mali. Many organizations are getting involved. They include U. S. A. I. D, the
American military, American health organizations, and European governments.
      To make sure that a vaccine will really prevent malaria, it must be tested on many people in many different
places. Doctor Dibbs says the people who join the vaccine tests are as important to the goal of finding the right
medicine as the scientists.
      People are told about the tests during public meetings with community leaders. Doctor Dibbs says people
should ask questions about good or had things that could happen to their bodies if they take the medicine that is
being tested. Adults or parents of children must agree to the vaccine test.
      Adults receive a small amount of the vaccine medicine. The children receive either the malaria vaccine or a
different medicine that protects them against a different disease.
      Then health care workers observe the people to see if they show any signs of malaria. The results of the tests
must be compared to people who have not received the vaccine.
      The vaccine is successful if fifty percent of the people who receive it do not show any signs of malaria for
one year.
      Then the United States government will be asked to approve the vaccine. However, it could still take another
five years before a licensed vaccine is ready to give to all the children in Africa and around the world.
                                          Part B: Listening Comprehension
Directions: In this part of the test there will be some short talks and conversations. After each one, you will be
asked some questions. The talks, conversations and questions will be spoken ONLY ONCE. Now listen carefully
and choose the right answer to each question you have heard and write the letter of the answer you have chosen
in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
Now Let us begin Part B with listening comprehension.
Questions 1 to 5 are based on the following conversation.
Woman: Tell us more about this "Mars Underground." Who are they, what have they been doing?
Man: Well, they're several dozen scientists and engineers, some of them work at NASA, um, a lot of them work at
universities, or space contractors, and these are people who just believe that it's humankind's destiny to go to
Mars—er, a little bit for economic reasons, a little bit for political reasons, but really, for, you know, the same
romantic reasons that sent us exploring in any other century—and they have been quietly—quietly, really, because
no one has been interested—paying attention to some of the results from the unmanned missions that we have
been sending to Mars for more than twenty years— and keeping an eye on which discoveries might be relevant to
getting humans to Mars, to letting them explore around there for a long time, and even, one day, setting up
colonies there.
Woman: So the $64 billion question is always what can humans do going to Mars that the machines we've already
sent can't?
Man: Well, and that question has been raised by the, em, claim of life on Mars. And the answer is if there is life on
Mars, it's not, you know, standing on the tarmac waiting to say: here we are! Em, it's underground. And a robot is
not good at digging underground, nor at looking at, er, what are the most promising sites. Em, so that's the current
motivation for sending astronauts to Mars. You know, not next week, but sometime, um, in the next decade.
Woman: Last question for you—Where will scientists focus their search for life, past or present?
Man: There are a lot of interesting places. Most of them have to do with water and energy; again, if there was life,
it needed liquid water, and it needed a source of energy. There are dry lake beds, there are dry river channels, there
are places where there may be thermal system, kind of like Yellowstone National Park, springs and fumeroles, and
if there is or was life there, that's where you would look certainly for the fossils, and maybe even for some
survivors.
Woman: Thanks a lot.
Question No. 1: According to the interview, what is the Mars Underground?
Question No. 2: According to the interview, what are members of the Mars Underground doing?
Question No. 3: According to the interview, why should we send humans instead of robots to Mars?
Question No. 4: According to the interview, which of the following statements is true?
Question No. 5: Scientists will focus their search for life on a lot of interesting places. According to the interview,
which of the following is definitely not one of them?
Questions 6 to 10 are based on the following news.
New York City: The United States National Weather Service says that the huge winter storm has dumped some
68.3 centimeters of snow in Central Park, making it the worst blizzard to hit New York City since records began in
1869. To add to the problems facing the entire north-eastern seaboard, winds across the region have been gusting
at up to 96 kilometers an hour, causing serious localized drifting. The road network in many places then is
impassable. Most of the airports in the region have been closed, with hundreds of flights cancelled.
Nuremberg: The soccer competition between the world's two biggest sports apparel, Nike and Adidas, is getting
increasingly intense. Nike, a relative newcomer to soccer, is gunning for the Germany company, whose name is
practically synonymous with the game. For Nike, soccer has become the Holy Grail. Nike is bigger than Adidas,
but as Nike sees it, to truly be the number one sport brand in the world, you have to be the number one in the
world's most popular sport. On the other hand, the spokesman of Adidas says that Adidas is number one in soccer,
always has been, always will be.
Manila: Rescuers in central Philippines are working through the night, scrambling to find survivors of today's
deadly mudslides. At least 15 bodies have been found, but more than a thousand villagers are still missing. Leyte
Governor said trees were sliding down upright with the mud. The landslide followed two weeks of non-step rain.
One survivor told Manila Radio Station that it sounded like the mountain exploded. Southern Leyte has been
devastated by natural disasters before. In 1991, more than 5,000 people were killed by floods and landslides
triggered by a tropical storm.
New York City: U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has asked Western nations to spend l0 to 12 billion US
dollars to fight AIDS. The request came at a special session of the UN General Assembly on AIDS. The first U.N.
session on AIDS four years ago led to the creation of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.
Since then, the fund has helped improve the health of millions of people in developing countries. But the Global
Fund now faces questions of whether it can ever thrive under constant pressure to prove to donors that it's
working.
Washington: A company owned by the government of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates that's set to take over
some operations at six US ports has agreed to undergo an intensive security review. The move is aimed at defusing
a fire storm on Capitol Hill. Critics from both Parties have been discussing legislation to block the deal allowing
Dubai Ports World to buy a British company that operates terminals at ports including New York and Miami. But
DPW has issued a statement asking for a full 45-day investigation from the Committee on Foreign Investment in
the United States, even though the deal had already been approved by the Federal Government. Now some
lawmakers say they are ready to hold off on voting to stymie the plan.
Question No. 6: What has caused great damage in New York City?
Question No. 7: Which of the following is not true about sports apparel companies?
Question No. 8: How many bodies have been found in the deadly mudslide in Philippine?
Question No. 9: What has the U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan asked Western nations to do?
Question No. 10: Why does DPW agree to undergo an intensive security review from the Committee on Foreign
Investment?
Questions 11 to 15 are based on the following interview.
Woman: Every day, surprising new research is being carried out all over the world. Findings that are changing our
traditional view of old age. New studies are proving that more and more people are living way beyond their
expectations. So then, we decided to get a real first hand look into this incredible groups of senior citizens... the
oldest old... centenarians. We asked Mr. Victor Parnell, the director of Cherry Blossoms Village, to discuss these
current trends and research findings.
Man: Well... yes... you know... I just read some fascinating new research done by some scientists who studied 96
non-institutionalized, independent centenarians. They wanted to discover what the real secrets were to becoming
an active and healthy 100-year-old. They were quite surprised by what they found. Most people believe diet,
exercise, and genetics are the common threads among most centenarians. However, these were not among the
traits that all of these individuals had in common.
Woman: OK then What were the common themes? What did the scientists find out?
Man: Well, they uncovered 4 themes that all 96 of their centenarians had in common. These were optimism,
engagement or commitment to something they were interested in, activity or mobility, and the strength to adapt to
loss. All four of these themes were pervasive among the "oldest old" they studied.
Woman: Mr. Parnell, I understand also that you have centenarians living in your village who have very
unconventional hobbies such as competitive swimming, auto racing, and horseback riding. Is this the norm?
Man: Well, no, not exactly not all of them take it quite this far, but all of our residents do some sort of regular
physical activity.
Woman: And what about diet?
Man: Yes, I'm glad you raised that question. I have to agree with the results of the scientists who did the research.
They found that the centenarians they studied had the highest caloric intake and ate the largest amount of fat.
Woman: Well... another thing I was thinking about—is... Mr. Parnell, when speaking with the centenarians in the
village, what do they tell you about diet and nutrition? I mean, do they offer advice about good eating habits and
nutrition that may help someone live longer?
Man: Oh, all of them basically do something different. Some of them eat a low-fat and low- calorie, unprocessed
food diet. But others suggest that everyone eat spicy food, drink whisky, and have a large portion of sweet pork
each day.
Woman: Earlier you mentioned that researchers found that the ability to cope with loss is another characteristic
that healthy centenarians share.
Man: Yes, exactly! I'll say this... if you live to be 100 you are bound to lose a lot. It's natural. Most of our
centenarians have lost a spouse, children, and siblings. Many have lost their peer group as well. But in spite of this,
they are able to incorporate that losses in a positive way so they can go on with their lives.
Woman: One final question about the centenarians... So, if I want to live to be 100... what would they suggest I
do?
Man: Mmm, it's really hard to say... but I suggest most of them would suggest that you work hard, stay busy, and
always find something to laugh about.
Question No. 11: What is the main idea of the interview?
Question No. 12: According to the interview, why is more research on the "oldest old" needed?
Question No. 13: According to the interview, which of the following is not among the 4 themes in becoming a
100-year-old?
Question No. 14: According to the interview, which of the following statements is true?
Question No. 15: According to the interview, which of the following is the suggestion the centenarians offer about
living to be 100?
Questions 16 to 20 are based on the following talk.
      Every culture has many sayings that give advice about life. These sayings are part of what is commonly
called folk wisdom. Of course, folk wisdom is also expressed in other ways, such as myths, fairy tales, legends,
and songs. Often however, folk wisdom is shared in the form of short sayings about the best ways to approach
life's joys and sorrows.
      One characteristic of American folk wisdom is its humor. Humor makes the bitter medicine of life easier to
swallow. It sometimes makes the harsh realities of life more attractive. For example, Ben Franklin's clever saying,
"A full belly makes a dull brain" means "People who are well-fed or self-satisfied can become lazy and stupid."
But this paraphrasing loses the elegance and humor of Franklin's original saying. Some moralists in the United
States are successful because they are able to say wise things humorously.
      Abraham Lincoln expressed similar opinions about life but in a different way. Lincoln continued the
tradition of "horse sense" humor. This type of humor appeals to people who are hungry for practical common
sense. Lincoln, both a politician and an idealist, understood the need for horse sense. He knew how to use
common sense to influence people's opinion. He could take the highest moral principles or the most critical
observations and use them in folksy—or simple commonsense—humor to make them better understood and more
easily accepted. Take, for example, this quote, which is one of best known in the United States: "You can fool all
the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the
time." Another of Lincoln's wise, folksy statements is: "The Lord prefers common-looking people. That's why he
makes so many of them."
      There is no doubt that people need a little push sometimes to help them see the folly of their ways. Mark
Twain used humor to reveal that many popular ideas were false, foolish, or even harmful. Twain thought that most
human beings didn't examine why they believe certain things, and that they were too easily influenced by the
opinions of people in power. He felt that it was easier for people to be "misled" than to be led correctly, so he tried
to show the foolishness of those in power. For example, he said, "Hain't we got all the fools in town on our side
and ain't that a big enough majority in any town?"
      Now you may get the impression that Twain was a misanthrope, a person who saw everyone' s mistakes and
never noticed their good qualities. It's true that his humor was sometimes harsh, but it was used to reveal truths
about human relationships. Twain thought the result would be a better, more just society. However, he also
realized that he irritated a lot of people. He was aware that when newspapers reported his death, many people
might be happy to hear the news. The telegram he sent from Europe to the Associated Press is typical of his humor.
It read, "The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated."
Question No. 16: According to the talk, what is major characteristic of "folk wisdom"?
Question No. 17: According to the talk, what is the major difference between Franklin and Lincoln when
composing short sayings of folk wisdom?
Question No. 18: According to the talk, which of the following statements is true about "horse sense" humor?
Question No. 19: According to the talk, what was Mark Twain's purpose for using humor?
Question No. 20: According to the talk, why did Mark Twain send the telegram which said, "The reports of my
death are greatly exaggerated. "?
This is the end of SECTION 1, listening test.
                                          SECTION 4: LISTENING TEST
                                        Part A: Note-taking And Gap-filling
Directions: In this part of the test you will hear a short talk. You will hear the talk ONLY ONCE. While listening
to the talk, you may take notes on the important points so that you can have enough information to complete a
gap-filling task on a separate ANSWER BOOKLET. You will not get your ANSWER BOOKLET until after you
have listened to the talk.
Now listen to the talk carefully.
      Alcoholism and drug addiction have already reached epidemic proportions in the 21st Century. One of the
biggest misconceptions about addiction is that it only affects certain groups within society: poor people from poor
neighborhoods and ethnic minorities are more likely to be addicted to alcohol and drugs. The truth is, however,
that addiction is blind to race, color and socio economic background. Another fact is that drug and alcohol related
crimes are increasing all over the world.
      There are many reasons why a person might first try drugs. Some of these might include peer pressure from
friends, stress and personality characteristics. People take drugs and alcohol because of the elevating or relaxing
effects they have on the body otherwise people wouldn't take them in the first place.
      But as the person develops a habit the chemistry of the brain starts to change and adapt, demanding more and
more of the drug as it resists the discomfort of withdrawal. The person becomes an addict and the initial reasons
for taking the drug soon pale into insignificance as the need for drugs or alcohol begins to dominate every aspect
of the addict's life. Addictions are lifelong illnesses that are very hard to treat. The disturbing fact is that 1/3 of
patients who do receive treatment usually relapse within one year.
      Many scientists believe that addiction is related to our most basic instinct, survival. Since the beginning of
time our brain has evolved to ensure the survival of our species. The brain controls behavior by rewarding actions
that will ensure survival of the species. For example, the intake of nutrients such as sugars and fats activate taste
receptors that in turn activate brain reward mechanisms. The activation of these mechanisms produces certain
change in the individual ranging from being in a much better mood to intense pleasure and euphoria. We are far
more likely to continue to seek out and eat these nutrients because the brain rewards us for taking the nutrients
into the body by releasing chemicals that make us feel good.
      The problem lies in the fact that these reward systems do not only reward the intake of harmless substances
such as sugars and fats. Some chemicals activate brain reward systems directly, bypassing the sensory receptors
mediating natural rewards. Caffeine, alcohol and nicotine all activate brain reward mechanisms directly.
      But other far more harmful drugs such as heroine, crack and cocaine are better at activating brain reward
systems, producing a far more powerful effect compared to a feeling of calmness or relaxation after eating a good
nutritious meal. The activation is much more intense causing the individual to crave the drug and to focus their
activities around taking the drug. The ability of addictive drugs to strongly activate brain reward mechanisms and
their ability to chemically alter the normal functioning of these systems can produce an addiction. However, some
people become addicted while others do not.
      Many people drink alcohol or smoke cannabis or even cocaine and other illegal drugs but this does not
necessarily make them addicts and not all addicts have the same intensity of addiction.
      It has been estimated that approximately 10% of any population of any country will tend to have an addictive
nature and become addicts of some kind. It is true though that some races, notably Native American Indians and
Eskimos, do tend to have higher rates of addiction than others for reasons that are not fully understood. It is also
true people who become addicts may be highly intelligent and be extremely motivated but are unable to control
their addiction. Addiction is by no means dependent on intelligence. Some of the most skilled and intelligent
people might become addicts even though they are fully aware of the detrimental natural of continuing to take
drugs or alcohol.
      The fact is that still we do not know why some people become addicts but others do not, although there are
many theories that reason that some people simply have an "addictive personality type", being far more
susceptible to the reward mechanism that produces addiction while others still believe that it is the addict's lack of
will power to refrain from taking drugs or alcohol. The biggest killer though is a person's denial of his or her
condition that they believe that they do not have a problem, do not seek help but instead continue the abuse until
they have either lost everything or die as the body cannot cope and eventually shuts down.
                                         Part B: Listening and Translation
Ⅰ. Sentence Translation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 5 English sentences. You will hear the sentences ONLY ONCE.
After you have heard each sentence, translate it into Chinese and write your version in the corresponding space in
your ANSWER BOOKLET.
Now let us begin Part B with sentence translation:
Sentence No. 1: Today, people believe in a more balanced diet. In many countries where food shortage is no
longer a problem for immediate attention, people start to eat less and attach importance to the nutrition and
wholesomeness of the food.
Sentence No. 2: What annoyed me most about parents is their inability to say "No". As a result children are
allowed to decide for themselves what they want to do and when to do it. What they need is their parents' time,
which seems to be in increasingly short supply.
Sentence No. 3: With one quarter of the world's population, a stable and increasingly enterprising government,
China's economic strength will profoundly affect the future of the world.
Sentence No. 4: The fact is that no matter how nicely we dress, or how beautifully we decorate our homes, we
can't be truly elegant without good manners because elegance and good manners always go hand in hand.
Sentence No. 5: The earthquake that shook Los Angeles in 1994 claimed the death of more than 60 people.
According to scientists, the damage and death toll could have been much worse if it wouldn't occur in the early
morning of a holiday.
Ⅱ. Passage Translation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 2 English passages. You will hear the passages only once. After
you have heard each passage, translate it into Chinese and write your version in the corresponding space in your
ANSWER BOOKLET. You may take notes while you are listening.
Now let us begin passage translation with the first passage.
Passage One:
      Most advertisements are made for a target audience, for instance, teenage girls 14 to 18 or young men from
20 to 28. The target audiences are usually thoroughly researched. Special researches design questionnaires and
conduct interviews with members of the target audiences, getting their responses to samples of the product. As
well, researchers try to understand secret fears and wishes of consumers. Part of their work is to gain up-to-date
information or what types of packaging and promotion techniques will produce the maximum response.
Passage Two:
      The World Cup is a grand event every four years of football fans around the world. In most World Cups the
home team, or the team from the host country, usually plays better than most people expect. In 1966,1974 and
1978, the home teams of England, West Germany and Argentina all won the World Cup. However, since the Cup
began, all of the winning teams have been from Europe or South America. Teams from Asia or Africa Mways do
well, but they haven't yet won.
This is the end of SECTION 4, listening test.
                                                      参考答案
                                         SECTION 1: LISTENING TEST
                                               Part A: Spot Dictation
1. tiny insects                                                 2. carry parasites
3. Malaria Vaccine Development Program                          4. more complex than other organisms
5. uses many tricks                                              6. prevent the disease
7. being tested on adults                                    8. getting involved
9. and European governments                                       10. really prevent malaria
11. the goal of finding the right medicine               12. with community leaders
13. ask questions about good or bad things                 14. a small amount of
15. protects them against                                      16. observe the people
17. received the vaccine                                       18. 50% of the people
19. approve the vaccine                                        20. a licensed vaccine is ready
                                         Part B: Listening Comprehension
1. C 2. A 3. B 4. C 5. D 6. A 7. C 8. A 9. B 10. D
11. B 12. A 13. C 14. C 15. D 16. B 17. D 18. D 19. A 20. D
                                          SECTION 2: READING TEST
1. A       2. B       3. A       4. D      5. D       6. C        7. B       8. B       9. C   10. D
11. A       12. D      13. A      14. C     15. B      16. A       17. B      18. A      19. B   20. A
                                       SECTION 3: TRANSLATION TEST
      戴尔表示问题在于降价过度,但从更深的层面来看,有其他的因素正威胁着它。
      首先是竞争对手的重新崛起,他们的产品已与戴尔的廉价型号旗鼓相当。戴尔的降价无意中也帮助了
对手降低成本。           “供应链的每一个环节的标准都是统一的——固然资金被节省了出来。                                               ”专家解释道,      “戴
尔不走零售渠道,这使得它的效率高出不少,但这所带来的成本降低并未起到实质性的作用。                                                              ”
      重创戴尔的第二个因素在于,电脑业增长的来源是个体消费市场和新兴国家,但戴尔 85%的电脑都销
至公司团体。增加个体消费者的购买量对戴尔来说十分困难,因为个人消费者在购买前都希望看到并试用
电脑样品。他们也希望当电脑出现故障时可以较方便地退还电脑。戴尔一度自吹自己的产品不上零售柜台
带来的莫大的好处,而如今看来却成为重大缺陷。
      戴尔所面临的第三个问题是戴尔专用因特尔芯片,而因特尔的死敌——AMD 生产的芯片廉价得多。
虽然戴尔可以因此以并不昂贵的价格购买芯片并享有因特尔大方的市场捆绑营销计划,但是戴尔却丧失了
盈利更大的服务器市场。
                                         SECTION 4: LISTENING TEST
                                        Part A: Note-taking and Gap-Filling
1. drug                                        2. misconceptions
3. poor                                        4. blind
5. race                                          6. elevating/pleasing/comforting
7. chemistry/mechanism                       8. demanding/needing/requiring
9. withdrawal/quitting                     10. encouraging/rewarding
11. nicotine                                 12. activate/trigger
13. bypassing/evading                       14. harmful/deadly/fatal/lethal/addictive
15. powerful/strong                         16. intense/strong
17. illnesses/stains/sickness          18. intelligent/smart/well-educated
19. aware                                      20. denial.
                                      Part B: Listening and Translation
Sentence Translation
1.如今,人们崇尚更为平衡的饮食。在一些国家,粮食短缺已经不再是一个必须立即引起重视的问题。
人们吃得变少,更多地开始关注食物的营养和健康。
2.使我最为苦恼的是父母永远不会说“不”                             ,这使得孩子们可以自己决定做什么,什么时候做。而他们需
要的来自父母的陪伴,这一点却越来越无法得到满足。
3.中国人口是世界的 1/4,政府稳定而富有进取精神,它的经济实力将会对世界的未来有深远的影响。
4.不管我们穿得多好,家里布置得多漂亮,我们都不能成为真正优雅的人,因为优雅总是与礼貌直接相
关。
5.1994 年洛杉矶的地震造成了 60 人死亡。科学家表示,如果地震不是发生在假期中的清晨,死亡人数和
损失可能会更大。
Passage Translation:
1.大多数广告是针对目标观众的,例如,14~18 岁的少女或者 20-28 岁的年轻男子。这些目标观众通常
被彻底地研究过。特殊的研究调查会设计一些问卷以及针对目标观众群中的一些人进行访谈,获得他们对
于产品样品的反馈。同样地,研究者们努力想了解消费者隐秘的喜好和厌恶。同时他们还需随时获取最新
的信息,或者什么样的产品包装和促销技巧能够激起顾客们最热烈的反应。
2.世界杯对全世界的球迷来说是每四年一次的盛会。过去的大多数世界杯比赛中,主队也即来自东道国
的球队,表现常常高于人们的期望值。在 1966 年、1974 年和 1978 年,英格兰队、德国队、阿根廷队作为
主队都分别在当年的世界杯上捧走了第一名的奖杯。尽管如此,自从世界杯诞生开赛以来,所有拔得头筹
的球队都来自欧洲和南美洲。                    来自亚洲和非洲的球队虽然表现也很好,                          但是他们从来没有赢得过                “世界杯”     。
                                         SECTION 5: READING TEST
1. John W. Rogers Jr. is the CEO of Ariel Capital Management LLC. From his example, the author wants to tell us
that: Today, everybody seems to be able to get a lot of information from the Internet. But some well educated,
better-off professionals or managers, like Rogers, are reluctant to use Internet. They would rather read email
print-outs or paper copies of Wall Street analysts reports. They believe that relying on Internet is a "huge
distraction".
2. By "non-Netizens", the author refers to those people who do not use Internet. The "non Netizens" are composed
of following people: 1. poor people who can't afford Internet service or those people who iive in remote areas
without affordable connections. 2. those people who are too old to adopt new technology. 3. millions of well-off,
educated and young professionals who are avoiding the Internet. 3. People say "no" to the Internet for various
reasons. 1. Some people worry that the Net isn't safe since it is full of online seams and digital viruses. 2. Some
people believe that the Internet breaks down social interaction. 3. The Internet still remains too complicated and
costly for the majority of American society. 4. Some people don't trust Internet because it may disclose their
privacy. 5. Some people believe that the Internet is an example of "the surrender of culture to technology".
4. The boom of delivery business can be attributed to the following reasons: 1. the success of e commerce:
Consumers and companies continue to flock in droves to the internet to buy and sell things. Online retailers have
set new records in America. And most of the stuff traded online was posted or delivered by parcel companies. 2.
the outsourced production. Companies are outsourcing production. It is becoming increasingly common for
products to be delivered direct from factory to consumer.
5. People are paying more bills online and sending more e-mails instead of letters, so postal firms were once seen
as obsolete. But now, the success of e-commerce requires large amount of delivery services. So post offices are
"rescued". After four years of profits, the US Postal Service has cleared, its $11 billion of debt. E-retailers like
Amazon and eBay have helped Britain's Royal Mail profitable. Germany's Deutsche Post now owns DHL, a big
international delivery company.
6. The challenges that the online retailers are now faced with are: due to higher shipping costs, the increase in
sales does not lead to the increase in profits. In order to boost their sales, online traders have to subsidize shipping,
which further reduces their profit-earning power. Traditional bricks-and-mortar stores like Wal-Mart are also
improving their own online offers. They even offer "pick-up in-store" options for people buying online but
wanting to avoid shipping costs or having to stay at home to take deliveries.
7. The cost of higher education tuition is growing, and its growth rate is faster than family incomes, grand aid and
federal student loans.
8. The US Congress is under the pressure of high budget deficit. It has passed the Deficit Reduction Act, which
will cut the bulging budget deficit by taking $12.7 billion off the federal student loan program. At the Same time,
interest rates on student loans will rise while subsidies fall.
9. Because private student loans are profitable. Lenders charge market rates for the loans before adding 6%-7%
up-front fees. Also, the mortgage market is cooling, while private student loans are currently the fastest-growing
segment of consumer finance, and by far the most profitable one.
10. The future trend for the private student loans business is just like what the credit card business has experienced.
It is a scale business, smaller lenders will have a tough time. Even though the student loan market is booming, but
it is also new and untested. Students are high-risk borrowers. And the question is getting more urgent because the
growth in private student loans has come through a shift from students at elite schools to a wider and riskier group
at community colleges.
                                        SECTION 6: TRANSLATION TEST
      Billions of football fans are so excited about the World Cup, a carnival for sports, where star players from 32
top teams gather in Germany to compete hard for Trophy.
      How would the World Cup affect the world economy? While fans, deep in their excitement of the games on
pitch, leave no time for the above questions, the dispassionate economists have got their idea. The World Cup, a
commercial event just like the Olympic Games, brings the host country a great fortune. Experts estimate that this
World Cup will bring Germany an immediate return of 20 billion USD. It is then easy to understand why
Hypercube, a Holland-based consulting firm, proposed that FIFA hold the World Cup every two instead of four
years.

				
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