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					                                             PREFACE


November 2005 sees the implementation of the Civil Contingencies Act 2004. This places
statutory duties on a range of Category 1 and 2 Responders. The City Council is a Category 1
Responder.
We are expected to prepare to deliver an appropriate emergency response and maintain normal
services during any crisis. This is an essential part of community leadership.
It is essential that Responders work together to address the wider resilience agenda. Developing
closer links with all those delivering key services to the people of Newcastle will be a priority.
Our previous commitment to emergency planning sees us well placed to meet this challenge. But
the bar is being raised and it will take further effort to reach.
The greatest task is to embed ‘resilience’ within mainstream service delivery. It can no longer be
assumed that “it will never happen here”, or if it does “we will cope on the day”. There is a statutory
duty to provide clear evidence that we are prepared.
The Act focuses on events or situations which threaten serious damage to human welfare and/or
the environment. In reflecting the current political climate, emphasis is also placed on the impact of
war, or terrorism, which threatens serious damage to security.
Government has acknowledged the growing burden by increasing the funding available to address
the Act. This supports our Resilience Planning Team, which will be fully operational by February
2006.
Our Team co-ordinates corporate response to the resilience agenda. It also assists Directorates in
meeting their obligations. Additionally, we will continue to call upon the services of Tyne and Wear
Emergency Planning Unit.
New funding brings new obligations. Government has strengthened compliance monitoring
procedures. As of October 2005, there will be specific reference to the resilience agenda within
Comprehensive Performance Assessment.
As the Council’s ‘Head of Resilience’, it falls upon me to ensure that we are capable of delivering
an effective response to any crisis that may impact on the well-being of Newcastle. However, we
will all need to contribute to preparedness and response when it is required.


Stephen P Savage,
Head of Public Health and Environmental Protection
Regeneration Directorate,
Newcastle City Council.




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                                           CONTENTS

                 PREFACE                                                      1

                 CONTENTS                                                     2

SECTION 1:       RESILIENCE AGENDA                                            4
                 1.1      Civil Contingencies Act 2004                        4
                 1.2      Risk Management Strategy                            4
                 1.3      Our Vision Statement                                4
                 1.4      Our Mission Statement                               4
                 1.5      Developing Our Brand                                4
                 1.6      Product Range                                       5
                 1.7      Core Services                                       5
                 1.8      Engaging the City Council                           5
                 1.9      Head of Resilience Planning                         6
                 1.10     Resilience Planning Team (RPT)                      6
                 1.11     Tyne and Wear Emergency Planning Unit (EPU)         6
                 1.12     Resilience Planning Group (RPG)                     6
                 1.13     Schedule of Key Milestones                          7

SECTION 2:       PERFORMANCE MONITORING                                       7
                 2.1      Risk Management Steering Group (RMSG)               7
                 2.2      Out-sourced Services                                8
                 2.3      Core Cities Emergency Planning Group                8
                 2.4      Comprehensive Performance Assessment (CPA)          8

SECTION 3:       SERVICE CONTINUITY PLANNING                                  9
                 3.1      Definition                                          9
                 3.2      Strategic Implications for ‘Resilient Newcastle’   10
                 3.3      Standard to be Attained                            10
                 3.4      Addressing Existing Vulnerabilities                10
                 3.5      Priorities for Service Continuity Planning         10
                 3.6      Schedule of Product Delivery                       11

SECTION 4:       EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING                                 11
                 4.1      Definition                                         11
                 4.2      Strategic Implications for ‘Resilient Newcastle’   11
                 4.3      Standard to be Attained                            12
                 4.4      Addressing Existing Vulnerabilities                12
                 4.5      Priorities for Emergency Response Planning         12
                 4.6      Schedule of Product Delivery                       12

SECTION 5:       PROMOTION OF BUSINESS CONTINUITY MANAGEMENT                 13
                 5.1      Definition                                         13
                 5.2      Strategic Implications for ‘Resilient Newcastle’   13
                 5.3      Standard to be Attained                            13
                 5.4      Addressing Existing Vulnerabilities                14
                 5.5      Newcastle Business Continuity Forum                14




RESILIENT NEWCASTLE –STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (OCTOBER 2005)             2
SECTION 6:       ENGAGING PARTNER AGENCIES                                14
                 6.1      Role of Partner Agencies                        14
                 6.2      Category 1 Responders                           14
                 6.3      Category 2 Responders                           14
                 6.4      Northumbria Local Resilience Forum (LRF)        15
                 6.5      Role of Tyne and Wear Emergency Planning Unit   15
                 6.6      Newcastle Resilience Forum                      15

SECTION 7:       ENGAGING THE PUBLIC                                      16
                 7.1      Public Awareness                                16
                 7.2      Role of Elected Members                         16

SECTION 8:       RESILIENT NEWCASTLE WEBSITE                              16
                 8.1      Use of Information Technology                   16
                 8.2      Use of Intranet                                 17
                 8.3      Business Continuity Management                  17
                 8.4      Partner Agencies                                17
                 8.5      Public Awareness                                17

APPENDIX A: ‘RESILIENT NEWCASTLE’ POLICY STATEMENT                        18
                 A1       Introduction and Summary                        18
                 A2       Statement of Intent                             18
                 A3       Resilience Planning Objectives                  18

APPENDIX B: SCHEDULE OF IMPLEMENTATION                                    19




RESILIENT NEWCASTLE –STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (OCTOBER 2005)          3
                             SECTION 1: RESILIENCE AGENDA


1.1     Civil Contingencies Act 2004
1.1.1   The Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (The Act) has placed statutory duties upon the City
        Council (as a Local Authority Category 1 Responder) as follows:
           Assess local risks and use this to inform emergency planning;
           Put in place emergency plans;
           Put in place Business Continuity Management arrangements (the City Council refers
            to this as Service Continuity Planning);
           Put in place arrangements to make information available to the public about civil
            protection matters and maintain arrangements to warn, inform and advise the public
            in the event of an emergency;
           Share information with other local responders to enhance co-ordination;
           Co-operate with other local responders to enhance co-ordination and efficiency; and
           Provide advice and assistance to businesses and voluntary organisations about
            Business Continuity Management.
1.1.2   In the context of the Act, an emergency is defined as:
           An event or situation which threatens serious damage to human welfare;
           An event or situation which threatens serious damage to the environment; or
           War, or terrorism, which threatens serious damage to security.


1.2     Risk Management Strategy
1.2.1   We had recognised the need to enhance our resilience, particularly with regard to Service
        Continuity Planning. Linkage between resilience and risk management is essential.
1.2.2   Further recognition of this need arose during Exercise MAGPIE. The focus on a
        catastrophic incident scenario brought home key lessons to all who took part.


1.3     Our Vision Statement
1.3.1   Newcastle City Council’s Vision Statement is:
                           “CREATING A RESILIENT NEWCASTLE”


1.4     Our Mission Statement
1.4.1   To pursue this vision, we will adopt the following Mission Statement:
               “PREPARING NEWCASTLE TO MANAGE IN TIMES OF CRISIS”


1.5     Developing Our Brand
1.5.1   We will develop products and strategies, both internally and with external partners, which
        promote the brand:
                                   “RESILIENT NEWCASTLE”
1.5.2   This should establish us as community leaders in respect of resilience and highlight the
        relevance of work being undertaken.



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1.6     Product Range
1.6.1   Addressing the resilience agenda will involve development of a range of products:
             Emergency Plans and Procedures;
             Training and Awareness Events (including Briefings, Seminars and Exercises);
             Plan Validation and Audit Procedures (Exercises and Rehearsals);
             Liaison and Co-operation Meetings (including Forum and Working Groups); or
             Communications (Hard Copy and/or Electronic and Publicity Campaigns).


1.7     Core Services
1.7.1   ‘Resilient Newcastle’ will require delivery of three core services:
           Service Continuity Planning: Enhancing our ability to continue to deliver normal
            services in the face of disruptive challenges. This includes day-to-day emergencies
            and major or catastrophic incidents.
           Emergency Response Planning: Enhancing our ability to provide extraordinary
            support to communities affected during times of crisis. This is normally associated
            with major or catastrophic incidents.
           Promotion of Business Continuity Management: Encouraging businesses and
            voluntary agencies to prepare to continue operation during and/or recover effectively
            from the impact of disruptive challenges. This is normally associated with major or
            catastrophic incidents.
1.7.2   Delivering these services will require extensive engagement with partner agencies and/or
        the public in respect of:
           Development of a Local Risk Register;
           Sharing information to enhance co-ordination of preparedness and response;
           Co-operating to enhance co-ordination and efficiency of preparedness and response;
            and
           Development of mechanisms to warn, inform and advise the public.


1.8     Engaging the City Council
1.8.1   A successful response to emergency will rely on effort and commitment of many people
        from a range of disciplines. Some people will take on duties related to the emergency
        itself. Others will maintain delivery of normal services to those not directly affected.
1.8.2   The Act places emphasis on the whole organisation and there is a need to embed
        resilience throughout all levels. Linkage with risk management and mainstream service
        planning are regarded as essential aspects.
1.8.3   The quality of emergency response will be influenced by the standard and extent of
        preparedness. Resilience planning has to be seen as good management. Emergencies
        will see normal services being delivered in exceptional circumstances. It is recognised
        that this will create new burdens and may incur costs.
1.8.4   Those charged with specific responsibility for the resilience agenda will act as ‘Corporate
        Champion’. They can offer guidance and support to Directorates and Service Units but
        ultimate responsibility will be shared throughout the organisation.




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1.9      Head of Resilience Planning
1.9.1    Although there is no officer specifically designated as ‘Head of Resilience Planning’, this
         role is undertaken by the Head of Public Health and Environmental Protection.
1.9.2    Apart from leading this area of work, the main responsibilities include:
             Role of City Incident Controller (CIC) when City Major Incident Plan is activated;
             Chair of the Resilience Planning Group (RPG);
             City Council representative on the Northumbria Local Resilience Forum (LRF); and
             Role of District Liaison Officer (DLO) in dealings with Tyne and Wear Emergency
              Planning Unit (EPU).


1.10     Resilience Planning Team (RPT)
1.10.1   The Resilience Planning Team consists of the Resilience Planning Manager and two
         Resilience Planning Officers and will be fully operational be February 2006.
1.10.2   Its role is to oversee operational delivery of the resilience agenda and ensure compliance
         with legislation. Its strategic aim is to embed resilience in the culture of the City Council.
1.10.3   The Resilience Planning Manager is a member of the Risk Management Steering Group
         (RMSG). Linkage will be vital in embedding resilience within mainstream service
         management.
1.10.4   There is need for a close working relationship with the EPU, which will be overseen on an
         operational basis by the Resilience Planning Manager.


1.11     Tyne and Wear Emergency Planning Unit (EPU)
1.11.1   Traditionally, we have provided funding for a centralised Emergency Planning Unit (EPU)
         under the auspices of Tyne and Wear Fire and Civil Defence Authority (TWFCDA).
1.11.2   The Act restricted the role of TWFCDA to that of a Fire Authority. It has been re-named
         as Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Authority (TWFRA). However, it is considered
         appropriate to maintain a centralised EPU.
1.11.3   The precise role of the EPU is under negotiation. However, it will provide a range of
         common services to Tyne and Wear Authorities. This should yield ‘economies of scale’
         and maintain a cadre of experienced and specialist Emergency Planning Officers.
1.11.4   Additionally, the EPU will represent Tyne and Wear Authorities on a number of wide
         area/regional forums and take the lead in liaising with other local responders.


1.12     Resilience Planning Group (RPG)
1.12.1   The Resilience Planning Group (RPG) consists of lead officers from Directorates and
         those with responsibility for strategic functions. The RPG oversees preparedness and its
         members would be expected to take a lead in response to incidents.
1.12.2   Functions include consideration and determination of the corporate/strategic attitude to
         resilience planning. It provides a focus for co-ordination in the implementation of
         appropriate preparedness measures.
1.12.3   Where necessary, the RPG will report to Business Management Group (BMG), Corporate
         Management Team (CMT) or the Executive.




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1.12.4   Although co-ordinated by the RPG, Directorates are responsible for ensuring that the
         services they provide are both resilient and capable of sufficient flexibility to deliver
         extraordinary support during any crisis situation.


1.13     Schedule of Key Milestones
1.13.1   The resilience agenda responds to legislation and locally determined priorities.
         Mechanisms for overseeing delivery are in place and key milestones include:
         October 2005  Resilience Planning Group Meeting
                       Risk Management Steering Group Meeting: Risk Update
         November 2005 Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (Majority of Part 1 Duties) commences on
                       14 November
         January 2006  Resilience Planning Group Meeting
                       Risk Management Steering Group Meeting: Risk Update
                       Cabinet Office Capability Survey (Linked to SR2006)
         February 2006 Resilience Planning Team fully operational
         April 2006    Resilience Planning Group Meeting
                       Risk Management Steering Group Meeting: Risk Update
                       Resilient Newcastle – Strategic Implementation Plan: Update
         May 2006      Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (Business Continuity Management
                       Promotion Duty) commences on 15 May
         July 2006     Resilience Planning Group Meeting
                       Risk Management Steering Group Meeting: Risk Update
         October 2006  Resilience Planning Group Meeting
                       Risk Management Steering Group Meeting: Risk Update
                       Resilient Newcastle – Strategic Implementation Plan: Update
         January 2007  Resilience Planning Group Meeting
                       Risk Management Steering Group Meeting: Risk Update




                        SECTION 2: PERFORMANCE MONITORING


2.1      Risk Management Steering Group (RMSG)
2.1.1    The greatest challenge for ‘Resilient Newcastle’ is to embed resilience within the culture
         of the City Council. The Civil Contingencies Act is intended to ensure a minimum standard
         of provision in a manner that is applicable to the whole organisation.
2.1.2    It has been easy to view resilience separately from normal service provision. Legislation
         addresses this but our risk management strategy had already initiated the process.
2.1.3    Failure to become resilient poses a significant risk to our well-being. This is addressed by
         Strategic Risk SR13 (third highest on Strategic Risk Register), which is defined as:
         Inadequate response to a major emergency impacting on Newcastle and/or its
         residents or critical service interruption resulting in external criticism, adverse
         media, loss of community confidence. (NB Civil Contingencies Act 2004)
2.1.4    Quarterly Highlight Reports are submitted to RMSG. These provide effective monitoring of
         structural progress and focus on:
         (1)   Budget Status;


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        (2)   Schedule Status;
        (3)   Products completed during previous quarter;
        (4)   Problems (Actual and Potential);
        (5)   Products due for completion during coming quarter;
        (6)   Project Issues Status; and
        (7)   Impact of Changes (Budget and Schedule).
2.1.5   Where problems are identified, prompt referral to Business Management Group (BMG) or
        Corporate Management Team (CMT) should enable timely initiation of remedial action.


2.2     Out-sourced Services
2.2.1   Out-sourcing aspects of the resilience agenda involves risk where adequate control
        cannot be exerted. Without effective control of assets there is limited flexibility to respond
        to dynamic situations and immediate need.
2.2.2   Statutory duties require enhanced compliance and performance monitoring in respect of
        services provided by the EPU. This involves compliance mechanisms as follows:
        (1)   Strategic issues will be addressed at quarterly ‘District Liaison Officers’ Meetings’.
              These are long-standing but will require adjusting to reflect the new relationship.
        (2)   Operational issues will be addressed at monthly ‘Resilience Management Meetings’.
              The Resilience Planning Manager will monitor progress using a Highlight Report
              procedure similar to that developed for RMSG.
        (3)   The EPU will make quarterly progress reports to the Resilience Planning Group.
2.2.3   Principles outlined in relation to the EPU will be applied appropriately to any organisations
        that we enter agreement with to provide out-sourced resilience services.


2.3     Core Cities Emergency Planning Group
2.3.1   Benchmarking improves delivery of resilience. Comparison with other Tyne and Wear
        Authorities is helpful but benchmarking with Core Cities provides a good indicator of
        performance.
2.3.2   The Core Cities Emergency Planning Group has operated since June 2002. It began as a
        benchmarking forum but now provides a support network for Regional Cities that face a
        broadly similar range of challenges.
2.3.3   Government has indicated that future funding for resilience work depends on delivery of
        results. This will involve detailed scrutiny as part of the Spending Review 2006 (SR2006).
        It is vital that Core Cities continue to work together and share examples of good practice.


2.4     Comprehensive Performance Assessment (CPA)
2.4.1   CPA 2005 Key Lines of Enquiry (KLOE) for Corporate Assessment include reference to
        the resilience agenda within the ‘Safer and Stronger Communities’ Section (5.2).
        Question 5.2.5 asks “Is the Council well prepared for internal or external emergency
        situations?”
2.4.2   The Inspection Focus seeks evidence that “continuity arrangements would allow the
        Council to respond to emergencies, support Emergency Service partners, and continue to
        deliver critical local services.”
2.4.3   Criteria for Judgment for a Level 2 score require that:




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        (1)   The Council’s emergency arrangements are fit for purpose and would allow the
              Council to respond to emergencies, support emergency service partners and
              communicate effectively with the public about the emergency at any time (24 hours
              a day) while continuing to deliver critical public services.
        (2)   The Council has made an up-to-date local risk assessment to inform those
              arrangements and has a regular programme of tests and exercises to validate
              them.
        (3)   There are tested continuity arrangements for maintaining the services that are the
              responsibility of the Council during an emergency.
        (4)   The Council can demonstrate involvement in the relevant local joint multi-agency
              arrangements, in particular the Local Resilience Forum, including appropriate
              protocols for sharing information. It has agreements about mutual aid with
              neighbouring authorities.
        (5)   The Council promotes business continuity to local businesses and voluntary and
              community organisations.
2.4.4   Criteria for Judgment for a Level 3 score require that:
        (1)   The Council’s emergency arrangements are fit for purpose and would allow the
              Council to respond to emergencies, support emergency service partners and
              communicate effectively with the public about the emergency at any time, while
              continuing to deliver critical public services. It has identified vulnerable individuals
              and tailored arrangements to meet a diversity of potential needs.
        (2)   The Council has made an up-to-date local risk assessment to inform those
              arrangements and activities aimed at reducing and preventing relevant risks.
        (3)   There are tested continuity arrangements for all services that are the responsibility
              of the Council, owned by relevant departments or staff sections.
        (4)   There is a regular programme of test and exercises to validate emergency
              arrangements and the Council actively learns lessons using exercises, incidents
              and wider research.
        (5)   The Council has contributed positively to local joint multi-agency arrangements, in
              particular the Local Resilience Forum, including co-ordinating effective information
              and resource sharing.
        (6)   The Council effectively promotes business continuity to local businesses and
              voluntary organisations.
        (7)   A programme of regular training covers general staff awareness and specific
              requirements for identified staff. It involves relevant voluntary and community
              sector, contractor and other agency partners.
2.4.5   The Audit Commission is developing examples of good practice to illustrate performance
        at a Level 4 score, which will be placed on their website.




                      SECTION 3: SERVICE CONTINUITY PLANNING


3.1     Definition
3.1.1   Service Continuity Planning is work undertaken to enhance our ability to continue to
        deliver normal services in the face of disruptive challenges. This includes day-to-day
        emergencies and major or catastrophic incidents.



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3.2     Strategic Implications for ‘Resilient Newcastle’
3.2.1   The Civil Contingencies Act requires all Category 1 Responders to put in place Business
        Continuity Management arrangements (defined for our purposes as Service Continuity
        Planning) in respect of their ability to respond to major or catastrophic incidents.
3.2.2   Our risk management strategy identified the need to address Service Continuity Planning
        in a wider context. Risk Management funding is supporting development of a ‘service
        continuity culture’ by embedding within routine management procedures.
3.2.3   It will be necessary to give early consideration to the practical implications and
        ramifications for the on-going development of Service Continuity Planning.
3.2.4   The schedule of implementation will deliver regularly maintained products as follows:
        (1)   Corporate Service Continuity Plan: Provides strategic overview of generic
              response to the disruption of normal services. Sufficiently flexible to address
              challenges ranging from localised incidents to those with a citywide impact.
        (2)   Directorate Service Continuity Plans: Outlines operational procedures to be used
              by Directorates in response to disruption of normal services. These plans will
              support the implementation of the Corporate Service Continuity Plan.
        (3)   Service Unit Service Continuity Plans: Outlines detailed operational procedures
              to be used in response to disruption of normal services.


3.3     Standard to be Attained
3.3.1   Compliance with PAS56 is the target for attainment. This ‘Publicly Available Specification’
        is accepted as a de facto standard by many organisations and is currently being
        converted to the British Standard.
3.3.2   Full implementation will take time and 31 March 2007 is seen as an achievable target
        date. This involves expanding internal expertise and capacity. Specific training material
        has been developed and relevant officers are being identified and participating.


3.4     Addressing Existing Vulnerabilities
3.4.1   A long-term Service Continuity Planning strategy has been identified but it is imperative
        that short-term vulnerabilities are addressed.
3.4.2   The Resilience Planning Team is developing Service Continuity Plans that provide a basic
        response in the short-term. These will evolve to comply with PAS56.


3.5     Priorities for Service Continuity Planning
3.5.1   All services we deliver are important to the well-being of Newcastle but some require
        higher priority in the event of disruption. This will be particularly relevant where limited
        resources prohibit immediate restoration of all disrupted services.
3.5.2   Regular assessment of services delivered will establish levels of importance in time of
        crisis. Services will fall within one of the following categories:
        (1)   Critical Services: Those which are required to be restored to normal operational
              condition within 24 hours (or less) of disruption. Loss of any Critical Service for
              longer than the specified period should not be accepted.
        (2)   Urgent Services: Those which are required to be restored to normal operational
              condition within 72 hours of disruption. Loss beyond that period should only be
              accepted where it permits a Critical Service to be restored in its place.



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        (3)   Desirable Services: Those which are required to be restored to normal operational
              condition within 7 days of disruption. Loss beyond that period should only be
              accepted where it permits a Critical or Urgent Service to be restored in its place.
        (4)   Other Services: Those not designated in one of the three categories above will not
              be regarded as a priority. Should be maintained where possible, although it may be
              necessary to divert resources to support Critical, Urgent or Desirable Services.


3.6     Schedule of Product Delivery
3.6.1   Adherence to the principles of the Newcastle Project Management Framework will yield a
        programme of product delivery. Each product will be treated as a specific time-limited
        project. The overall schedule is:
        November 2005 Directorate Service Continuity Plans (Version 1)
                       Plan Validation Exercise (Event 1 – Influenza Pandemic)
        December 2005 Basic Service Continuity Awareness Sessions (Stream2)
        February 2006  Corporate Service Continuity Plan (Version 2)
        March 2006     Basic Service Continuity Awareness Sessions (Stream 3)
        May 2006       Directorate Service Continuity Plans (Version 2)
                       Plan Validation Exercise (Event 2 – Flooding)
        June 2006      Service Impact Analysis (Full Update)
                       Basic Service Continuity Awareness Sessions (Stream 4)
                       Directorate Service Continuity Training (Stream 1)
        August 2006    Corporate Service Continuity Plan (Version 3)
        September 2006 Basic Service Continuity Awareness Sessions (Stream 5)
                       Directorate Service Continuity Training (Stream 2)
        November 2006 Directorate Service Continuity Plans (Version 3)
                       Plan Validation Exercise (Event 3 – Loss of Civic Centre)
        December 2006 Basic Service Continuity Awareness Sessions (Stream 6)
                       Directorate Service Continuity Training (Stream 3)
        February 2007  Corporate Service Continuity Plan (Version 4)
        March 2007     Basic Service Continuity Awareness Sessions (Stream 7)
                       Directorate Service Continuity Training (Stream 4)




                     SECTION 4: EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING


4.1     Definition
4.1.1   Emergency Response Planning is work undertaken to enhance our ability to provide
        extraordinary support to communities affected during times of crisis. This is normally
        associated with major or catastrophic incidents.


4.2     Strategic Implications for ‘Resilient Newcastle’
4.2.1   The Civil Contingencies Act requires Category 1 Responders to put in place Emergency
        Plans (defined within Council as Emergency Response Planning) in respect of their ability
        to respond to major or catastrophic incidents.



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4.2.2   We have a long-established record of commitment to emergency planning but recognise
        the requirement to enhance our capability and embed it within routine service provision.
4.2.3   A two year schedule of implementation outlines key milestones the delivery of products
        (which will be maintained on a regular basis) as follows:
        (1)   City Major Incident Plan: Provides strategic overview of generic response to major
              and catastrophic incidents. Sufficiently flexible to address challenges ranging from
              localised incidents to those with a citywide impact.
        (2)   Directorate Major Incident Plans: Outlines operational procedures to be used in
              response to major and catastrophic incidents. Additional plans for specific areas of
              service delivery will be produced if required.


4.3     Standard to be Attained
4.3.1   Standards set by the Cabinet Office give the target for attainment. Chapter 13 of
        ‘Preparing for Emergencies’ (Statutory Guidance) includes a self-assessment checklist
        relating to the main duties of the Act.
4.3.2   The Audit Commission produced a self-assessment tool in anticipation of the Act, which it
        proposed should be used by Local Authorities. It is understood that this tool sets more
        demanding targets than the Government’s own ‘minimum standard’, which it funds.
4.3.3   Given that the Audit Commission has produced CPA 2005 Key Lines of Enquiry (KLOE)
        for Corporate Assessment, with specific reference to the resilience agenda included in the
        ‘Safer and Stronger Communities’ Section, both methods of assessment will be applied.
4.3.4   Peer review within the Core Cities Emergency Planning Group will play an important part
        in enhancing delivery of the resilience agenda.


4.4     Addressing Existing Vulnerabilities
4.4.1   A long-term Emergency Response Planning strategy has been identified but it is
        imperative that short-term vulnerabilities are addressed.
4.4.2   The Resilience Planning Team will develop a range of Emergency Response Plans that
        support the City Major Incident Plan and Directorate Major Incident Plans.


4.5     Priorities for Emergency Response Planning
4.5.1   Although we have an important leadership role to play in the long term aftermath of a
        major or catastrophic incident, our immediate role is to support the Emergency Services
        where appropriate. Care for members of the public displaced by the on-going incident is
        our highest priority.
4.5.2   We will undertake regular assessment of services delivered to establish which are of
        immediate importance during emergencies and those that will be more relevant to the
        aftermath and recovery phase.


4.6     Schedule of Product Delivery
4.6.1   Adherence to the principles of the Newcastle Project Management Framework will yield a
        programme of product delivery. This should further embed the existing emergency
        response capability and address gaps in provision. Each product will be treated as a
        specific time-limited project. The overall schedule is:
        November 2005 Plan Validation Exercise (Event 1 – Influenza Pandemic)



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        March 2006     Directorate Major Incident Plan Updates
                       Emergency Response Awareness Sessions (Stream 1)
        April 2006     City Major Incident Plan Update
        May 2006       Plan Validation Exercise (Event 2 - Flooding)
        June 2006      Emergency Response Awareness Sessions (Stream 2)
        September 2006 Directorate Major Incident Plan Updates
                       Emergency Response Awareness Sessions (Stream 3)
        October 2006   City Major Incident Plan Update
        November 2006 Plan Validation Exercise (Event 3 – Terrorist Incident)
        December 2006 Emergency Response Awareness Sessions (Stream 4)
        March 2007     Directorate Major Incident Plan Updates
                       Emergency Response Awareness Sessions (Stream 5)




        SECTION 5: PROMOTION OF BUSINESS CONTINUITY MANAGEMENT


5.1     Definition
5.1.1   Promotion of Business Continuity Management (BCM) is work undertaken to encourage
        businesses and voluntary agencies to prepare to continue operating during (or recover
        from the impact of) times of crisis. This is normally associated with major or catastrophic
        incidents.


5.2     Strategic Implications for ‘Resilient Newcastle’
5.2.1   The Civil Contingencies Act requires us to provide advice and assistance to businesses
        and voluntary organisations about Business Continuity Management. This duty
        commences on 15 May 2006.
5.2.2   Major and catastrophic incidents pose a significant threat to both the economic well-being
        of individual businesses and Newcastle itself. Development of a resilient business
        community is essential to minimise negative economic impact.
5.2.3   Voluntary organisations make a significant contribution to day-to-day health and welfare
        service provision. It is vital that this can be maintained in times of crisis. Additionally,
        certain voluntary organisations contribute directly to emergency response.
5.2.4   It is too early to determine a detailed schedule of implementation. The EPU has a
        significant role to play in the promotion of consistent information across Tyne and Wear
        but work is being undertaken to enhance our capability.


5.3     Standard to be Attained
5.3.1   Standards set by the Cabinet Office give the target for attainment. Chapter 13 of
        ‘Preparing for Emergencies’ (Statutory Guidance) includes a self-assessment checklist
        relating to this duty.
5.3.2   Despite our role, it remains the responsibility of each business or voluntary organisation to
        secure its own future.
5.3.3   It is in our general interest to provide advice and support, particularly in the aftermath of
        major or catastrophic incidents.


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5.4     Existing Vulnerabilities
5.4.1   The Act places the initial focus on larger businesses, many of whom already address the
        issue. Experience suggests that Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) need most
        support. We will seek to improve general awareness using existing enterprise strategies
        and communications mechanisms.
5.4.2   Businesses and/or voluntary organisations may ask us for more specific assistance to
        develop individual Business Continuity Plans. Legislation permits us to provide such
        services on a cost recovery basis but we are not obliged to do so.
5.4.3   Response to such requests is being considered and will require a robust assessment of
        our capability and/or capacity. Where we decline to provide this service, it is permitted to
        refer those seeking help to commercial organisations.


5.5     Newcastle Business Continuity Forum
5.5.1   We are considering establishing a ‘Newcastle Business Continuity Forum’. This will bring
        together representatives of businesses and voluntary organisations to consider issues
        specifically related to Business Continuity Management. If viable, the first meeting will
        follow commencement of this duty in May 2006.




                      SECTION 6: ENGAGING PARTNER AGENCIES


6.1     Role of Partner Agencies
6.1.1   The Civil Contingencies Act emphasises the need to develop a multi-agency approach to
        the resilience agenda. Each responding agency must address its responsibilities but
        needs to share information and co-operate with partner agencies.


6.2     Category 1 Responders
6.2.1   All Category 1 Responders have similar duties although Local Authorities must address
        the provision of advice and assistance to businesses and voluntary organisations about
        Business Continuity Management.
6.2.2   Category 1 Responders will focus on those elements of the resilience agenda that fall
        within their existing remit and work in other Responders to ensure ‘joined-up working’.
        Any gaps in service provision should be identified and addressed. Category 1
        Responders that we will have to engage with include:
           Local Authorities in Tyne and Wear and Northumberland.
           Government Agencies such as the Environment Agency.
           Northumbria Police, Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service and North East
            Ambulance Service NHS Trust.
           Health Protection Agency (HPA), Newcastle Primary Care Trust (PCT), Newcastle
            Hospitals NHS Trust and Port Health Authorities.


6.3     Category 2 Responders
6.3.1   Category 2 Responders will be placed under the lesser duties of co-operating with
        Category 1 Responders and sharing relevant information. These currently include:


RESILIENT NEWCASTLE –STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (OCTOBER 2005)                                 14
           Utilities (Electricity; Gas; Water and Sewerage; and Public communications providers
            [landlines and mobiles]).
           Transport (Network Rail, Train Operating Companies [Passenger and Freight]
            including NEXUS; Newcastle International Airport; Port of Tyne Authority; and the
            Highways Agency).
           Health and Safety Executive.


6.4     Northumbria Local Resilience Forum (LRF)
6.4.1   The duty to co-operate and share information will increase workloads significantly in the
        short term. Given the number of organisations involved, effective co-ordination will be
        vital. This will be undertaken by the Northumbria Local Resilience Forum (LRF), which is
        based on the Police Area.
6.4.2   The LRF will support co-ordination and co-operation between responders (Category 1 and
        2). Additionally, the LRF will ensure that local developments are consistent with those at
        regional and national level.
6.4.3   Key organisations that have no statutory duties but who will have significant roles to play
        in respect of preparedness and/or emergency response will participate in the LRF. These
        include the Regional Resilience Team (RRT) of the Government Office North East
        (GONE) and the Military.


6.5     Role of Tyne and Wear Emergency Planning Unit
6.5.1   A key function of the EPU is to support development of consistent levels of Local
        Authority provision throughout Tyne and Wear. The EPU is neither a Category 1 nor 2
        Responder.
6.5.2   Each Tyne and Wear Authority is a member of the LRF in its own right, with the EPU
        acting as “Special Adviser” on matters relating to aspects of the resilience agenda.
6.5.3   The EPU provides a day-to-day link between partner agencies and Tyne and Wear
        Authorities. As this is undertaken on our behalf, adequate provision will be made to
        ensure reporting back of issues raised and/or development of procedures.


6.6     Newcastle Resilience Forum
6.6.1   It is necessary to enhance operational relationships between organisations likely to
        provide the practical response to emergencies. We are considering establishing a
        ‘Newcastle Resilience Forum’, which will bring together representatives of partner
        agencies on a quarterly basis.
6.6.2   Emphasis will be placed on practical issues associated with response and recovery. It is
        considered that regular contact between professionals will prove beneficial during
        emergencies. It is not possible to identify the date of the first meeting as discussion about
        the nature of the proposal is still being conducted with partner agencies.




RESILIENT NEWCASTLE –STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (OCTOBER 2005)                                  15
                           SECTION 7: ENGAGING THE PUBLIC


7.1     Public Awareness
7.1.1   A significant problem during and after major or catastrophic incidents involves
        communication with the public.
7.1.2   Many practitioners believe that greater public awareness of issues prior to their
        occurrence will enable a better response once it is required.
7.1.3   Government has recognised this but states that a balance must be struck between raising
        awareness and causing alarm. We are required to contribute appropriately to putting
        arrangements in place to make relevant information available to the public and
        maintaining arrangements to warn, inform and advise the public in the event of an
        emergency.
7.1.4   Given that major or catastrophic incidents do not respect municipal boundaries, it is
        necessary to consider appropriate wide area strategies. Consistency of public information
        will be critical, particularly where many of the organisations involved have responsibility
        for areas covering several Local Authorities.
7.1.5   We need to consider existing and/or new mechanisms for relaying information to the
        public before, during and after any incidents that impact on Newcastle. Preliminary
        assessment of technological systems currently available to meet its specific obligations is
        on-going.


7.2     Role of Elected Members
7.2.1   As public awareness of the resilience agenda increases, Elected Members may find that
        related issues become more prominent. This may relate to their Wards and/or as part of
        specific duties they undertake or offices that they hold.
7.2.2   Consideration is being given to developing mechanisms that will enable Elected Members
        to respond to the increasing impact of the resilience agenda. Progress will be reported at
        a future date.




                     SECTION 8: ‘RESILIENT NEWCASTLE’ WEBSITE


8.1     Use of Information Technology
8.1.1   Assessment of the best use of electronic means (Intranet and Internet) in supporting
        development of the resilience agenda is on-going. Development of a ‘Resilient Newcastle’
        Website will underpin significant elements of the delivery of core services.
8.1.2   This will offer access to appropriate information about our resilience agenda to a range of
        audiences. Sensitive information (e.g. personal contact details) will be restricted to those
        directly involved in implementing our plans.
8.1.3   Until our electronic capability is developed, the existing site operated by the EPU provides
        basic information relevant to our resilience agenda.




RESILIENT NEWCASTLE –STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (OCTOBER 2005)                                 16
8.2     Use of Intranet
8.2.1   Subject specific information related to Service Continuity Planning and Emergency
        Response Planning is to be made available to staff through the intranet. This will increase
        general awareness of issues and support implementation of plans during incidents.


8.3     Business Continuity Management
8.3.1   Promotion of Business Continuity Management will involve a public site accessed through
        Newcastle.gov.uk. This will host information designed to advise and assist businesses
        and voluntary organisations in developing their resilience capability within the context of
        our resilience agenda.
8.3.2   The delayed commencement date of the duty in respect of the promotion of Business
        Continuity Management provides an opportunity for a specific public launch in May 2006.


8.4     Partner Agencies
8.4.1   It is intended that, wherever appropriate, material relating to our resilience agenda is
        freely accessible by electronic means to partner agencies. Appropriate material will be
        accessed through Newcastle.gov.uk. Access to sensitive information will be restricted to
        authorised users and subject to appropriate levels of security, particularly the
        requirements of the Data Protection Act.


8.5     Public Awareness
8.5.1   It is intended that, wherever appropriate, material relating to our resilience agenda is
        freely accessible by electronic means to the public. Appropriate material will be accessed
        through Newcastle.gov.uk. Access to sensitive information will be prohibited.
8.5.2   Particular recognition will be made of the assumption of openness enshrined within the
        Freedom of Information Act.




RESILIENT NEWCASTLE –STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (OCTOBER 2005)                                17
              APPENDIX A: RESILIENT NEWCASTLE POLICY STATEMENT


A1      Introduction and Summary
A1.1    The Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (supported by Civil Contingencies Act 2004
        (Contingency Planning) Regulations 2005, Statutory and Non-statutory Guidance) places
        statutory duties on Newcastle City Council, as a Local Authority Category 1 Responder,
        as follows:
           Assess the risk of an emergency either occurring or making it necessary for it to
            perform its functions.
           Maintain plans to enable it to perform its functions in an emergency necessary to
            prevent, reduce, control and mitigate its effects.
           Maintain plans for service continuity.
           Publish plans or risk assessments (as appropriate) in the public domain.
           Co-operate with, and provide information to, other Category 1 Responders.
           Maintain arrangements to warn the public and provide public advice.
           Promote business continuity management in its area.
A1.2    Newcastle City Council has further obligations that arise from the Government’s
        ‘Capabilities Programme’. This involves contributing to the development of response
        capabilities to deal with catastrophic incidents on a scale similar to that of ‘September 11’.


A2      Statement of Intent
A2.1    Newcastle City Council is committed to providing effective resilience planning that will:
           Minimise the impact of emergencies on the welfare of the directly affected
            communities and Newcastle as a whole;
           Ensure that the response to incidents undertaken by Newcastle City Council is
            delivered in an efficient and effective manner; and
           Support partner agencies in delivering their contribution to the response to incidents.


A3      Resilience Planning Objectives
A3.1    Newcastle City Council will pursue the following resilience planning objectives:
           Ensure that hazards and threats which may impact on Newcastle are fully assessed
            and appropriate plans are in place to address significant risks;
           Ensure that effective liaison and co-operation exists with partner agencies;
           Ensure that effective emergency response management capabilities are embedded
            at Corporate, Directorate and Service Unit level;
           Ensure effective participation in multi-agency emergency response management
            structures;
           Ensure that training and awareness opportunities are made available to employees
            and contractors that reflect their expected level of involvement in resilience planning;
           Ensure that emergency response plans and procedures are subject to validation;
           Improve public preparedness and resilience of local communities, businesses and
            voluntary organisations throughout Newcastle; and
           Comply with statutory obligations and locally determined policies in accordance with
            established standards, benchmarks and best practice.


RESILIENT NEWCASTLE –STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (OCTOBER 2005)                                   18
                     APPENDIX B: SCHEDULE OF IMPLEMENTATION



               2005/2006                                       2006/2007

     O     N    D     J    F    M     A    M     J    J    A        S   O   N   D   J   F   M

 a    x               x               x               x                 x           x

 b    x               x               x               x                 x           x

 c    x                               x                                 x

 d    x                               x                                 x

 e                               x                                  x                       x

 f                         x                               x                            x

 g         x                               x                                x

 h              x                x               x                  x           x           x

 i         x                               x                                x

     O     N    D     J    F    M     A    M     J    J    A        S   O   N   D   J   F   M


a:   Resilience Planning Group Meetings (RPG) [ORANGE]
b:   Risk Management Steering Group (RSMG) Highlight Reports [BLUE]
c:   Resilient Newcastle – Strategic Implementation Plan Revision [RED]
d:   City Major Incident Plan Updates [YELLOW]
e:   Directorate Major Incident Plan Updates [BROWN]
f:   Corporate Service Continuity Plan Updates [PURPLE]
g:   Directorate Service Continuity Plan Updates [GREEN]
h:   Training/Awareness Sessions [GREY]
i:   Plan Validation Exercises [DARK BLUE]




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