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					TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES




      Shared Success
Building a Better Texas through
         Shared Responsibilities




         2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR
  INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT




                  DECEMBER 14, 2005
FROM THE STATE’S CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER



         December 14, 2005


         The 79th Texas Legislature clearly set the new direction for technology management in
         state government through landmark legislation. It is a direction that maximizes technology
         infrastructure and allows individual agencies to focus efforts on respective core businesses.
         Shared Success is the roadmap that ensures this vision will become reality through
         objectives and strategies that support and involve all state agencies while reflecting strong
         ties to the goals of the Governor and all state leadership.

         Throughout the report, you will see the word “shared”—this has been carefully chosen.
         Transforming technology in Texas state government is not the responsibility of a single
         agency. It is, rather, a shared responsibility of all agencies, working collaboratively, to
         build an enterprise infrastructure that supports individual, mission-critical agency business
         processes. The result will be a shared success.

         I would like to thank the technology and business professionals across both public and
         private sectors in Texas, including an Advisory Committee for the State Plan for
         Information Resource Management, who provided input into this report.

         Technology resource management is being transformed in Texas government. Through
         sharing vision, responsibilities, and success, the citizens of this great state will reap
         countless benefits.

         Larry A Olson
         Executive Director
         Department of Information Resources




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
     ABO UT T HI S PL AN

     The Information Resources Management Act (Chapter 2054, Texas Government Code) requires the Texas
     Department of Information Resources (DIR) to prepare a state strategic plan that establishes strategies to meet the
     changing technology needs of state government to effectively serve Texans for the next five years.
     This plan outlines statewide technology initiatives that are in place or being planned over the current and next
     biennium and provides initial guidance to state agencies for planning their information and communications
     technology initiatives. DIR will issue detailed instructions for the preparation and submission of state agency
     information resources strategic plans in spring 2006.
     Note: For the purposes of this report, the term “state agency” is used to indicate a state agency or a state
           institution of higher education.

     T HE PL AN ON LIN E

     The 2005 State Strategic Plan for Information Resources Management can be accessed from DIR’s Web site
     (http://www.dir.state.tx.us). Detailed information regarding the implementation of a specific strategy is or will be
     posted as it becomes available. Additionally, specific DIR commitments and agency responsibilities for each
     objective and strategy have been excerpted from this plan and are presented in the State Strategic Roadmap for
     Shared Success, which can be found at this site.




iv                                                                  DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
Contents

    Section 1. Executive Summary ................................................................................................. 1
    Section 2. Defining Shared Success ......................................................................................... 3
        Strategic Goals ................................................................................................................ 3
        Statewide Objectives ........................................................................................................ 4
        A Model for Shared Success.............................................................................................. 4
        Key Factors Impacting the Strategic Plan ............................................................................ 5
        Applying the Texas Model ................................................................................................. 6
    Section 3. Acting on Shared Responsibilities ............................................................................. 7
        Objective 1. Reduce Cost, Eliminate Duplication, and Improve Data Center Services............ 8
        Objective 2. Safeguard Information and Communications Technology Assets..................... 10
        Objective 3. Leverage Shared Network Operations and Resources .................................... 12
        Objective 4. Solve Common Business Problems through Shared Applications..................... 14
        Objective 5. Maximize Buying Power on Commodity Technologies and Services................. 16
        Objective 6. Ensure Maximum Results from State Projects ................................................. 18
        Objective 7. Encourage Business and Technology Architectures ........................................ 20
        Objective 8. Enhance the Value of State Reviews.............................................................. 22
        Objective 9. Increase the Value of Electronic Data and Information ................................... 24
        Objective 10. Deploy Innovative, Value-Added Solutions to Meet Agency Core Missions....... 26
    Section 4. Bringing It All Together.......................................................................................... 29
    Guide to Appendices............................................................................................................ 31
    Appendix A. Fulfilling the Objectives...................................................................................... 33
       Strategies for Objective 1................................................................................................ 34
       Strategies for Objective 2................................................................................................ 37
       Strategies for Objective 3................................................................................................ 41
       Strategies for Objective 4................................................................................................ 44
       Strategies for Objective 5................................................................................................ 47
       Strategies for Objective 6 ............................................................................................... 50
       Strategies for Objective 7................................................................................................ 53
       Strategies for Objective 8 ............................................................................................... 56
       Strategies for Objective 9................................................................................................ 59
    Appendix B. Agency Innovations (Fulfilling Objective 10)......................................................... 63
    Appendix C. Related Legislation ............................................................................................ 69
    Glossary.............................................................................................................................. 77
    Acknowledgments ................................................................................................................ 79
    Endnotes ............................................................................................................................. 81




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                                  v
vi   DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                   Section 1
                                                                 Executive Summary

    The 79th Texas Legislature signaled a clear mandate for the state to restructure the roles and
    responsibilities for its investment in information and communications technology. In responding to this
    directive, the Texas Department of Information Resources (DIR) gathered input from stakeholders from
    across the state. These individuals gave generously of their time and knowledge to help craft a state plan
    that emphasizes an enterprise vision to build on shared responsibilities and shared success.

    This plan supports leadership’s commitment to ensure that the state’s business needs provide the driving
    force behind the state’s technology. This plan reflects this support through each of its sections.

    Section 2: Defining Shared Success describes the legislative and business imperative for changing
    technology investment and management practices. The section articulates five statewide goals that govern
    the development of the plan:

         Reduce government costs
         Drive effective technology contracting
         Leverage shared technology operations
         Promote innovative use of technology that adds value
         Protect technology and information assets

    Section 2 further develops the Texas Model of the Enterprise, first introduced in the 2004 report,
    Foundation for Change. The model describes how the goals of the plan are collaboratively worked out
    through layers of shared responsibility. Finally, the section provides an overview of the key factors that
    affect technology planning and management in the state.

    Section 3: Acting on Shared Responsibilities presents ten statewide objectives that address elements of one
    or more of the goals.

      1.   Reduce cost, eliminate duplication, and improve performance of data center services
      2.   Safeguard information and communications technology assets
      3.   Leverage shared network operations and resources
      4.   Solve common business problems through shared applications
      5.   Maximize buying power on commodity technologies and services
      6.   Ensure maximum results from state projects
      7.   Encourage business and technology architectures that drive improved planning and coordination
      8.   Enhance the value of state reviews
      9.   Increase the value of electronic data and information
     10.   Deploy innovative, value-added technology solutions to meet agency core missions

    This section also introduces the strategies to implement the objective.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   1
    Appendix A: Fulfilling the Objectives describes each strategy introduced in Section 3. This appendix
    includes DIR commitments and agency responsibilities that are required to implement each strategy and
    develop agency information resources strategic plans.

    Appendix B: Agency Innovations describes technology trends and presents excellent examples of agencies
    delivering innovative, mission-critical business solutions that fulfill the strategic goals of Objective 10.

    Appendix C: Related Legislation describes legislation passed by the 79th Texas Legislature that impacts
    technology planning and management in the state.

    The Glossary offers definitions of key terms used in the plan.




2                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                       Section 2
                                                         Defining Shared Success

    The mission of Texas state government is “to ensure that state government is limited, efficient, and
    completely accountable.”1 A well-structured vision for the use of technology is an essential ingredient for
    meeting these principles. The 79th Texas Legislature enacted legislation that directs an enterprise approach
    to managing the state’s investment in information and communications technology.

                                                  Texas will maximize value from this investment by incorporating the
      T HE S H AR ED VI SI ON F OR T EX A S       needs and interests of state agencies into its enterprise operations.
      Texas will maximize the value of its        The Texas Department of Information Resources will support the
      technology investment by working            shared vision for technology by working across organizational
      together in areas of common                 boundaries to promote common interests, support business and
      interest, using technology to advance       technological innovation, and support the core missions of state
      agency-specific missions while              agencies.
      preserving flexibility to innovate.
      Success will be ensured through             Commitments DIR made in its 2004 Biennial Performance Report
      clear commitments, open and honest          and the Foundation for Change report are consistent with recent
      communication, and a collaborative          legislation. These commitments align with statewide goals for
      approach that leverages the best and        limited, efficient, and accountable government and provide the
      brightest minds across agencies,
                                                  focus needed for the state to advance services to citizens, support
      institutions of higher education, city
      and county governments, and the
                                                  the core missions of individual agencies, simplify technology
      private sector.                             management, and maximize the value of the state’s investment in
                                                  hardware, software, services, data, and personnel.

                                                  Strategic Goals

                                                  The commitments articulated in the 2004 Biennial Performance
                                                  Report have been refined into strategic goals that will govern the
                                                  state’s technology investment. These goals are:

                                                            Reduce government costs
                                                            Drive effective technology contracting
                                                            Leverage shared technology operations
                                                            Promote innovative use of technology that adds value
                                                            Protect technology and information assets




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                          3
Statewide Objectives

    The strategic goals drive the key objectives and strategies in this plan and together they fulfill the shared
    vision. Specifically, this plan seeks to:

     1.   Reduce cost, eliminate duplication, and improve performance of data center services
     2.   Safeguard information and communications technology assets
     3.   Leverage shared network operations and resources
     4.   Solve common business problems through shared applications
     5.   Maximize buying power on commodity technologies and services
     6.   Ensure maximum results from state projects
     7.   Encourage business and technology architectures that drive improved planning and coordination
     8.   Enhance the value of state reviews
     9.   Increase the value of electronic data and information
    10.   Deploy innovative, value-added technology solutions to meet agency core missions

    By unifying Texas government through coordinated commitments and shared responsibilities, the state can
    strategically align its significant investment in information and communications technology with the
    business needs of state agencies. Together, every agency will share in the success of the enterprise by
    delivering superior services to Texans.

A Model for Shared Success

    The statewide goals for information resources management will
    require substantial coordination among all levels of government.
    In its 2004 report, Foundation for Change, DIR introduced its
    model for sharing and managing the state’s technology
    investment. The Texas Model of the Enterprise is a
    refinement of this model, reflecting new legislation
    and the vision of greater cost efficiencies, improved
    services, and a shared technology infrastructure
    that is flexible, innovative, and supports agencies
    in meeting their missions.

    The base of the Texas Model—the statewide
    infrastructure layer—delivers shared functions
    that, similar to utility services, are needed
    by all agencies, but are not unique or
    specific to an individual agency.                          The Texas Model for the Enterprise

    Building on the statewide infrastructure layer is the collaboration layer. This layer supports the shared
    development of guidelines and practices that contribute to effective enterprise management of information
    and communications technology. One practice includes guiding the development of integrated
    architectures that advance data and information sharing among agencies. Another practice employed in
    this layer is establishing a collaborative approach for evaluating opportunities to standardize agency




4                                                               DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
    business processes where common needs exist. Additionally, this layer supports the adoption of statewide
    technology rules and standards.

    Leveraging each of the preceding layers, the most important is the agency layer, which supports the unique
    functionality that an agency must deliver to successfully support its mission. Together, the layers of the
    Texas Model of the Enterprise comprise the vision for effective technology planning and service delivery in
    the state.

Key Factors Impacting the Strategic Plan

    The successful implementation of the statewide objectives in this plan are driven by, and are dependent on,
    several key planning factors:

         New statutory requirements drive a new vison
         The 79th Texas Legislature enacted a series of technology bills that support the continued
         implementation of a shared technology infrastructure. The scope, impact, and timelines required by
         this legislation have been incorporated in this plan. Specific DIR commitments and agency
         responsibilities resulting from recent and previous legislation are described in Appendix A. High-level
         descriptions of these technology bills are presented in Appendix C.

         Agency focus on core missions remains paramount
         Agencies have been given critical missions to fulfill in addition to new responsibilities resulting from
         House Bill 1516 (HB1516). Through collaboration and strong project planning, all of these missions
         and responsibilities will be met. The result will be new infrastructure and collaboration practices that
         will allow agencies to spend more of their time fulfilling their core missions.

         Financial constraints are a fact of life
         Like other states, Texas is faced with accelerating budget demands, such as those caused by
         population growth and spiraling health care costs. Texas will face additional budget challenges in the
         coming biennium due to new priorities, such as homeland security and response to natural disasters.

         Managing information and communications technology as an enterprise is fundamental to meeting
         statewide business goals. While the absence of funding may be viewed as a limitation, in Texas it
         translates to an opportunity. Several innovative approaches have been successful in overcoming
         funding constraints and others are under development. These approaches eliminate the state’s up-front
         investment. Examples range from the state’s electronic portal, TexasOnline, to utility-based, fee-for-
         service pricing models, such as the consolidation of the state’s data centers and the statewide
         messaging initiative. The state must continually seek new opportunities, no matter the financial climate.

         The makeup of the technology workforce is changing
         As Texas begins to unify its information and communications technology operations, skills in project
         management, systems integration, and business processes will become key to the success and
         alignment of technology with agency core missions. DIR is committed to the training and retention of
         the best technology workforce in state government through the development and delivery of
         information resources management training and education programs for state technology
         professionals. When objectives in this plan have a potential negative impact on workforce, DIR is



2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                      5
        committed to looking for ways to mitigate impacts to state personnel. DIR is committed to frequent and
        honest communications to positively address these issues.

        New innovations will emerge
        Technology innovation is fast-paced and pervasive. The state must continually evaluate emerging
        technology to determine its application and value to state government. Within the infrastructure layer,
        DIR will continually assess the benefit and impact of implementing new technologies. Assessment of
        new technologies includes a business-driven analysis focused on factors, such as cost, savings, and
        performance, among others. Similarly, within the agency layer, state agencies must be flexible and
        innovative in addressing the changing requirements of their constituencies. To provide responsive
        solutions, agencies must evaluate opportunities to utilize new technologies to provide additional
        services and value to citizens.

        New challenges will arise
        The impact of hurricanes Katrina and Rita underscores the fact that unforeseen challenges may impact
        the state during this plan period. The infrastructure established through this plan should be flexible and
        adaptable to enable an effective response to new challenges and to provide increased security and
        disaster recovery capabilities.

        Competition benefits Texans
        Taxpayer dollars are maximized when Texas government has a vibrant technology vendor community.
        This community is supported by providing easily understood channels to compete for business, a focus
        on open standards where appropriate, and strategies to provide opportunity for the state’s small and
        historically underutilized businesses. By encouraging competition and by enabling equitable market
        forces on all public sector technology initiatives, Texas will benefit through highly attractive pricing,
        improved service levels, and strong partnerships with private sector partners, both large and small.

Applying the Texas Model

    This plan outlines the statewide objectives and strategies that
    support each of the layers of the Texas Model and establishes
    the foundation from which agencies will develop their
    information resources strategic plans.

    The illustration at right shows how each of the
    objectives described in Section 3 is linked to one
    of the layers of the Texas Model. The strategies
    that support these objectives are described in
    Appendix A. Through implementation of
    these objectives and strategies the state will
    realize its vision for shared responsibilities
    and shared success.




6                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                                                                Section 3
                                                       Acting on Shared Responsibilities

This section describes the objectives and introduces the strategies to achieve the state’s vision




                                                                                                                                                               Effective Contracting
of shared responsibility and shared success. In the table below, statewide objectives and




                                                                                                                                                                                       Shared Operations


                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Secure Resources
strategies are mapped to each of five strategic goals, shown at right. This roadmap charts a




                                                                                                                                                                                                           Innovative Use
                                                                                                                                                Reduce Costs
course for DIR and state agencies to plan and commit the essential resources needed to
realize the shared vision for Texas government.

                           Statewide Objective                       Statewide Strategy                                                               Strategic Goals

                           1 DATA CENTER                             1.1 Maximize the value of current data center resources (p. 34)
                           Reduce cost, eliminate duplication, and   1.2 Implement a shared data center system (p. 35)
                           improve performance of data center
                           services (p. 8)
STATEWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE




                           2 SECURITY                                2.1 Develop and implement a comprehensive security program (p. 37)
                           Safeguard information and communi-        2.2 Enhance network security operations (p. 38)
                           cations technology assets (p. 10)

                           3 NETWORK                                 3.1 Upgrade and optimize the shared network infrastructure (p. 41)
                           Leverage shared network operations and 3.2 Gain new business value from advanced network services (p. 42)
                           resources (p. 12)

                           4 SHARED APPLICATIONS                     4.1 Offer additional electronic government services to Texans (p. 44)
                           Solve common business problems            4.2 Offer shared applications when common needs exist (p. 45)
                           through shared applications (p. 14)

                           5 PROCUREMENT                             5.1 Build a scalable commodity procurement infrastructure (p. 47)
                           Maximize buying power on commodity        5.2 Deliver the full potential of the cooperative contracts program
                           technologies and services (p. 16)             (p. 48)

                           6 PROJECT DELIVERY                        6.1 Implement the Texas Project Delivery Framework (p. 50)
                           Ensure maximum results from state         6.2 Support and share systems development best practices (p. 51)
                           projects (p. 18)

                           7 ARCHITECTURE                            7.1 Support the development of agency architectures (p. 53)
COLLABORATION




                           Encourage business and technology         7.2 Incorporate technology reuse into agency architectures (p. 54)
                           architectures that drive improved
                           planning and coordination (p. 20)         7.3 Align common aspects of agency architectures (p. 55)

                           8 STATE REVIEWS                           8.1 Streamline technology and information reporting (p. 56)
                           Enhance the value of state reviews (p. 22) 8.2 Align and improve review processes (p. 58)

                           9 DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS                  9.1 Manage electronic data and information systematically and
                                                                         efficiently (p. 59)
                           Increase the value of electronic data and
                           information (p. 24)                       9.2 Expand government Web site usability (p. 60)
                                                                     9.3 Protect the privacy of personal information in state custody (p. 62)

                           10 CORE MISSION                           10 Fulfilled by each agency examining its core mission and acting
                                                                        upon that mission as directed by the Legislature
AGENCY




                           Deploy innovative, value-added
                           technology solutions to meet agency            Examples of agencies delivering innovative, mission-critical
                           core missions (p. 26)                          business solutions that fulfill the strategic goals of Objective 10
                                                                          are shown in Appendix B (p. 63)

                           The short name for each statewide objective is shown in SMALL CAPS.



             2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                                                                                                 7
    OBJECTIVE|DATA CENTER



OBJECTIVE 1
REDUCE COST, ELIMINATE DUPLICATION, AND IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF DATA CENTER SERVICES


    Historically, state agencies have procured data center and disaster recovery services individually,
    addressing agencies’ specific needs, but creating redundant functions and resources across the state. This
    has resulted in more than 30 state and agency data centers statewide with independent operations and a
    broad range of technical environments, service levels, and security standards. As documented by the 2005
    Gartner, Inc., assessment of agency data centers, these disparate environments are more expensive to
    maintain and operate than a consolidated statewide system.2 This fragmentation creates a duplication of
    effort and presents a challenge for statewide disaster preparedness and response.

    Building a shared data center system is a critical step toward helping government build a more secure,
    agile, and cost-effective infrastructure for the delivery of government services. The 79th Texas Legislature
    recognized the importance of a stronger statewide technology infrastructure and, through the passage of
    HB1516, directed DIR to lead the effort to accelerate consolidation of the state’s data center and disaster
    recovery services.

    A consolidated data center system will give agencies equal access to advanced technologies and will
    maximize state resources by leveraging economies of scale. Most importantly, by coordinating and sharing
                                                       resources at the statewide level, agencies can focus
                IN FOC U S:
                S H ARED D AT A C ENT ER S ER VIC E S  more of their technology resources on agency-specific
                                                       applications that support their unique missions.
                   In March 2005, Gartner, Inc.,
                   under contract by DIR, submitted a         To prepare for the transition to a shared data center
                   report titled Expenditure and              system, DIR is working with agencies to identify current
                   Facilities Assessment, Validation and
                                                              service levels and performance metrics for data center
                   Analysis, to DIR in response to
       direction by the Legislative Budget Board. This
                                                              and disaster recovery services. DIR will also work with
       study analyzed data center and disaster recovery       agencies to ensure that individual data centers are
       costs for the state’s 24 largest agencies. It found:   consolidated without service disruption and that they
     • Texas spends $135 million annually on data             provide the same or better service levels than those
       center services                                        currently provided.
     • Only 30 percent of total data center
                                                              Institutions of Higher Education are not part of the
       expenditures are managed centrally
                                                              current data center consolidation project defined in
     • Agencies’ combined expenditures are                    HB1516; however, institutions will perform an inventory
       approximately 22.6 percent ($29.6 M) higher
                                                              of data center services as required by the
       than that of comparable organizations that
       deliver similar services through consolidated
                                                              Appropriations Act. This inventory will be used by DIR
       data centers                                           and the higher education systems or individual
                                                              institutions to identify opportunities for data center
     • Evaluating agencies on a case-by-case basis, as
       done in the past, for inclusion in the existing        collaboration to meet the needs of higher education.
       state data center, does not effectively leverage
       economies of scale




8                                                                  DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                  OBJECTIVE|DATA CENTER




                                     C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E : DAT A C ENT ER CO N SO LID ATI ON PRO JECT

                                    The DIR project to build a shared data center system is a primary example of the
                                    collaborative approach the state will employ in fulfilling the objectives of this plan.
      Through an advisory committee, technical workgroups, and other project activities, more than 160 employees
      from agencies across the state are working on the critical aspects of consolidation. The advisory committee,
      composed of 30 state technology officers, meets monthly to discuss the data center consolidation project and
      provide agency feedback.
      Technical workgroups in the areas of database administration, disaster recovery, network, security, and technical
      services have made recommendations on the scope of services of the new data center system. Additionally, several
      administrative workgroups have been formed to address a host of topics, including finance, federal funding, and
      human resources.
      The federal funding workgroup is addressing the complex issues of billing methodology, including statewide and
      agency-specific requirements for Cost Allocation Plans and Advance Planning Documents. Coordination of this
      activity is essential to ensure that the state’s federal partners are fully informed of, involved in, and approve of the
      state’s approach.
      As the project progresses, agency personnel will be involved in performance measurement, agency environmental
      descriptions, interagency contracts, statements of work, and other activities. These workgroups are instrumental in
      incorporating individual agency technical and program expertise into this enterprise project.


    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 1:

     1.1 Maximize the value of current data center resources outlines the process for improving the usage of
         the existing state data center.

     1.2 Implement a shared data center system proposes developing a new consolidated statewide system
         and migrating the prioritized agency data centers to it.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 34), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                   9
     OBJECTIVE|SECURITY



OBJECTIVE 2
SAFEGUARD INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY ASSETS


     A 2005 report issued by Forrester Research states that “Information security is moving from the world of
     information technology operations to focus on security processes, metrics, policy, risk, and compliance.”3
     Information and communications technology security has never been a more significant issue at all levels
     of government. In the past, security focused on testing computer systems. More recently, technology
     security, both physical and cyber, has become a key component of critical infrastructure protection.
     Moreover, a compromise of physical security or an attack on a public facility could damage information
     sharing and could disrupt critical government processes that affect citizens and infrastructure statewide.

     An attack on the technology systems of any government entity could expose millions of records containing
     confidential information, such as driver licenses and Social Security numbers, to theft, tampering, or
                                                          destruction. In 2004, there were more than 635,000
                   IN FOC U S:
                                                          cases of fraud and identity theft nationally, with
                   S E CUR IT Y C L EARI NG HO U SE
                                                          reported losses of more than $547 million.4
                  To promote a statewide approach to
                  technology security management, DIR         In a large and decentralized state government
                  will establish a Web portal to              environment, lack of coordination and limited security
                  advance secure communications with          resources makes responding to a severe security threat
                  state information security officers         challenging. Any strategic enterprise approach to
      (ISOs). The portal will:
                                                              information security management in Texas must
      • Share cyber security threat information               address two basic issues: resources and technology
      • Establish an e-mail communications capability         infrastructure. Vulnerability is increased when there are
      • Provide a real-time collaboration tool                inadequate resources to respond to the security threat
                                                              or when there is no policy or infrastructure to protect
      Additionally, the portal will incorporate:
                                                              individual environments from threats. In either case,
      • Emergency alert notifications
                                                              coordination of efforts and resources among agencies
      • Updated contact information for state                 is key to controlling a threat to state assets.
        information resources managers and ISOs
      • Security policies, standards, and guidelines          To adequately secure state assets, the state must
                                                              establish the processes and infrastructure that all
      • Continuity and contingency planning
                                                              government entities in the state can use to coordinate
      • Security training opportunities, including incident
                                                              their security capabilities and responses to security
        response
                                                              threats. The state must develop adaptable security
      • High-level results of state security assessment
                                                              policies that can adjust to address emerging threats to
      • Topical reviews on emerging security issues           the state’s information and communications technology
                                                              infrastructure.




10                                                                 DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                      OBJECTIVE|SECURITY




                                     C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E :
                                     G O VER NM ENT F OR U M F OR INCI DENT R E S PON S E TE A M S

                                       The State of Texas has lead roles in developing collaborative efforts to respond to
      critical infrastructure protection and cyber security threats. Texas is one of a few states invited to participate in the
      Government Forum for Incident Response Teams (GFIRST), the forum for sharing cyber security threat information
      and training at the federal level. Among the states, DIR also has taken a lead role in the Multi-State Information
      Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC)—the official state effort to drive information sharing and collaboration on
      technology security issues.
      DIR will carry these national models forward to foster strong cooperative ties with state agency, city, and county
      resources. For example, DIR, in partnership with the University of Texas at San Antonio’s Center for Infrastructure
      Assurance and Security (CIAS) and the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security, will design and conduct a state-
      level cyber security exercise based on a community exercise model. The project, funded by the U.S. Department of
      Homeland Security, will host simultaneous exercises in three Texas cities to develop a training template for other
      communities that will help them to prevent, deter, and respond to cyber security incidents.



    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 2:

     2.1 Develop and implement a comprehensive security program outlines the state’s strategy for
         developing a statewide technology and information security asset management plan.

     2.2 Enhance network security operations outlines plans for a state network security center mandated by
         HB3112.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 37), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                    11
     OBJECTIVE|NETWORK



OBJECTIVE 3
LEVERAGE SHARED NETWORK OPERATIONS AND RESOURCES


     Effective communications technologies, such as high-quality voice, data, and video services, provide a
     critical foundation for state government operations and services. Providing agencies access to a shared
     communications network that reduces statewide costs and delivers exceptional performance is essential for
     Texas government to continue to serve state employees and customers.

     To advance this shared communications network, DIR renegotiated its TEX-AN agreement with SBC. The
     new agreement allows TEX-AN to support a range of expanded services, from the traditionally offered
     infrastructure elements agencies use to build their own networks, to fully developed communications
     services that can be cost-effectively shared among multiple agencies. Over the next four years, the state will
     save approximately $20 million from this contract negotiation. Additionally, agencies will benefit from
                                                              enhanced and expanded services and capabilities,
                              SHARED SUCCESS:
                                                              including:
                              T EC HNO LO GY R E SP ON SE T O
                              H U RRIC AN E K ATRI N A
                                                                  A common communications infrastructure that will
                              In the wake of Hurricane            support Internet Protocol (IP) services across state
                              Katrina, DIR collaborated with      government
                              the Health and Human                Extensive network and hardware infrastructure
       Services Commission, other agencies, and its
                                                                  redundancy to enhance business continuity
       vendor partners, SBC and e-Loyalty, to deliver the
       following services:                                        Network security enhancements, including intrusion
                                                                  detection devices, virtual private networks, traffic
       • Fifty VoIP stations in Austin (within 24 hours) to
                                                                  analyzers, and improved physical security
          handle overflow traffic for the Houston Area
          Information Center (AIC) for the Information            The Texas Collaboration Forum, comprising
          and Referral Program available to evacuees              representatives from the vendor community, state
          through 2-1-1                                           government, and other public entities, which
       • Connectivity (within 12 hours) to the Information        facilitates information sharing
         and Referral Program from the public switched
         telephone network by leveraging the Capitol       A shared communications network allows agency-level
         Complex Telephone System. This additional         infrastructure and resources that overlap the needs of
         capacity relieved the strain on 2-1-1 AICs        other agencies to be integrated, expanded, or adapted
         across the state                                  to benefit the entire state. One example of elevating
      • Wireless data services (within 24 hours) for       agency-level infrastructure to that of a shared
        shelters that were not able to accommodate         communications resource involves the Health and
        physical network connections                       Human Services Commission (HHSC) wide area
      • High-speed network connections at 18 HHSC          network.
        evacuation shelters across the state—most
        installations were completed within 24 hours       HHSC transferred the management of its wide area
      • Communications infrastructure to support three     network to DIR in 2004. Following this transfer, HHSC
        TEA call centers providing information on          agreed to transfer to DIR the network infrastructure that
        enrolling displaced students and teachers in       supports 2-1-1 (the application that connects citizens to
        Texas schools                                      information about critical health and human services
      • An employment hotline and facilitation of access   available in their community). Through the new TEX-AN
        to TWC voicemail boxes for evacuees                agreement, DIR replicated and expanded the 2-1-1



12                                                               DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                    OBJECTIVE|NETWORK



    infrastructure model to an infrastructure that could accommodate all state agency networks, including the
    HHSC wide area network. Because the IP-based technology of the 2-1-1 model converges voice, data,
    and video traffic, agencies will soon be able to take advantage of converged services, reducing the state’s
    communications network costs and eliminating the need for separate voice and data networks.

                                     C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E : LO NE ST AR ED UC ATI ON AND RE S E ARC H N ETW ORK

                                    The Lonestar Education and Research Network (LEARN) is a non-profit collaboration
                                    of 33 Texas higher education institutions that supports the research, education,
      health care, and public service missions of these institutions. LEARN has received $7.5 million in state funding to
      build and operate a fiber-optic network. This network will include connectivity to Internet2 and the National
      Lambda Rail. Key segments of this fiber-optic network will be brought online by December 31, 2005.
      HB1516 allows DIR to leverage LEARN in cases of disaster recovery and business continuity for state agencies. DIR
      is also authorized by this legislation to use LEARN for the transport of latency-tolerant data traffic to and from state
      data centers.



    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 3:

     3.1 Upgrade and optimize the shared network infrastructure describes the current plans for enhancing
         and expanding the existing state voice, data, and video network infrastructure.

     3.2 Gain new business value from advanced network services describes projects and initiatives that are
         made possible by the services provided through the upgraded and optimized shared network.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 41), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                               13
     OBJECTIVE|SHARED APPLICATIONS



OBJECTIVE 4
SOLVE COMMON BUSINESS PROBLEMS THROUGH SHARED APPLICATIONS


     Agencies are constantly seeking new ways to use automation to address business problems and make
     improvements for citizens and employees. The state vision holds that problems specific to the mission of the
     agency should be solved locally, and agencies should be encouraged to innovate.

     Inevitably, however, agencies must manage processes that are not unique, but that, in fact, overlap and
     even replicate processes of many other agencies. Without coordination, agencies develop duplicative, and
     often conflicting, solutions.

     One approach to shared applications involves the coordination of planning and development across
     multiple agencies. Examples include the planning for electronic grants and the common state development
                                                        effort in the Integrated Statewide Administrative System
                         SHARED SUCCESS:
                         T EX AS ONLI NE                (ISAS) project.

                            The award winning                Another approach entails a single state agency hosting
                            TexasOnline portal delivers a    an application for use by other agencies. For example,
                            host of electronic               the Office of the Comptroller hosts the state’s
                            government functions for state   accounting system of record, USAS (Uniform Statewide
      and local government. The portal provides a
                                                             Accounting System), for more than 100 state agencies.
      common online payment processing engine and a
      highly secure infrastructure for all transactions      The remaining agencies interface with USAS to report
      processed online.                                      their financial data and transactions to the statewide
                                                             system.
      The TexasOnline Licenses, Permits and
      Registrations project was awarded the Center for
                                                             A third approach encompasses the establishment of
      Digital Government’s “Best of Texas” award for
      Demonstrated Excellence in Project Collaboration       comprehensive statewide applications. Providing
      in 2005. This shared service enables Texas             electronic government services to citizens through
      professionals licensed by one or more of 33 state      TexasOnline is one example. Another example,
      agencies to renew or apply for their occupational      applicable to government employees, is the
      licenses, permits, or registrations online.            establishment of enterprise messaging and
      In conjunction with the Governor’s Office, DIR         collaboration services, including email.
      launched a single-stop business portal on
      TexasOnline in March 2005 for persons wanting          Implementing selected shared applications will improve
      to expand or move their businesses to Texas. The       performance and integration across state government
      portal facilitates access to existing Web sites that   and enable agencies to focus on responsibilities that
      provide valuable information about state laws,
                                                             support their missions. In all cases, due diligence and
      demographics, and links to state services geared
                                                             architectural review must be performed to determine
      toward business interests in Texas.
                                                             whether a common solution will solve business
      The portal has enjoyed widespread adoption by
                                                             problems and standardize business processes. Once
      Texas citizens transacting business online.
      Additionally, the online portal serves as a mass       these common needs are agreed upon, there are
      communications channel. It was instrumental in         multiple approaches to shared application solutions.
      communicating critical and timely information to
      individuals affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.




14                                                                DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                         OBJECTIVE|SHARED APPLICATIONS




                                     C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E : ST AT EWID E ME SS AGI NG INIT I ATI V E

                                     The pending statewide offering for enterprise messaging and collaboration services,
                                     including e-mail, exemplifies the value of collaboration across state agencies. DIR
      and the Health and Human Services Commission had multiple discussions on various approaches to HHSC’s need
      to upgrade its messaging infrastructure. Both agencies agreed to develop a solicitation that reflected statewide
      concerns and coordinated multi-agency participation. Through several briefings and discussions, 13 additional
      agencies signed letters of intent to participate in the solicitation. Agencies have had a substantive role in
      requirements development, response evaluation, and due diligence.
      The services will be available on a subscription basis to all state agencies and other organizations that use DIR
      services. DIR estimates that these services will be delivered to more than 50,000 employees of participating
      organizations within the first two years of operation. Volume discounts will be available to all participants in this
      initiative as the total number of users increases. The initial contract will last for a period of seven years with a
      two-year extension at the state’s option. Implementation is scheduled to begin January 2006.


    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 4:

     4.1 Offer additional electronic government services to Texans discusses plans for expanding electronic
         government services offered by state entities.

     4.2 Offer shared applications when common needs exist describes the plans for providing shared
         application service offerings statewide.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 44), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                15
     OBJECTIVE|PROCUREMENT



OBJECTIVE 5
MAXIMIZE BUYING POWER ON COMMODITY TECHNOLOGIES AND SERVICES


     An enterprise approach to maximizing the state’s technology buying power is one of DIR’s basic tenets.
     DIR’s cooperative contracts program enables government entities to pool their purchasing power to drive
     down costs. The program provides an effective procurement channel to thousands of public sector entities
     across Texas.

     The success of this program can be measured by the extent to which demonstrably lower prices draw new
     customers and increase the frequency of use by existing customers. The DIR program has seen dramatic
     growth and wide acceptance across all eligible customer segments over the last two years—including state
     agencies, public universities and colleges, counties and municipalities, public school districts and
     educational service centers, and political subdivisions. In the past ten years, annual usage of cooperative
     contracts has increased from $57 million to $667 million. Growth in fiscal 2005 was approximately $150
     million, an increase of almost 28 percent when compared to fiscal 2004. Usage of the program is
     projected to grow another 20 percent in fiscal 2006.

                           SHARED SUCCESS:                  Increased usage of the cooperative contracts program
                           B U Y ER A LER T P RO GR A M     translates into savings for customers. In fiscal 2004,
                                                            DIR implemented a new process to track savings on
                            In 2004, DIR recognized an
                                                            major contracts renegotiated beginning in February
                            opportunity to improve
                            customer communications         2004. An audit by a contract internal auditor found
                            and created the Buyer Alert     that an appropriate framework was in place to manage
      Program. This program informs DIR customers of        and report on DIR’s cost savings on those major
      opportunities for cost savings in technology          initiatives. Since May 2004, DIR has documented more
      commodities and technical services, upcoming          than $81 million in projected savings, including
      events, product comparisons, and other
                                                            $27.8 million already realized to date by program
      information of interest.
                                                            customers.
      Through e-mails to more than 6,000 state and
      local government agencies, including school           Significant savings, coupled with ease of purchasing,
      districts, DIR gives immediate notification to        has resulted in a large and varied customer base. More
      customers of savings resulting from contract
                                                            than 55 percent of the gross dollar volume comes from
      negotiations and renegotiations. One of the
                                                            approximately 1,200 public school districts across
      program’s first offerings was a standardized
      desktop computer configuration. Within two hours      Texas. Local government entities represent an
      of the first e-mail announcement, a school district   additional 27 percent of gross purchases, and state
      purchased 2,000 computers at the new price.           agencies, 17 percent. A full 97 percent of cooperative
      State agencies, K–12 and local government             contracts usage has been voluntary—a testament to the
      customers have received savings of more than          value of the program to its customers.
      27 percent on each items purchased.
      The Buyer Alert Program has been expanded             The cooperative contracts program supports an
      beyond desktop computers to include notebook          enterprise approach to procurement; however, it has
      computers, servers and printers from major            yet to reach its full potential. Historically, state agencies
      manufacturers. The program will be an effective       have purchased technology goods and services
      starting point as DIR works with state agencies to
                                                            independently. Federal funding limitations, proprietary
      develop a standard computer configuration.
                                                            legacy systems, and a narrow procurement strategy



16                                                                DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                          OBJECTIVE|PROCUREMENT



    have contributed to this uncoordinated purchasing environment. This situation limits the state’s ability to
    more effectively negotiate volume discounts and obtain good value from vendors.

    HB1516 mandated that all technology commodity items (hardware, software, services) be purchased
    through DIR cooperative contracts—positioning the state to realize the full potential of that buying power.

    With this change comes even greater responsibility and accountability to save money and improve service
    levels. DIR must aggressively seek new ways to deliver an enterprise approach to purchasing. DIR will build
    the processes and the infrastructure to further increase value to customers. Additionally, DIR is increasing
    its efforts to expand participation of historically underutilized businesses (HUBs) in the cooperative contracts
    program.

                                     C OL L A BOR AT I O N BRI D G E : C O O PE R ATI VE C O N T R AC T S PRO G R A M

                                      After passage of HB1516, DIR examined the scope and process for information
                                      technology commodity purchasing for state agencies. DIR immediately formed an
      Interagency Commodity Items Workgroup to address the issues that needed to be resolved prior to implementing
      the legislation, which took effect in September 2005.
      The workgroup expanded to include active participation from more than 30 state agencies. Subcommittees worked
      throughout the summer of 2005 to determine the definition of commodity items, develop an agency exemption
      process, and examine gaps between existing DIR contracts and agency procurement needs. The result was a series
      of agency recommendations, accepted by DIR, which became part of the Information Technology Commodity
      Purchasing Program Guidelines and Instructions and were also reflected in commodity purchasing rule changes.
      This workgroup will continue throughout fiscal 2006 to provide DIR with guidance on standard hardware
      configurations, planned procurement schedules, and technology sourcing strategies.



    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 5:

     5.1 Build a scalable commodity procurement infrastructure outlines internal and external processes,
         information, and technology that will support future growth and scalability of the cooperative
         contracts program.

     5.2 Deliver the full potential of the cooperative contracts program introduces sourcing strategies and
         program modifications that will allow Texas to truly maximize the technology buying power of the
         state.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 47), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                    17
     OBJECTIVE|PROJECT DELIVERY



OBJECTIVE 6
ENSURE MAXIMUM RESULTS FROM STATE PROJECTS


     State agencies currently manage a variety of multi-million dollar business automation projects. These
     projects typically span years, involve numerous deliverables, and require effective management practices to
     keep business and technology components aligned.

     Successful project delivery requires alignment of business and technology goals among stakeholders under
     the direction of agency executives. This tight connection of business problems and technology solutions
     requires repeatable practices, a consistent method for assessing outcomes, and accountability at the head
     of the agency.

     Elevating the review and approval of key project deliverables to an agency head establishes clear
     accountability for technology investments throughout project delivery. By formalizing a structure based on
     repeatable practices, appropriate actions can be taken to prevent project suspension or failure, and project
     outcomes can be consistently evaluated across state agencies.

     Additional factors to ensure project success include proper planning, management, design, development,
     testing, and deployment. These factors require the use and incorporation of documented practices and
     lessons learned from prior projects, as well as reuse of technology resources where appropriate.

     DIR is implementing, at the Legislature’s direction, the Texas Project Delivery Framework (Framework),
     which provides strategies for tying technology projects to clearly defined business needs and outcomes, a
                                                           clear scope, and solid cost-benefit estimates. The
                 IN FOC U S:                               Framework will be closely aligned with the practices of
                 ALIGNI NG BUSIN E SS AND
                 T EC HNO LO GY                            the Quality Assurance Team and the Contract Advisory
                                                           Team to ensure consistent utilization across the state.
                 The Health and Human Services             See Objective 8 for more information on this alignment
                 Commission sponsored a Business-
                                                           effort.
                   Technology Alignment event in May
                   2005. The event focused attention on    Additionally, to establish uniformity in technology
      the alignment of agency business operations and
                                                           contract management practices, DIR will work to align
      technology management as offered by service-
      oriented architecture. Agencies making               the State of Texas Contract Management Guide and
      presentations at the event included the Governor’s   technology contracting practices with the Framework.
      Office, DIR, and HHSC.                               DIR expects that the Framework will help state agencies
      HHSC also instituted a Technical Architecture        consistently deliver successful projects that meet
      Review Board to ensure that their projects stay      business and performance requirements on time and
      aligned with business needs across the health and    within budget. The Framework will be refined over time
      human services enterprise. This process is           to incorporate new and successful tools, techniques,
      accomplished with the definition, maintenance,       and processes.
      and enforcement of Enterprise Technical
      Architecture standards.




18                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                               OBJECTIVE|PROJECT DELIVERY




                                      C OL L A BOR AT IO N BRIDG E : TE X A S P ROJ ECT D ELI V ER Y FR AME WOR K

                                     DIR has established the Framework workgroup, consisting of representatives from the
                                     Health and Human Services Commission, Texas Department of Transportation,
      Texas Building and Procurement Commission, Legislative Budget Board and State Auditor’s Office. The workgroup
      meets on an ongoing basis to guide the development and deployment of the Texas Project Delivery Framework.
      Additionally, through regular involvement with the Contract Advisory Team and the Quality Assurance Team, the
      Framework tools and templates are reviewed prior to release.
      Focus groups, workgroups, briefings, interview sessions, and electronic review tools are among the various
      approaches used to identify concerns, issues, expected results, and recommendations on project delivery practices.
      More than 150 individuals representing a broad spectrum of government interests continue to influence the
      development of the Framework.



    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 6:

     6.1 Implement the Texas Project Delivery Framework describes plans for expanding practices established
         for delivery of business automation projects.

     6.2 Support and share systems development best practices discusses the progress of initiatives to
         promote consistent use of best practices in systems development.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 50), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                              19
     OBJECTIVE|ARCHITECTURE



OBJECTIVE 7
ENCOURAGE BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURES THAT DRIVE IMPROVED PLANNING AND
COORDINATION


     Architecture, in the technology sense, refers to sets of principles and standards that guide investments to
     support strategic business objectives. Gartner, Inc., describes architecture as:

         [...] the bridge between business and technology. It is the translation mechanism by which business
         needs are translated into technology solutions. The architecture can provide two things that are critical to
         the success of the real-time enterprise: (1) an unambiguous alignment of technology solutions with
         business goals and (2) a mechanism by which the business can express its needs to the technologists,
         who, in turn, can provide a means of supporting those needs.5

     Architectural standards start with a structured understanding of the key business functions the agency must
     fulfill to achieve its mission and support the goals of the state. With business needs established as a
     baseline, technology architectures can be developed that directly support those priorities. In other words,
     technology is deployed for business purposes, not simply for the sake of technology.

                   IN FOC U S:                                 When agencies develop a clear understanding of both
                   ARC HIT ECT UR E CO M P ONE NTS F OR        business and technology architectures, areas of
                   T HE ENT ER PRIS E                          common interest can be identified and acted upon.
                                                               Coordination is made possible by encouraging
                   Architecture Components for the
                   Enterprise (ACE) was an interagency         agencies to develop agency architectures in a manner
                   effort to lay the foundation for future     that allows for a common starting point. This objective
                   development of technology                   is further reinforced when agencies build reuse and
      architectures for the state.                             interoperability strategies into their development and
      This collaborative effort produced a taxonomy            deployment standards.
      within which agencies could develop their own
      technology standards, rules, and guidelines. The         With the right information and approach, the state will
      results of this effort have been incorporated in DIR     be well positioned to coordinate individual efforts as
      communications and will be used to support               part of a larger state concern. DIR will coordinate areas
      agency architecture development.                         of common interest, such as technology reuse, business
      ACE also produced a body of standards and best           process standardization, and interoperability, to
      practices that are being used to develop new             structure and optimize the relationship between the
      administrative rules and to lay the groundwork for
                                                               statewide infrastructure and agency layers of the Texas
      new commodity procurement contracts.
                                                               Model.




20                                                                   DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                             OBJECTIVE|ARCHITECTURE




                                     C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E : GIS D AT A E XC H AN GE

                                     The Texas Geographic Information Council (TGIC) is an example of a collaborative
                                     approach among agencies to advance the mission of the state through a common
      technology architecture and data standards. With 46 member organizations composed of agencies, universities,
      and regional organizations, TGIC serves as the state coordinating council for geographic information systems
      (GIS) technology in the state. The council provides guidance to DIR on GIS standards and best practices and
      provides legislative recommendations on improving the state’s GIS technology.
      Texas has 24 digital base maps under development; for example, satellite imagery maps, digital road maps, and
      census maps. For a state the size of Texas, these maps can cost millions of dollars to develop and maintain
      collectively. Collaboration among TGIC agencies allows geographic data created and maintained individually to
      be shared among all agencies throughout the state, avoiding greater costs associated with individual
      development. This kind of collaboration is applicable in many other areas within the state, such as electronic forms
      management and criminal justice data exchange.



    DIR has defined three strategies to fulfill Objective 7:

     7.1 Support the development of agency architectures outlines a proposal for assisting agencies in
         developing internal architectures.

     7.2 Incorporate technology reuse into agency architectures outlines the proposed initiative for promoting
         reuse of state technology resources.

     7.3 Align common aspects of agency architectures outlines how to improve interoperability and set the
         basis for future shared services.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 53), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                           21
     OBJECTIVE|STATE REVIEWS



OBJECTIVE 8
ENHANCE THE VALUE OF STATE REVIEWS


     The technology investment decisions of individual agencies collectively represent the state’s technology
     investment. Oversight of the success and status of the state’s investment is primarily focused on mitigating
     risk, identifying and documenting best practices, and ensuring that state leadership is kept well informed.
     State review responsibilities span multiple entities, including the Governor’s Office, Legislative Budget
     Board, State Auditor’s Office, Office of the Attorney General, Office of the Comptroller, Texas Building
     and Procurement Commission, and DIR.

     To effectively oversee and manage the state’s technology investment, agencies and decision-making
     authorities require current and reliable information. At present, Texas collects and analyzes technology
     information and monitors agency projects through a number of processes and reporting applications.
     Additional reporting from state agencies will be required to succeed in deploying the Texas Project Delivery
     Framework, consolidating the state’s data center and disaster recovery services, and utilizing DIR’s
                                                           cooperative contracts program for purchasing
                   IN FOC U S:
                   Q U A L I T Y AS S UR AN C E T E A M    commodity technologies and services.

                   The Quality Assurance Team (QAT),       The current data collection strategy at DIR and other
                   composed of representatives from        agencies is “siloed,” and often based on ad hoc
                   the Legislative Budget Board, the       definitions, processes, and technologies. A
                   State Auditor, and DIR, provides
                                                           comprehensive, self-reported technology asset and
                   primary review for major agency
                                                           resource data collection effort was undertaken in fiscal
      information resources projects. The QAT reviews
      projects to ensure they meet the functionality,      2004, through the Statewide Information Technology
      budget, and time commitments made to state           Asset Reporting (SITAR) tool. As the first such inventory
      leadership at the point of project funding.          in more than a decade, the information collected by
      The QAT annual reports* have noted several           DIR was instrumental in developing the 2004
      trends in state agency information resources         Foundation for Change report, which was a call to
      projects: (1) investments in major projects          action for improving the state’s technology investment.
      continued to decline for the past several years;     Although the collection of this data served a specific
      (2) agency estimated versus actual costs for
                                                           purpose at the time, continued use of the SITAR
      projects continued to fluctuate, primarily due to
                                                           application and its associated processes would
      changes in functionality and uncertain initial
      project assumptions; and (3) agencies continue to    produce yet another silo.
      face challenges just maintaining their existing
      technology infrastructure, which results in fewer    The state will benefit from a close examination of its
      resources to dedicate to identifying opportunities   oversight processes to ensure that oversight agencies
      for new technology investment that would improve     can work in complementary fashion and that reporting
      the cost effectiveness of government services.       agencies can effectively coordinate strategic planning,
      * Available from the Legislative Budget Board at     budgeting, and reporting of technology expenditures,
        http://www.lbb.state.tx.us/The_LBB/Access/
        Other_Documents.htm#QAT
                                                           assets, and projects.




22                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                OBJECTIVE|STATE REVIEWS




                                      C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E :
                                      S TR E A MLIN E TE CH NO LO GY AND I NF OR M ATIO N RE P ORTING I NITI ATI V E

                                     The Texas Legislature, in HB1516, directed DIR to “analyze current automated
                                     information systems of state agencies to determine how the systems may be
      combined to more effectively synchronize strategic planning, budgeting, and reporting of technology expenditures,
      assets, and projects.” In response to this directive, DIR established two workgroups to help review, evaluate, and
      recommend improvements to the state’s technology data collection and reporting systems and processes.
      The first workgroup includes representatives from agencies with technology oversight responsibilities. Based on a
      review of technology data collection systems and processes, the group will develop requirements to improve the
      value of the data collected. Better data will be more useful to oversight entities and the state’s decision makers in
      managing the state’s technology investment.
      The second workgroup includes representatives from ten reporting agencies. This group assisted in developing
      recommendations for DIR’s report to the Legislature (December 2005) and is reviewing reporting requirements to
      find ways to reduce agency reporting burdens. This group is also evaluating the viability of an enterprise data
      model for information and communications technology.



    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 8:

     8.1 Streamline technology and information reporting describes an effort to rationalize and streamline
         reporting.

     8.2 Align and improve review processes outlines methods to improve alignment of major technology
         projects with business goals and objectives.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 56), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                23
     OBJECTIVE|DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS



OBJECTIVE 9
INCREASE THE VALUE OF ELECTRONIC DATA AND INFORMATION


     Data and information collected and used by Texas government form one of the state’s most valuable
     assets—the institutional memory of state government and its public records. Agencies collect, process,
     store, and maintain data in order to provide information and services to Texans. The public uses the
     information and services supplied by government to fulfill business and personal needs. Both government
     and citizens need access to trustworthy, usable, and timely information based on accurate and reliable
     data.

     Information held by government resides in abundant quantities, in multiple versions, and in various formats
     within mainframes, network servers, desktop hard drives, e-mail systems, and mobile devices. Without tools
     and processes to locate and retrieve required files, data is effectively useless. To enhance their value, data
     and information must be controlled systematically from creation to disposition. Managing information
     consistently will minimize redundancy in data collection and storage, improve data accuracy, increase staff
     productivity, and improve system performance. Standardizing data and electronic records management
     practices will allow agencies to reduce risk and maintain compliance with legal requirements. Agencies will
     be able to respond quickly and fully to public information requests and to serve as responsible stewards of
     the public record by preserving Texas history for future generations.

     Electronic information has proven valuable because it is easily manipulated and shared. Agencies have
     been able to reduce publication costs and increase customer convenience by providing information and
     services through their Web sites. As use of the Internet for service delivery matures, it becomes imperative
     to ensure access to all segments of the population. Texas has a large number of Spanish-speaking
                                                           residents, some with limited English skills. To reach this
                          SHARED SUCCESS:
                          ACC E SS T O T EXAS ON LIN E     population through their Web sites, agencies must
                                                           provide information and services in Spanish. Agencies
                          According to a report issued     must also make their Web sites accessible to disabled
                          by Forrester Research in
                                                           clients by adopting accessibility standards specified by
                          December 2004, Texas was
                          the only state that provided a   DIR rule.
      fully translated Spanish-language version of its
                                                            The traits that make electronic information valuable
      English-language state Web site, TexasOnline.*
                                                            also make it problematic. Electronic information—
      Out of the 50 state Web sites analyzed for
                                                            whether it is available online through the Internet or in
      Spanish-language content only Idaho, Tennessee,
      Washington, and Texas linked directly to Spanish      agency networks or storage devices—is vulnerable to
      versions. Approximately 35 percent of Texas           misuse, improper disclosure, and theft. Texans entrust
      constituents are Spanish speakers. Other states       personal information to the custody of the state in order
      with large Hispanic populations did not provide       to obtain services and comply with government
      comprehensive Spanish-language sites.                 regulations. In turn, agencies must take precautions to
      * Rogowski, Ron. TexasOnline Leads State Government   ensure that personal information in state data systems
        Solutions for Spanish Speakers, Cambridge, MA,
        Forrester Research, 2004.                           is protected and secured.




24                                                               DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                               OBJECTIVE|DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS




                                     C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E :
                                     M A N AG E AND P RE S ER VE D ATA A ND EL ECTRO NIC R ECOR DS

                                       The ACE Data and Electronic Records Management Domain Subcommittee,
      composed of archivists, records managers, and information technologists from state and local government entities,
      worked with DIR to identify and prioritize statewide issues affecting data and electronic records management. Two
      guidelines, one that clarifies staff roles and responsibilities for data and electronic records management and one
      that identifies recordkeeping standards, were developed and are available for agency use.
      DIR also participated with staff from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) in an electronic
      records preservation workshop sponsored by the Library of Congress. DIR will continue collaborating with TSLAC,
      the Records Management Interagency Coordinating Council, and other state and local government agencies to
      develop strategies to preserve historical electronic records. The groups will explore additional opportunities for
      improving the management of data and information. The outcome will enhance the ability to preserve the state’s
      history.



    DIR has defined three strategies to fulfill Objective 9:

     9.1 Manage electronic data and information systematically and efficiently describes statewide efforts to
         standardize data and information management.

     9.2 Expand government Web site usability discusses the state’s approach to making state Web sites more
         usable and accessible to persons who speak Spanish or who have disabilities.

     9.3 Protect the privacy of personal information in state custody outlines strategies for protecting the
         privacy of citizen data held by state entities.

    Appendix A provides more information about these strategies (p. 59), including benefits, DIR commitments,
    and agency responsibilities.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                             25
     OBJECTIVE|CORE MISSION



OBJECTIVE 10
DEPLOY INNOVATIVE, VALUE-ADDED TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS TO MEET AGENCY CORE MISSIONS


     Objectives 1 through 9 of this plan present key functions of the statewide infrastructure and collaboration
     layers of the Texas Model of the Enterprise. The most critical layer of the model—the agency layer—builds
     on this foundation of shared technology and business solutions.

                           SHARED SUCCESS:                    Agencies will achieve their core missions by aligning
                           L E VE R AGIN G T H E              their specific technology solutions with their unique
                           ENT ERPRI SE TO MEET               business functions. Additionally, by integrating shared
                           C ORE MI S SI ONS                  technologies and best practices into their processes,
                           Key areas where agencies           agencies will be empowered to take advantage of a full
                           must leverage existing             spectrum of resources made available through the
      infrastructure and collaboration efforts to             statewide infrastructure and collaboration layers of the
      individually adapt solutions for their core mission     Texas Model. In so doing, agencies will be positioned
      include:
                                                              to serve their customers more quickly, efficiently, and at
      • Services to Citizens – developing innovative          a lower cost.
        solutions to deliver vital services and information
        to all Texans                                         Where common business problems can be solved
      • Business-Technology Alignment and Planning –          through shared opportunities, state agencies should
        establishing effective internal governance            partner with DIR and other agencies to effectively
        practices to align agency projects with their         deploy solutions that realize the benefits of a shared
        business needs                                        approach. Where effective development and
      • Collaboration and Resource Sharing – ensuring         deployment is best positioned at the agency level, state
        state and other government agencies make              agencies should leverage the enterprise resources, as
        more effective use of existing technology assets
                                                              applicable, to deliver value-added solutions for their
        through shared opportunities
                                                              unique business needs.
      • Mission-Focused Applications – keeping pace
        with rapid technology advancements and the            State support of innovative solutions at the agency level
        constant emergence of new technologies to             will help to ensure the flexibility needed for Texas to
        extend or replace legacy applications
                                                              adapt to constantly changing internal and external
      • Adapting Mobile and Wireless Technologies –           environmental factors in government technology. DIR
        developing value-added solutions for the              will seek to gather and share innovative solutions
        workplace and citizens allows government to
                                                              across state agencies so that individual successes can
        achieve efficiencies through automation, even in
        the most remote rural areas
                                                              be shared and implemented on a statewide basis.

      • Other Adaptations – working to integrate the
        statewide infrastructure and collaboration layers
        of the Texas Model, agencies will innovate
        additional value-added technology solutions to
        meet their core missions




26                                                                 DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                               OBJECTIVE|CORE MISSION




                                     C OL L ABOR AT IO N BRIDG E : SH ARIN G AGE NC Y SO LUT ION S

                                    Several structures exist to support and spread information on innovative agency
                                    solutions. The Best of Texas Awards, distributed by the Center for Digital
      Government, provide one avenue for celebrating and sharing state and local government successes. Another
      means to communicate and share creative solutions and best practices is through the new Texas Technology
      magazine, launched in fall 2005. Published by eRepublic, Inc., this magazine highlights new models of
      governance, identifies leaders driving public-sector transformation, and provides regional technology news, best
      practices, and information targeted at regional, state, and local governments throughout Texas.
      To support agencies and other public entities in sharing and exchanging best practices and testing the viability of
      new network applications, private-sector partners, through the TEX-AN contract renegotiation, will establish the
      Texas Collaboration Forum. To support this effort, DIR is implementing research and testing capability at the
      disaster recovery operations facility in Austin. This facility will be a microcosm of TEX-AN that has all the key
      IP-based communications hardware and software in use across the network. Agencies and other eligible users will
      be able to use this facility to test new technologies and develop solutions to communications needs and problems
      before implementing them on the statewide network.



    This objective will be met collectively by all agencies acting to fulfill the missions given to them by state
    leadership to build a better Texas. In preparing their information resources strategic plans, state agencies
    should seek to support and integrate this state strategic plan with their agency-specific goals, objectives,
    and strategies that will integrate all layers of the Texas Model of the Enterprise to effectively meet their core
    missions. DIR will publish specific instructions for preparing agency information resources strategic plans in
    spring 2006.

    Innovative solutions that address key areas where agencies have already realized success in meeting
    business challenges and their core missions are described in Appendix B (p. 63).




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                              27
28   DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                 Section 4
                                                          Bringing It All Together

    This plan describes a shared vision to maximize the value of technology investments to best serve all Texans
    and presents a model of interaction that spans infrastructure, collaboration, and agency core missions.
    Fulfilling this vision will result in a more adaptable, more cost-effective enterprise that supports mission-
    critical agency business processes.

    Technology exists to serve business needs, and the most important business for all levels of Texas
    government is to meet and exceed expectations of state leadership, of state employees, and most
    importantly, of Texas citizens.

    Ten key objectives were presented in Section 3. Appendix A describes specific strategies, commitments, and
    responsibilities that fulfill Objectives 1–9. Appendix B presents excellent examples of agencies delivering
    innovative, mission-critical business solutions that fulfill the strategic goals of Objective 10.

    Together, through the objectives and strategies presented in this plan, state government will join to meet
    commitments and responsibilities to deliver successful business outcomes and realize shared success for
    Texas.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   29
30   DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                 Guide to Appendices

    The following appendices are presented with the State Strategic Plan for Information Resources
    Management:

         Appendix A: Fulfilling the Objectives (p. 33) describes each strategy identified in Section 3. This
         appendix includes DIR commitments and agency responsibilities that are required to implement each
         strategy and to use in developing agency information resources strategic plans.

         Appendix B: Agency Innovations (p. 63) describes technology trends and presents excellent examples
         of agencies delivering innovative, mission-critical business solutions that fulfill the strategic goals of
         Objective 10, Core Mission.

         Appendix C: Related Legislation (p. 69) describes legislation recently passed by the 79th Texas
         Legislature that impacts technology planning and management in the state.

    The plan closes with the Glossary (p. 77), Acknowledgments (p. 79), and Endnotes (p. 81) sections.

    The appendices and closing sections can be downloaded as a single document from DIR’s Web site.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                    31
32   DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                                                        Appendix A
                                                                                    Fulfilling the Objectives

This section describes the strategies to implement the objectives to achieve the state’s vision




                                                                                                                                                               Effective Contracting
of shared responsibility and shared success. In the table below, statewide objectives and




                                                                                                                                                                                       Shared Operations


                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Secure Resources
strategies are mapped to each of five strategic goals, shown at right. This roadmap charts




                                                                                                                                                                                                           Innovative Use
                                                                                                                                                Reduce Costs
a course for DIR and state agencies to plan and commit the essential resources needed to
realize the shared vision for Texas government.

                           Statewide Objective                       Statewide Strategy                                                               Strategic Goals

                           1 DATA CENTER                             1.1 Maximize the value of current data center resources (p. 34)
                           Reduce cost, eliminate duplication, and   1.2 Implement a shared data center system (p. 35)
                           improve performance of data center
                           services (p. 8)
STATEWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE




                           2 SECURITY                                2.1 Develop and implement a comprehensive security program (p. 37)
                           Safeguard information and communi-        2.2 Enhance network security operations (p. 38)
                           cations technology assets (p. 10)

                           3 NETWORK                                 3.1 Upgrade and optimize the shared network infrastructure (p. 41)
                           Leverage shared network operations and 3.2 Gain new business value from advanced network services (p. 42)
                           resources (p. 12)

                           4 SHARED APPLICATIONS                     4.1 Offer additional electronic government services to Texans (p. 44)
                           Solve common business problems            4.2 Offer shared applications when common needs exist (p. 45)
                           through shared applications (p. 14)

                           5 PROCUREMENT                             5.1 Build a scalable commodity procurement infrastructure (p. 47)
                           Maximize buying power on commodity        5.2 Deliver the full potential of the cooperative contracts program
                           technologies and services (p. 16)             (p. 48)

                           6 PROJECT DELIVERY                        6.1 Implement the Texas Project Delivery Framework (p. 50)
                           Ensure maximum results from state         6.2 Support and share systems development best practices (p. 51)
                           projects (p. 18)

                           7 ARCHITECTURE                            7.1 Support the development of agency architectures (p. 53)
COLLABORATION




                           Encourage business and technology         7.2 Incorporate technology reuse into agency architectures (p. 54)
                           architectures that drive improved
                           planning and coordination (p. 20)         7.3 Align common aspects of agency architectures (p. 55)

                           8 STATE REVIEWS                           8.1 Streamline technology and information reporting (p. 56)
                           Enhance the value of state reviews (p. 22) 8.2 Align and improve review processes (p. 58)

                           9 DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS                  9.1 Manage electronic data and information systematically and
                                                                         efficiently (p. 59)
                           Increase the value of electronic data and
                           information (p. 24)                       9.2 Expand government Web site usability (p. 60)
                                                                     9.3 Protect the privacy of personal information in state custody (p. 62)

                           10 CORE MISSION                           10 Fulfilled by each agency examining its core mission and acting
                                                                        upon that mission as directed by the Legislature
AGENCY




                           Deploy innovative, value-added
                           technology solutions to meet agency            Examples of agencies delivering innovative, mission-critical
                           core missions (p. 26)                          business solutions that fulfill the strategic goals of Objective 10
                                                                          are shown in Appendix B (p. 63)

                           The short name for each statewide objective is shown in SMALL CAPS.



             2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                                                                                        33
      STRATEGIES|DATA CENTER



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 1
REDUCE COST, ELIMINATE DUPLICATION, AND IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF DATA CENTER SERVICES

     (Objective 1 is presented on page 8.)

     DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 1:

     1.1 Maximize the value of current data center resources outlines the process for improving the usage of
         the existing state data center.

     1.2 Implement a shared data center system proposes developing a new consolidated statewide system
         and migrating the prioritized agency data centers to it.

STRATEGY 1.1
MAXIMIZE THE VALUE OF CURRENT DATA CENTER RESOURCES

                                                        Texas has made a substantial investment in state and
                      STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                        agency data centers. Current data center resources
                         Reduce Costs                   include the state data center in San Angelo and a number
                         Effective Contracting          of agency facilities across the state. During this biennium,
                         Shared Technology Operations
                                                        DIR will work with other agencies to assess data center
                         Secure Resources and Data
                                                        and disaster recovery purchases and determine when
                                                        migrating existing, agency operations to the current state
                                                        data center is cost effective.

     In addition, DIR will work with current state data center customers to continually improve operations and
     ensure that service levels are consistently met or exceeded.

     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 1.1
         Contains or reduces data center and disaster recovery costs
         Improves the utilization of the current state data center
         Enhances security of state data and systems

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 1.1
         Publish the Statewide Technology Center Guide for Data Center and Disaster Recovery Services with
         the new processes for DIR review and approval of data center and disaster recovery expenditures
         Assess planned data center and disaster recovery expenditures
         Evaluate at least three agency data center operations in the fiscal 2006–2007 biennium and, if cost
         effective, migrate to the current state data center

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 1.1
         Review statutory requirements for state chief technology officer approval of data center and disaster
         recovery expenditures
         Provide information on planned data center and disaster recovery expenditures
         Review and follow the Statewide Technology Center Guide for Data Center and Disaster Recovery
         Services for changes in procedures that must be incorporated into agency processes
         Participate (current state data center customers) in the state data center advisory board




34                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                       STRATEGIES|DATA CENTER



STRATEGY 1.2
IMPLEMENT A SHARED DATA CENTER SYSTEM

                                                       To meet stakeholder needs, grow with program changes,
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                       and adapt to ever-changing technologies, Texas needs a
                       Reduce Costs                    flexible, secure, and reliable environment for data center
                       Effective Contracting           and disaster recovery operations. To effectively address
                       Shared Technology Operations
                                                       these requirements, the state will establish a shared data
                       Secure Resources and Data
                                                       center system to provide shared data center and disaster
                                                       recovery services to state and other government agencies.
    This fully consolidated data center system will reduce statewide costs, improve or maintain performance
    levels, raise security and disaster recovery capability to consistent standards, and provide the flexibility
    required to respond to changing agency needs.

    In the 2005 Gartner, Inc., assessment, commissioned by DIR and provided to the 79th Texas Legislature,
    several approaches to consolidating existing data centers were examined. These approaches included the
    cost and benefit of various degrees of consolidation and outsourcing, including all state-run facilities, a
    combination of state- and vendor-run facilities, and all vendor-run facilities. This analysis, reflected in the
    fiscal note for HB1516, determined that maximum savings would be achieved by selecting a vendor as
    service provider to consolidate and operate the shared data center system.

    DIR will issue a competitive solicitation for services to consolidate and provide ongoing operational support
    of the shared data center system. Through this competitive procurement process, DIR will manage risk,
    such as disruption of service, and leverage statewide economies of scale. Additionally, this approach
    capitalizes on vendor expertise in the specialized field of data center consolidation and provides cost
    savings through rapid and efficient migration.

    Procurement planning activities have begun. Solicitation, contract negotiation, contract execution, and
    transition activities will occur throughout the current and upcoming biennium. Twenty-seven agencies,
    representing the greatest opportunities for savings, will be included in the initial consolidation.6 DIR will
    work carefully with these agencies to determine their technology assets, business needs, and service level
    requirements.

    The shared data center system will be required to meet or exceed the state’s current performance standards
    for data center and disaster recovery services. The selected provider will be responsible for understanding
    the state’s current operating environment, proposing an effective and workable transition plan, and
    working with DIR to identify and manage potential risks.

    Additionally, as required by Article IX of the 2005 General Appropriations Act, DIR will work with
    institutions of higher education to collect a detailed inventory of their enterprise computing services. In
    partnership with the Information Technology Council for Higher Education, DIR, will review this information
    and develop a report for the Legislative Budget Board and the Governor’s Office that identifies the
    potential for costs savings through consolidation of data center services.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                      35
     STRATEGIES|DATA CENTER



     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 1.2
        Improves the efficiency of existing data center operations for agencies, increases the security of
        agencies’ data, and reduces statewide costs for those services
        Provides a process for data center consolidation that minimizes risk, maximizes cost savings, and
        establishes a rigorous vendor management function within the state
        Leverages the state’s purchasing power through a competitive procurement
        Enables agencies to focus on mission-critical applications and services

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 1.2
        Ensure agency involvement throughout the procurement process via advisory committee and
        workgroups
        Collect information on data center-related assets, services, service levels, and expenditures for
        prioritized agencies
        Define data center and disaster recovery services through administrative rule
        Provide updates on the progress of the data center consolidation project to agencies and the public
        through the DIR Web site and other venues
        Develop and execute interagency contracts with state agencies
        Develop a cost allocation methodology that complies with requirements of all funding sources,
        including federal agencies
        Develop technical requirements for the shared data center system solicitation
        Conduct a competitive solicitation for the shared data center system contract
        Establish a statewide strategy and governance model to actively manage the shared data center system
        contract, services, and service levels
        Negotiate, sign, and manage a contract to consolidate, optimize, and operate the shared data center
        system
        Report annually to the Texas Legislature on the status of reviews and transfers accomplished during the
        fiscal year and provide an update on the status of any contracts related to the shared data center
        system
        Work with institutions of higher education to collect a detailed inventory of their enterprise computing
        data center services
        Report to the Legislative Budget Board and the Governor on the results of the inventory and
        recommendations regarding data center consolidation (September 2006)

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 1.2
        Review and execute an interagency contract with DIR (March 2006)
        Actively participate in data center consolidation activities to provide requirements, business needs, and
        expertise to the process
        Work with DIR to complete all requirements for continued federal financial participation
        Provide information (prioritized agencies) on data center-related assets, services, and service levels
        Work with DIR (prioritized agencies) to transition data center and disaster recovery operations and
        services to the shared data center system
        Submit a detailed inventory (institutions of higher education) of data center services to DIR and assist in
        the assessment of consolidation opportunities




36                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                        STRATEGIES|SECURITY



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 2
SAFEGUARD INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY ASSETS

    (Objective 2 is presented on page 10.)

    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 2:

     2.1 Develop and implement a comprehensive security program outlines the state’s strategy for
         developing a statewide technology and information security asset management plan.

     2.2 Enhance network security operations outlines plans for a state network security center mandated by
         House Bill 3112.

STRATEGY 2.1
DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT A COMPREHENSIVE SECURITY PROGRAM

                                                      The state must implement a comprehensive security
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                      program to leverage and manage all of its critical
                       Effective Contracting          information and communications technology assets. DIR
                       Shared Technology Operations   recently completed an assessment of technology security
                       Innovative Technology Use
                                                      resources and practices at state agencies. As part of this
                       Secure Resources and Data
                                                      effort, DIR identified commonalities in technology security
                                                      architecture, assets, personnel credentials, training, and
    polices and procedures. The assessment report, to be published in December 2005, highlights areas of
    technology security that are in need of improvement, are redundant, or have operational inefficiencies. The
    report identifies opportunities where technology collaboration among agencies will benefit the state. The
    assessment is a basis for DIR’s ongoing work with state and other government agencies to further develop
    a comprehensive security program that protects the state’s information and communications technology
    assets and infrastructure.

    Improvements to statewide security practices should be adopted by state agencies. Through administrative
    rule, DIR has issued guidance for agencies to develop security policies based on documented risk
    management decisions and business functions. A recent proposed change to this rule recommends that
    state agencies develop policies that establish the requirements to conduct periodic information vulnerability
    assessments and specific focus areas for the assessments based on the results of the security risk
    assessment.

    Additionally, as part of the effort to develop a comprehensive statewide security program, more visibility
    into agency practices for planning, prioritizing, and budgeting security resources is needed to better
    understand and determine the effectiveness of agency security programs and practices.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   37
     STRATEGIES|SECURITY



     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 2.1
         Emphasizes a higher priority on information and communications technology security requirements,
         resulting in a more effective state investment in technology security
         Increases availability of additional technology security resources through collaboration and
         coordination
         Improves security of state technology infrastructure and the data and information maintained in that
         infrastructure

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 2.1
         Collect information on agency security assets and resources and evaluate commonalities in technology
         security architecture, assets, training, and polices and procedures
         Prepare and submit a report to the Legislature describing the results of the statewide technology
         security assessment (December 2005)
         Develop a comprehensive strategy for advancing a statewide security program that:
           – Addresses incident response and other training
           – Promotes information classification
           – Establishes an approach to engage agencies in proof-of-concept pilots
           – Provides for topical workshops on emerging security issues
         Promote, through administrative rule, improvements to statewide security practices and state agency
         policies
         Ensure alignment with the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan for the collection, integration, and
         protection of homeland security-related information

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 2.1
         Continue to participate in current and ongoing statewide assessment activities
         Incorporate and implement periodic information vulnerability assessments into agency security policy
         Establish a means to track and provide information regarding requested and allocated technology
         security budgets
         Participate in training opportunities
         Evaluate and classify information that defines required information security protection levels
         Work with DIR to plan, execute, and evaluate proof-of-concept pilots and topical workshops

STRATEGY 2.2
ENHANCE NETWORK SECURITY OPERATIONS

                                                      Rapid advances in science and technology have
                   STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                      significantly accelerated the convergence of computer
                      Reduce Costs                    and communications networks. However, the advances
                      Effective Contracting           and convergence also pose unprecedented security
                      Shared Technology Operations
                                                      challenges of uncertain character and scale. In
                      Secure Resources and Data
                                                      developing a statewide network infrastructure, the state
                                                      must prioritize requirements for security in concert with
                                                      increased functionality and efficiency.

     The state must ensure that government communications and computer networks are secure as part of its
     overall information and communications technology security strategy. By consolidating the functions of a


38                                                            DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                          STRATEGIES|SECURITY



    network operations center into a state network security and operations center, the state will strengthen its
    ability to protect these critical infrastructures and provide more collaborative opportunities for agencies to
    share information and effectively plan against cyber security threats. HB3112 provides DIR the authority to
    establish this center on a cost-recovery basis to manage and deliver network security system services to
    state agencies. Services delivered by the center may also be provided to non-state entities by mutual
    agreement, as specified in HB3112.

    DIR will establish the shared statewide network security and operations center to initially deliver services to
    state agencies that are part of the statewide network infrastructure. The goals and functions of the center
    are to:

         Conduct real-time monitoring of network intrusion detection systems and correlation of collected data
         Research and disseminate early warnings of external cyber system threats
         Provide immediate incident response capability and share information between sectors
         Provide trending and other analyses for security planning
         Distribute current proven security practices and recommendations

    DIR will use the findings from its December 2005 assessment report to the Legislature (Strategy 2.1) as a
    basis for advancing a program to guide efforts to protect the state’s technology assets and infrastructure.
    Potential aspects of the program include a more comprehensive approach to technology security training
    for state and other government agencies.

    DIR will partner with other agencies to create a statewide computer security incident response and recovery
    capability program to improve the state’s capacity to recognize, analyze, and respond to an incident. A
    formalized program will ensure a more rapid response, minimize damage, and reduce the cost of recovery.

    DIR will develop and administer a secure cyber security Web portal for state and other government
    agencies. This portal will enhance security communication, collaboration, and information sharing
    capabilities throughout the state.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 2.2
         Expands and enhances availability of security services to agencies through a shared statewide network
         security and operations center
         Provides faster response to newly identified external threats
         Broadens the scope and availability of security training
         Improves security planning and collaboration opportunities through a cyber security portal
         Reduces internal dependencies through resource sharing within Texas, among other states, and
         nationally

    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 2.2
         Establish shared statewide network security and operations center for state agencies and other
         government entities that participate in the statewide network infrastructure
         Adopt and provide network security guidelines and standard operating procedures for the shared
         statewide network security and operations center
         Incorporate assessment findings and recommendations into plans for a shared statewide network
         security and operations center, including:



2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                    39
     STRATEGIES|SECURITY



          – Develop a comprehensive statewide computer incident response and recovery capability
          – Develop and deploy a comprehensive technology security training program
          – Develop and administer a collaborative secure cyber security portal for state agencies and local
            governments
        Work with agencies to conduct a study on user access technology and submit recommendations to the
        Legislature regarding interoperability, scalability, cost savings, and security benefits to enhance network
        security (December 2006)
        Report on the status of services provided through the shared statewide network security and operations
        center and on the center’s accomplishments toward meeting its service objectives and other
        performance measures (Biennial Performance Report, November 2006)

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 2.2
        Determine benefits and capabilities of the shared statewide network security and operations center in
        reviewing and assessing opportunities to leverage and participate in the statewide network
        infrastructure
        Review agency policies for compliance with state network security policies, guidelines, and standard
        operating procedures
        Assess current network security resources to identify requirements for information sharing
        Establish a means to assess, track, and provide information regarding technology security training
        investments and needs to DIR
        Participate in collaborative opportunities, such as the statewide computer security incident response
        and recovery capability program
        Participate (affected agencies) in determining the feasibility and benefits of user access technology




40                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                        STRATEGIES|NETWORK



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 3
LEVERAGE SHARED NETWORK OPERATIONS AND RESOURCES

    (Objective 3 is presented on page 12.)

    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 3:

     3.1 Upgrade and optimize the statewide network infrastructure describes the current plans for
         enhancing and expanding the existing state voice, data, and video network infrastructures.

     3.2 Gain new business value from advanced network services describes projects and initiatives that are
         made possible by the services provided through the upgraded, optimized network.

STRATEGY 3.1
UPGRADE AND OPTIMIZE THE SHARED NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE

                                                        Upgrading and optimizing services provided by the
                      STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                        statewide network infrastructure will streamline
                      Reduce Costs                      operations, integrate common functions, and more
                      Effective Contracting             effectively share network resources. DIR will work to
                      Shared Technology Operations
                                                        upgrade the state’s existing communications
                      Secure Resources and Data
                                                        infrastructure to incorporate modern, proven
                                                        technologies, such as Multiprotocol Label Switching
    (MPLS), to support convergence of voice, data, and video across the state enterprise. The new statewide
    network infrastructure will afford additional features and functionality including:

         Network traffic prioritization through “quality of service” classifications
         Increased scalability
         Enhanced network security through Internet Protocol Virtual Private Networks
         Improved bandwidth utilization

    Merging local and long distance voice, data, and video communications into a common infrastructure
    will reduce the number of network circuits and the amount of equipment and other operational resources
    needed by government agencies, resulting in operational cost savings.

    Converged technologies, such as Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), provide efficient and exciting
    options that augment the state’s communications strategy. DIR continues to work with state agencies to
    highlight best practices for VoIP implementations.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 3.1
         Enhances capability to support and expand service offerings
         Provides an opportunity for cost savings statewide
         Allows for convergence of voice and data networks
         Facilitates implementation of VoIP technology
         Enhances network survivability and reliability




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                  41
     STRATEGIES|NETWORK



     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 3.1
         Expand the current 2-1-1 network to deliver a shared, secure, statewide IP infrastructure available to
         all state agencies
         Implement VoIP services within the Capitol Complex
         Expand and upgrade the high-speed, fiber-optic Austin metropolitan area network
         Leverage the Lonestar Education and Research Network for business continuity and data traffic
         transport

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 3.1
         Review and consider network premise equipment upgrades in order to leverage MPLS and converged
         network service capabilities
         Assess opportunities to leverage the statewide network infrastructure or services before procuring
         additional communications network resources
         Inform DIR of communications service needs so DIR can comprehensively plan to provision the
         required services

STRATEGY 3.2
GAIN NEW BUSINESS VALUE FROM ADVANCED NETWORK SERVICES

                                                       The upgrade and optimization of the statewide network
                    STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                       infrastructure and resources will allow state and local
                      Reduce Costs                     government agencies to select from an expanded suite
                      Effective Contracting            of high performance, cost-effective communications
                      Shared Technology Operations
                                                       service solutions. These solutions will provide
                      Innovative Technology Use
                      Secure Resources and Data        opportunities for interagency collaboration and will
                                                       support agency efforts to achieve enhanced business
     value by providing:

         Cost savings by taking advantage of new shared network services
         Improved efficiencies through advanced network services
         Increased productivity from the use of advanced network services and applications

     Two examples of the advanced network service solutions designed to add business value are VoIP and
     interactive voice response (IVR) services.

     VoIP has the potential to provide cost savings and improved performance to agencies by reducing long
     distance charges and eliminating duplicative network resources. VoIP can also improve business
     processes and efficiency by providing added features and functionality, such as mobility and portability,
     virtual offices, advanced call routing and forwarding, and unified messaging. DIR will leverage the state’s
     IP-based, 2-1-1 Information and Referral Program network into a new shared services network
     infrastructure .7 DIR will offer this shared network to agencies so they may take advantage of these value
     enhancement opportunities.

     IVR applications enable users to interact with computer systems and databases via the telephone to
     complete an automated transaction or to access services. IVR will be implemented to speech-enable




42                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                        STRATEGIES|NETWORK



    TexasOnline applications (Strategy 4.1). Additionally, agencies that utilize TEX-AN services may also
    purchase IVR services to integrate with their applications that are not offered through TexasOnline.

    The Texas Collaboration Forum will supplement the value added by these advanced services. As a
    service delivered by private sector partners through the TEX-AN contract, the forum will provide
    additional value to the state by facilitating opportunities for intergovernmental collaboration and access
    to network resources for testing the viability of new network applications. To support the Texas
    Collaboration Forum, DIR is implementing research and testing facilities at the disaster recovery
    operations center in Austin.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 3.2
         Promotes use of advanced communications services
         Provides citizens additional avenues to interact with Texas government
         Realizes cost savings
         Increases agency efficiencies using advanced network services
         Increases agency and staff productivity by providing effective networking and communications
         solutions
         Facilitates interagency and intergovernmental collaboration through the Texas Collaboration Forum

    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 3.2
         Extend advanced services, such as VoIP and IVR, to support government agencies across the state
         Develop a set of best practices, with assistance from the VoIP workgroup, to inform and assist
         agencies that are considering a migration to VoIP
         Participate in the Texas Collaboration Forum to facilitate and promote interagency and
         intergovernmental collaborative efforts

    AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 3.2
         Consider shared network services and solutions available statewide before independently procuring
         additional network infrastructure or services
         Review and follow, where applicable, best practices as defined by the VoIP workgroup
         Review options available through the Texas Collaboration Forum for projects that have a high
         degree of complexity or that could benefit other entities




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   43
      STRATEGIES|SHARED APPLICATIONS



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 4
SOLVE COMMON BUSINESS PROBLEMS THROUGH SHARED APPLICATIONS

     (Objective 4 is presented on page 14.)

     DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 4:

     4.1 Offer additional electronic government services to Texans discusses plans for expanding electronic
         government services offered by state entities.

     4.2 Offer shared applications when common needs exist describes the plans for providing shared
         application service offerings statewide.

STRATEGY 4.1
OFFER ADDITIONAL ELECTRONIC GOVERNMENT SERVICES TO TEXANS

                                                        Bringing government services online not only improves
                      STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                        access to services for Texans, but also helps to streamline
                       Reduce Costs                     and improve agency business processes. While the most
                       Effective Contracting            visible example of electronic government services is seen
                       Shared Technology Operations
                                                        on the state portal, TexasOnline, virtually all government
                       Innovative Technology Use
                       Secure Resources and Data        entities provide information or deliver services online.
                                                        These citizen-facing services allow Texans to transact
     business with the state from any location at their convenience.

     Key initiatives underway through TexasOnline include improvements to the Common Occupational
     Licensing System, implementation of an improved authentication system for transactions, and automation
     of motor vehicle inspection and vital records information (birth, death, marriage, divorce) for citizens.
     Additional initiatives include new systems to improve the processes for citizens interested in starting a
     business in Texas and for those seeking grant opportunities available from state agencies.

     A significant enhancement planned for the TexasOnline infrastructure is to offer e-government services
     through a voice portal as an alternative to computer-based transactions through the Internet. This
     enhanced functionality will be deployed through speech-enabled interactive voice response (IVR)
     technology.

     IVR provides phone-based access to e-government services for citizens who have physical limitations or
     language barriers while using the Internet. Of the total population, 99 percent of Texas households have
     telephone service, while, as of 2003, only 51.8 percent of Texas households had Internet access.8 By
     integrating IVR technology with TexasOnline, practically all Texas citizens will be able to use either IVR or
     the Internet to conduct business through the state’s portal.

     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 4.1
         Increases opportunities for citizens to obtain state and local government information and services
         electronically
         Streamlines and reduces agencies’ cost of interactions with other agencies and the public
         Provides cost savings and improved customer service by automating business processes and customer
         calls, reducing customer transaction and hold time, and improving transaction accuracy


44                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                             STRATEGIES|SHARED APPLICATIONS



    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 4.1
         Implement a user authentication system to allow an application to be accepted online and serve as an
         electronic replacement for a signature or notary signature
         Support current and projected TexasOnline initiatives, including Common Occupational Licensing
         System–Bulk Processing, Motor Vehicle Inspection, and Vital Records
         Initiate electronic government services for Texans, including:
           – Implement Phase III of the initiative by the Governor’s Office to deliver integrated services to
              business customers
           – Establish capability to post or search grant opportunities online
           – Provide assistance to Texas Education Agency in delivery of an education portal
         Implement IVR technology to provide an alternative access to TexasOnline applications

    AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 4.1
         Create interfaces with TexasOnline to make use of user authentication system, as appropriate
         Work with DIR to determine integration requirements with portals for business customers
         Participate in DIR’s electronic grants initiative (grant-providing agencies) and provide requirements for
         an electronic grants search system
         Inventory service delivery applications and supporting processes to assess the feasibility of delivery
         through the state’s portal

STRATEGY 4.2
OFFER SHARED APPLICATIONS WHEN COMMON NEEDS EXIST

                                                       By considering opportunities to share common
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                       administrative or support functions and applications (for
                      Reduce Costs                     example, sharing common functions supported by an
                      Effective Contracting            enterprise messaging and collaboration system) the state
                      Shared Technology Operations
                                                       stands to gain from economies of scale, standardization
                      Innovative Technology Use
                      Secure Resources and Data        of practices, and improvements to service delivery.
                                                       Factors, such as cost savings, service improvement
    opportunities, and the appropriate alignment of agency-specific applications with business, are key
    elements to consider within the business cases for these potential initiatives. The reviews of future shared
    applications are further described in Strategy 7.3.

    To leverage economies of scale and enhance existing e-mail functionality, DIR, with support from the
    Health and Human Services Commission and several other agencies, issued a Request for Offer for
    enterprise messaging and collaboration services in February 2005. This project will establish a contract for
    e-mail, calendar, scheduling, and collaboration functions. In 2006, DIR will begin to implement these
    services.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 4.2
         Creates opportunities to improve performance, realize operational efficiencies, and lower costs
         Delivers business process standardization and minimizes cost of ongoing agency-specific customization
         Provides enhanced functionality and helps agencies focus on their core missions




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                  45
     STRATEGIES|SHARED APPLICATIONS



     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 4.2
        Implement enterprise messaging and collaboration services through a subscription-based, fee-for-
        service to state agencies that participate in the initial offering
        Expand enterprise messaging and collaboration services to other eligible entities

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 4.2
        Review and compare services provided through the enterprise messaging and collaboration system to
        existing and future acquisitions of similar technologies
        Review opportunities to develop common applications for individual business units




46                                                          DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                   STRATEGIES|PROCUREMENT



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 5
MAXIMIZE BUYING POWER ON COMMODITY TECHNOLOGIES AND SERVICES

    (Objective 5 is presented on page 16.)

    DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 5:

     5.1 Build a scalable commodity procurement infrastructure outlines internal and external processes,
         information, and technology that will support future growth and scalability of the cooperative
         contracts program.

     5.2 Deliver the full potential of the cooperative contracts program introduces technology sourcing
         strategies and program modifications that will allow Texas to truly maximize the buying power of the
         state.

STRATEGY 5.1
BUILD A SCALABLE COMMODITY PROCUREMENT INFRASTRUCTURE

                                                    Before the passage of HB1516, DIR managed a
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                    substantial volume of technology sales—$667 million last
                     Reduce Costs                   fiscal year. In the future, this volume will increase
                     Effective Contracting          significantly based on required state agency usage of
                     Innovative Technology Use
                                                    cooperative contracts and the increased voluntary usage
                                                    of cooperative contracts by the other DIR customers. To
                                                    accommodate these growing demands while continuing
    to improve performance for a larger base of technology commodity goods and services, DIR will
    implement measures to enhance and expand the state’s cooperative contracts program.

    As part of this effort, DIR will continue to work with agencies to collect the information needed to analyze
    and establish contracting priorities, develop negotiation strategies, and document outcomes. Additionally,
    DIR will deliver a suite of service and reporting tools that will enhance the customer experience and provide
    information needed to effectively manage the contracting process.

    One of DIR’s initiatives in the current biennium is to deploy an external-facing Web-based procurement
    interface that will support an electronic marketplace for its customers. Coupled with this are improved
    internal supply chain management tools, such as a contract management system, that will enable the state
    to advance its negotiating position in statewide procurements.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 5.1
         Improves access and provides better information on which to base contracting priorities, strengthens
         the state’s negotiating position, and increases understanding of customer requirements
         Improves customer service through collaboration and facilitates information reporting
         Provides an opportunity for DIR and the Texas Building and Procurement Commission to partner on a
         variety of procurement-related initiatives




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                47
     STRATEGIES|PROCUREMENT



     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 5.1
         Develop and implement the agency-provided planned procurement schedule required by HB1516 and
         use that information to determine contracting priorities and to support aggressive vendor negotiations
         Analyze the exemptions requested by state agencies and use that information to drive new contracting
         opportunities that will bring more value to state agencies
         Implement robust contract and customer management systems within DIR to provide an integrated
         supply chain management solution, from demand analysis and procurement to customer support and
         service delivery through effective outreach activities
         Document and report savings and cost reductions and distribute broadly
         Develop a Web-based, customer-facing solution that improves the procurement experience for
         customers and integrates into a variety of financial systems
         Emphasize opportunities to collaborate with customers to continuously improve the cooperative
         contracts program
         Promote transparency of the public contracting program by publishing an administrative fee rate
         schedule for all DIR contracts and an annual report on the state of the cooperative contracts program
         Routinely solicit feedback from cooperative contracts customers to identify improvement opportunities

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 5.1
         Provide accurate and detailed information in their planned procurement schedules
         Participate in workgroups and focus groups for program development
         Provide routine customer satisfaction feedback on the cooperative contracts program

STRATEGY 5.2
DELIVER THE FULL POTENTIAL OF THE COOPERATIVE CONTRACTS PROGRAM

                                                         Over the course of the next biennium, DIR will be
                    STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                         examining a variety of technology sourcing strategies and
                       Reduce Costs                      contracting opportunities to deliver on the full potential of
                       Effective Contracting             the DIR cooperative contracts program. This value
                       Shared Technology Operations
                                                         potential must balance cost, quality, and benefit. This
                       Innovative Technology Use
                                                         effort will focus on legislative requirements, such as
                                                         standard configurations and aggregated purchases, as
     well as innovative sourcing strategies like reverse auctions, indefinite demand/indefinite quantity (IDIQ)
     strategy, and other contract vehicles that provide rebates and other incentives.

     An immediate emphasis will be placed on re-engineering two significant cooperative contracts: technology
     staffing services and seat management services. Both of these contracts have broad customer interest and
     offer great potential for saving money and improving service levels across the state.

     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 5.2
         Delivers significant savings, provides new ideas, enables standardization, and improves service levels
         Streamlines procurement practices and improves efficiency of agency processes
         Reduces length of procurement cycle
         Improves value to customers and vendors




48                                                               DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                   STRATEGIES|PROCUREMENT



    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 5.2
         Provide a series of technology sourcing options and contracting opportunities to vendors that stimulate
         competition and provide good value to customers
         Work with customers and the vendor community to reengineer technology staffing services and seat
         management services available through DIR cooperative contracts
         Establish new procurement and contracting strategies for specific technology services and products that
         fill gaps in current contracts
         Implement a dedicated historically underutilized business contracting program that works in a variety of
         venues to provide access to contracting opportunities and maximize participation while stimulating
         competition

    AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 5.2
         Provide subject area expertise through workgroup and focus group participation to develop standard
         configurations and refine seat management and technology staffing offerings
         Participate in the development and usage of innovative sourcing procurements, such as aggregated
         purchasing and reverse auctions
         Provide feedback to DIR on technology sourcing and contracting activities




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                49
      STRATEGIES|PROJECT DELIVERY



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 6
ENSURE MAXIMUM RESULTS FROM STATE PROJECTS

     (Objective 6 is presented on page 18.)

     DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 6:

     6.1 Implement the Texas Project Delivery Framework describes plans for expanding practices established
         for delivery of information technology projects.

     6.2 Support and share systems development best practices discusses the progress of initiatives to
         promote consistent use of best practices in systems development.

STRATEGY 6.1
IMPLEMENT THE TEXAS PROJECT DELIVERY FRAMEWORK

                                                        Providing proper problem definition, clear requirements,
                      STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                        and discrete and measurable outcomes will strengthen
                         Reduce Costs                   results and enhance the value of business automation
                         Effective Contracting          projects in the eyes of state leadership. The Texas Project
                         Innovative Technology Use
                                                        Delivery Framework (Framework) provides the guidance
                         Secure Resources and Data
                                                        and tools to achieve positive outcomes based on desired
                                                        business needs.

     The Framework functions in concert with an agency’s existing governance structure and project
     management processes by providing a formal structure that emphasizes accountability and decision-
     making by agency heads at specific points, or gates, during project delivery. Agency head participation in
     that governance structure is a key component of the Framework and one that distinguishes the Framework
     from standard project management practices and oversight. Review gates, specified by the Framework,
     require careful assessment of whether a project will meet its business outcomes and is ready to proceed to
     the next stage. Accountability is present from the initial Business Justification review gate, in which agency
     business automation projects are justified and selected, to the fifth and final Benefits Realization review
     gate, in which measurable outcomes are tracked, reported, and evaluated.

     As part of the business justification, before a business automation project is selected, the agency must
     examine the projected return on investment and the overall value of the project in relation to other agency
     projects. In this context, the agency head will approve the agency’s analysis of the business case for the
     project, including a financial return on investment and the project’s impact on, and utilization of, statewide
     or local technology resources.

     The ability for the project to deliver on its projected business outcomes is tracked and managed by the
     agency throughout the project. As part of the Benefits Realization review gate, lessons learned from the
     project are documented and the results are shared and incorporated in agency process improvements for
     future projects.

     In addition to providing methods for aligning agency business automation projects with agency business
     goals, the Framework also provides a toolset for practitioners directly involved with the delivery of the




50                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                     STRATEGIES|PROJECT DELIVERY



    project. The toolset includes templates, questionnaires, checklists, and guidelines that align with agency
    missions and statewide oversight processes.

    The Framework will help state agencies to consistently deliver successful major information resources
    projects that meet business and performance requirements on time and within budget. It will be refined
    over time to incorporate new and successful tools, techniques, and processes.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 6.1
         Establishes clear agency head accountability for justification, execution, and outcomes of business
         automation projects
         Enables consistent project review and evaluation at a statewide level based on benefits realization
         measurements and lessons learned
         Promotes technology as a conduit to transform business processes to deliver services

    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 6.1
         Develop a common and consistent approach to ensure that the planning and delivery of agency
         projects are aligned with defined business objectives and outcomes
         Develop Framework tools, templates, and guidelines that support project delivery and are aligned with
         streamlining efforts described in Objective 8
         Develop and deliver Framework educational events and briefings to state agencies with a strong
         emphasis on training for agency executive management and project managers

    AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 6.1
         Review and provide guidance on new requirements to utilize the Framework for project delivery
         Follow Framework project delivery requirements based on a philosophy of ongoing process
         improvement
         Align overall agency governance and project management practices with the Framework for all
         projects
         Participate in Framework educational events and briefings

STRATEGY 6.2
SUPPORT AND SHARE SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT BEST PRACTICES

                                                             State information and communications technology
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                             managers and professionals have identified a need to
                        Reduce Costs                         promote the use of best practices through a consistent
                        Effective Contracting                toolset that supports a Software Development Life Cycle
                        Innovative Technology Use
                                                             (SDLC) methodology. An effective development
                        Secure Resources and Data
                                                             methodology is required to deliver applications as
                                                             designed, on time, and within budget.

    DIR is coordinating with state agencies to promote systems development life cycle tools and guidance. DIR
    will also assess SDLC models, tools, and guidelines to supplement the use of the Texas Project Delivery
    Framework. Additionally, DIR will provide guidance for evaluating and selecting an SDLC model based on
    business, project, and technology requirements.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                     51
     STRATEGIES|PROJECT DELIVERY



     As the tools and guidelines are developed, DIR will examine public and private sector options to provide
     training and assistance to agencies needing to acquire the expertise to use the tools in their projects. DIR
     will also develop recommendations for securing vendor assistance with requirements analysis and with
     validation and verification practices.

     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 6.2
         Promotes the use of best practices through a consistent toolset that supports industry development life
         cycle models
         Provides efficiency through the ability to select and tailor a software development life cycle model
         based on business need, project requirements, and technology requirements
         Improves the ability to deliver projects that meet agency business expectations within schedule and
         budget requirements

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 6.2
         Coordinate with agencies to develop SDLC models, tools, and guidance to help agencies develop
         quality automated systems and business applications
         Examine and adopt appropriate SDLC models to supplement the use of the Framework
         Provide guidelines for evaluation and selection of a development life cycle model based on business
         need, project requirements, and technology requirements
         Review training opportunities for state agencies needing to acquire expertise in using such
         methodologies
         Develop recommendations for securing vendor assistance with requirements analysis and validation
         and verification practices

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 6.2
         Coordinate with DIR to evaluate and adopt life cycle models, tools, and guidelines to help agencies
         develop quality systems and applications and deliver specified business outcomes
         Review and comment on proposed life cycle models, tools, and guidelines
         Tailor use of SDLC models, tools, and guidelines based on business need, project requirements, and
         technology requirements
         Consider using training opportunities offered by DIR
         Consider obtaining vendor assistance when planning resource requirements for validation and
         verification functions of complex projects




52                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                     STRATEGIES|ARCHITECTURE



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 7
ENCOURAGE BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURES THAT DRIVE IMPROVED PLANNING AND
COORDINATION

    (Objective 7 is presented on page 20.)

    DIR has defined three strategies to fulfill Objective 7:

     7.1 Support the development of agency architectures outlines the proposed strategy for assisting
         agencies in development of internal architectures.

     7.2 Incorporate technology reuse into agency architectures outlines the proposed initiative for promoting
         reuse and leveraging of state technology resources.

     7.3 Align common aspects of agency architectures outlines how to improve interoperability and set the
         basis for future shared services.

STRATEGY 7.1
SUPPORT THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGENCY ARCHITECTURES

                                                    Rather than developing a single enterprise architecture
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                    that would have to coordinate all state business functions,
                      Reduce Costs                  DIR will coordinate a statewide effort to support the
                      Effective Contracting         development of agency architectures. DIR will seek to
                      Innovative Technology Use
                                                    align these architectures in areas of common interest,
                                                    such as the sharing and exchange of information. This
                                                    strategy will provide predictability for agencies in
    developing their own architectures and improve the interoperability and maintainability of state
    applications.

    DIR will ensure that rules and standards are developed in a manner that fits seamlessly with direction
    provided on structuring agency architectures. Working together, agencies will ensure that standards and
    best practices developed in this new environment complement each other and improve interoperability.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 7.1
         Provides a predictable process for setting and enforcing technology standards
         Reduces the number of supported technologies and improves interoperability and maintainability
         Establishes timelines for migration to emerging technologies or for abandoning obsolete technologies

    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 7.1
         Develop and document a policy regarding agency architecture development
         Provide training and assistance to agencies in initiating development of agency architectures
         Review existing policies, procedures, and rules, as well as existing agency architectures, for consistency
         and improvement
         Ensure that explicit and derived standards are defined, unambiguous, and practical




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   53
     STRATEGIES|ARCHITECTURE



     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 7.1
         Implement agency architectures
         Seek to align agency architectures with state and federal standards

STRATEGY 7.2
INCORPORATE TECHNOLOGY REUSE INTO AGENCY ARCHITECTURES

                                                      By designing and implementing taxpayer-funded projects
                   STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                      so that key assets or processes can be leveraged in future
                      Reduce Costs                    initiatives, Texas can reduce costs and delivery time.
                      Effective Contracting           Incorporating a culture of reuse into agency architectures,
                      Innovative Technology Use
                                                      coordinated as appropriate from a statewide level, sets
                      Secure Resources and Data
                                                      the stage for reduced cost and rapid deployment of new
                                                      projects in the future.

     In support of the “build once, use often” philosophy, DIR will establish and define a program to actively
     support widespread technology reuse across state government. The proposed initiative will outline specific
     strategies, methods, and techniques for reuse practices at the statewide and agency level.

     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 7.2
         Improves agencies’ ability to achieve cost savings, higher-quality end-product or service, reduced
         implementation cycle time, and improved long-term productivity

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 7.2
         Develop a model technology reuse policy statement, a set of guiding principles, and guidelines for use
         by agencies
         Publish findings related to implementing a technology reuse program that achieves widespread
         adoption by state agencies
         Establish an interagency workgroup to assist in development of the reuse efforts
         Promote, through administrative rule, guidelines for the effective reuse of technology
         Issue guidance to agencies on preparation of statewide impact analysis reports required by HB1516
         Review alternatives to leverage a statewide repository of specific strategies, methods, and techniques
         for more effective technology reuse statewide
         Develop and deliver technology reuse program educational events and briefings for state agencies

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 7.2
         Begin to identify opportunities for technology reuse
         Participate in interagency workgroup
         Participate in technology reuse program educational events and briefings




54                                                            DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                         STRATEGIES|ARCHITECTURE




STRATEGY 7.3
ALIGN COMMON ASPECTS OF AGENCY ARCHITECTURES

                                                             Through a better understanding of how agencies are
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                             planning to deploy technology, the state will be able to
                        Reduce Costs                         proactively identify areas where a business process could
                        Effective Contracting                be improved with an interagency initiative. If a business
                        Innovative Technology Use
                                                             process can be aligned by establishing interoperability
                        Secure Resources and Data
                                                             standards or common processes, coordination initiatives
                                                             should be identified and established.

    Two examples of an interoperability effort are the Texas Geographic Information Council (TGIC), which
    coordinates the development of geographic information systems (GIS) and data, and the Texas Integrated
    Justice Information Systems committee, which is working to coordinate statewide information sharing and
    technology projects for criminal justice data. By developing agreements on how information and processes
    will flow across multiple agencies, Texas decision makers will be more informed and better able to respond
    to changing needs.

    DIR will also work with agencies to explore opportunities for expanded shared service offerings and to
    identify and articulate the common business processes that can yield positive results and value statewide.
    When common business processes are identified, a business case documenting alternatives will be
    developed for consideration by state decision makers.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 7.3
         Improves alignment of agency activities
         Extends the use of existing data for single agency applications to support the needs of the enterprise
         Provides meaningful analysis of options to improve the value of the state’s technology investment

    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 7.3
         Work with agencies to identify and review business processes that are common across multiple
         agencies
         Work with TGIC to develop an enterprise strategy to cost-effectively deliver geospatial technology, such
         as GIS resources and information to state employees and citizens
         Support the efforts of interagency advisory groups managing collaboration initiatives for specific
         business areas, such as GIS, homeland security, criminal justice, and human services
         Work with advisory councils to identify best practices from other entities that will expedite the
         development of data models
         Publish standards and specifications for data model development that are recommended by advisory
         councils
         When appropriate, develop a business case that considers alternatives and recommends actions
         related to future shared services that will deliver cost savings and value to agencies

    AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 7.3
         Participate in existing and future advisory groups
         Incorporate interoperability standards when adopted
         Assist with the development of business cases and consideration of alternatives



2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                      55
      STRATEGIES|STATE REVIEWS



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 8
ENHANCE THE VALUE OF STATE REVIEWS

     (Objective 8 is presented on page 22.)

     DIR has defined two strategies to fulfill Objective 8:

     8.1 Streamline technology and information reporting describes an effort to rationalize and streamline
         reporting.

     8.2 Align and improve review processes outlines methods to improve alignment of major technology
         projects with business goals and objectives.

STRATEGY 8.1
STREAMLINE TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION REPORTING

                                                       Tracking the outcomes from agency and statewide
                      STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                       technology investments is a critical government
                        Reduce Costs                   responsibility. Agency reporting should provide insight
                        Effective Contracting          into the state portfolio of technology assets, including
                        Innovative Technology Use
                                                       projects, applications, and other resources. To achieve
                        Secure Resources and Data
                                                       this, the current process of collecting asset information
                                                       from agencies will be reexamined to ensure consistency
     and a unified view of the state’s technology investment. A unified perspective places more useful
     information in the hands of agency chief information officers, executive directors, oversight entities, and
     state leadership.9

     An initiative to streamline technology and information reporting has been established to reach a common
     understanding of the data needed by the state’s oversight entities and to rationalize and streamline
     reporting requirements for gathering that information. Wherever possible, data will be managed in a way
     that serves both the oversight needs of the state and the technology planning and implementation
     requirements of each agency. The objective is to develop reporting requirements that are targeted and
     specific to ensure accountability without interfering with the latitude agencies need to operate and manage
     their technology operations.

     DIR will also develop a new data collection and reporting system to gather the agency information needed
     to fulfill its responsibilities. This system will use common data definitions and an enterprise data model and
     will be coordinated with data collection processes at agencies with technology oversight responsibilities.
     Wherever possible, DIR will implement processes to enable agencies to use reported information as the
     basis for more effectively managing their own technology assets and services.




56                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                  STRATEGIES|STATE REVIEWS



    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 8.1
         Supports effective statewide technology planning and decision making
         Eliminates or minimizes redundant reporting requirements to help agencies better coordinate the input,
         access, and reporting of technology-related information
         Simplifies the state’s technology reporting processes
         Establishes uniform definitions for technology expenditures, assets, and projects
         Enhances electronic data sharing capabilities

    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 8.1
         Coordinate with other agencies with oversight responsibilities to analyze and recommend methods to
         more effectively coordinate planning, budgeting, and reporting of technology expenditures, assets, and
         projects
         Develop and submit a report to the Texas Legislature that recommends strategies to streamline
         technology reporting requirements related to planning, budgeting, and procurement (December 2005)
         Develop an enterprise model to synchronize statewide data collection
         Develop a new DIR data collection and reporting system to replace the Statewide Information
         Technology Asset Reporting (SITAR) application, which includes Texas Project Delivery Framework
         reporting and submission of agency information resources strategic plans and is synchronized with
         information systems and processes at oversight agencies

    AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 8.1
         Participate in identifying reporting redundancies and opportunities for consolidating agency reports to
         reduce their reporting burden
         Participate in defining requirements and other project activities that support the development of a new
         DIR data collection and reporting system




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                57
     STRATEGIES|STATE REVIEWS




STRATEGY 8.2
ALIGN AND IMPROVE REVIEW PROCESSES

                                                        DIR will coordinate with oversight agencies to develop
                    STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                        opportunities to align and improve overall review
                        Reduce Costs                    processes for contracts, projects, commodity
                        Effective Contracting           procurements, and reporting of technology assets,
                        Shared Technology Operations
                                                        budgets, and expenditures. DIR will work with members of
                        Innovative Technology Use
                        Secure Resources and Data       the Quality Assurance Team (QAT), Contract Advisory
                                                        Team (CAT), and other stakeholders to identify
     opportunities to align specific review processes toward common statewide technology management
     functions, including strategic planning, spend management, project monitoring, commodity procurement,
     and shared services management. Options that will be examined in this effort include improvements to
     review processes within these stakeholder teams or alignment of existing processes to keep decision makers
     informed about the progress and health of key state projects and initiatives.

     DIR will research and advise on methods that will ensure oversight is both informative and supportive of
     successful project completion.

     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 8.2
         Provides more consistent and predictable oversight practices
         Provides more coordinated management of technology projects, contracts, and assets across the
         enterprise

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 8.2
         Convene an alignment committee to examine current technology review guidelines, responsibilities,
         and processes, and propose methods to align and improve them
         Align internal quality assurance procedures and guidelines with the Texas Project Delivery Framework
         Align Texas Project Delivery Framework deliverables, QAT guidelines, and CAT review of agency
         projects with statewide technology management functions
         Provide legislative recommendations on any statutory changes needed to fully align review processes
         (Biennial Performance Report, November 2006)

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 8.2
         Provide input to the alignment committee to develop effective oversight guidelines, responsibilities, and
         processes




58                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                       STRATEGIES|DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS



FULFILLING OBJECTIVE 9
INCREASE THE VALUE OF ELECTRONIC DATA AND INFORMATION

    (Objective 9 is presented on page 24.)

    DIR has defined three strategies to fulfill Objective 9:

     9.1 Manage electronic data and information systematically and efficiently describes statewide efforts to
         standardize data and information management.

     9.2 Expand government Web site usability discusses the state’s approach to making state Web sites more
         usable and accessible to persons who speak Spanish or who have disabilities.

     9.3 Protect the privacy of personal information in state custody outlines strategies for protecting the
         privacy of citizen data held by state entities.

STRATEGY 9.1
MANAGE ELECTRONIC DATA AND INFORMATION SYSTEMATICALLY AND EFFICIENTLY

                                                        Data, information, and records management permeate
                     STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                        all agency business processes and intersect with all lines
                       Reduce Costs                     of business. Because so much information exists in
                       Innovative Technology Use        multiple devices, in many versions, and in many different
                       Secure Resources and Data
                                                        applications, locating and retrieving required information
                                                        is difficult and expensive. According to recent studies by
                                                        several research groups, employees spend from 15 to 35
    percent of their time looking for specific information, but successfully find it only half the time.10 Besides
    wasted staff time, the uncontrolled growth of data and information increases storage and maintenance
    costs and reduces system performance.

    On the positive side, managed data can be aggregated, analyzed, and shared to create new opportunities
    for accomplishing agency missions and protecting taxpayer investments. To increase the value of
    information, data and electronic records should be managed throughout their life cycle, from initial
    creation to final disposition. Data management should be incorporated in agency technology governance
    processes and should be consistent with strategies for reuse and interoperability (Strategies 7.2 and 7.3).
    Recordkeeping requirements should be identified in the earliest stages of application and system design,
    before records are ever created.

    Managing electronic information, however, is not an easy task. State laws and administrative rules, such as
    the Public Information Act11 and Electronic Records Standards and Procedures,12 influence agencies’
    treatment of data and information. To assist agencies, DIR published a set of collaboratively developed
    guidelines for data and electronic records management.13

    Because the challenges are similar across all levels of government, approaching solutions from an
    enterprise-wide perspective will provide common strategies from collection through disposal. Implementing
    a life-cycle approach to managing the state’s data and electronic records will improve agency efficiency on
    a daily basis and preserve Texas history over the long term.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                  59
     STRATEGIES|DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS



     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 9.1
         Achieves greater business efficiencies and productivity
         Meets legislative and regulatory compliance requirements
         Reduces costs associated with the infrastructure, administration, and management of data and
         electronic records
         Preserves documents crucial to government accountability and state history

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 9.1
         Collaborate with the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and others to develop policies,
         procedures, guidelines, or best practices for selected data and electronic records management issues
         Work with other government entities to identify opportunities for improving data management
         Coordinate with the Texas State Library and Archives Commission to study and develop a statewide
         strategy for preserving digital information of historical value

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 9.1
         Participate in data and information management workgroups
         Use guidelines for improving data and electronic records management developed through statewide
         workgroups to create internal data and information management practices
         Comply with the Texas State Library and Archives Commission’s administrative rules, “Electronic
         Records Standards and Procedures”
         Attend data and information management educational events
         Develop and implement procedures and technologies to preserve historical records

STRATEGY 9.2
EXPAND GOVERNMENT WEB SITE USABILITY

                                                       Government information and services should be usable
                    STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                       by all of the state’s citizens who need or want them. In the
                        Reduce Costs                   past, agencies met citizen needs by distributing printed
                        Effective Contracting          publications about available programs and services.
                        Innovative Technology Use
                                                       Citizens interacted with agencies by face-to-face
                                                       meetings, through telephone calls, or by written
                                                       correspondence. Government information now is
     increasingly distributed through electronic means over the Internet. Citizens can access information and
     services at their own convenience if they have the means and ability to find it.

     State agencies can make it easier for citizens to get information by designing easy-to-navigate Web sites
     ordered around functional areas rather than agency organizational structures. Providing search and
     browse capabilities can also help citizens locate what they need. To make government information
     available to all citizens, however, some additional design considerations should be incorporated into
     agency Web sites. Texas has a large Spanish-speaking population, some of whom have limited English
     proficiency. Information on agency Web sites should be made available in Spanish to ensure that these
     Texans can access services they are entitled to receive. At the statewide level, Texas has shown exemplary
     progress in providing a fully translated Spanish-language version of its English-language portal,
     TexasOnline.




60                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                       STRATEGIES|DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS



    For the approximately four million Texans with disabilities,14 emerging assistive technologies, such as text
    readers and speech-enabled interactive voice response systems, provide access to government information
    and services. Because the likelihood of developing impairments increases during middle age, Forrester
    Research predicts that 57 percent of working-age adults in the United States will likely benefit from the use
    of accessible technology.15 Agencies’ responsibility for disabled persons is two-fold. They must provide
    disabled staffs with electronic and information resources to perform their jobs, and they must provide
    accessible services to clients.

    Recently enacted legislation requires state agencies to use reasonable efforts to translate Web site content
    for Spanish-speaking persons of limited English proficiency and to follow DIR rules relating to the
    development and monitoring of Web sites to provide access to individuals with disabilities.

    BENEFITS – STRATEGY 9.2
         Enables all users of state services to access the data and information they need quickly and
         inexpensively
         Promotes an informed citizenry
         Facilitates access for Texans who are disabled
         Facilitates access for Texans whose primary language is Spanish

    DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 9.2
         Promote, through administrative rule, the need for agencies to provide accessible electronic and
         information resources for use by state employees with disabilities
         Revise the administrative rule on Web accessibility to align requirements with national standards and
         provide for the translation of English content into Spanish
         Assess the need for additional training for state agencies in accessible Web site design and testing
         Perform annual assessment of state agency Web sites and report on agency compliance with
         accessibility standards required by HB2819 (Biennial Performance Report, November 2006)

    AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 9.2
         Make a reasonable effort to ensure that state employees with disabilities have the same level of access
         to information resources as those without disabilities
         Make a reasonable effort to ensure that Spanish speakers with limited English proficiency can access
         the agency’s online information and services
         Make a reasonable effort to ensure that persons with disabilities have access to the agency’s online
         information and services
         Attend DIR training on new technology access requirements
         Participate in DIR’s annual assessment of state Web site compliance with accessibility standards
         required by HB2819
         Make print publications that are available through free subscriptions available online, and notify
         subscribers of their online availability
         Make any forms used by the public available on the agency Web site




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   61
     STRATEGIES|DATA MANAGEMENT+ACCESS



STRATEGY 9.3
PROTECT THE PRIVACY OF PERSONAL INFORMATION IN STATE CUSTODY

                                                     State and local governments must collect, use, and
                    STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                     maintain information obtained from individuals in order
                       Innovative Technology Use     to provide services. The bulk of this data is captured and
                       Secure Resources and Data     stored in electronic form, making it easy to compile,
                                                     analyze, and share. The very characteristics that make
                                                     electronic information a valuable commodity also make it
                                                     vulnerable to misuse, improper disclosure, and identity
     theft. In 2004, more than 9.3 million Americans were victims of identity theft, resulting in $52 billion in
     fraud-related activities.16

     Three out of four Texans using the Internet report ongoing concerns about information privacy. As more
     services are offered online, it is imperative that agencies are able to ensure the safekeeping of personal
     information or they will lose the trust of their customers.17

     Agencies must ensure that only authorized users have access to personal information in their custody and
     must secure the information from unauthorized access. Personally identifying information, such as Social
     Security numbers, should be protected from inadvertent release. Although open government is a
     cornerstone of democracy, confidential information must be protected when sharing data among cross-
     jurisdictional programs and when fulfilling public information requests.

     The 79th Texas Legislature passed several bills to reduce the risk of identity theft, including House Bill 22
     (Disposal of Surplus Property), Senate Bill 255 (Removal of Data from Surplus Computers), and Senate
     Bill 327 (Computer Spyware). These legislative provisions are further described in Appendix C.

     BENEFITS – STRATEGY 9.3
         Encourages greater use of online services by the public
         Improves the balance between open government and private personal information
         Protects privacy of government consumers

     DIR COMMITMENTS – STRATEGY 9.3
         Identify strategies and methods for protecting personal information in agency information systems
         Publish guidelines for including privacy protection of personal data in information systems
         Adopt administrative rules for disposal of data in surplus computer equipment
         Adopt administrative rules to protect unencrypted personal information transmitted over a network
         Review current legal environment and make recommendations for legislation, if deemed necessary

     AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES – STRATEGY 9.3
         Implement controls in compliance with state law to protect personal information in agency systems
         Limit collection of personal information when possible
         Implement procedures for disposition of surplus computer equipment and removal of data from same
         in compliance with state law
         Implement policies to protect personal information transmitted over the Internet or wireless networks
         Implement procedures for handling spyware in compliance with state law




62                                                              DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                        Appendix B
                                                                     Agency Innovations

                                                         This appendix highlights information and communications
                 STR AT EGI C GOAL S
                                                         technology best practices, innovations, and successes by
                    Reduce Costs                         describing how agencies successfully develop and deliver
                    Effective Contracting                effective services to their constituents. These successes serve
                    Shared Technology Operations
                                                         as excellent examples of agencies delivering mission-critical
                    Innovative Technology Use
                    Secure Resources and Data            business solutions, which effectively fulfill the strategic goals
                                                         of Objective 10, Core Mission (p. 26).

Services to Citizens

    The core missions of government agencies include                                            S H A R E D S UC C ES S E S
    provision of vital services and information to all Texans.
    The examples below illustrate best practices in delivering                                  Texas Education Agency
                                                                                                The Texas Education
    services to citizens through technological innovation.
                                                                                                Agency’s (TEA’s) eGrants
    The Governor’s Office, in conjunction with DIR, has                                         Project centralizes grants
                                                                                                management for all TEA
    launched new business and consumer portals that facilitate
                                                                            grant processing. eGrants is a comprehensive
    access to government services. The Texas Business Portal                Web portal for online submission, tracking,
    (http://www.business.texasonline.com) allows companies                  review, and processing of education grant
    that want to do business in Texas to acquire all necessary              applications. The project offers a streamlined
    licenses and permits. The Living in Texas Portal                        and customer-friendly solution to manage
    (http://www.living.texasonline.com) provides citizens online            education grants. This project received a
                                                                            2005 Best of Texas Award from the Center for
    services and information, such as driver license renewals,
                                                                            Digital Government.
    electric utility payments, consumer protection, taxes, and
    tourism. Both sites are available through TexasOnline, the              Texas Workforce Commission
                                                                            The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC)
    official state Web portal.
                                                                            manages WorkinTexas.com, a free, online job
                                                                            matching and information system designed to
    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ)
                                                                            help employers and job seekers connect
    utilized the state portal’s electronic payment (ePay)
                                                                            electronically. Employers and job seekers can
    infrastructure component to allow its customers to pay bills            register online, browse for jobs or potential
    and fees online. This system integrates payments with the               employees, post their jobs or qualifications,
    commission’s electronic reporting and permit applications               and participate in the matching process. This
    processing. ePay is also used for self-service payments at              site received a 2004 First Place Digital
    the commission, for items such as quick copies.                         Government Achievement Award from the
                                                                            Center for Digital Government. In the first
                                                                            year of operation, more than 204,000 job
                                                                            seekers found employment using this site.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                63
     AGENCY INNOVATIONS|CORE MISSION



Business-Technology Alignment and Planning

     With limited resources for technology projects, it is critical that agencies establish effective internal
     governance practices to align their projects with their business needs. This ensures that resources are spent
     wisely and business areas get tools they need to provide better service delivery. The following examples
     show how agencies are moving aggressively to address technology governance issues.

                                                        The Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services
                          SHARED SUCCESS:
                          T HE UNI V ER SIT Y O F       (DADS) initiated a monthly meeting for internal Business
                          T EX AS MED IC AL BR ANCH     and Technology Services/Application Development and
                          AT GALVEST ON                 Support. This initiative provides a forum for business
                          The University of Texas       process improvement and the development of new
                          Medical Branch at             processes that will work best for the entire agency. DADS
      Galveston’s Electronic Health Network             has also chartered a Business Process Advisory Team that
      (http://ehn.utmb.edu) received a 2005 Best of     includes representatives from all program and service
      Texas award for Best Application Serving a        delivery areas. This team will work toward agency-wide
      Public Organization’s Business Needs. It has
                                                        business-technology alignment. Additionally, the agency
      also been inducted into the Smithsonian
      Permanent Research Collection for Innovation
                                                        has started work on an information technology business
      in Information Technology.                        plan that will recommend business process improvements.

      This electronic health delivery system contains   The Texas Department of Insurance (TDI) has approached
      more than 50,000 paperless medical
                                                        government technology planning from an agency-wide
      documents and performs more than 200
      patient examinations via telemedicine daily.
                                                        perspective to ensure that technology projects and
      The system provides an inclusive, enterprise      purchases are driven by business needs. Business needs
      approach to integrating all health technology     from all areas of the agency are communicated and jointly
      components into a single system for health        prioritized to foster coordination and sharing of information
      care delivery.                                    technologies. Every biennium, each TDI program area
                                                        completes a comprehensive business plan that includes a
     description of future projects. Projects with a technology component are subject to an internal approval
     process, including a business justification and cost-benefit analysis. Representatives from all TDI program
     areas attend monthly planning meetings where technology projects are prioritized from an agency-wide
     perspective. Business planning in the agency is documented by a Five-Year Information Technology
     Roadmap that the agency updates annually.



Collaboration and Resource Sharing

     Collaboration and resource sharing envisioned by this plan help state and other government agencies
     make more effective use of existing technology assets. State and local partnerships help technological
     innovations and solutions to spread quickly throughout the state. The examples in this section illustrate how
     agencies leverage each other’s strengths to reduce costs and provide service to customers.

     The Texas State Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners consolidated its information technology services
     (hardware, software, programming, assessment, and security) through the Health Professions Council
     (HPC), located at the Hobby State Office Building. HPC members, particularly small agencies, have
     reported that consolidated provision of technology services has been very successful.


64                                                               DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                   AGENCY INNOVATIONS|CORE MISSION



    In 2004, government agencies housed in the Hobby State                                        SHARED SUCCESS:
    Office Building began a collaborative effort with DIR to                                      L OC A L GO V ER N M EN T
    identify opportunities for consolidating or co-locating                                       C OL L ABOR AT IO N
    information and communications technology services.                                            Three municipal
    Recommendations include replacing Internet connections                                         governments, Arlington,
    with a single, high-speed Ethernet connection, an enterprise                                   Carrollton, and Grand
    messaging and collaboration system, and a secure room to                 Prairie, formed a collaboration to buy and
                                                                             share enterprise resource planning software.*
    co-locate and consolidate equipment. Implementation of
                                                                             The North Texas Council of Governments
    several of the recommendations has begun.
                                                                             purchased and hosts the shared applications
                                                                             through its Shared Services Center. These
    The Texas Structural Pest Control Board reports that it has
                                                                             shared applications will allow the cities to
    received significant assistance from TDI on local area                   streamline and integrate their business
    network maintenance. TDI has also supplied surplus                       processes as well as improve access to data
    property, such as desktops, monitors, and laptops to the                 and information. The three cities each saved
    board at no cost.                                                        50 percent of the costs that would have
                                                                             resulted from installation of new business
    Texas Tech University, the Texas Department of Criminal                  software. The Shared Services Center provides
    Justice, and the University of Texas Medical Branch have                 additional savings by offering disaster
    partnered to provide telemedicine services to the state’s                recovery services and other affordable high-
                                                                             availability systems. These three cities will
    prison population. This health care delivery system includes
                                                                             additionally benefit from additional
    primary care clinics in each prison, 16 infirmaries, several             economies of scale as new customers join the
    regional clinics, and a full-service prison hospital. The                center.
    university has also partnered with local communities to           * News Staff, “North Texas Council of Governments Signs
    provide telemedicine services in rural areas. The Big Bend          Major ERP Contract,” Government Technology (Jan. 7,
                                                                        2005). Retrieved 2-Dec-2005 from Government
    area—one of the country’s most remote regions and offers            Technology at <http://www.govtech.net/news/
                                                                        story.print.php?id=92686>.
    less local medical care per resident than any other area in
    the state—has partnered with Texas Tech University’s
    Health Sciences Center to link the Alpine hospital to the university’s medical professionals. In Hart, the
    school health clinic is linked with the Texas Tech Health Science Center to provide school-based
    telemedicine clinics. Texas Tech also has established several telemedicine clinics in the colonias near El
    Paso.

    The University of Texas at Brownsville has partnered with the University of Texas-Pan American to purchase
    and operate a single library management system for both universities. This collaboration has saved
    approximately $70,000. The partnership attributes its success to detailed coordination for daily system
    management, ongoing monitoring to ensure that data is not lost or corrupted, and procedures and
    administration management and responsibilities established early in the collaboration process.

Mission-Focused Applications

    Rapid technology advancements and the constant emergence of new technologies create many challenges
    for state agencies. The following excerpts highlight how they have shared best practices in application
    development and transition of legacy systems.

    The Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired has converted its student database from a legacy
    mainframe system to a more accessible Web-based application that includes multi-level security, reporting


2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                                65
     AGENCY INNOVATIONS|CORE MISSION




                          SHARED SUCCESS:               capabilities, and all data required for Public Education
                          T EX AS D EP AR TM E NT O F   Information Management System (PEIMS) reporting. The
                          AGRIC ULT URE                 new system provides campus-wide access and allows more
                           The Texas Department of      efficient dissemination of information to the school’s staff,
                           Agriculture’s BRIDGE         including those who are blind or visually impaired. With
                           project is a Web-based       this system, any authorized individual can generate reports
      application that processes licenses, grants,      on demand. The system has improved scalability and the
      claims, and inspections. It includes a stand-
                                                        potential for connections to other campus systems as they
      alone laptop system that allows field staff to
                                                        are converted to Web-based applications written in the
      document their inspections and send the
      results to the agency’s main office. The          Java programming language.
      department’s customers and staff have direct
      access to information on the agency’s             The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) developed
      services. This information is also available      JumpStart as a template application that provides a
      online.                                           complete technical framework for new TWC applications.
       The BRIDGE system won a 2004 Excellence          JumpStart streamlines application development by
       Award from the Texas Association of State        providing a template and tools for display logic, business
       Systems for Computing and Communications         logic, and data layers. JumpStart provides a skeleton
       and a 2005 Best of Texas award from the          framework upon which to code a new application and a
       Center for Digital Government.                   working sample application that provides developers with
                                                        examples of each type of Web page. Benefits of this system
     include the built-in security functionality, which saves each project time to design, code, and test Web
     pages. The skeleton framework sets up a new application in minutes, instead of weeks. Performance is
     improved by using thoroughly tested examples and development methods. Accessibility is ensured through
     the use of a pre-tested layout. The system promotes a consistent look and feel, and coding is streamlined
     by requiring only the specific business logic to be added.

     The Department of Public Safety (DPS) has converted its legacy M204/VMSA applications to leading edge
     technology utilizing a DB2 database and SQL/UDB stored procedures. Manual programming has been
     replaced by an online customer search capability. The department’s improved stability and availability of
     mission-critical applications has drastically reduced the total print volume. All batch processes have been
     eliminated, and turnaround time for information searches has greatly improved.

Adapting Mobile and Wireless Technologies

     The expanding reach and power of communications technologies are a key component of many of the
     strategies in this plan. In local and remote workplace settings, the combination of mobile and wireless
     technologies are being increasingly implemented by state agencies. For example, the use of a modem-
     equipped personal data assistant (PDA) that receives text messages via satellite technology allows
     government entities to achieve efficiencies, even in the most remote rural areas. The examples that follow
     illustrate how agencies are using communications technologies to provide advanced services to customers.

     The Texas Department of Transportation has partnered with Coach Connect Corporation to implement its
     Road Connect initiative (http://www.RoadConnect.net), which provides free wireless Internet access at 102
     Texas rest areas. This initiative is designed to reduce driver fatigue by increasing rest area stops. Drivers




66                                                               DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                         AGENCY INNOVATIONS|CORE MISSION



    can use Road Connect to access travel and safety                                    SHARED SUCCESS:
    information as well as information on local area                                    T EX AS D EP AR TM E NT O F
    restaurants, hotels, and attractions.18                                             P R O T ECT I V E AND
                                                                                        F A M I L Y SER VI C E S
    The Hand-Held Devices Project enhances TCEQ’s                                        The Texas Department of
    Investigation Information Collection System by providing an                          Protective and Family
    interface between a handheld PDA and the Consolidated           Services (DPFS) has supplied its caseworkers
    Compliance and Enforcement System (CCEDS). When                 with tablet personal computers that include a
    preparing for facilities inspections, investigators download    custom documentation application, mapping
                                                                    software, digital camera, and wireless
    permit and compliance information into their PDAs. Upon
                                                                    capacity. These laptops have improved
    return from an investigation, staff can upload site data from
                                                                    efficiency and productivity because they free
    PDAs into the CCEDS. This process eliminates manual             caseworkers to spend more time in the field
    transcription and data entry from handwritten reports. Thus,    with their clients.
    it reduces staff preparation and reporting time, facilitates    Caseworkers are able to complete required
    information location, reduces total investigation time,         documentation without having to return to
    reduces paperwork and filing, and decreases correction          their offices. Supervisory reviews are more
    time.                                                           timely and accurate because field reports are
                                                                    completed in real time and digital pictures
    DPS has implemented a three-phase project to replace the        can be shared. The system also provides
    Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications System. The            caseworkers with immediate access to agency
    new system will provide message switch functions,               policies and resource information. The system
                                                                    won the Center for Digital Government’s
    computer-to-computer interface connectivity, and a Web-
                                                                    2005 Best of Texas Award for Best Application
    based user interface with law enforcement agencies. The         Serving the Public.
    satellite system provides the ability to increase statewide
    service, reduce costs, and improve reliability. Mandated response times are met while security and privacy
    requirements are ensured through double encryption. Backup features are also available.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                        67
68   DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                               Appendix C
                                                                 Related Legislation

    The 79th Texas Legislature enacted a series of technology bills that support the continued implementation
    of a shared statewide technology infrastructure. The legislation is summarized by House Bill (HB) and
    Senate Bill (SB) in the following pages. Unless otherwise noted, each bill was passed during the regular
    session.

House Bills

         House Bill 1: TexasOnline Contract
         Article 1, General Government (Department of Information Resources)
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         Rider 11 requires DIR, with the advice of the Legislative Budget Board (LBB) and State Auditor’s Office
         (SAO), to negotiate a new/extended contract for TexasOnline that will increase the state’s share of
         revenue to at least 20 percent of gross receipts from all applicable revenue sources. Before DIR
         executes the contract, the LBB and SAO must report the financial details of any new or extended
         contract to the chairs of the House Appropriations and Senate Finance committees, Speaker of the
         House, and Lieutenant Governor. This requirement begins in fiscal 2007.

         House Bill 1: Higher Education Data Centers
         Part 9, Information Resources Provisions
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         Section 9.06 requires higher education institutions to conduct detailed inventories of their data center
         services. The chief information officer of each institution must submit the inventory to DIR following
         guidelines issued by DIR.

         Institutions that are associated with a system must report this information on a system-wide basis. The
         internal auditor (or similar position) at each higher education institution or system must verify that the
         inventory data captures the full size, scope, and cost of data center services. DIR may conduct follow-
         up visits to confirm this information. The results of this inventory and DIR’s recommendations based on
         potential cost savings for data center service consolidation, including consolidation within institutions
         or systems, must be submitted to the LBB and Governor by September 1, 2006.

         DIR must report on the potential impact of the Lonestar Education and Research Network on higher
         education data center service consolidation efforts to the LBB and Governor by September 1, 2006.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   69
     House Bill 1: State Data Center
     Article 7, Texas Department of Transportation
     Effective Date; September 1, 2005

     The Texas Department of Transportation must migrate its data center operations to the State Data
     Center at Angelo State University by September 1, 2005, unless the LBB determines that a cost-
     effective agreement cannot be reached.

     House Bill 22: Disposal of Surplus Property
     Effective Date: May 24, 2005

     HB22 amends Chapter 2175 of the Texas Government Code. It states that property which an agency
     cannot sell, dispose of or has no resale value may be donated to an assistance organization.
     Assistance organizations are defined in Section 2175.001 of the Texas Government Code.

     House Bill 26: Texas Building and Procurement Commission’s Electronic Procurement System
     Effective Date: June 17, 2005

     HB26 amends Section 2177 of the Texas Government Code to transfer authority for the state’s
     electronic procurement marketplace from DIR to the Texas Building and Procurement Commission
     (TBPC). DIR will continue to manage the electronic infrastructure for the state procurement system, and
     TBPC assumes responsibility for content. TBPC must make the information posted under this legislation
     available to the public and make it searchable by contract value, agency, and vendor. TPBC is
     authorized to make the information searchable by other methods. Agencies must send procurement
     contracts for $5 million and the solicitations associated with them to TBPC.

     House Bill 423: Availability of Government Publications Online
     Effective Date: September 1, 2005

     HB423 amends Section 441.1035 of the Texas Government Code to require that agency print
     publications available through free subscription should be available on an agency’s Web site. If a
     publication is available on an agency’s Web site and on paper, the agency must inform subscribers to
     the paper version that the publication is available online.

     If a subscriber prefers online access to the publication, the agency must electronically notify the
     subscriber of new issues of the publication available online and remove the subscriber from its mailing
     list for the printed publication.

     House Bill 908: Use of Reverse Auctions by the Texas Building and Procurement Commission
     Effective Date: September 1, 2005

     HB908 amends Chapter 2155 of the Texas Government Code. It requires TBPC to use reverse
     auctions, in which vendors bid online or through submitted bids, if doing so offers the best or equal
     value to other purchasing methods.




70                                                         DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
         House Bill 1516: Implementation of DIR Biennial Performance Report Recommendations
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         HB1516 amends Chapters 2054, 2157, and 2170 of the Texas Government Code to implement
         DIR’s technology recommendations from its 2004 Biennial Performance Report, Making Technology
         Deliver.

         The bill requires DIR to establish a statewide technology center for data or disaster recovery services. It
         authorizes DIR to establish and operate additional centers when consolidating operations or services
         will promote efficiency and effectiveness and provide the best value for the state. Governor and LBB
         approval are required before implementing additional centers.

         DIR is required to negotiate a favorable price for commodities, including hardware, software, services,
         including seat management. State agencies, not including institutions of higher education, must
         provide a planned procurement schedule for commodity items to DIR before the agency’s biennial
         operating plan may be approved. DIR will use the schedules to plan future vendor solicitations of
         commodity items. State agencies must notify DIR, LBB, and SAO if the agency makes a substantive
         change to a planned procurement schedule.

         DIR, in consultation with LBB and SAO, will develop Texas Project Delivery Framework (Framework)
         guidelines and forms. DIR will work with other agencies to develop the guidelines. State agencies are
         required to prepare all Framework documents for major information resources projects. Each
         document required by the legislation must be approved by the agency’s executive director, the project
         manager, and the agency employee in charge of information security and filed in accordance with
         statutory provisions.

         Other provisions authorize:

           – DIR to enter into procurement contracts, including a contract under Section 2157.068, to be used
             by governmental entities in another state

           – DIR to approve the designation of a joint information resources manager for two or more state
             agencies

           – A joint information resources manager to consolidate the operating plans of each agency for
             which the manager serves

           – DIR to conduct an assessment of technology security resources and practices of state agencies. The
             department is required to report the results to state leadership by December 31, 2005

           – DIR, in coordination with LBB, TBPC, and the Comptroller, to analyze the automated information
             systems of state agencies to determine how the systems may be combined to more effectively
             synchronize strategic planning, budgeting, and reporting of technology expenditures, assets, and
             projects. DIR is required to report the results to state leadership by December 31, 2005




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                    71
     House Bill 1765: Emerging Technology Fund
     Effective Date: June 14, 2005

     HB1765 adds a new Chapter 490 to Title 4, Subtitle F of the Texas Government Code. The legislation
     creates the Emerging Technology Fund to encourage innovation and commercialization of technology
     research, attract technology companies, and increase applied technology research capabilities of
     higher education institutions.

     Half of the fund will be used to create regional centers of innovation and commercialization.
     One-fourth of the fund will be used to match funds for projects that accelerate the commercialization
     and production of discoveries that could result in scientific breakthroughs or provide an economic
     benefit. One-fourth of the fund will be used to create or enhance technology research capabilities of
     state higher education institutions.

     House Bill 2048: Duties of TexasOnline
     Effective Date: June 18, 2005

     HB2048 amends Chapters 531 and 2054 of the Texas Government Code and Chapter 548 of the
     Texas Transportation Code, and repeals certain provisions in Chapters 342 and 2054 of the Texas
     Government Code. The bill abolishes the TexasOnline Authority and transfers its duties to DIR. The bill
     contains several requirements relating to TexasOnline (http://www.texasonline.com) services. The bill
     provides DIR with additional rulemaking authority related to TexasOnline.

     House Bill 2337: Driver License Image Verification System
     Effective Date: September 1, 2005

     HB2337 amends Chapters 502, 521 and 730 of the Texas Transportation Code to require the Texas
     Department of Public Safety (DPS) to reengineer the Texas driver license system. The new system must
     include image comparison technology (technology that compares facial images, fingerprints or
     thumbprints). DPS must verify a person’s image before they may issue a driver license. DPS must submit
     an annual report on the error rate in its image verification system to the legislature.

     House Bill 2553: Cell Phone Users Directory
     Effective Date: September 1, 2005

     HB2553 adds a new Subchapter E to Chapter 64 of the Texas Utilities Code that prohibits cell phone
     providers from publishing the name and telephone number of customers without their consent.

     House Bill 2593: Powers and Fees Related to TexasOnline
     Effective Date: June 18, 2005

     HB2593 amends Chapter 2054 of the Texas Government Code and Chapter 548 of the Texas
     Transportation Code to abolish the TexasOnline Authority and transfers its duties to the DIR board of
     directors.

     The bill prohibits TexasOnline (http://www.texasonline.com) from charging a subscription fee for a
     service until the service is available online. It also requires TexasOnline to charge a fee for all services
     provided as of the effective date of the statute, unless specifically exempted by legislation.




72                                                           DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
         House Bill 2753: Legislative Budget Board Access to Criminal Justice Databases
         Effective Date; June 17, 2005

         HB2753 amends Article 60, Texas Code of Criminal Procedure and Chapters 322 and 552 of the
         Texas Government Code. It also repeals certain sections of the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies
         Code and Texas Government Code. This legislation gives the LBB access to the databases of state
         criminal justice agencies. It exempts all LBB working papers and communications between LBB
         members and staff from the Texas Open Records Act, until an LBB review is completed. The bill
         designates LBB as the state statistical analysis center and as liaison with the U.S. Department of Justice
         on criminal justice issues, unless the Governor designates another agency or university.

         House Bill 2819: Access to Government Technology by Persons with Disabilities
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         HB2819 adds Subchapter M to Chapter 2054 of the Texas Government Code that requires state
         agencies to ensure that disabled state employees and citizens with disabilities have the same access to
         electronic and information resources as those without disabilities, unless providing that access would
         impose a significant difficulty or expense to the agency. Agencies not able to comply with the above
         provisions may provide alternative access via voice, fax, teletype, Internet, text-to-speech synthesis,
         audio description, or captioning.

         HB2819 requires DIR to adopt rules and evaluation criteria to implement its provisions by March 1,
         2006. DIR must provide training and technical assistance for agencies related to this legislation. DIR
         must also develop a process for the public to report information regarding agency compliance with this
         bill. DIR must conduct an annual survey of agencies on electronic and information resources related to
         providing access for persons with disabilities.

         Agency compliance with this bill is optional prior to September 1, 2006, and mandatory thereafter.

         House Bill 3112: Texas Computer Network Security System
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         HB3112 adds a new Chapter 2059 to Title 10, Subtitle B of the Texas Government Code. It requires
         DIR to provide network security to agencies that transfer their networks to the consolidated state
         network. DIR may also provide network security to local governments, the legislature, special districts,
         and, if approved by the Information Technology Council for Higher Education, institutions of higher
         education. DIR is only responsible for providing security against external threats to a network.

         The bill requires DIR to establish a network security center that provides services to agencies. Agencies
         may not purchase network security services unless DIR determines that it cannot provide the requested
         service at comparable cost. DIR must adopt guidelines and standard operating procedures to ensure
         efficient operation of the network security center.

         DIR must prepare a report on integration and user-specific access features that will enhance network
         and information security (December 31, 2006). Additionally, DIR must prepare a biennial report on the
         accomplishments and status of the state’s consolidated network security system.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   73
Senate Bills

      Senate Bill 5: Telecommunications (Second Called Session)
      Effective Date: September 1, 2005

      SB5 creates Chapter 43 of the Texas Utilities Code, titled “Use of Electric Delivery Systems for Access
      to Broadband and Other Enhanced Services, Including Communications.” The bill promotes
      competition and investment in advanced telecommunications networks by authorizing broadband
      systems over power lines. The bill reduces regulations on telecommunications providers and authorizes
      the establishment of a state-issued franchise to provide cable or video services.

      Senate Bill 45: Advisory Committee on Health Care Information Technology
      Effective Date: September 1, 2005

      SB45 adds Section 104.0156 to the Texas Health and Safety Code. It establishes a health care
      information technology advisory committee to develop a long-range plan that uses information
      technology to achieve better cost-effectiveness and patient outcomes. The bill requires that the state
      health plan include strategies to incorporate technology into the state’s health care service delivery
      system.

      Senate Bill 46: Electronic Card for Integrated Benefits
      Effective Date: June 17. 2005

      SB46 adds Section 531.080 to the Texas Government Code. It authorizes the Health and Human
      Services Commission (HHSC) to develop and implement an integrated benefits card. The bill permits
      use of fingerprint image identifier technology. Additionally, HHSC must determine the feasibility of a
      single, integrated benefits card and report the assessment results to the Texas Legislature by January 1,
      2006.

      Senate Bill 96: Agency Forms on TexasOnline
      Effective Date: September 1, 2005

      SB96 adds Section 2054.132 to the Texas Government Code. It requires agencies to make any forms
      used by the public available on their Web sites. Occupational licensing agencies must add a link on
      TexasOnline (http://www.texasonline.com) to facilitate access to each occupational license listed on
      the state portal.

      Senate Bill 213: TexasOnline Information in Spanish
      Effective Date: September 1, 2005

      SB213 adds Section 2054.116 to the Texas Government Code. It requires that every agency make a
      reasonable effort to ensure that Spanish-speaking persons with limited English proficiency can
      meaningfully access state government information online. In determining whether meaningful access is
      provided online, agencies must consider the number of Spanish-speaking persons with limited English
      proficiency in their service populations and the frequency with which they seek information. Agencies
      must allow public input as part of this evaluation. These requirements do not apply to interactive
      agency applications provided through TexasOnline (http://www.texasonline.com).




74                                                          DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
         Senate Bill 255: Removal of Data from Surplus Computers
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         SB255 adds Section 2054.130 to the Texas Government Code. It requires agencies to permanently
         remove data from data processing equipment before disposing of it or transferring it outside of the
         agency.

         DIR must adopt rules that specify types of data processing equipment, including computer hard drives
         and other memory components; explain the acceptable methods for data removal; and adopt forms
         for agencies to document their data removal processes, including completion of these processes. DIR
         must adopt these rules by March 1, 2006.

         Senate Bill 327: Computer Spyware
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         SB327 adds Chapter 48 to the Texas Business and Commerce Code. It prohibits a person who is not
         the owner or operator of a computer from knowingly copying software in order to collect information
         by deceptive means, including keystroke logging. Individuals are prohibited from collecting personally
         identifiable information that could be correlated with information regarding Web sites visited by the
         owner or operator of a computer.

         The bill prohibits individuals from collecting, through deceptive means, personally identifiable
         information from a consumer’s computer hard drive for a purpose unrelated to the purpose of the
         software or services described. Individuals who are not the owners or operators of a computer are
         prohibited from modifying computer settings through deceptive means, taking control of computers for
         harm or advertisement, modifying Internet settings to steal personally identifiable information about the
         computer owner or operator, or modifying security settings to damage a computer.

         Government agencies are exempt from these prohibitions in conducting such activities on their
         computers.

         Senate Bill 593: Study of Emerging Technologies
         Effective Date: June 17, 2005

         SB593 requires the Governor to report to the Texas Legislature by December 1, 2006, on the results of
         a study summarizing the legal tools available to government that encourage economic development
         and emerging technologies. The report must outline the economic development functions and
         responsibilities of public and private entities that are interested in encouraging economic opportunities
         and growth.

         Senate Bill 611: Electronic Filing of Court Documents
         Effective Date: June 17, 2005

         SB611 amends Article 2.26 and Chapters 21, 23, and 38 of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure to
         allow electronic submission of criminal prosecution documents to judges or court clerks. The bill states
         that electronically preserved documents have the same legal standing as paper documents.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                 75
         Senate Bill 727: Open Records Requests
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         SB727 amends Chapters 402 and 552 of the Texas Government Code to transfer the state’s open
         records management responsibilities from the Texas Building and Procurement Commission to the
         Office of the Attorney General. The bill allows requestors ten business days, rather than ten calendar
         days, to receive/review information made available by an agency under an open records request.

         Senate Bill 1002: Electronic Information on State Grants
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         SB1002 amends Chapter 2055 of the Texas Government Code to require DIR to establish a Web site
         through TexasOnline (http://www.texasonline.com) for grants available through a state agency. DIR, in
         coordination with the Governor’s Office, must direct agencies in establishing and using a common
         reporting system and a common electronic application form for applying for multiple grants issued by
         different agencies.

         Senate Bill 1670: Verification of Auto Insurance
         Effective Date: September 1, 2005

         SB1670 amends Chapter 502 and 601 of the Texas Transportation Code to require the Texas
         Department of Insurance, in consultation with DIR, DPS, and the Texas Department of Transportation,
         to establish a program to verify whether motor vehicle owners have required auto insurance.

         These four agencies must form a workgroup with insurance industry representatives and technical
         experts to implement the program, develop rules, and test/adjust their proposed solution. The Texas
         Department of Insurance, in consultation with the other three agencies, must select a vendor to operate
         the program by December 31, 2005.

Resources

     Online resources for DIR administrative rules and Texas state law:

         Texas State Law
         http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/statutes.html

         DIR Administrative Rules
         http://info.sos.state.tx.us/pls/pub/readtac$ext.ViewTAC?tac_view=3&ti=1&pt=10




76                                                               DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                            Glossary

    2-1-1 – An easy to remember telephone number that, where available, connects people with important
    community services such as health and human resources and crisis intervention.

    Best practices – A term used to describe generally agreed upon processes, derived from experienced
    industry experts, which should be undertaken when deploying projects in order to decrease operational and
    financial risk.

    Collaboration software – Software that allows user groups to share information and applications online.

    Cyber security – The branch of security that protects data and information against unauthorized disclosure,
    transfer, modification, or destruction, whether accidental or intentional.

    Data center – A centrally managed computing facility that houses servers or mainframe(s) and storage
    devices to serve as a centralized processing center. Typically, such a facility is constructed or modified with
    separate climate controls and electrical connections that are adequate to support the computing
    environment.

    Digital base map – A reference dataset of geographic information representing the best available map
    data for an area that has been developed and documented to an adopted cartographic standard. A base
    map provides the foundation layer upon which other geographic data can be placed using a geographic
    information system.

    Disaster recovery services – Services usually provided by a third party that include developing advance
    arrangements and procedures to enable an organization to either maintain or quickly resume mission-
    critical functions within a specified time frame, minimizing loss to the organization.

    Geographic information system (GIS) – A system of computer hardware, software, and procedures used to
    store and manipulate electronic maps and related data to solve complex planning and management
    problems.

    Interactive voice response (IVR) – A computerized system that allows a person, typically a telephone caller,
    to select an option from a voice menu and interact with a computer system. Generally, the system plays
    pre-recorded voice prompts to which the person presses a number on a telephone keypad to select an
    option or speaks simple answers such as “yes,” “no,” or a number.

    Internet2 – The second generation of the Internet, developed through a collaborative effort of more than
    200 universities, private companies, and the U.S. government. It was not developed for commercial use or
    to replace the Internet. Rather, it is intended primarily for research and for applications that demand far
    more bandwidth than can be provided through the current Internet.

    Intrusion detection system (IDS) – Software and/or hardware that detect and log inappropriate, incorrect,
    or anomalous activity on a network and that identify suspicious patterns that may indicate an attack from
    someone attempting to break into or compromise a system.




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                   77
     Lonestar Education and Research Network (LEARN) – A nonprofit collaboration of 33 higher education
     institutions that supports the research, education, health care, and public service missions of those
     institutions. The network will include connectivity to Internet2 and the National Lambda Rail.

     Multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) – A method used to increase the speed of network traffic flow.

     National Lambda Rail – A major initiative of U.S. research universities and private-sector technology
     companies to provide a nationwide fiber-optic infrastructure for research and experimentation in
     networking technologies and applications.

     Network convergence – The integration of voice, data, and video networks.
     Portfolio management – A business process in which investment decisions are made to determine and
     select the mix of active projects and the budget, staffing, and other resource allocations for each one.

     Quality of service – The concept of applying and ensuring specific, quantifiable performance levels on a
     shared network.

     Reverse auction – A type of auction in which the role of the buyer and seller are reversed. In a typical
     reverse auction, a buyer specifies what is to be purchased and, through an auction process, awards the
     procurement to the lowest bidder.

     Seat management services – A method of standardizing installation, operation, and maintenance of
     hardware and software at each desktop across an enterprise.

     Service-oriented architecture (SOA) – A collection of self-contained services that communicate with each
     other by passing data or coordinating activity among two or more services.

     Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) – The process used to develop an information system, including
     requirements, validation, training, and user ownership through investigation, analysis, design,
     implementation, and maintenance. Also known as Systems Development Life Cycle

     Spyware – A broad category of malicious software intended to intercept or take partial control of a
     computer’s operation without the user’s informed consent for the benefit of a third party.

     Verification and Validation – A process employing a variety of software engineering methods, techniques,
     and tools for evaluating the correctness and quality of a software product throughout its life cycle.

     Virtual Private Network (VPN) – A data network that uses the public communications infrastructure, but
     maintains privacy by using special communications protocols and security procedures.

     Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) – A technology used to transmit voice over a data network using the
     Internet.




78                                                             DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                    Acknowledgments

    DIR BOARD OF DIRECTORS                                       CONTRIBUTORS
    The 2005 State Strategic Plan for Information                Rob Aanstoos, Rachel Biggs, Britt Brookshire,
    Resources Management was approved by DIR’s                   Joy Hall Bryant, Donna Clay, Cathy Cox,
    governing board on December 14, 2005.                        David Dennis, David Duncan, Eddie Esquivel,
                                                                 Linda Fernandez, Doug Holt, Roslyn Hotard,
    William Transier, Board Chair
                                                                 Larry Hutchison, Ted James, Brian Kelly,
    Lance K. Bruun
                                                                 Jerry Johnson, Dale Krueger, Genice Mancini,
    Larry R. Leibrock, Ph.D.
                                                                 Allan Martin, Renee Mauzy, John Miri,
    M. Adam Mahmood, Ph.D.
                                                                 Wendy Motloch, Leslie Mueller, Linda Mullins,
    Keith Morrow
                                                                 Nick Osborn, Mike Ouimet, Sherry Parks, Bill Perez,
    Cliff Mountain
                                                                 Brian Rawson, Martha Richardson, Kevin Tanner,
    Bill Wachel
                                                                 Kim Weatherford, Rose Wheeler
    Robert L. Cook, ex officio
    Brad Livingston, ex officio                                  INPUT, REVIEW AND COMMENT
    Adam Jones, ex officio                                       Thank you to the individuals and institutions that
                                                                 provided valuable input into the plan, including
    STATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
                                                                 agency and university information resources
    Robert Bray, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Bill
                                                                 managers, the Quality Assurance Team, and
    Broadus, Commonwealth Computer Company,
                                                                 representatives from state and local government.
    Frederick Chang, Ph.D., The University of Texas at
    Austin, Clair Goldsmith, Ph.D., The University of Texas      Kassandra Aggee-Letton, Isaac Barbosa,
    System, Charles Gray, Texas Conference of Urban              Robert Cadenhead, Michael Cagle, Pierce Cantrell,
    Counties, Casey Hoffman, Office of the Attorney              John Cox, Victor Gonzalez, Rebecca Gray,
    General, Sandra K. Johnson, Ph.D., IBM,                      Bowden Hight, Stacy Jefferson, Richard Kautz,
    Walt Magnussen, Ph.D., Texas A&M University System,          Jim Kilchenstein, Gayle Lathan, Maurice Leatherbury,
    Larry Mathews, U.S. Attorney, Steve Papermaster,             Darryl Lindgens, Lawrence Lippke, Mark Majek,
    Powershift Ventures, Pike Powers, Fulbright and              Carrice Marcovich, James Martino, Frank May,
    Jaworski, Steve Simmons, Texas Department of                 Mike McKenna, Richard S. Moore, Hope Morgan,
    Transportation, Carol Thompson, The Thompson                 Patricia Nalle, Greg Nudd, Robert Ott,
    Group, Charlotte Willis, Health and Human Services           Stephen Paxman, Stan Reid, George Rios,
    Commission                                                   Gene Rodgers, Ginger Salone, Gary Sitz, Judy Skeen,
                                                                 Brandon Theis, C.R. Thomas, Lewis Watkins,
    PLAN MANAGEMENT
                                                                 Debby Wattman, Cliff Woodruff, Ann Woody,
    Dustin Lanier, Director, Strategic Initiatives Division
                                                                 Carl Wyatt
    Regina Rousseau, Assistant Director, Strategic
    Initiatives Division

    PLAN WORKGROUP
    Cathy Cox, Genice Mancini, Nick Osborn,
    Martha Richardson

    DESIGN, EDITING, PRODUCTION
    Vivian Badillo, Lisa Nowotny

    WEB HOSTING
    Andrea Richeson




2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                        79
80   DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
                                                                                                   Endnotes

1   State of Texas, Legislative Budget Board, Instructions for Preparing and Submitting Agency Strategic Plans, Fiscal Years
    2005–2009, Austin, Texas (March 2004).

2   Gartner, Inc., Statewide Data Center Assessment (March 29, 2005). Retrieved 2-Dec-2005 from DIR at
    <http://www.dir.state.tx.us/pubs/datacenter/index.htm>.

3   Rasmussen, Michael, From IT Security to Information Risk Management (Cambridge, MA: Forrester, Inc., June 10,
    2005).

4   Federal Trade Commission, National and State Trends in Fraud and Identity Theft January–December 2004 (February
    2005). Retrieved 2-Dec-2005 from the FTC at <http://www.consumer.gov/sentinel/pubs/Top10Fraud2004.pdf>.

5   Lapkin, Ann, and Bill Rosser, Architecture is Not About Technology, Gartner, Inc. (Stamford, CT: Gartner, Inc., July 7,
    2003).

6   State of Texas, Department of Information Resources, “Prioritized Agencies.” Retrieved 2-Dec-2005 from DIR at
    <http://www.dir.state.tx.us/datacenter/priorityagencies.htm>.

7   The Texas 2-1-1 Information and Referral Network (http://www.hhsc.state.tx.us/tirn/tirnhome.htm) is a legislative
    initiative that provides access to essential human services such as basic human needs resources, physical and mental
    health resources, employment support, and support for older persons, persons with disabilities, children, youth, and
    families.

8   U.S. Census Bureau, “Table 1B. Presence of a Computer and the Internet for Households, by State: October 2003.”
    Retrieved 14-Dec-2005 from <http://www.census.gov/population/socdemo/computer/2003/tab01B.xls>.

9   Gartner, Inc., Predicts 2005: IT Asset Management Adds Value, Lessens Risk, (Stamford, CT: Gartner, Inc., November
    2004).

10 Feldman, Susan, “The High Cost of Not Finding Information,” KMWorld (March 2004). Retrieved 2-Dec-2005 from
   KMWorld at <http://www.kmworld.com/Articles/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=9534>.

11 TEX. GOV’T CODE ANN. § 552 (2005). Retrieved 2-Dec-2005 from the Texas Legislature Online at
   <http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/gv.toc.htm>.

12 13 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § §6.91-6.97 (2003) (Texas State Library and Archives Commission). Retrieved 2-Dec-2005
   from the Secretary of State at <http://www.sos.state.tx.us/tac/index.html>.

13 State of Texas, Department of Information Resources, Data and Electronic Records Management Reference Guide:
   Roles and Responsibilities. Available online from DIR at <www.dir.state.tx.us/pubs/>.

    State of Texas, Department of Information Resources, Data and Electronic Records Management Reference Guide:
    Technology Standards. Available online from DIR at <www.dir.state.tx.us/pubs/>.

14 State of Texas, Office of the Governor, “Statistics.” Retrieved 2-Dec-2005 from the Governor’s Office at
   <http://www.governor.state.tx.us/disabilities/resources/statistics>.

15 Forrester Inc., The Market for Accessible Technology—The Wide Range of Abilities and Its Impact on Computer
   Technology (Cambridge, MA: Forrester, Inc., 2003).

16 Council of State Governments, Trends in America: Charting the Course Ahead (Lexington, KY: Council of State
   Governments, June 2005).



2005 STATE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                                                            81
17 Strover, Sharon, Straubhaar, Joe, Inagaki, Nobuya, Gustafson, Karen, and BoaVentura, Ana, E-Government Services
   in Texas: Results of Public Survey (Austin, TX: University of Texas at Austin Telecommunications and Information Policy
   Institute, July 2004).

18 eMediaWire, ‘’Santa Says Texas is First on His List, Thanks to Free Wireless Internet,” December 20, 2004, retrieved
   2-Dec-2005 from eMediaWire at <http://www.emediawire.com/releases/2004/12/ emw190295.htm>.




82                                                                 DECEMBER 2005 | TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION RESOURCES
Department of Information Resources
P.O. Box 13564
Austin, TX 78711-3564
www.dir.state.tx.us/




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